You are on page 1of 1

Jeff Lovett 

Thesis Proposal – Abstract 
2‐27‐2010 
 

 power equals work over time 

 “Mining […] has a very temporary, prosperous impact on a community and particularly on the owners 
of the mine itself [...] But once it’s gone, it leaves a scar; it leaves every kind of scar in the form of acid 
water in all the creeks, of barren landscapes that have no topsoil whatsoever on them, or ancient veins 
left by interior mines or canyons left by strip mining.  Once the resource is gone, the communities that 
were established because of the coal […] have to change or they die – and many of them have died.”  

Ora E. Anderson, A Forest Returns 

With this quotation by Mr. Anderson as a counter point to the physical definition of power1,    explores “the entanglement of 
2
physical landscapes, ecological systems, and socioeconomic histories in Appalachian Ohio...”   The exhibition will present a cross‐
section of this collaborative research in conjunction with the artistic productions inspired by it.   

 
330   

Coal is an archive of the indexical remains from an ancient time of prolific organic growth. For hundreds of thousands of years, the 
biological growth in this region was covered with clay and compressed in to the earth. This hermetic (oxygen‐deprived) environment 
prevented decomposition and preserved the photosynthetic energy that these plants absorbed from the sun while pressure and 
time converted the organic plant matter to inorganic coal. The bituminous coal found in Appalachia, when burned, releases solar 
energy collected 330 million years ago and that energy is, in turn, converted to power.  

 

The indexical remains of coal’s presence are marked in the people, politics, geology, and ecology of Appalachian Ohio.  Coal powered 
the industrial revolution in England and produced steel for the great American cities. At the beginning of the 20th century, this 
resource was a critical component to the development of the modern world, and Appalachia had coal en masse. The tragedy, 
wealth, scars, ruin, and rehabilitation enabled by the extraction of coal from the region are targets of the research in  . The 
path to those targets, forks through a complex network that is explored and revealed through the exhibition of the archive.   

 

Utilizing my “archival impulse”3 I am continually and collaboratively developing a non‐hierarchical archive of the region and its 
network of influences.  The archive serves as a point of access for the viewer and a point of departure for artistic productions that, 
when completed, are folded back into the archive from which they were inspired. Many of these artistic productions take the form 
of annotated photographic prints of scanned sites, video documentation of exploration through visual prosthetics, and 
augmentation of existing archival materials but the reincorporation of these into the archive inspires new combinations and paths of 
research.  This cyclical methodology of research and production facilitates an archive that is continually re‐informed and reflexive. 
 is the presentation of a cross section of this archive. 

 

                                                            
1
 Power is the rate at which work is performed or energy is converted. 
2
 McKee, Y. (2010). Ohio University School of Art Critical Regionalism Initiative: Political Ecology Research Sites, 1.  
3
 Foster, H. (2004). “An Archival Impulse”. October110, 3‐22. Foster describes the archival impulse as a “notion of artistic practice as an idiosyncratic probing into 
particular figures, objects, and events in modern art, philosophy, and history.”