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FOUNDATION STAGE

AND KEY STAGE

1
2004

Years 1 and 2 and reception

Assessment and reporting
arrangements
This booklet contains important information about the key stage 1 tests, including any
new arrangements agreed for 2004.

2004

Please recycle previous versions of this booklet.

The Secretary of State, acting in pursuance of section 87(11) of the Education Act 2002 and Article 11
of The Education (National Curriculum) (Key Stage 1 Assessment Arrangements) (England) Order 2003,
has adopted the contents of this booklet.

First published 2003
© Qualifications and Curriculum Authority 2003
Reproduction, storage, adaptation or translation, in any form or by any means, of this publication is
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by the Copyright Licensing Agency. Excerpts may be reproduced for the purpose of research, private
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permission, providing full acknowledgement is given.
Printed in Great Britain by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority under the authority and
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of Parliament.
The Qualifications and Curriculum Authority is an exempt charity under Schedule 2 of the
Charities Act 1993.
Qualifications and Curriculum Authority
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www.qca.org.uk/

Contents

This booklet contains important information about the key stage 1 tests
and tasks, including any new arrangements agreed for 2004.
Please recycle previous versions of this booklet.
1

Introduction

2

2

Changes for 2004

4

3

Foundation Stage Profile

6

4

Key stage 1 statutory assessment: key responsibilities

8

5

Which children should be entered for the key stage 1 tasks and tests?

10

6

Teacher assessment

17

7

The tasks and tests: subject information

19

8

The tasks and tests: key dates and administrative information

25

9

The tasks and tests: special arrangements

29

10

Audit

33

11

Reporting and using results

36

Appendix A

Calculating teacher assessment subject levels at the end of key stage 1

44

Appendix B

Key stage 1 order form for extra level 3 tests

45

Appendix C

Key stage 1 order form for modified large print and braille test materials

46

Appendix D

Key stage 1 reports and the 2003 national results

47

Appendix E

Timing and distribution of tasks and tests

48

Appendix F

Key stage 1 codes for OMR and electronic pupil record sheets

49

Appendix G

Headteacher’s declaration form

51

Appendix H

Useful websites and publications

52

Appendix I

Contact details

54

Appendix J

Form for participation in QCA feedback groups

56

Index

57

The centre pages of this booklet contain a pull-out chart of the key dates.
The index at the back of this booklet will assist users in finding relevant
information.

1 Introduction What is this booklet? This booklet provides information and guidance on the Foundation Stage Profile and key stage 1 national curriculum assessment arrangements in 2004. and key stage 1 reporting requirements in their planning for the school year 2003/2004. assessment coordinator and teachers of year 2 children. 1. together with information on the Foundation Stage Profile assessment. including the administration of the statutory tasks and tests.1 1. It will enable schools and teachers to include the key stage 1 statutory tasks and tests. 1.2 Who needs to have this booklet? The following people within schools must have a copy of this booklet: Updated headteachers. They provide a snapshot of a child’s attainment at the end of the key stage. when and how the tasks and tests must be administered and when teachers should complete their teacher assessment.qca.3 Further copies of this booklet can be downloaded from the QCA website at www. 1 and 2. QCA Publications tel: 01787 884444. The key changes have been highlighted on pages 4–5. Details of special arrangements in the key stage 1 tasks and tests are provided on pages 29–32. . Previous versions of the Assessment and reporting arrangements booklets must be discarded. n n In addition. all reception and key stage 1 teachers should be made aware of this booklet. 1 2 Throughout this booklet. as it contains the requirements for reporting to parents1 of children in years R (reception). It also tells schools when the materials will arrive. year 2 teachers who will be involved in the end of key stage 1 assessment arrangements.org. It also provides details of all the statutory assessment and reporting arrangements for children throughout key stage 1. this includes others with parental responsibility for. or care of.uk/ca/tests/ara/ or are available free of charge from QCA Publications. where reference is made to the terms ‘parent’ and ‘parents’. a child. Any special arrangements used must not invalidate the assessment. This booklet replaces all information and guidance provided by QCA in previous key stage 1 Assessment and reporting arrangements booklets. Sufficient copies of this booklet have been sent to schools for the headteacher. n the person responsible for special arrangements in the tests. It is expected that children will work independently and unaided when taking the tests unless they have special assessment needs and provision to support these needs is normally available in the classroom. Purpose of the tasks and tests The key stage 1 tasks and tests are designed to test children’s knowledge and understanding of the key stage 1 programmes of study.

legislation. The Education (National Curriculum) (Foundation Stage Profile Assessment Arrangements) (England) Order 2003. reporting and transfer of information when a child changes school are based on: n n n n n n n The Education (National Curriculum) (Key Stage 1 Assessment Arrangements) (England) Order 2003.uk 3 . Single copies of the orders may be purchased from The Stationery Office on 0870 600 5522 or viewed on HMSO’s website at www. The Education (Pupil Information) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2001. as amended.4 Statutory assessment and reporting The arrangements for assessment.gov. The Education (School Performance Information) (England) 2001 Regulations.hmso.INTRODUCTION 1. The Education (Pupil Information) (England) Regulations 2000. The Education (Pupil Information) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2002. The Education (Pupil Information) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2003.

Key stage 1 statutory assessment: key responsibilities See pages 8–9. the text has been re-ordered or presented in bullet point format. It also replaces the appendix entitled ‘Absence. a vertical line will appear alongside it to indicate the amount of amended text. Updated will appear in the panel. children who would previously have been described as having the tasks and tests disapplied are described as children who are unable to access the tests. Instead. Information about these children is provided in this section. n This section comprises text previously located in different parts of the booklet together with new information. 4 n To assist schools in making decisions about whom to enter for the tasks and/or tests. n The section formerly entitled ‘General requirements for key stage 1’ has been retitled ‘Key stage 1 statutory assessment: key responsibilities’. n Where a significant piece of text has been added or updated. Presentation of text New n Where there is completely new text or where text has been added to previous versions of the Assessment and reporting arrangements. . It is therefore being phased out as a term. n This section has been updated. section and subsection numbering have been introduced to the booklets in 2004.2 Changes for 2004 This booklet replaces all information and guidance provided by QCA in previous key stage 1 Assessment and reporting arrangements booklets. n The term ‘disapplication’ in relation to entry for the tasks and tests has been an area of confusion over the years. In a number of sections. Where the text has been updated. disapplication and modification’ that appeared in previous editions of the booklet. Which children should be entered for the tests? See pages 10–16. The key changes are highlighted below. this coloured text panel will appear alongside the new text. n The term ‘disapplied’ will remain in place in relation to the national curriculum and teacher assessment. These changes are not flagged up unless they involve significant reformatting or updating. Foundation Stage Profile See pages 6–7. which includes information and examples of different circumstances that schools may encounter. the 2004 booklet includes a separate section. n Running headers. ‘Which children should be entered for the tests?’.

P scales See page 43. n Information on the proposed amendment to target setting regulations has been included. Target setting See page 43. schools may use a previous year’s mathematics task in order to carry out the assessment for children working at level 1 or below. The trial will take place in a number of local education authorities (LEAs) in 2004. 5 . The key stage 1 Assessment and reporting arrangements booklet for 2005 will be distributed later in 2004 (than is usual practice) to take account of the outcome of the trial. This approach will place more emphasis on teachers’ overall assessment. NB: The 2002 mathematics task is the most recently published task. QCA will provide further details on what schools in trial LEAs will be required to administer. No new task was published in 2003. n It must be stressed that in LEAs not taking part in the trial. n In 2004. offer more flexible administration and provide simpler information for parents. All schools will automatically be sent one copy of the 2002 mathematics task in December 2003 to use if they wish. but all children will still need to be assessed by means of a task or test. n New information on P scales has been included. statutory tasks and tests remain and will need to be administered in accordance with the arrangements set out in this booklet.CHANGES FOR 2004 Previous year’s mathematics task See page 20. Schools taking part in the trial will have some flexibility in terms of assessment. Key stage 1 assessment trial n The primary document Excellence and Enjoyment – A strategy for primary schools sets out a proposal to trial a more flexible approach to assessment at key stage 1.

Summary profiles must be completed.2 What do practitioners have to do? n n n n n n n They will complete a profile summary (against the 13 scales) for each child reaching the end of the foundation stage.1 Foundation Stage Profile What is the Foundation Stage Profile? The Foundation Stage Profile is a way of summing up each child’s progress and learning needs at the end of the foundation stage. if the LEA is recommending its use to schools.3 3. For most children.uk/ca/foundation An electronic version of the scales booklet. together with the appropriate identifying data.3 National data collection Foundation Stage Profile schools and settings must submit to their LEA the 13 Foundation Stage Profile summary scores for each child reaching the end of the foundation stage in the summer of 2004. four weeks before the end of the summer term. This is the only requirement. 6 . tasks or tests to be carried out. will be available via the LEA. There is no requirement for schools to use the scales booklet or the eProfile to record ongoing assessments.org. if they so wish. 3. The deadline for submitting data will be determined by the LEA. There are no assessment activities. Each child’s typical developments and achievements will be recorded on assessment scales derived from the stepping stones and the early learning goals. Updated The Foundation Stage Profile is based on practitioners’ ongoing observations and assessments in all six areas of learning in the Curriculum guidance for the foundation stage. The scales booklet (and handbook) will be available for downloading electronically from www. The scales booklet can be completed throughout the year – or at the end of the year by transferring judgements from current class record keeping systems.qca. the eProfile. this is at the end of the reception year in primary school – but profiles must be completed in any government-funded setting in which children complete the foundation stage. Further information can be found in the Foundation Stage Profile Handbook available from QCA Publications on 01787 884444 (QCA/03/1006) or on the QCA website at www. Practitioners will be able to use the completed profiles (either in their entirety or selectively) as a basis for their annual report to parents. Only the profile summary needs to be completed.qca. for each child reaching the end of the foundation stage.uk/ca/foundation 3.org.

The numerical results from the 13 scales will be collected annually. for example: n n n n n attainments in the six areas of learning.4 What will happen to the results of the assessment? Data from the profiles will be used to inform parents and year 1 teachers about each child’s progress and learning needs. the attainments of children born in different months of the year. 7 . attainments in settings educating children from similar socio-economic backgrounds.FOUNDATION STAGE PROFILE 3. other analyses based on matching children with their PLASC data. the attainments of boys and girls. It will also be possible to provide useful information about.

This does not normally apply to schools established in hospitals. ensure that the test opening and administrative procedures in this booklet are followed. including the statutory assessment and reporting arrangements. are met. identify which children should be assessed at the end of key stage 1. provide results to the school’s governing body to enable it to comply with national data collection requirements and reporting to parents. facilitate the audit of the school’s administration and marking of the tasks and tests. including the statutory assessment and reporting arrangements. including the completion of the Common Transfer File. ensure that all test materials are kept securely and treated as confidential. Headteachers must: n n n n n n n n n n 4. this refers to those children eligible for assessment. ensure that teacher assessment levels for the core subject attainment targets are recorded for all children so that overall subject levels are calculated. where reference is made to all children. the school governing body must ensure that the headteacher’s duties are carried out by their nominated representative if the headteacher is temporarily or permanently absent. 8 1 Throughout this booklet.4 4. The statutory Headteacher’s declaration form (HDF) (see appendix G on page 51) must be signed by headteachers to confirm this. provide parents with written reports free of charge on their child’s progress and provide the opportunity for discussion at least once in each school year. ensure that the statutory requirements for the transfer of records between schools are fulfilled. . Children for whom national curriculum teacher assessment has been disapplied and children unable to access the tasks and/or tests are included in the school’s numbers for reporting school. where reference is made to the headteacher.2 remind teachers of their contractual duty to comply with the assessment and reporting arrangements. including those who are absent on the day when the majority of children did a task or test. Governing bodies Governing bodies have a general duty to ensure that the national curriculum requirements.1 Key stage 1 statutory assessment: key responsibilities Headteachers’1 duties Headteachers of maintained schools have a duty to secure the implementation of the national curriculum in their school. 2 Throughout this booklet. Headteachers must ensure that their school complies fully with all the aspects of the statutory arrangements for assessing all children2 at the end of key stage 1. ensure that all children take the appropriate key stage 1 tasks and tests and that their responses to the tasks and tests are marked accurately and consistently by the school. LEA and national results. as prescribed. as described in this booklet and any subsequent guidance sent out with the tasks and test materials.

In parallel with these arrangements. NB: From 2005. QCA will be responsible for the audit of independent schools and the distribution of OMR forms to these schools. 9 . to take part in the assessment and reporting arrangements at the end of key stage 1. in accordance with the instructions on page 34. It is also expected that they will: ensure that all children who are at the end of key stage 1 in the school. LEAs will: n See page 32 for details on early opening of test papers. they have a responsibility for ensuring that all their schools understand and follow the statutory requirements. advise schools about early opening of test papers in order to make adaptations for children with specific educational needs. where the school’s arrangements meet the audit requirements. mathematics and science are recorded in line with the statutory requirements. the audit agency in consultation with QCA. n participate in the audit arrangements. 4.5 Independent schools Independent schools are strongly encouraged. they must comply fully with the procedures set out in this booklet for administering the tasks and tests. n ensure that teacher assessment levels for English. the LEA as the ‘verifying authority’ for key stage 1. may substitute or annul a school’s or child’s results as part of the audit process. n n n n offer schools general training and advice on all aspects of assessment at key stage 1. but not required. for maintaining the security and confidentiality of the tests and for making any special arrangements. Therefore. who are eligible to undertake the tasks and tests in a subject do so. n submit results via an independent audit agency for all children assessed to DfES. OMR forms will no longer be available. n See pages 33–35 for details on the key stage 1 audit. New 4. If independent schools decide to participate. ensure that schools are aware of the security requirements set out in this booklet. n See pages 33–35 for details on the key stage 1 audit. Independent schools cannot submit their results to DfES unless they have participated in the audit process as outlined on pages 33–35 of this booklet. collect end of key stage 1 statutory assessment results and submit them to DfES.3 LEAs LEAs have a duty to ensure that the statutory assessment and reporting arrangements in this booklet are administered appropriately by their schools. ensure that the audit of the key stage 1 assessment arrangements is carried out as specified in this booklet and the Audit arrangements booklet.4 Amendment or annulment of national curriculum results Following an investigation into allegations of malpractice or administrative irregularities.KEY STAGE 1 STATUTORY ASSESSMENT: KEY RESPONSIBILITIES 4. provide a service to distribute OMR forms (where used) and process the key stage 1 data using OMR forms or electronic means. for inclusion in the national summary of results. or for independent schools.

they should contact their LEA assessment coordinator. to be ready to proceed to the key stage 2 programmes of study. those children may take the relevant national key stage 1 assessments early. provided the child will be moving on to the key stage 2 programmes of study in the next school year. 10 . If schools have any queries about entering children for the tests.5 Which children should be entered for the key stage 1 tasks and tests? This is a new section which comprises text previously located in different parts of the booklet together with new information. a child should be assessed in the school year in which he or she reaches the age of seven. New 5. It should be noted that some children with special educational needs could move on to some aspects of the key stage 2 programmes of study without having completed all the key stage 1 programmes of study.2 Children older or younger than seven at the end of key stage 1 Some children to be assessed at the end of key stage 1 will be older or younger than seven years old because they are not being taught with their chronological year group. who are still on a school’s roll and children with a statement of special educational needs (unless the child is unable to access the tasks and tests). In small schools where children are not in specific year-group classes. This includes children in special schools and those attending a pupil referral unit on a part-time basis. for example they have been moved up a year or two or held back a year or two. who have completed the key stage 1 programmes of study in a subject. All children who are moving on to the key stage 2 programmes of study in the next school year are regarded as being in the final year of key stage 1.1 Which children should be entered for the key stage 1 tasks and tests? All children in their final year of key stage 1 in the school year 2003/2004 must be assessed. Updated Where a headteacher judges an individual child or a group of children. A child who has been entered earlier than his or her peers may not be re-entered the following year. A child may only take the end of key stage 1 statutory assessments in any subject once. Updated 5. Most of these children will be in year 2 and reach the age of seven by the end of the school year.

Children who. n n Subsections 5. ie child working at the level of the tasks and/or tests but not able to access them.7 below provide more information on these different types of circumstances. It is helpful to consider a child’s circumstances in relation to the following categories: child working at the level of the tasks and/or tests and able to access them. are provided in subsections 5.WHICH CHILDREN SHOULD BE ENTERED FOR THE KEY STAGE 1 TASKS AND TESTS? 5. The arrangements that should be followed for these children. would have had the tasks or tests disapplied are in the second category. When considering a child’s ability to participate in the tasks and tests.7 on pages 12–16. in the former terminology. child working at the level of the tasks and/or tests but not able to access them.4 New Disapplication – phasing out the term Disapplication was the term formerly used in the Assessment and reporting arrangements booklets to refer to the very small number of cases where a child was capable of working at the level of the tasks and/or tests but was not able to access them. 5. These subsections replace the appendix ‘Absence. Decisions may need to be made for each task or test separately. However. The terminology has often been confusing. the term ‘disapplication’ has not always been consistently interpreted. disapplication and modification’ that appeared in previous versions of this booklet. where necessary. n child working at W or within level 1. Therefore information and references in this booklet to teacher assessment will. It is proposed that we move away from this term in relation to the tasks and tests.3 When should a child not participate in the key stage 1 tasks and tests? The key stage 1 tasks assess national curriculum levels 1 and 2 and the key stage 1 tests assess levels 2 and 3 of the national curriculum.6–5. The arrangements are similar to those set out in previous Assessment and reporting arrangements booklets but the terminology has been simplified. ‘The tasks and tests: subject information’. New Occasionally schools are not sure about entering certain children for some or all of the tasks and/or tests. schools should instead refer to the four categories of circumstances referred to in the section above. Full details about tasks and tests are provided in section 7. even to those with extensive experience in the administration of the national curriculum tasks and tests. refer to disapplication from teacher assessment.5–5. n unable to ascertain the level the child is working at. together with examples of different situations. 11 . The term disapplication will remain in use in relation to children’s ability to access the national curriculum.

12 . New In the case of mathematics. eg translation of key words or phrases. for example in the case of children recently arrived from different educational systems who do not speak English. the child should be marked as D because it is the timing that makes the tasks and/or tests inaccessible.7 below for further information. 5. in others it will be the child’s present circumstances that make the assessment inaccessible. a child who is deemed to be working at the level of the tasks and/or tests is still unable to access them. If possible. the school should consider if he or she would be able to access them using the special arrangements set out in section 9.5 Unable to ascertain the level the child is working at (eg recently arrived overseas children who do not speak English) In some cases schools are not sure what level the child is working at. n If the school is unable to reach a judgement because of insufficient time before the tasks and/or tests to carry out internal assessments. the child should be marked as A or D on the teacher assessment form. Schools should refer to subsections 5. n If. even with special arrangements provision. ‘The tasks and tests: special arrangements’.6 Updated Children unable to access the tasks and/or tests Each year there will be an extremely small number of children who will be working at the levels covered by the tests but who will be unable to take part in some or all of the assessment arrangements. teachers and language support staff will need to carry out measures to find out the level that the child is working at. For some children in this category it will be because they have long-term special assessment needs. n Schools should carry out teacher assessment where possible. ie it is the timing of the tests that causes the inaccessibility.KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004 5. n If the child is deemed to be working at the level of the tasks and/or tests in mathematics. even allowing for the full range of special arrangements that can be made. this process should involve translating national curriculum work into the child’s preferred language.6 and 5. they should be marked as D on the pupil record sheet. If it is not possible.

but the examples set out below should assist schools in making decisions about whether or not a child should be entered for (some or all of) the tasks and/or tests. They are also unable to write without the use of an amanuensis. even allowing for the full range of special arrangements or the use of modified test materials. 1. See specific example 1 below. See specific example 3 overleaf. See specific example 2 overleaf. 4. 3. Example 1 n Child who has experienced sudden loss or deterioration of vision who is unable to access the English reading tests because they are unable to have a reader (and are not yet proficient in braille). See specific example 5 overleaf. Child has a physical or sensory disability and cannot access the tasks and/or tests. See specific example 4 overleaf. Child is experiencing. 2. temporary severe emotional problems (perhaps because of a family crisis) and it is currently inappropriate to enter them for the tasks and/or tests. or has been educated at home or has been excluded from schools and needs time to adjust to regular school life. Child has had spells in hospital during the latter end of the key stage. 5. Child has physical or severe learning difficulties who is unable to respond to the stimulus of the writing task except by simple mark making. despite having been able to read independently before the loss of vision. Do not enter for the English reading tests or English writing tasks and mark as D on the pupil record sheet. The school could administer the spelling test 13 . or has recently experienced. as necessary. Specific examples It is not possible to provide examples for every circumstance. Child has recently arrived from a different educational system and a period of adjustment to the national curriculum is required.WHICH CHILDREN SHOULD BE ENTERED FOR THE KEY STAGE 1 TASKS AND TESTS? New General examples The examples that follow provide some scenarios that schools may encounter but they cannot anticipate all situations. The child is likely to have a statement of special educational needs. n What should the school do? Curriculum: administer the curriculum as normal – making any special adjustments necessary Teacher assessment: provide teacher assessment as normal Tasks/tests: administer the mathematics tasks and/or tests using special arrangements.

Mark as W for English because working towards level 1 Example 3 n Child has had an extensive period in hospital at the end of the key stage following a serious illness. n What should the school do? Curriculum: (assuming child is back at school) administer the curriculum as normal – making any special adjustments necessary Teacher assessment: provide teacher assessment if there is sufficient evidence on which to base a judgement. It has been a disruptive period. mark as A Tasks/tests: do not enter for the English and mathematics tasks and/or tests. they would have been working at the level of the test. n What should the school do? Curriculum: administer the curriculum as normal – making any special adjustments necessary Teacher assessment: provide teacher assessment as normal Tasks/tests: do not enter for the mathematics tasks or tests and mark as D on the pupil record sheet. Mark as D on the pupil record sheet Example 4 14 n Child has had extremely difficult home circumstances in the latter part of the key stage. involving a number of changes in their accommodation arrangements. they would have been working at the level of the test. Otherwise. mark as A Tasks/tests: do not enter for the English and mathematics tasks and/or tests. n What should the school do? Curriculum: administer the curriculum as normal – making any special adjustments necessary Teacher assessment: provide teacher assessment if there is sufficient evidence on which to base a judgement.KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004 New Example 2 n Child who has recently arrived from overseas and has very limited fluency in written or spoken English. He or she has been unable to undertake any teaching or learning during this period due to the seriousness of their condition. If they had not had these circumstances. Mark as D on the pupil record sheet . Before this experience. They may be working at the level of the mathematics tasks and/or tests if delivered in their preferred language but they would be unable to access the tests because only key words and phrases can be translated. Otherwise. Their attendance at school has been affected and they have had limited teaching or learning during this period.

The headteacher makes final decisions on the arrangements. however. n Write a report (or use the QCA online form.WHICH CHILDREN SHOULD BE ENTERED FOR THE KEY STAGE 1 TASKS AND TESTS? Example 5 New 5. n What should the school do? Curriculum: administer the curriculum – making any special adjustments as necessary Teacher assessment: provide TA as normal Writing task: do not enter for the writing task.org. they do not need permission from their LEA. It is important to clarify that schools are responsible for making arrangements to agree and acknowledge that a child will not be able to participate in some or all of the tasks and tests. A copy of the form is available on the QCA website at www. It is helpful. Schools could use form ‘Child not accessing the tasks or tests’ in order to complete this exercise.7 Updated n Child with physical or severe learning difficulties who is unable to respond to the stimulus of the writing task except by simple mark making. and to any procedures the school has used to analyse and monitor the child’s needs and difficulties. or special support already offered. or if this information is documented elsewhere indicate where it can be found. Making arrangements for children unable to access the tasks and/or tests Where a child is working at the level of the tasks and/or tests but unable to take them. see below) which indicates why the child cannot be entered for some or all of the tasks or tests. – indicate whether these circumstances are likely to be long term or short term. to discuss the arrangements with the LEA assessment coordinator in advance.qca. n Consult with educational psychologists. – refer to any action already taken. Mark as W for the writing task on the pupil record sheet because working towards level 1. n Consult with the LEA (usually through the LEA assessment coordinator). You should use code D when entering details about the child’s task/test status on the pupil record sheet. Procedures for making arrangements for these children n Discuss the child’s circumstances and needs with his or her parents and teachers. schools need to make appropriate arrangements to agree and acknowledge that the child will not be able to take some or all of the tasks and/or tests.uk/ca/tests/ara 15 . medical officers or other specialist staff. The term ‘report’ is used in place of the term ‘direction’ that was used in the disapplication section of previous versions of the Assessment and reporting arrangements booklets.

they must produce the report referred to in subsection 5. this should be made under the LEA’s curriculum complaints arrangements. Should this fail.8 Parental requests and appeals Parents may ask a headteacher not to enter their child for the tests. the governing body and the LEA.KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004 Providing information Updated Send a copy of the report to: the child’s parents. In the case of maintained schools. for example by providing an interpretation or translation of the documents or arranging to discuss them with parents. to the headteacher. governing bodies are expected to hear appeals with all due speed and allow representations from parents. they may make a complaint. If they accept the request.7. n A copy should also be placed on the child’s educational record. he or she must write to the parent. they must offer appropriate assistance. n the LEA assessment coordinator. Copies must be sent to the governing body and the LEA assessment coordinator. if the headteacher does not respond within a fortnight. either in writing or orally. where a parent may have difficulty in understanding the letter. Their right to appeal should be included with the report. the parent has the right of appeal to the governing body. accompanied by a friend if they wish. if the headteacher decides not to meet the request. parents may make a formal request. 5. and allow specialist staff to attend if necessary. headteachers must respond to requests within a fortnight. because of difficulty with reading or with understanding the language. Copies of the report must be sent to the parent. n the chair of the governing body. In the event of receiving a request. as well as the headteacher. . the procedures set out below need to be followed: n n n n n n n n 16 headteachers should discuss requests with parents and seek to resolve any difficulties without resort to formal procedures. if parents remain dissatisfied. giving reasons for rejecting it and giving details of the parents’ right of appeal. the governing body may either confirm the headteacher’s action or direct him or her to take any other action they consider appropriate. They must give reasons for it. Where a headteacher believes that a parent may have difficulty in understanding the report. the headteacher should make appropriate arrangements to explain it. It is not appropriate to not enter or modify the tests simply because the parents report that the child would find them stressful or because of opposition to the assessment. They must notify the parents and headteacher of their decision in writing.

There is no need for schools to undertake the calculation themselves. 6. Teacher assessment. covers the full range and scope of the programmes of study. taking account of the child’s progress and performance throughout the key stage.1 Schools should promote teacher assessment through a range of strategies. a subject level can also be calculated for English. Advice on this subject can be obtained from the Office of the Information Commissioner on 01625 545700. while avoiding unnecessary workload for teachers. in the form of: a level for each attainment target in English. It takes account of evidence of achievement in a range of contexts. carried out as part of teaching and learning in the classroom. In retaining evidence and keeping records.Teacher assessment Key dates 6 Key dates 30 June 2004. schools may need to notify themselves as data controllers. mathematics and science. The results from teacher assessment are reported alongside the task and test results.2 End of key stage teacher assessment Teachers are required to summarise their teacher assessment judgements at the end of the key stage for each eligible child. n an overall subject level in mathematics and science. They must update these records at least once a year. which must be calculated by aggregating the teacher assessment levels for each attainment target according to weightings described in appendix A on page 44. n 17 . Subject levels for English. schools should be guided by what is both manageable and useful in planning future work. mathematics and science are all calculated automatically when the OMR forms are processed or when the individual attainment targets are entered into the school’s computer management system. including information on academic achievements. End of key stage teacher assessment levels must be finalised. or two weeks before the end of the summer term if that is earlier 6. Ofsted inspectors will not require more detailed records. Schools should consider the implications of the requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998 for information contained in children’s educational records. The tasks and tests provide a standard snapshot of attainment at the end of the key stage. Recording and retaining evidence Schools are required to keep records on every child. including that gained through discussion and observation. Both have equal status and provide complementary information about children’s attainment. General principles Teacher assessment is an essential part of the national curriculum assessment and reporting arrangements. Under the 1998 Act. If desired. Decisions about how to mark work and record progress are professional matters for schools to consider in the context of the needs of their children. other skills and abilities and progress made in school.

In such cases. which can be printed out and shared with colleagues. The headteacher must carefully consider the implications of not providing a child with teacher assessment levels and may wish to seek advice from the DfES on 020 7925 6356/6967.ncaction.org. n Disapplication of teacher assessment Only in rare circumstances will there be a need to disapply teacher assessment for a child. n create a portfolio of exemplification materials. an overall subject level will still be calculated using the remaining attainment targets and their weighting as set out in appendix A on page 44. Again. Examples of children’s work assessed by QCA QCA has published a website that provides examples of children’s work assessed by QCA. Subject levels are not awarded where more than one attainment target has been disapplied within a subject. n support their judgements and discuss assessments with colleagues. prior to using the absent code. Level descriptions indicate the type and range of performance which children working at a particular level should characteristically demonstrate. n is checked against adjacent level descriptions to ensure that the level awarded is the closest match to the child’s performance in each attainment target. Teachers should use their knowledge of a child’s work to judge which level description best fits that child’s performance across a range of contexts. so that schools can submit their results for national data collection. Absence from teacher assessment There may be exceptional circumstances where a school is unable to make valid teacher assessment judgements. n See page 24 for more information on assessing the most able and those working below the level of the tests. Timing End of key stage teacher assessment levels for each attainment target and for the subject must be finalised by 30 June 2004. a child should be recorded as A on the pupil record sheet. The aim is for a rounded judgement which: is based on knowledge of how the child performs over time across a range of contexts. Where a single attainment target has been disapplied. this will be done automatically when the OMR forms are processed or when added into the school’s computer management system.uk/ Teachers can use this site to: find out about teacher assessment in each subject. The address is www.KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004 The level descriptions in the national curriculum are the basis for judging children’s levels of attainment at the end of the key stage. n takes into account strengths and weaknesses of the child’s performance. for example where a child has been absent from school for extensive period(s) due to illness. 18 . or two weeks before the end of the summer term if that is earlier.

There will be three new titles for the level 1 list and three new titles for level 2. As in 2003. n A reading test for level 2. guide times for the administration are given in the Teacher’s handbook and Teacher’s guides to the tests. A reading task. The test assesses the child’s ability to read independently and respond in writing to comprehension questions. The task assesses the child’s ability to read a book aloud with accuracy and discuss his or her understanding of the text. which will award levels 1 and 2. spelling and mathematics. teachers will be required to use a book with which the child is not familiar. funding is available within the school’s overall resources. Should a school require supply cover for the periods during which a teacher is engaged in administering the tasks and tests. Most of the key stage 1 tasks and tests are not strictly timed. – Booklists for the reading task have been revised for 2004. which will be based on a story and information text.1 The tasks and tests: subject information The tasks and tests for 2004 Teachers are required to use the relevant key stage 1 tasks and tests with all children to be assessed at the end of key stage 1 to make separate assessments of reading. Booklists. 7. The level 2 test provides additional and complementary information to the reading task. which is designed to allow children to show their best independent work. n A reading test for level 3. The English and mathematics tasks must be completed between the beginning of January 2004 and four weeks before the end of the summer term (the assessment period).7 7. The level 3 reading test. The writing task. The level 2 reading test. which will be distributed to schools in December 2003. Publishers were told of the final booklists in June 2003. It will consist of a story and one or more other texts with questions for children to answer on each page of a single booklet. The mark scheme will allow a numerical outcome. one longer and one shorter. Each task should normally be administered only once with each child. The tests must be completed during May 2004. Details of the books will be published in the English tasks Teacher’s handbook. However. which will be similar in structure to the 2003 test. It will provide grades C–A at level 2. together with one question booklet for children to complete. Children will complete two written tasks. Nine titles from each of the 2003 level 1 and level 2 booklists have been retained. The test will award level 2 and provide grades C–A at this level. n A writing task. which will be combined with the n 19 .2 English The tasks and tests will consist of: The reading task. writing. Teachers will have scope for discretion in deciding on the exact content of the tasks.

20 A task for mathematics at level 1. n A test for mathematics at level 2. so children who achieve level 3 will not have a reading task result.3 The reading task must be used with all children who are judged to be working towards or within level 1 or within level 2. – Assessment of reading at level 1 is through the reading task only. See chart on page 22. Children who achieve grade A at level 2 in both the reading task and the level 2 reading test must be taken on to the level 3 reading test. and children who have achieved level 1 in the reading task must not be entered for the level 2 reading test. however. – Children who have not yet completed the reading task but are expected to achieve level 1 should not be entered for the level 2 reading test. All schools will be sent one copy of the 2002 mathematics task to use if they have not retained previous years’ tasks. that there may not be time to enter children for the level 2 test if they unexpectedly achieve level 2 in the reading task after the end of May. or are expected to achieve. n The level 3 reading test. Children whose teacher assessment in reading is level 3 or above should be entered directly for the level 3 reading test. they should enter the child for the level 2 test. Guidance on entering children for the reading task and the reading tests The reading task. Twenty words will be tested – one mark will be awarded for correct answers only. Children who are entered directly for the level 3 reading test. There will be no new task for level 1 mathematics in 2004. Separate levels will not be awarded for the test. must be assessed using both the reading task and the level 2 reading test to make an assessment at level 2. Teachers must bear in mind. After the introduction and time allowed for planning.KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004 New The spelling test. but do not score enough marks for the award of level 3. Mathematics The tasks and tests will consist of: Updated The mathematics task. n A spelling test. The assessment at level 3 is through this test alone. which must be administered to all key stage 1 children together with the rest of the tests in May 2004. n The level 2 reading test. n n n 7. The outcome will be a numerical score which will contribute to the mark for writing. In any case where teachers are uncertain as to whether the child will exceed level 1 in the reading task. which must be used with all children judged to be working within level 2 in mathematics as a whole. the longer task is likely to take about 45 minutes to complete and the shorter task should take about 30 minutes. The mathematics level 2 test. The test will provide grades n . All children who achieve. Teachers must use any previous year’s tasks in order to carry out this assessment. which should be carried out on different days. The use of a task remains a statutory requirement for children working at level 1 or below. level 2 in the reading task must be entered for the level 2 reading test to complete their statutory assessment in reading. handwriting score (obtained from the writing task) and the spelling score from the spelling test to award an overall level for writing. All four components must be completed to achieve an overall level for writing. Children who have achieved grade B or C at level 2 in the reading task or test must not be entered for the level 3 reading test. n Two writing tasks.

n Children who are entered directly for the level 3 test. Teachers should use their judgement to decide if some children would perform better on the level 3 paper if they have first taken the level 2 paper. The balance of marks within the tests will reflect the structure of the national curriculum. Both level 2 and 3 tests. children must not be provided with number lines or number squares. Guidance on entering children for the mathematics tests Schools can choose whether or not to enter children whose teacher assessment in mathematics is level 3 directly for the level 3 mathematics test. n Only the highest mathematics test level achieved should be reported. but do not score enough marks for the award of level 3. Level 3 test. n Children who are entered for the level 2 test and achieve level 2A may be entered for the level 3 test.THE TASKS AND TESTS: SUBJECT INFORMATION The mathematics level 3 test. including children’s understanding of the language of mathematics as set out in the programme of study at key stage 1. Teachers should also note that. if a question requires it. Questions to be administered orally. n Children should not be provided with calculators. See chart on page 22. These questions will range in difficulty across the level of demand appropriate to the test. The Number and algebra attainment target will receive about 80 per cent of the marks and the Shape. n 21 . The questions will not be timed and children will be allowed to write any working out in their test booklet. working at the same table. n Each child will also need a ruler marked in centimetres for the level 2 mathematics test or half-centimetres for the level 3 mathematics test. which must be used with all children judged to be working within level 3 or above in mathematics as a whole. must be entered for the level 2 test. Teachers should use their judgement to decide whether it is appropriate to enter children who have only just achieved level 2A for the level 3 test. n Cubes and structured apparatus should not be provided for children entered for the level 3 test. Both level 2 and 3 tests. Resources for the mathematics tests Level 2 test. n As in previous years. as a mark may be awarded for a correct method even if the final answer is incorrect. the tests will comprise some questions for oral administration and some written questions. n A test for mathematics at level 3. Teachers will need to take care with the seating arrangements to ensure this. Dienes tens and ones) should be provided for each child or each group. children should show their working out in the space allocated. entered for the level 2 test. These questions assess aspects of mathematics less easily assessed by written questions. however QCA is currently undertaking a review of their use. Children who narrowly miss achieving level 2 through the test will be awarded level 1. space and measures attainment target will receive about 20 per cent. C–A at level 2. The first five questions of each test will be administered orally. As in previous years. consisting of tens and units (for example Unifix cubes in sticks of tens and ones. The teacher will be required to read these questions aloud and the children will write their answers in spaces provided in the test booklet. Interlocking cubes or structured apparatus.

KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004

Guidance on entering children for the key stage 1 tasks and tests
Children judged
to be working:

Reading task

Reading test

Writing
task

Spelling
test

Mathematics

Towards level 1
(W)

Attempt level 1
reading task

No

Yes

Yes

Attempt level 1
mathematics
task from a
previous year

At level 1

Level 1 reading
task – if child
does well,
attempt level 2

No

Yes

Yes

Attempt level 1
mathematics
task from a
previous year

At level 2

Level 2 reading
task

All children who achieve
level 2 in the reading task
must be entered for the
level 2 reading test (if a
child achieves level 2A in
both the reading task
and the reading test, they
must also be entered for
the level 3 reading test)

Yes

Yes

Level 2
mathematics
test. Children
who just miss
level 2 can be
awarded level 1.
Children who
achieve level 2A
may be entered
for the level 3
mathematics test
(see page 21)

At level 3 or
above

No level 3
reading task

Enter directly for the level
3 reading test. If a child
does not achieve level 3,
then they must be
entered for the level 2
test and the level 2 task

Yes

Yes

Children may be
entered directly
for the level 3
mathematics
test. Children
who do not
achieve level 3
must be entered
for the level 2
mathematics test

7.4
See appendix H on page
52 for website address.

National literacy strategy
The national literacy strategy Framework for teaching and the national curriculum
programmes of study have been aligned. This ensures that teachers following the
framework are implementing the programmes of study for reading and writing. This
advice was also given in the national curriculum order for English, implemented from
September 2000.
Teachers should note that the national curriculum English tasks and tests are
summative measures of the work of the key stage. They assume coverage of the
knowledge, skills, understanding and breadth of the programme of study for reading
and writing in order to meet the standards of performance described by levels 1–3 as
appropriate for each task or test.

22

THE TASKS AND TESTS: SUBJECT INFORMATION

7.5
See appendix H on page
52 for website address.

National numeracy strategy
The national numeracy strategy Framework for teaching mathematics from reception
to year 6 and the national curriculum programmes of study have been aligned. This
ensures that teachers following the framework are implementing the programmes of
study for mathematics. This advice was also given in the national curriculum order for
mathematics, implemented from September 2000.
Teachers should note that the most able key stage 1 children will need to be taught
material beyond the yearly teaching programme for year 2. The first section of the
Framework for teaching mathematics from reception to year 6, ‘Introducing the
Framework’, explains the relationship of the teaching programmes to national
curriculum level descriptions. The expectations in the yearly teaching programmes
correspond to these levels:
year 2: consolidation of level 2, and start on level 3;
year 3: revision of level 2, but mainly level 3;
n year 4: consolidation of level 3, and start on level 4.
n
n

For children to attain national curriculum level 3, they will need to be taught material
beyond the yearly teaching programme for year 2.

7.6
Scores which are adjusted
to take account of the
child’s age.

7.7

Additional information from the tests – age standardised
scores
The age standardised scores for the level 2 and level 3 reading tests, the spelling test
and the level 2 and level 3 mathematics tests will be included in the Teacher’s guides
which will be sent to schools in April 2004. The materials will include tables
to enable teachers to convert raw scores in these tests to age standardised scores. The
scores take account of the child’s age when the tests were taken. These scores will
be available for schools to use on an optional basis. They will provide additional
information which may be reported or used within the school.

Report on the 2003 national curriculum assessments for
7-year-olds
The Implications for teaching and learning leaflet from the 2003 national curriculum
key stage 1 tests in English and mathematics will be available on the QCA website at
www.qca.org.uk/ca/tests/ks1 in October 2003 and sent to schools in November 2003
in poster format.
The TestBase CD-ROM will accompany the teaching and learning leaflet in November
2003. The Standards report on children’s performance in the tests will be sent to
schools in January 2004.
Registration codes to access the full version of the TestBase CD-ROM may be
purchased from: TestBase, PO Box 208, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE3 1FX,
info@testbase.co.uk or by telephoning 0870 900 0402.
The 2003 national summary of results for year 2 children can be found in appendix D
on page 47.

23

KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004

7.8

Assessing the most able
There is a range of options for assessing the most able and gifted children who have
followed a curriculum that blends faster pace and more breadth with greater depth in
a subject. This includes:
a range of optional tasks that teachers may use to support their teacher assessment
judgements. Tasks are available on QCA’s website at www.qca.org.uk/ca/tests/ with
exemplar material and commentaries from teachers to support teachers’ assessment
of performance at level 3 and beyond;
n early entry for the key stage 1 tasks and tests if the child has completed the key
stage 1 programmes of study for the appropriate subject and is about to move on
to the key stage 2 programmes of study. NB: a child may take the key stage 1 tasks
and tests only once;
n taking an optional end-of-year test early, for example year 3 or year 4.
n

7.9

Assessing children working below the level of the tests
The statutory assessment requirements for children working at levels W and 1 are met
through the range of tasks and tests in English and mathematics. Full guidance on
meeting the assessment needs of these children is given in the table on page 22.
Teachers must use the existing key stage 1 mathematics tasks which have been
produced in previous years to support their assessment of children working at level 1
or below, as no new mathematics tasks will be made available. A copy of the 2002
mathematics task will be distributed to all schools in December 2003 in case previous
years’ tasks have not been retained.

24

containing the school registration form. Schools are automatically provided with enough copies for half their year 2 children.org.8 The tasks and tests: key dates and administrative information Key dates Schools receive a DC1 pack. By 6 February 2004 Orders for modified large print (MLP) and braille test materials must be submitted by schools to the modified test agency (statutory). Key dates September 2003 Results reported to parents. The option to purchase multiple copies of the tests for informal administration was also given. Schools will need to consider carefully how many children they wish to enter for the level 3 reading tests and the level 3 mathematics tests. 8. January 2004 2004 English task books in braille sent to schools.uk/ca/tests/ara/ks1_formb. 19–23 April 2004 Tests and guidance on their use sent to schools. April 2004 Maintained schools receive OMR forms from their LEA unless they are using an electronic system for transfer of data. Extra copies of the level 3 tests can be ordered using the form on page 45 of this booklet. May 2004 Tests administered. June/July 2004 Results and Headteacher’s declaration form (HDF) completed and submitted to LEA/agency for processing. This must be returned by 12 September 2003. January 2004 to four weeks before the end of the summer term Tasks administered.1 Ordering the task and test materials Schools were sent the school registration form (part of the DC1 pack) by the DCA at the beginning of the 2003 autumn term. Schools that opted to purchase multiple copies will receive an order form in November 2003 and will be sent materials shortly after the May 2004 test period.asp 25 .qca. Schools participating in the tests will receive task and test materials based on this information. Modified large print and braille materials sent to schools. The form is also available on the QCA website at www. which requested the number of year 2 children and teachers. from the data collection agency (DCA). December 2003 2004 English and 2002 mathematics tasks and guidance on their use sent to schools.

2 Modified large print or braille test papers will be sent separately from the main delivery of standard test materials. given that there is very limited time for corrections. The Headteacher’s declaration form (HDF) will be included in this dispatch to schools. QCA’s key stage 1 team must be informed immediately. teachers can check that they have sufficient copies of the appropriate test materials. Alternatively. All schools will be sent one copy of the 2002 mathematics task to use if they have not retained any copies of previous years’ tasks. Receiving and opening the tasks Schools will receive copies of the 2004 English task materials and one copy of the 2002 mathematics task in December 2003. They are subject to the same opening regulations as the standard tests. However. the headteacher or delegated senior member of staff must check the delivery against the consignment note to ensure that the correct number of test packs has been received. Schools may open task packs as soon as they are received. Receiving and opening test materials Schools will receive the tests and the Teacher’s guides in April 2004. 26 . Schools can open the teacher packs and pupil packs only up to one school day prior to the first planned administration of the test to a group of children so that: n n teachers can familiarise themselves with the procedures and contents of each test. the error must be reported immediately to the key stage 1 distribution helpline.KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004 Participation is optional for independent schools. schools may photocopy the form on page 51. If a school has received test packs that are unsealed on arrival. Early opening for special arrangements Schools should follow the guidance given on page 32. schools may use previous years’ tasks in order to carry out this assessment. and tasks can be administered at any time between January 2004 and four weeks before the end of the summer term. confidentiality of the test material must be maintained until the end of May. Non-participating schools will be sent a copy of the materials for information purposes after the May 2004 test period. Contact the key stage 1 team on 020 7509 5516. They must also check that no sealed packs have been opened. Schools can administer each test to smaller groups over a number of occasions if they wish. 8. If the delivery is found to be incomplete. so that details can be recorded and a letter of acknowledgement sent to the school. One English subject pack per year 2 teacher will be sent to the school – each of which will contain enough materials for one class. Ordering braille and modified large print assessment materials Schools must follow the guidance given on page 31. Contact the key stage 1 distribution helpline on 0800 801958. Receiving the mathematics task In 2004. When the tests arrive in school.

If there are instances where the task or test paper does not represent a child’s own independent work. Participating independent schools will be sent their OMR forms with their test materials by Wednesday 31 March 2004 from QCA. Headteachers must ensure that appropriate systems are in place to preserve the security and confidentiality of the tests. In administering the tasks and tests. introduce and administer the task or test as required by the guidance given in the Teacher’s handbook for the tasks or the Teacher’s guide for the tests. Preparation of children for the tasks and tests Some aspects of the tasks and tests may be unfamiliar to children and they may benefit from some appropriate preparation. 8. etc in the classroom do not give children an unfair advantage. Schools must develop a system that protects them from any possible allegation of malpractice. individually and without access to materials that could give them an unfair advantage. teachers may choose to provide opportunities for children who are used to working cooperatively to work 27 . during and after the tests have taken place.3 Storing test materials It is the headteacher’s duty to ensure that test materials are stored securely. from the time they are delivered to the school up to the completion and audit of the marking. Updated 8. or other room.4 Administering the tasks and tests The tasks and tests must be carried out under appropriate conditions to ensure that all schools are administering them to agreed national standards. for example where a child copies from someone else. The best place to keep test materials is in a locked cupboard or store room. even for a few minutes. they are required to substitute accurate results for those given by the school. cannot be regarded as secure if it is left unattended and unlocked. support or information is given. This arrangement does not prohibit teachers from taking test papers home to mark provided the materials are kept secure at all times. the headteacher should be informed.THE TASKS AND TESTS: KEY DATES AND ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION Delivery of pupil record sheets (OMR forms) – if being used Maintained schools will receive their OMR forms from their LEA as usual. make sure children are aware of what they have to do and the time they will be given to complete the task or test. schools must ensure that: n n n children can work undisturbed. the wall displays. Where auditors are unable to verify the results as accurate. In particular. children are reminded that the work they produce in the tasks and tests must be their own and that they should not discuss questions or copy answers. teachers must: n n n n ensure that children have the correct test materials and all necessary resources. For instance. It is expected that the headteacher will be able to give an accurate account of all those who have had access to the test materials before. ensure that no additional help. The headteacher’s office.

they can photocopy the form on page 51. and submit it with the OMR forms (or as arranged) to the LEA/agency responsible for submitting key stage 1 results to DfES. As in previous years. If schools want additional copies. 8. which in most cases will be similar to the 2003 tests. This is a statutory requirement. NB: From 2005. headteachers must sign the Headteacher’s declaration form (HDF).5 See appendix F on page 49 for details on OMR codes. which will be included with the test packages. 28 Completion and submission of pupil results and the Headteacher’s declaration form (HDF) When all the assessments are completed. OMR forms will no longer be available. the results for each child should be recorded on an OMR form or other system for submitting results as arranged with the LEA/agency responsible for collecting the results. . Format of test items: It would be helpful to familiarise the children with the layout and design of the tests.KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004 independently before they undertake the tasks and tests. New See appendix G on page 51 for details on Headteacher’s declaration form.

for example visual or hearing impairment.9 The tasks and tests: special arrangements Key dates by 6 February 2004 9. Teachers should use their knowledge of individual children in deciding which adaptations should be made. 9.dfes.3 Children who may need special arrangements Teachers should decide whether any special arrangements are appropriate by careful consideration of the assessment needs of the individual.uk/sen/). However.gov. bearing in mind the nature and level of support that these children receive as part of normal classroom practice.1 Schools must place their orders for modified large print and braille tests. or who are currently undergoing a statutory assessment (or reassessment) of their special educational needs as described in the SEN Code of Practice (available from DfES Publications on 0845 602 2260 or www. They are designed so that many children with special educational needs can undertake them in their standard format.dfes. More specific advice for particular needs. General information on the range and extent of the flexibility and adaptations that may be adopted for tasks and tests at the end of key stage 1 will be given in the Teacher’s handbooks and the Teacher’s guides.uk/sen/ n children with a statement of special educational needs (SEN). Special arrangements may be appropriate for: The SEN website is www. 29 Key dates The range of special arrangements set out in this section applies to children in all schools. advice on the suitability of questions is taken from a range of educational experts and special educational needs specialists. is provided where appropriate. . teachers may need to adapt the administrative arrangements for the tasks and tests so that some children can demonstrate their achievement. During the development of the tests and tasks. General principles The tasks and tests are intended to assess children’s ability in a fair and comparable way and so that as many children as possible have access to them. Special arrangements should neither advantage nor disadvantage individual children. 9.2 Adaptations to the tasks and tests It is not possible to provide specific rules governing the use of adaptations because of the wide range of children’s needs and circumstances.gov.

is physically unable to write down his or her answers and is also unable to use a word processor. may be unable to take the tests.KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004 children for whom provision is being made in school at School Action or School Action Plus of the SEN Code of Practice. Word processors.6 The language of the tests and children’s response language Some schools have language support teachers to help particular children in their normal classes. social or behavioural difficulties. concept keyboards or other similar aids may be used in the writing task.4 Children unable to take the tasks and tests A very small number of children. recounting. etc. Tests may not be opened early for this purpose. n 9.5 Use of amanuenses and readers in the key stage 1 tasks and tests Amanuenses Amanuenses may be used for any task or test except for the writing task. n children who are unable to sit and work at a test for a sustained period because of a disability or emotional. Readers In the mathematics tests. n Updated n Amanuenses are not allowed for the writing task at key stage 1 because 7-year-old children are generally unable to distinguish between dictating writing to a scribe and oral story telling. which remains unchanged in format from 2003. 30 . ‘Which children should be entered for the key stage 1 tasks and tests?’. readers may be used in accordance with the guidance in the Assistance for the written questions booklet. n may be suffering from severe motor disabilities or physical discomfort when writing. In English. readers can be used only for particular children to explain the procedures of the reading tests. on pages 10–16. n children for whom English is an additional language and who have limited fluency in English. Schools may choose to make these or other support teachers available while the tasks and tests are taking place. In these cases. including those with chronic or severe illness. The planning sheets for the example writing tasks may be read to children. and whose learning difficulty or disability significantly affects access to the tests. An amanuensis should only be used to support a child who: is a braillist. 9. even when the materials have been adapted or other special arrangements have been made. when necessary. No other help with reading can be given. headteachers will need to refer to the arrangements set out in section 5 of this booklet. 9.

skills and understanding. However. 31 . Information and examples of key stage 1 modified test materials can be accessed via the QCA website at www.qca. the National Library for the Blind.7 Modified versions of the materials The level 1 and level 2 booklists published in the English tasks Teacher’s handbook. Modified test agency (statutory) tel: 0870 321 6727. These books will be available in January 2004 from the modified test agency (statutory) on 0870 321 6727. simplified illustrations and with all extraneous information removed. In these cases. Teachers and/or language support staff may. A braille version of the spelling test is not provided. Orders must be submitted by 6 February 2004. Complete test papers must not be translated. Copies will be available in April 2004 and can be ordered by photocopying and completing the order form on page 46. a national lending library of children’s books in braille. in April 2004.uk/ca/tests/modified_tests/ Braille See appendix C on page 46 for braille order form. the tasks and tests are designed to test children’s ability to read and write in English. See page 55 for details on obtaining braille texts on the booklists. However. schools should order the grade 2 version of the test and follow the modified wording used in the print transcription of the braille. which will be distributed to schools in December 2003. these MLP papers may be used by other children who have special educational needs. the procedures of the tests may be given in the child’s home language.THE TASKS AND TESTS: SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS In English. If necessary. 9. translate words or phrases used in the assessment materials or used by children in their responses. The level 2 and level 3 reading and mathematics tests and the spelling test will also be produced in modified large print (MLP). Schools requiring braille materials should photocopy and complete the order form on page 46. In mathematics. The assessment must be conducted in English and children must respond in English. Some books on the booklists may be available for loan through the Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB). schools can undertake the rebrailling of grade 2 tests into grade 1 or a mixture of grades 1 and 2. and ClearVision. While designed for children with visual impairment. include a number of titles that are indicated as suitable for use for children with visual impairment. although when necessary. teachers should be aware that these test papers are helpful only for particular special educational needs. therefore. These materials will be sent to schools that have ordered them. teachers should bear in mind that children for whom English is an additional language or who use British Sign Language or other sign-supported communication may not be familiar with some subject vocabulary and technical terms in their home language. The modified papers are produced in black and white only on A4 size paper using bold print. The level 2 and level 3 reading tests and the level 2 and level 3 mathematics tests will be available in grade 2 braille. the task and tests are designed to test children’s mathematical knowledge. Modified large print See appendix C on page 46 for modified large print test order form.org. A number of books on the level 1 and level 2 booklists for the reading task have been produced in braille. Orders must be submitted by 6 February 2004. and should seek advice if necessary from the modified test agency (statutory) before ordering materials.

etc. n n n Providing apparatus or other aids. school-based changes to the text of questions in the tests must not be made. enlarging.8 Early opening in order to make special arrangements Test packs may be opened early (up to five working days prior to the first planned administration of the tests) only in order to allow the SEN coordinator or other appropriate members of staff nominated by the headteacher to prepare for one or more of the following special arrangements.KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004 9. without looking at the current year’s papers. rebrailling of grade 2 braille tests. n n n n photocopying onto coloured paper. embossing or mounting diagrams. preparing language support teachers for administration of a test. Care has been taken to ensure the language used in the papers is as straightforward as possible and that the questions allow as many children as possible to use the test materials. providing appropriate apparatus or other aids for children with particular special needs. while maintaining strict confidentiality: Making adapations to the tests. preparing signers and communicators for signing a test. enhancing shading and/or emboldening lines on diagrams. Therefore. 32 . cutting out. The majority of special arrangements can be made by using the previous year’s tests for guidance. These arrangements include preparing readers or amanuenses. charts and graphs.

Schools will be informed of a random audit check at least two school days in advance. QCA. The auditor can. for this purpose. Audit arrangements for 2004 Most schools are only required to have the administration and marking of the tasks and tests audited at least once in a four-year cycle. require the headteacher to provide additional samples of work undertaken as part of the tasks and tests and such further materials as they may require. to require the headteacher to arrange for the marking to be reconsidered by the teachers concerned and to resubmit the results for verification. for maintained schools. each LEA will carry out an audit of a minimum of 25 per cent of their schools. 33 Key dates 10.2 . where the auditor judges that the results are inaccurate. Under these arrangements for audit. In addition to these full audits. This means that any school may be subject to a random audit check during any year in which it is not subject to full audit. to appoint auditor(s) with recent experience of the national curriculum in primary schools and appropriate authority to verify that marking standards are accurate. if necessary. and to secure consistent standards of administration of the tasks and tests. LEAs will also carry out a number of random audit checks during the assessment period. as detailed below. to notify the headteacher and. in the light of the scrutiny.10 Audit Key dates 27 February 2004 10. LEAs will inform schools by 27 February 2004 that they are to have their results audited in 2004. This applies to all key stage 1 schools unless the LEA requires the results of a particular school to be audited more frequently. for participating independent schools. LEAs/QCA have the following specific duties: n n n n n to ensure that all schools are included in the audit arrangements at least once in a four-year cycle and that schools with identified problems or other particular circumstances are audited more frequently. QCA will be responsible for the audit arrangements in participating independent schools. to notify the headteacher of each school whether the administration and marking standards in the school are accurate or inaccurate. Therefore. Statutory responsibility for audit The statutory responsibility for audit of the standards of administration and marking of both the tasks and tests is held by: n n LEAs. to arrange for the auditor to scrutinise samples of work undertaken by children as part of each task and test in English and mathematics from every school which is subject to audit in 2004.1 The LEA or agency responsible for audit will notify schools of any key dates in their audit process.

3 Independent schools and audit Independent schools taking part in the end of key stage 1 tests. Although not statutory. QCA will inform any such school by the end of February in any year that they must obtain an audit if they wish to submit their results for inclusion in the national data. n 10. and wishing to submit their results. using funds available within schools’ overall resources. discussions based on guidance documents issued by QCA). LEAs/agencies may advise QCA that a particular independent school should be audited more frequently. the auditor’s judgements continue to differ from those of the school. OMR forms will no longer be available. The headteacher and governing body have specific duties: to permit the auditor to enter the premises of the school at all reasonable times in order to observe the conduct of tasks and tests. New Participating independent schools wishing to submit their results to DfES will need to employ an LEA or agency to process the OMR forms and submit their results each year between the four-yearly statutory audit. meetings with teachers from other schools to compare approaches to assessment n and understanding of assessment standards. for example. A list of accredited agencies will be sent to all participating independent schools in January 2004.KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004 n to substitute their assessment for that of the school where. n to meet reasonable requests from the auditor for samples of children’s written work undertaken as part of the tasks and tests and to provide such further materials as may be required. it is recommended that the auditor should arrange also for the observation of the administration of at least one task/test in every school subject to a full audit in 2004. after the steps outlined above. n Headteachers have a general responsibility to secure the implementation of the national curriculum assessment arrangements. 34 . This is likely to involve: attendance at training courses. Only results from independent schools taking part in the audit arrangements and who have contracted an audit agency for a full audit at least once in every four years can be submitted to DfES for inclusion in the national summary of results. must have their results audited in the first year of their participation and then at least once in every four-year cycle. NB: From 2005. Teachers engaged in marking tasks and tests and carrying out teacher assessment should have adequate opportunities to become familiar with national assessment standards. Independent schools must employ an LEA or QCA accredited agency to have their tasks and test results verified. n meetings of teachers within the school to scrutinise samples of children’s work and to agree on a common approach to assessment (this might include.

Overseas schools Overseas schools taking part in the end of key stage 1 tests do not have their results included in the national data published by the DfES. in the format of a circular) and request OMR forms from QCA.4 Contact the key stage 1 team on 020 7509 5516. they can purchase the services of an independent agency (details will be available in January 2004 on the website. 35 . If overseas schools wish to have their results audited. They are not therefore sent OMR forms.AUDIT 10.

at level 2 and the reading test at level 2. as instructed. the writing task. Participating independent schools that have complied with the requirements set out in this booklet should follow the guidance for independent schools on this page and on page 38. a written report should be included for parents.1 alongside national comparative figures from the 2003 assessments. Headteachers are also required to submit details of those unable to access the tasks and/or tests. Headteachers must ensure that they report the minimum information required by the regulations. Key dates National figures for 2003 are given on page 47.2 Each school is also required to publish a summary of its teacher assessment and test results in English and mathematics as verified by their LEA through the four-year audit cycle in the school prospectus and governors’ annual report.11 Reporting and using results Key dates by the end of the summer term 11. Maintained schools should submit their national data returns to their LEA. Headteachers will need to submit a teacher assessment level for all attainment targets in English.teachernet. National data collection Key stage 1 assessment results will be recorded by schools on OMR forms as in previous years. disapplication and absences. The national summary of key stage 1 results for 2003 can be found on page 47. The overall level for these subjects will be generated by the key stage 1 software. mathematics and science. Headteachers will need to submit the outcomes of the reading task for children working towards level 1.uk/management/atoz under ‘Organisation and Management’. 11. available at www. NB: From 2005. at level 1. the mathematics task for children working towards level 1 and at level 1. OMR forms will no longer be available. ref: DfES/0269/2002.1 See appendix F on pages 49–50 for guidance on recording results. Publishing summary results 1 36 For further information see DfES guidance Governors’ Annual Reports and School Prospectuses in primary schools. the mathematics test at level 2 and the mathematics test at level 3 (as applicable in each case). . unless your LEA has made provisions for these to be submitted electronically.gov. The arrangements for the collection of key stage 1 results on a national basis will be as for 2003. unless the child has reached level 3 in the test. in which case the reading test level 3 only is submitted. and report the results to parents as outlined below. Where PSHE and citizenship are included in the curriculum.

of those. the audit agency in consultation with QCA. n This meeting should be within the term in which the Foundation Stage Profile has been completed. for independent schools. the percentage of unauthorised absences.3 Amendment or annulment of national curriculum results Following any investigation into allegations of malpractice or administrative irregularities. For children at the end of year R Parents must be offered a reasonable opportunity to discuss the outcomes of the Foundation Stage Profile with their child’s teacher. 37 . n The child’s general progress. may substitute or annul a school’s or child’s results as part of the audit process. 11. the LEA as the ‘verifying authority’ for key stage 1. n For children of compulsory school age n A summary of the child’s attendance record during the period to which the information in the report relates. The Education (Pupil Information) (England) Regulations 2000. The Education (Pupil Information) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2001 and The Education (Pupil Information) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2003 prescribe the minimum content of children’s reports. n For all children in year R and above Brief comments on the child’s progress in each subject or area of learning and activity studied as part of the school curriculum. or.4 Reporting children’s achievements (reception to the end of key stage 1) to parents Headteachers’ responsibilities Headteachers are responsible for ensuring that they send a written report to parents on their child’s achievements at least once during the school year. showing the number of possible attendances and. n Arrangements for parents to discuss the report with the child’s teacher at the school. Schools may issue more than one report. provided that the minimum information is sent to parents by the end of the summer term. Teachers may wish to consider making the results available to parents as part of this discussion. If parents ask to see a copy of their child’s profile.REPORTING AND USING RESULTS 11. the school should make this available. These should highlight strengths and development needs.

qca.2 Reports should show the proportion of eligible pupils in the final year of key stage 1 at W. which may be reported. The table ‘School results’ on page 47 sets out what must be reported along with the finer grading (C–A) at level 2. Schools may also include age standardised scores if they wish. disapplied and absent for reading. 3. disapplied and absent for teacher assessment.uk/ca/tests/ara/ for use in school reports. or who completed levels 1. which may be reported:2 – a statement that the levels have been arrived at by statutory assessment. schools’ and national results.KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004 Additional information for children at the end of key stage 1 The tables on page 47 exemplify how these requirements might be met for reporting individual children’s. which may be reported. . They should also report general progress and progress in all other subjects and activities studied as part of the school curriculum. The percentage of children at the school in 2004 at each level of attainment at the end of key stage 1. 4+. and in relation to other children in the same year. levels 1. they are not required to report the overall subject level for English.org. 2. The table ‘Child’s results’ on page 47 sets out what must be reported along with the finer grading (C–A) at level 2. writing and mathematics. Reports should also show the task/test results summary for children in the final year of key stage 1 in the school. drawing attention to any particular strengths and weaknesses. Schools may wish to report grades C–A at level 2.2 The 2003 national percentage of children at each level of attainment at the end of key stage 1. – a statement where any attainment target has been disapplied for a child under sections 92 or 93 of the Education Act 2002. showing the proportion of children at W. The table ‘National results’ on page 47 sets out what must be reported and gives the actual national results along with the finer grading (C–A) at level 2. 2. These tables can be downloaded from the QCA website at www. – a brief commentary setting out what the results show about the child’s progress in the subject individually. Schools must report separate teacher assessment results for Speaking and listening. Level 2B should be regarded as the nationally expected level of achievement for children at the end of key stage 1. Reading and Writing. n n n n n n n n 2 38 The child’s national curriculum assessment levels. 3.

4 Should be reported where the child is of compulsory school age. If the parent has not already been given this information. if schools wish.REPORTING AND USING RESULTS Summary of information which must be reported to parents in 2003/2004 Requirement Updated Year R 1 2 (end of key stage1) Brief particulars of achievements in all subjects and other activities3 ¸3 ¸ ¸ General progress ¸ ¸ ¸ Arrangements for discussion ¸ ¸ ¸ Attendance record ¸4 ¸ ¸ National curriculum assessment results5 ¸ Brief commentary ¸ A statement that the levels have been arrived at by statutory assessment ¸ A statement explaining why the child has not been entered for the tasks and tests. 39 . headteachers must ensure that the minimum information required by the regulations is included. 3 This should include separate comments on each subject reception year children have been following. 6 Examples are given in appendix D. If so. serve as the annual report to parents. However. 5 Where the child is in the final year of a key stage. or in the case of teacher assessment has been disapplied ¸ Comparative information about the attainments of children of the same age in the school6 ¸ Comparative information about the attainments of children of the same age nationally6 ¸ Children with a statement of special educational needs Reports for the annual review of a child’s statement of special educational needs may. a parent may ask about the child’s levels in each attainment target of any subject where statutory assessment has taken place. in particular by supplementing the basic minimum information with a more detailed account of the child’s progress in relation to the curriculum that the child is following. it must be provided within 15 school days of the request. schools should always provide contextual information in reports to parents on children who have special educational needs.

material that would reveal. but it is not a subject within the national curriculum.org.qca. QCA has published Non-statutory guidance on RE for LEAs and schools. . This consists of: n n n n n n 40 material supplied by anyone other than employees of the school or LEA or the person requesting disclosure. It is a general requirement that schools report children’s progress on RE to their parents. their trust deed/faith guidelines. certain information is exempt from disclosure. an institution of further or higher education. except those withdrawn by their parents. 11. material. n include in the report additional information about the child’s progress. especially if an eight-level scale has been adopted in the syllabus. Schools may be required to use this scale. no national statutory assessment requirements and no collection of national data. references supplied to potential employers of the child. reports by a school to a juvenile court. There is nothing to prevent the scale being used by other schools on a voluntary basis if their agreed syllabus does not require any other form of assessment. another school. material concerning actual or suspected child abuse. or a local version of it.uk/ca/subjects/re/ or from QCA Publications (ref: QCA/00/576 price £3) on 01787 884444. in the case of aided and foundation schools of a religious character. any national body concerned with student admissions. Local agreed syllabuses or faith community guidelines might also contain requirements or guidance on reporting RE. QCA Publications tel: 01787 884444. This provides guidance on assessing progress in RE using two attainment targets and a non-statutory eight-level scale. n Information that is exempt from disclosure Under the Data Protection Act 1998. Schools are required to teach RE according to their LEA’s agreed syllabus or.6 Powers of headteachers Headteachers have discretion to: arrange for the report to be translated.KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004 11. or enable to be deduced. beyond the minimum required. or any other place of education and training.5 Religious education Religious education (RE) is a statutory subject for all children. n decide when to issue the report to parents. which came into force on 1 March 2000. the disclosure of which would be likely to cause serious harm to the physical or mental health or emotional condition of the child or someone else. as long as the minimum required information is sent to parents by the end of the summer term. the identity of a person other than the child to whom the information relates or the person requesting disclosure as the source of information or as a person to whom the information relates. There are therefore no national programmes of study. It is available at www. These syllabuses/guidelines may contain local requirements or guidance on assessing and reporting RE. but there is no required format for such reporting nationally. in their assessment and reporting of progress in RE if it has been incorporated into a local agreed syllabus/guidelines.

gov. Others hold meetings part-way through the year and use the annual written report as an end-of-year summative statement. QCA has produced updated guidance on report writing. including some sample reports. Some schools find it useful to send out reports midway through the school year to inform meetings with parents and to set targets for progress. and that will need to be recorded for manual transfers.REPORTING AND USING RESULTS Further information on the Data Protection Act 1998 can be obtained from the Office of the Information Commissioner on 01625 545700. the file can also be sent on a floppy disk.org. and their unique pupil number (UPN). See page 52 for website address.asp Updated 11. and this record must be transferred automatically when a child changes school. This information is available on the QCA website: www.gov.gov. therefore.teachernet.qca.uk/ca/tests/2003sample_reports.teachernet. The sample reports are no longer provided in this booklet. The information that should be included in the Common Transfer File Updated The statutory information that will automatically form part of the Common Transfer File for electronic transfers.uk/s2s/. Schools are required to provide one written report to parents each year. 41 . Although the basic model is that the ‘old’ school will send the Common Transfer File to the ‘new’ school by one of these methods.uk/s2s/ How the information should be sent to the receiving school The Common Transfer File can be sent to the receiving school either: through the new secure file transfer service on the TeacherNet website at www. n In an emergency.8 See DfEE circular 0015/2000 Pupil Records and Reports and DfES guidance 0268/2002 The Common Transfer File.teachernet. the law allows the file to be provided by local education authorities where there are agreed local arrangements to that effect. has been distributed via LEAs and is available on the Information Management Strategy (IMS) website at www. including their most recent key stage results and teacher assessments (plus test results and teacher assessments at previous key stages where these are known to the transferring school). including use of the new DfES TeacherNet website. is listed at Annex A of DfES/0268/2002 The Common Transfer File.uk/management/tools/ims Detailed guidance on compiling and sending the Common Transfer File. There is a statutory requirement to send specified information about the child to the receiving school. although many provide more than one. They are. to discuss strengths and weaknesses and to set targets for the future. a key aspect of the school improvement process. Since June 2002 this information has been transferred through the electronic common transfer file. 11. Schools can order copies from DfES Publications or view it on the TeacherNet website at www. Children who transfer to a new school Copies of each child’s report have formed part of their educational record since March 2000.7 Reporting to parents to improve children’s achievement Reports and meetings with parents provide an opportunity to review a child’s progress to date. or n as an e-mail attachment or file over a secure network that links schools within an LEA or within a regional broadband consortium.

A headteacher should at least telephone the child’s parents and. for example due to late or queried national curriculum results. by attainment target where available. the file must include: n the teacher’s latest assessments of the child’s progress against the attainment targets in the core subjects. schools are encouraged to send the Common Transfer File to a special area in the TeacherNet secure file transfer website that will form a database of ‘missing’ children. What is reasonably practicable will depend on circumstances. if the address is known write to the parents. The duty to provide a report to a child’s new school does not apply where: the child has been registered at a school for less than four weeks (although in such a case the headteacher of the school should pass on in turn to the new school any reports that may have been transferred from a child’s previous school or schools). For children who transfer at any other time during key stage 1. Where neither of these approaches is successful. it is the responsibility of the school at which the child was on roll when the tasks/tests were predominantly carried out to submit both the teacher assessment and task/test results. n the most recent assessment information is not available within 15 days of the child ceasing to be registered at the transferring school. n 42 . For a child who transfers from one school to another during the key stage 1 assessment period. but should give a fair indication of a child’s progress within each attainment target. unless the new school is not known. the file must include: n the child’s key stage 1 statutory assessment results in English and mathematics and teacher assessment.KEY STAGE 1 ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS 2004 For children at the end of key stage 1. For all children The headteacher must send to the child’s new school. For children who transfer during the assessment period. in all core subjects. The latest assessments do not have to be presented as levels on the national curriculum eight-level scale. n The information must be sent within 15 school days of: n the child ceasing to be registered at the old school. whether LEA-maintained or independent: the defined items of pupil data described in The Common Transfer File. Similarly. schools that do not receive Common Transfer Files for new children will be able to ask named contacts in the LEA to search the database to see if the files are there. n all educational records relating to the child. DfES/0268/2002. In this case it should be sent within 15 school days of any request from the child’s new school. the file must include: n any statutory assessment results that have been completed in English and mathematics and teacher assessments in all core subjects. n it is not reasonably practicable for the headteacher to find out a child’s new school. by attainment target where available. This may require the school to obtain teacher assessment results from the child’s previous school.

benchmarking and value added The statutory requirement for schools to set annual targets in relation to the performance of children aged 11 in the end of key stage 2 national curriculum assessments. on an optional basis. Schools may use funding from within their overall resources to support key stage 1 to 2 transfer activities. this is likely to be before the end of the term preceding transfer (for teacher assessments).uk/ performance for more information tel: 020 7395 5119 email: PAT. In general.10 National Curriculum in Action website at www.gsi.REPORTING AND USING RESULTS 11.gov. Governing bodies are responsible for setting and publishing targets by 31 December. DfES and Ofsted will publish a package of performance data during the autumn term.gov.ncaction.dfes. on page 38 of this booklet.org.uk contains examples of children’s work which will help teachers to make judgements.gov. To support the target-setting process. came into effect in September 1998.9 Transfer from key stage 1 to key stage 2 Where children transfer to a new school at the end of year 2. a CD-ROM containing software to help schools analyse this data and set individual pupil and school targets. enquiries@dfes. 43 . from 2005 and publish a national summary of results. it can be useful for teachers in key stage 1 schools to agree with their colleagues in key stage 2 schools the most appropriate time for the assessment information to be transferred. The circular is available at www. and pupils aged 16 in public examinations. When setting targets. key stage 1 schools will find it helpful to consider the advice about nationally expected levels of achievement for most 7-year-olds. P scales The P scales are a set of optional indicators for recording the achievements of children with special educational needs working towards the first level of the national curriculum.uk/publications/guidanceonthelaw/11_98/contents. The transfer file should be used to provide this information.dfes. The DfES will be sending to schools in October 2003 the Pupil Achievement Tracker (PAT). The benchmarking information provides schools with information about the performance of other schools with similar characteristics to their own.uk New Target setting. The DfES is intending to collect data on the P scales from schools. DfEE circular 11/98 provides practical guidelines and detailed information about publication and the target setting timetable. but they may do so if they wish.standards. The Autumn Package provides a summary of national results and benchmarking analyses. 11. QCA. The data will also inform the future extension and refinement of value added calculations. There is no statutory requirement for schools to set targets for key stage 1.htm Schools may choose to set additional targets. New See the PAT website www.

This child has attained level 3. this should be represented by zero. space and measures (Ma3) 1 1 1 5 8 Total To calculate the subject level for this child. 44 . Round to the nearest whole number.67). An example for science: Attainment targets Scientific enquiry (Sc1) (a) Level (b) Weighting (c) Level × weighting 3 3 9 Living processes and living things (Sc2) 2 1 2 Materials and their properties (Sc3) 2 1 2 Physical processes (Sc4) 3 1 3 6 16 Total To calculate the subject level for this child. This child has attained level 2. The mathematics attainment targets will be weighted as follows: Using and applying mathematics (Ma1) Number and algebra (Ma2) Shape. Note: subject levels will be calculated by the software provided all attainment targets have been entered An example for mathematics: Attainment targets (a) Level (b) Weighting (c) Level × weighting Using and applying mathematics (Ma1) 1 1 1 Number and algebra (Ma2) 2 3 6 Shape. where a child is working towards level 1 in an attainment target. space and measures (Ma3) 1 3 1 The science attainment targets will be weighted as follows: Scientific enquiry (Sc1) Life processes and living things (Sc2) Materials and their properties (Sc3) Physical processes (Sc4) 3 1 1 1 Halves should be rounded upwards to the next whole number.6). Round to the nearest whole number. total column (c) then divide by the total of column (b) (8 ÷ 5 = 1. For the purpose of this calculation only.Appendix A Calculating teacher assessment subject levels at the end of key stage 1 The English attainment targets will be equally weighted. total column (c) then divide by the total of column (b) (16 ÷ 6 = 2.

qca. This form is also available on the QCA website at www.uk/ca/tests/ara/ks1_formb Confirmation – for QCA use Date order received: You will receive your ordered materials by: If materials do not arrive by the date noted above. please contact the key stage 1 distribution helpline on 0800 801958.qca. to: Key Stage 1 Team Qualifications and Curriculum Authority 83 Piccadilly London W1J 8QA Fax: 020 7509 6979 Or you may submit this form electronically from the QCA website at www. ensuring that you leave enough time to order. Total number of year 2 children in school YOU WILL AUTOMATICALLY BE SENT ENOUGH LEVEL 3 READING TESTS AND LEVEL 3 MATHEMATICS TESTS FOR HALF OF YOUR YEAR 2 CHILDREN (ROUNDED UP TO THE NEAREST 5) Number of extra level 3 reading tests required Number of extra level 3 mathematics tests required Please return completed form by 21 May 2004.org. receive and administer the tests before the end of May.Appendix B PHOTOCOPIABLE ORIGINAL Key stage 1 order form for extra level 3 tests Contact name: Contact tel no: School name: E-mail address: School address: DfES no: Postcode: Please ensure that you have read the guidance on pages 19–22 and page 25 before photocopying and completing this form.org.uk/ca/tests/ara/ks1_formb and can be completed and returned electronically. Use this form to order extra copies. All schools will automatically be sent enough level 3 reading tests and level 3 mathematics tests for half their year 2 children. or by completing this form and sending it back to QCA. Extra copies can be ordered on the school registration form (DC1) in September. 45 .

Information and examples of key stage 1 modified test materials can be accessed via the QCA website at www. MLP papers may be used by other children who have special educational needs. using this form. please contact the modified test agency (statutory) on 0870 321 6727.qca. by 6 February 2004. Please contact the modified test agency (statutory) on 0870 321 6727 if you wish to discuss the suitability of the tests for use with children without visual impairment.org.Appendix C PHOTOCOPIABLE ORIGINAL Key stage 1 order form for modified large print (MLP) and braille test materials Contact name: Contact tel no: School name: E-mail address: School address: DfES no: Postcode: Please ensure that you have read the guidance on page 31 before photocopying and completing this form. 46 .uk/ca/tests/modified_tests/ Braille (number required) MLP (number required) English reading test for level 2 English reading test for level 3 Spelling test for levels 1–3 Mathematics test for level 2 Mathematics test for level 3 Signature: _________________________________________________ Name: ____________________________________ Date: _____________________________________ While designed for children with visual impairment. For example. Please return completed form by 6 February 2004 to: Modified Test Agency (Statutory) Pia Victoria Street Cwmbrân NP44 3YT Fax: 0870 321 6429 For queries regarding your order. You are asked to order the number of MLP and braille papers you will need. Test material will be dispatched in April for administration during May. some children with particular physical difficulties may find them more accessible than unmodified papers.

and therefore figures may not total 100 per cent. The tables on this page exemplify how these requirements might be met for reporting individual children’s.uk/ca/tests/ MATHEMATICS Teacher assessment result level Task or test results Mathematics task/test level SCIENCE Teacher assessment results level There are no tests or tasks in science for key stage 1 Level 1 and W (meaning working towards level 1) represent achievement below the nationally expected standard for most 7-year-olds. Copies are also available on QCA’s website: www.Appendix D Key stage 1 reports and the 2003 national results The reporting regulations require schools to report to parents of children at the end of year 2 their children’s teacher assessment levels. 47 . but have not yet achieved the standards needed for level 1. W represents children who are working towards level 1. schools’ and national results. CHILD’S RESULTS End of key stage 1 assessment results 2004 Name: Class: ENGLISH Teacher assessment results Speaking and listening Reading Writing Further details on reporting can be found on pages 36–41. but have not yet achieved the standards needed for level 1. Level 2B represents achievement at the nationally expected standard for most 7-year-olds. comparative national results. 2B and 2C. Level 2 is divided into three grades – 2A. comparative school results and. and therefore figures may not total 100 per cent. The number of eligible children is: TEACHER ASSESSMENT Figures may not total 100 per cent because of rounding. from the previous year. Levels 3 and 4+ represent achievement above the nationally expected standard for most 7-year-olds. Percentage at each level TEACHER ASSESSMENT W 1 2 3 4+ Pupils disapplied Pupils absent Speaking and listening 2 11 63 24 0 0 0 Reading 3 12 56 28 0 0 0 Writing 4 13 66 16 0 0 Mathematics 2 9 63 26 0 0 Science 2 9 64 26 0 0 Percentage at each level W 1 2 3 4+ Pupils disapplied Pupils absent Speaking and listening Reading Writing 0 Mathematics Science TASK AND TEST RESULTS TASK AND TEST RESULTS Percentage at each level W 1 C 2 B 3 A Pupils disapplied Percentage at each level Pupils absent W 1 C Reading task* Reading task* Reading tests* Reading tests* Writing task Writing task 5 Mathematics Mathematics 2 3 12 2 B 3 Pupils disapplied A Pupils absent 15 21 21 0 0 11 20 23 28 0 0 13 19 24 21 16 1 0 7 17 19 25 29 0 0 W represents children who are working towards level 1.org. NATIONAL RESULTS SCHOOL RESULTS These tables show the percentage of eligible children at the end of key stage 1 achieving each level in the school in 2004.qca. * These assessments do not apply at every level. level level level Task and test results Reading task level Reading test level Writing task level Many LEAs provide their schools with electronic versions of these tables. task/test levels. * These assessments do not apply at every level. These tables show the percentage of eligible children at the end of key stage 1 achieving each level nationally in 2003.

Subject Tasks and tests for 2004 Levels covered Distributed Period of use English Reading task Levels 1 and 2 December 2003 Any time during assessment period1 Reading test Level 2 April 2004 May 2004 Reading test Level 3 April 2004 May 2004 Writing task Levels 1–3 December 2003 Any time during assessment period1 Spelling test Levels 1–3 April 2004 May 2004 Mathematics task Level 1 Use a task from a previous year2 Any time during the assessment period1 Mathematics test Level 2 April 2004 May 2004 Mathematics test Level 3 April 2004 May 2004 Mathematics 48 1 The assessment period is from the beginning of January up to four weeks before the end of the summer term. . Copies of the 2002 mathematics task will be distributed in December 2003. 2 See pages 20 and 26 for details.Appendix E Timing and distribution of tasks and tests The following table gives the distribution and administration timetable for the tasks and tests in 2004.

Appendix F Key stage 1 codes for OMR and electronic pupil record sheets Guidance on completion of the key stage 1 OMR forms will be sent to schools in April 2004. writing and mathematics 1–4+ national curriculum levels in teacher assessment W child who is working towards level 1 A child not assessed due to absence or a child who has had a long period of absence or there is insufficient information to enable a teacher assessment result to be calculated D child for whom teacher assessment has been disapplied and/or child who is unable to access the tasks and/or tests L lower than the level 2 threshold for the reading test X child who is not required to be entered for a reading test Guidance on recording results Level 1 reading Level 2 reading Children who do not take the level 2 reading test because they are working within or at level 1 in reading will be shown as ‘X’ on the OMR form for the reading test. grades A–C at level 2 in reading. but will be shown as ‘X’. but enter results into their management systems and pass these electronically to their LEA. The result of the test will not be recorded on the OMR form. their level of attainment in reading will be the result of the task. n In the case of children who do not achieve level 2 in the test but achieve level 2 in the task. the level of attainment will be level 1 and recorded as such in the task. regardless of the level achieved in the test. The following codes are to be used: 1–3 national curriculum levels in the tasks and tests. The result of the reading task and ‘L’ (lower than the level 2 threshold) for the reading test will be recorded on the OMR form. n In the case of children who take the level 2 reading test but then achieve only level 1 in the reading task. n 49 . The same guidance applies to those schools that do not complete OMR forms. together with the forms where used. n In the case of children who achieve level 2 in the reading test and in the reading task. The results of both the reading task and test will be recorded on the OMR form. the level of attainment in reading will be the results of the task and test. ie ‘not required to be entered for the test’. unless the child goes on to achieve level 3 in the reading test. which assess different reading skills. in which case only the reading test level 3 is reported.

no task outcome will be recorded on the OMR form. n . the results of the test will not be entered on the OMR form.Level 3 reading Spelling Mathematics 50 Where a child achieves level 2A in both the level 2 reading task and reading test. and subsequently achieves level 3 in the level 3 reading test. ie the test level. should be recorded and reported. n The highest level achieved in the task or test should be entered on the OMR form. only the higher level. n As there will be no level outcome for the spelling test. In these cases.

any member of staff authorised by the governing body to act in this role as regards statutory assessment and reporting arrangements should complete this form. All headteachers must complete this form.* confirm that the key stage 1 tasks and tests took place in my school according to the statutory arrangements as laid down in the 2004 Assessment and reporting arrangements booklet for key stage 1. Signed: Dated: This form should be returned together with the pupil record sheets (OMR forms) (or other system for submitting results as arranged) to the LEA or accredited agency which is submitting your results to the DfES.Appendix G Form HDF Headteacher’s declaration form It is the headteacher’s statutory duty to secure the implementation of the national curriculum in his or her school. * For the purposes of this document. 51 . as described in the 2004 Assessment and reporting arrangements booklet for key stage 1. Name of headteacher: School name and address: Postcode: Telephone number: DfES number: I. the headteacher. Headteachers must ensure that their school fully complies with the statutory arrangements for assessing children at the end of key stage 1. security of test materials and return of results. including the statutory assessment and reporting arrangements. and in the absence of the headteacher.

dfes.uk/ n National Literacy/Numeracy Strategies www.nc.uk/ n Personal.uk/ca/foundation/profiles.uk/ n The Autumn Package www.gov.uk.uk/Management/tools/ict/ims n Curriculum guidance for the foundation stage Ref: QCA/00/587 www.qca.dfes.standards.standards.nc.uk.uk/schemes/ n National Curriculum www.ncaction. social and health education and citizenship at key stages 1 and 2 (QCA/00/579) www. NB: It is important to note that this is not an exhaustive list.Appendix H Useful websites and publications The following websites and publications may be useful to schools in their planning and preparation for the key stage 1 tests. but is a guide to useful materials.gov.gov.org.uk/numeracy/teaching_resources/?sec=0 n Framework for teaching reception to year 6 (National Literacy Strategy) www.org.aaia.dfes.asp/ n Foundation Stage Profile www.asp n Framework for teaching mathematics from reception to year 6 www.gov.uk/performance/ n The Common Transfer File (DfES 0268/2002) www. n Association for Achievement and Improvement through Assessment (AAIA) www.org.gov.standards.teachernet.uk/literacy/teaching_resources n Key stages 1 and 2 schemes of work (for art.net/ n National Curriculum in Action (exemplifying the national curriculum through children’s work) www.net/servlets/NCFrame/ New Updated 52 .uk/ca/foundation/guidance/curr_guidance.dfes.standards. physical education.qca. music and religious education) Refs: QCA/00/439–QCA/00/442 www.dfes.standards.gov.org.

asp/ n Tasks for the more able/gifted and talented www.dfes. English.qca. teaching and assessing the curriculum for children with learning difficulties (booklets for general guidance. design and technology.uk/ca/tests/teacherhelp/ n Using performance data www.dfes.dfes.qca.gov. history.net/ld n Pupil Records and Reports (DfEE 0015/2000) www. geography. information and communication technology.uk/ca/tests/ks1/standards.org. science.htm n Special Educational Needs Code of Practice (ISBN: 1 84185 5294) available from DfES Publications.standards.uk n World class tests www.n Planning.org.gov. information and communication technology.qca.uk/publications/guidanceonthelaw/dfeepub/mar00/050300/index.gov.uk/schemes n Schools.dfes. history. mathematics.gov. 0845 602 2260 n Schemes of work update (for science.teachernet.org. and design and technology) Refs: QCA/00/487–QCA/00/491 www. skills.standards.uk/ims/ n Teacher Help web page www.uk/schemes available from DfES Publications. geography. physical education.gov.uk/ca/tests/above_level.asp n TeacherNet www.htm n Schemes of work (for art.uk. physical education. modern foreign languages.worldclassarena.dfes.org.uk/sen/ n Standards report on previous years’ key stage 1 tests www.uk/publications/guidanceonthelaw/dfeepub/jun00/050600/index.updata. art and design.org/ New 53 . 0845 602 2260 www. music and religious education at key stages 1 and 2) (QCA/00/439–QCA/00/442) www. ‘Parents’ and ‘Parental Responsibility’ (DfES 0092/2000) www. PSHE and citizenship) (QCA/01/736–QCA/01/750) www.nc.gov.

uk QCA’s modified test agency (statutory) Victoria St Cwmbrân NP44 3YT 0800 801958 QCA’s key stage 1 distribution helpline Fax: For queries about deliveries of key stage 1 standard task and test materials For queries about the key stage 1 assessment arrangements.Appendix I Contact details Updated Whole section. Please make a note of your LEA/DfES number below for reference: nnn nnnn To register for obtaining school registration form (DC1) and to check school order details To order braille and/or modified large print test materials. You should have your LEA/DfES number ready to quote.com Fax: 020 7509 5516 020 7509 6979 QCA’s key stage 1 team Examinations and Testing Division 83 Piccadilly London W1J 8QA . including teacher assessment 54 QCA’s data collection agency (DCA) Pearson Assessment and Testing Hellaby Business Park Hellaby Rotherham South Yorkshire S66 8HN 01709 704699 01709 703455 www. for queries about modified test materials and ordering modified practice papers E-mail: Fax: E-mail: 0870 321 6727 0870 321 6429 helpline@pia.co. should you need to contact any of the organisations listed below. reading books.com dca@pearson.qcaupdate.

uk DfES Public Enquiry Unit For queries about the statutory requirements for assessment and the national results 020 7509 5555 tests@qcaorg.clearvisionproject.uk Fax: E-mail: Web: 0161 355 2000 0161 355 2098 enquiries@nlbuk.Other useful contact details For general enquiries E-mail: To order further copies of this booklet.uk Fax: E-mail: Web: 08457 023153 01733 375001 cservices@rnib.rniborg.org www.uk www.org www. other QCA publications or past standard test papers Fax: Web: For queries about TestBase QCA switchboard 01787 884444 01787 312950 www.nlbuk.information commissioner.testbaseco.uk E-mail: 0870 000 2288 info@dfes.gov.uk 020 7925 6356 020 7925 6967 TestBase PO Box 208 Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE3 1FX DfES Public Enquiry Unit Area 2b Castle View House Runcorn WA7 2GJ For queries about reporting to parents 020 7925 6124 For queries about the Foundation Stage Profile 020 7925 6534 To order single copies of the DfES assessment orders and circulars 0845 602 2260 DfES Publications PO Box 5050 Annesley Nottingham NG15 0DJ For telephone orders of priced copies of the Education Act 1996 and copies of the assessment orders and for general enquiries 0870 600 5522 The Stationery Office PO Box 276 London SW5 5DT For queries about the 1998 Data Protection Act Lending library for children’s books in braille Lending library for children’s books in braille Lending library for children’s books in braille 01625 545700 E-mail: mail@dataprotection.org E-mail: Web: 020 8789 9575 info@clearvisionproject.uk Web: www.qcashoporg.gov.gsi.org.uk QCA Publications PO Box 99 Sudbury Suffolk CO10 2SN E-mail: Web: 0870 9000 402 info@testbaseco.gov.uk www.org Office of the Data Protection Commissioner Wycliff House Water Lane Wilmslow Cheshire SK9 5AF Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB) Customer Services PO Box 173 Peterborough PE2 6WS National Library for the Blind Far Cromwell Road Bredbury Stockport SK6 2SG ClearVision (Marion Ripley) Linden Lodge School 61 Princes Way London SW19 6JB 55 .

for example focus groups revising our QCA publications.Appendix J Form for participation in QCA feedback groups If you wish to participate in any QCA assessment events involving teachers and/or LEA personnel. please complete the following sections. Name: Key stage: Address: Subject: Organisation: Date: E-mail: Telephone: Please indicate with a ¸ areas of interest: Assessment and reporting arrangements: (key stages 1–3) Special assessment needs advisory groups: (key stages 1. 5 optional tests: (English and mathematics) Implications for teaching and learning leaflets: (key stages 1–3) Year 7 progress tests and year 7 and 8 optional tests: (English and mathematics) Please state below any previous experience that you have in the areas you have specified: Thank you for your time Please return the form to: Test administration team Qualifications and Curriculum Authority 83 Piccadilly London W1J 8QA Fax: 020 7509 6979 56 . 2 and 3) Teacher panel: (test development key stages 1–3) Standards reports: (key stages 1–3) Year 3. 4.

37 33–35 43 43 31 46 44 4–5 10 27–28 29–32 41–42 12–16 24 41–43 54–55 data collection agency (DCA) 25 Data Protection Act 1998 17. 26. 37 5. 36 22 57 . 16. 37 Framework for teaching see English Framework for teaching mathematics from reception to year 6 23. 31 23 30 21 44 31 25. 22 30–31 19 22. use of teacher assessment attainment targets evaluation of the national curriculum tests exemplification of children’s work 32 36. 51 34 8. 26. 43 0268/2002 The Common Transfer File 41 TeacherNet website 41. 52 18. 48 early opening of test packs electronic transmission of data English as an additional language booklists Framework for teaching national literacy strategy readers. 41 19–20. 52 funding supply teachers transfer activities 19 43 gifted and more able children. 40 DC1 see school registration deciding which children should take the tests 10 delivery of test materials 26–27 Department for Education and Employment (DfEE) circulars 11/98 43 0015/2000 41 Department for Education and Skills (DfES) 34. 31 46 32 18. 42 disapplication 11 of teacher assessment 18 unable to access the tasks and/or test 12–15 distribution 26–27. use of resources for the tests teacher assessment attainment targets modified test agency (Statutory) modified test materials order form modifying tests National Curriculum in Action website national data collection national literacy strategy 26–27 9. 41 assessment and reporting duties 9 audit responsibilities 33–34 maintaining test security malpractice mathematics national numeracy strategy readers. 40. 36 36–39 41–43 23 9 34 36 25 9 33 29 36 17 25 43 10 language of the tests 30–31 language support teachers 30 large print test materials see modified test materials level 3. 26. 15.Index absence from teacher assessment age of children being assessed age standardised scores amanuenses amendment/annulment audit Autumn Package benchmarking braille test materials order form calculating teacher assessment subject levels changes for 2004 children older or younger than 7 preparation for the tests requiring special arrangements transferring to a new school unable to access tests working below level of tests Common Transfer File contact details 18 10 23 30 9. 43. assessment of governing bodies assessment and reporting responsibilities audit responsibilities 24 8 33 Headteacher’s declaration form (HDF) headteachers’ responsibilities audit key stage 1 reporting children’s achievements to parents on transfer of child to new school Implications for teaching and learning leaflet independent schools assessment and reporting duties audit arrangements inclusion of results in national data ordering test material participation in assessment arrangements key dates audit arrangements ordering modified test materials reporting and using results teacher assessment tasks and tests key stage 2 transfer of children from key stage 1 advance testing of key stage 1 children 8. 52 22 30 44 23 18 focus group application form 56 Foundation Stage Profile 6–7. order form for extra tests 45 local education authorities (LEA) 9. 20–22. 36.

42 26. 34. 27 27. publication of supply teachers. 31. 23. 35. test materials SEN Code of Practice special arrangements early opening of test packs special schools spelling Standards report statements of special educational needs statutes assessment and reporting content of children’s reports storing test materials summary results. 43 25 36 44 26–27 29–30 29–32 32 10 20. 18. 34. 49–50 record-keeping 17 religious education 40 report writing 41 reports 47 national curriculum assessment of 7-year-olds 23 to parents 36–41 School Action and School Action Plus school funds school registration (DC1) science teacher assessment attainment targets security.national numeracy strategy 23 Office of the Information Commissioner 17 Ofsted 17. 50 23 39 3 37 27 36 19 43 25–28 26 25–26 26–27 27 19–22 48 17–18 absence of child from calculating subject levels TeacherNet website Teacher’s guide 19. 31 45. 22. 25. 46 26–27 27 23 41–43 30–31 unique pupil number (UPN) 41 value added 43 websites and publications word processors writing 52–53 30 19–20. 48 . test materials ordering 25–26. 22. 30. 48. 17. 43 OMR forms 9. Teacher’s handbook 19. security storing TestBase CD-ROM transfer of child information on change of school translation 18 44 41. 49–50 codes 49–50 overseas schools 35 parents reporting children’s achievements to P scales pupil record sheets pupil referral units (PRU) Pupil Achievement Tracker (PAT) purpose of the tests 16 36–41 43 see OMR forms 10 43 2 readers. use of 30 reading 19. 48. 20. 30. funding target setting tasks and tests administrative information delivery of test materials ordering test materials security of test materials storing test materials subject information timing and distribution teacher assessment 58 30 19.

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EARLY YEARS 4 Curriculum and Standards Audience Headteachers. educational libraries and teacher centres Type Statutory arrangements and guidance Description This booklet provides information and guidance on the key stage 1 national curriculum assessment arrangements in 2004. Suffolk CO10 2SN (tel: 01787 884444. QCA/03/1084 Action required To note key stage 1 national curriculum assessment arrangements in 2004 Timing 2003/2004 academic year Contact See appendix I on pages 54–55 NATIONAL CURRICULUM 5–16 GCSE GNVQ GCE A LEVEL NVQ For school use OTHER VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS For more copies. ITT institutions. including the administration of the statutory tasks and tests Cross ref Key stage 2 assessment and reporting arrangements. Sudbury. PO Box 99. teachers of year 2 children and key stage 1 assessment and special educational needs coordinators Circulation lists LEAs. fax: 01787 312950) Order ref QCA/03/1083 258417 . contact: QCA Publications.

Pull-out chart Administration and statutory assessment timetable These centre pages are presented in the form of a pull-out chart to assist in the planning and administration of the key stage 1 statutory assessment and reporting arrangements. .

October December Key stage 1 tasks administered. Deadline for the ordering of modified large print and braille test materials. from the data collection agency (DCA). Schools receive the 2003 key stage 1 Standards report. Participating independent schools receive a list of QCA accredited audit agencies. Schools receive from QCA key stage 1 tasks and guidance. September 2003 Key stage 1 administration and statutory assessment timetable .Schools receive from QCA the 2004 Assessment and reporting arrangements for key stage 1. January to four weeks before the end of the summer term January By 6 February 2004 Schools receive a DC1 pack. containing the school registration form.

Modified large print and braille papers dispatched. using the information given in the ‘Reporting and using results’ section of the 2004 Assessment and reporting arrangements booklet for key stage 1. Schools receive key stage 1 tests. Schools report to parents. Deadline for the completion of teacher assessment. Schools check delivery is correct and store tests securely. Maintained schools receive pupil record sheets (OMR forms) from their LEA unless they are using an electronic system for transfer of data. guidance and Headteacher’s declaration form (HDF). Pupil record sheets (OMR forms) and the statutory Headteacher’s declaration form (HDF) completed and submitted to the LEA/agency for processing.Schools notified if they are to have their results audited in 2003. Key stage 1 tests administered. By end of February 19–23 April April May 30 June or two weeks before the end of the summer term if that is earlier June/July By the end of the summer term .

© 2003 Qualifications and Curriculum Authority .