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2012

2013

ENGLISH CURRICULAR PROGRAM


1. - INFORMATIVE DATA
INSTITUTION:MilitaryAcademy Miguel Iturralde N. 2 Tumbaco.
LOCATION:
PROVINCE:

Pichincha

CANTON:

Quito

PARISH:

Tumbaco

ADDRESS:

KM 17 Va Interocenica - Boyac Sector LaMorita

TIME:

Morning

TEACHER:
SCHOOL YEAR:

CLASS:

Lcda. MarianelaCanencia
2012- 2013

8th

High School A.1.1

PRINCIPALS NAME: Msc.Sara Muoz


ENGLISH AREA COORDINATOR:

Lcda. Pamela Erazo


Lcdo. Gerardo Revelo

2. STIMATED TIME FOR WORKING

8th

LEVEL A.1.1

200 Work days:

40 weeks

Weeks for evaluations and


unforeseen events

3 weeks x 6 = 18
periods

Availableweeks:

37weeks

WEEKLY PERIODS
periods

6 x 37 = 222
PERIODS

3.
LEVELS
OF
THEIR APPLICATIOON PER SCHOOL YEAR.

PROFICIENCY

AND

LEVELS OF PROFICIENCY: BRANCHING APPROACH


To show articulation and progression, the specific objectives INDEPENDENT
for listening and
speaking have been
USER
BASIC USER
formulated by taking into

considerationA1
the three main domains
of interest for the target group (i.e.
A2
B1 personal, educational, and
public) (Trim, 2009).

A1.1

A1.2

A2.1

A2.2

B1.1

B1.2

4. CURRICULUM EXIT PROFILE (LEVEL B1)


Regarding the linguistic component of communicative competence, high-school graduates at the B1 level
will be able to:
1. Have a sufficient range of language to describe unpredictable situations, explain the main points in an
idea or problem with reasonable precision, and express thoughts on abstract or cultural topics such as
music and films; and
2. Have enough language to get by with sufficient vocabulary to express themselves with some hesitation
and circumlocution on topics such as family, hobbies, and interests, work, travel, and current events, but at
times lexical limitations may cause repetition and even difficulty with formulation.
Regarding the sociolinguistic component of communicative competence, high school graduates at the B1
level will be able to:
1. Perform and respond to a wide range of language functions, using their most common exponents in a
neutral register;
2. be aware of noticeable politeness conventions, and act appropriately; and
3. be aware of and look out for signs of the most significant differences between the customs, usages,
attitudes, values, and beliefs prevalent in the community concerned and those of their own.
Regarding the pragmatic component of communicative competence, high-school graduates at the B1 level
will be able to:
1. adapt their expression to deal with less routine, even difficult situations;
2. exploit a wide range of simple language flexibly to express much of what they want;
3. intervene in a discussion on a familiar topic using a suitable phrase to get the floor;
4. initiate, maintain, and close simple face-to-face conversation on topics that are familiar or of personal
interest;
5. relate a straightforward narrative or description as a linear sequence of points fluently and reasonably;
and
6. link a series of shorter discrete simple elements into a connected, linear sequence of points.
With regard to the language skills, high-school graduates at the B1 level will be able to:
Listening:

understand the main points of clear, standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in
informal situations at school, work, leisure, etc.; and
understand the main point of many radio or television programs on topics of personal or professional
interest when the delivery is clear.

Reading:
understand texts that consist mainly of high-frequency, everyday language; and
understand the description of events, feelings, and wishes in personal letters.
Speaking:
deal with most situations likely to arise while travelling in an area where the language is spoken (i.e.
basic social language);
enter unprepared into conversation on topics that are familiar, of personal interest, or pertinent to
everyday life;
connect phrases in a simple way in order to describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes, and
ambitions;
give brief reasons and explanations for opinions and plans; and
describe their reactions to the plot of a book or film; and
narrate a story.
Writing:
write simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest; and
write personal letters describing experiences and impressions.

5.curricular exit profile (level b1)


Regarding the linguistic component of communicative competence, high-school graduates at the B1
level will be able to:
1.Have a sufficient range of language to describe unpredictable situations, explain the main points in an
idea or problem with reasonable precision, and express thoughts onabstract or cultural topics such as
music and films; and

2.Have enough language to get by with sufficient vocabulary to express themselves withsome
hesitation and circumlocution on topics such as family, hobbies, and interests,work, travel, and current
events, but at times lexical limitations may cause repetition
and even difficulty with formulation.
Regarding the sociolinguistic component of communicative competence, highschool graduates at the B1
level will be able to:
1. Perform and respond to a wide range of language functions, using their most common exponents in
a neutral register
2. Be aware of noticeable politeness conventions, and act appropriately; and
3. Be aware of and look out for signs of the most significant differences between the customs, usages,
attitudes, values, and beliefs prevalent in the community concerned and those of their own.
Regarding the pragmatic component of communicative competence, high-school graduates at the B1 level
will be able to:
1. Adapt their expression to deal with less routine, even difficult situations;
2. Exploit a wide range of simple language flexibly to express much of what they want;
3. Intervene in a discussion on a familiar topic using a suitable phrase to get the floor;
4.initiate, maintain, and close simple face-to-face conversation on topics that are familiar or of personal
interest;
5. Relate a straightforward narrative or description as a linear sequence of points fluently
and reasonably; and
6. Link a series of shorter discrete simple elements into a connected, linear sequence of points.
With regard to the language skills, high-school graduates at the B1 level will be able to:
Listening:
understand the main points of clear, standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in
informal situations at school, work, leisure, etc.; and
understand the main point of many radio or television programs on topics of personal or professional
interest when the delivery is clear.
Reading:

understand texts that consist mainly of high-frequency, everyday language; and


understand the description of events, feelings, and wishes in personal letters.

Speaking:
deal with most situations likely to arise while travelling in an area where the language is spoken (i.e.
basic social language).;
enter unprepared into conversation on topics that are familiar, of personal interest, or pertinent to
everyday life;
connect phrases in a simple way in order to describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes, and
ambitions;
give brief reasons and explanations for opinions and plans; and
describe their reactions to the plot of a book or film; and
narrate a story.
Writing:
write simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest; and
write personal letters describing experiences and impressions.

6. Exit profile level a1


By the end of the 9th year EGB, students will have reached the communicative competence for A1
proficiency level (basic user) and will be able to:

understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the
satisfaction of needs of a concrete
type (e.g. basic personal information, greetings, numbers and prices, directions, habits, etc.);
introduce themselves and others;
ask and answer questions about personal details such as where they live, people they know, and
things they have;
interact in a simple way provided the other person/people talk(s) slowly and clearly and is/are
prepared to help;

understand, identify, and produce very simple informational, transactional, and expository texts
(e.g. signs, personal letters, short biographies, etc.) that have some detail and show some variety
in sentence structure and a range of vocabulary; and
be aware of the society and culture of the community or communities in which English is spoken.

7. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES PER SCHOOL YEAR (8th and 9th EGB)


To show articulation and progression, the specific objectives for listening and speaking have been
formulated by taking into consideration the three main domains of interest for the target group (i.e.
personal, educational, and public) (Trim, 2009).
For pedagogical purposes, the first two (personal and educational) are addressed in level A1.1 because
they constitute the learners immediate surroundings. On the other hand, the third one (public) is
addressed in level A1.2 as it constitutes the learners extended surrounding which come afterwards.
Moreover, objectives and assessment indicators for speaking production and speaking interaction have
been set up.
Regarding reading and writing, on the other hand, not only are the specific objectives established for
students to face different text types they may encounter when they read English (Brown, 2007), but the
texts are also progressively more complex to follow basic pedagogical principles in education.
PROFICIENCY LEVEL
COMMUNICATIVE
COMPETENCE
LinguisticComponent

A1.1: By the end of the 8 year EGB, students willbe able to:
th

SociolinguisticComponent

Have a very basic repertoire of words and phrases related to their personal and educational
background.
Have limited control over a few simgrammatical structures and sentence pattein a learned
repertoire, which relates to theirpersonal and educational background.
Use basic expressions to impart and elicit factual information as well as socialize (e.g.greetings,
addressing forms, introducingoneself and others, and saying good-bye,etc.)

PragmaticComponent

Link words or groups of words with very basic linear connectors like and or or.

8. LANGUAGE SKILLS
PROFICIENCY LEVEL
LANGUAGE SKILLS

Listening

A1.1: By the end of the 8 year EGB, students willbe able to:
th

In simple spoken texts, understand expressions, words, and sentences


related to the learners personal and educational background (e.g. personal
information, house, daily life activities, curricular subjects, classroom
equipment, classroom commands, etc.) in simple spoken texts

Follow speech which is very slow and carefully articulated, with long pauses
for them to assimilate meaning within the personal and educational
domains.

Understand and identify very simple informational texts (e.g. labels,


messages, postcards, catalogs, etc.) a single phrase at a time, picking up
familiar names, words, and basic phrases and rereading as required.

Extract the gist and key information items from simple informational texts.

Produce slow, hesitant, planned monologues (i.e. with frequent pauses to


search for expressions, backtracking, errors, etc.)

Interact in a simple way by asking and answering simple questions about


the learners personal and educational background. Communication is
highly dependent on repetition at a slower rate of speech, rephrasing, and
repair.

Reading

Speaking

Writing

Produce very simple informational texts that can have little or no detail, can
have little variety in sentence structure, and may have some usage error.

9. EDUCATIVE OBJECTIVE OF module.


According the new Curricular Program, our educative objective is UNDERSTANDING, ANALIZYING AND
PRODUCING new grammatical structures through a variety of communicative tasks, and systematically
recycles key language items; to interact and give information in English.

MODULE OBJECTIVES 1:
Understanding, analyzing and producing simples sentences through the verb TO BE, questions words,

a/an, plurals, possessive pronouns, s, this/that, these/those, subject/object pronouns, possessive


adjectives/case, there is/there are, some/any, prepositions of places and the verb TO HAVE in order to
learn and practice vocabulary.

MODULE OBJECTIVES 2:
Understanding, analyzing and producing the simple present, adverbs of frequency and capital letters:
come through sentences, activities, appearance and character, likes/dislikes and daily routines in order
to write a paragraph yourself.

MODULE OBJECTIVES 3:
Understanding, analyzing and producing present progressive, simple present vs. present progressive and
present progressive (future use): turn through postcards, speech and descriptions and written exercises
in order to improve their English language.

MODULE OBJECTIVES 4:
Understanding, analyzing and producing simple past, used to be and joining words: go through
sentences, descriptions, intonation in questions, dialogues and biographies in order to describe activities
according the information.

MODULE OBJECTIVES 5:
Understanding, analyzing and producing past progressive, simple past vs. past progressive and time
expressions: put through sentences about emotions, dreams, animals & parts of the body, mystery,
stories and superstitions in order to read for comprehension and listen for the specific information.

MODULE OBJECTIVES 6:
Understanding, analyzing and producing simple future, (will/wont), conditionals type 1 & 2 and tag
questions: take through sentences, questions, predictions, opinions, and written exercises in order to
listen for ideas and learn expressions.

10. CROSS CURRICULAR Connection


General culture
Values

11.INTEGRATOR ELEMENT
English has a close relationship with Spanish Language Area so our integrator element is Listening,
Speaking, Reading and Writing to social interaction.

12. CURRICULAR module PLANNING


MODUL
E

TITLE OF
module

Lesson

GRAMMAR STRUCTURES

vocabulary

General culture

Curricular cut

Starter unit

Nice to meet
you
Favorite
objects
Home
Family

The verb TO BE
Questions words
A/an
Plurals
Possessive pronouns s
This/that
These/those
Subject/object pronouns
Possessive
adjectives/case
There is/there are
Some/any
Prepositions of places
The verb TO HAVE

Countries
Nationalities
Numbers
Objects, clothes
& colors
Rooms
&
household
objects
Family members

Profiles
Help
around
the house
Fun days
Culture
Id love to!
CrossCurricular Cut

Simple present
Adverbs of frequency
Capital letters

Activities
1d Teenage life in 1f Time zones of the
Britain
world (science).
Likes/dislikes
Appearance
&
character
Chores/
daily
routines
Days
of
the
week/the time

Lets
celebrate!

Special days
Celebrations
Festivals
Culture corner
Sweet sixteen
CrossCurricular

Present progressive
Simple
present
vs.
Present progressive
Present
progressive
(future use)

Weather
Celebrations
Traditions
Special days
Fruit
Colors

Characters
larger than
life

Superheroes
Superpowers
Fame

Simple past
Used to
Joining words

Abilities
Biographies
Life events

DAY
DAY

AFTER

2d
US
Food
festivalwatermelon
thump.

2f
Warm/cold
colors(art
&
design).

3d Legends
Excalibur

Ancient
Egyptian
kings(history)

Culture corner
Who stars in
it?
CrossCurricular cut
5

Unexplained
mysteries

Dreams
Mysteries
Stories
Culture corner
Nightmares
CrossCurricular cut

Past progressive
Simple past vs. Past
progressive
Time expressions to
show
sequence
of
events

Emotions
Dreams
Animals & parts
of the body
Mystery
Stories
Superstitions

Our planet

Earth SOS
Super
volcanoes
Can we help?
Culture corner
Good Idea
CrossCurricular Cut

Simple
future
(will/wont)
Conditionals type 1 & 2
Tag questions

Environment
actions
Wild animals
Volcanoes
Environment
problems

4d Superstitions
in the UK: Good
luck Bad luck

4f The minotaur
Language arts).

5d
The
bald
eagle a true
survivors story.

Why should we
recycle at home?
(earth science)

13. METHODOLOGY AND TECHNIQUES


Didactic methods

Techniques

Audiovisual method

Applying of songs, chants,


poems

Notional-functional method

Communicative method

Total physical response

The silent way

Natural approach

Deductive-inductive method

Direct method

14. - RESOURCES

Brainstorming
Using vocabulary so that the
cadets understand the
meaning in context of the
sentences
Using of Scrolls is a good
technique so that students
learn how to understand a
written text
During reading, the use of
techniques such a Skimming,
Scanning, Gist by Skimming
a text a student gets the
general idea about a text, by
Scanning a text
The students gets or looks
for specific information and
by Gist, the student gets a
code or main idea of a text.
Test Mapping, is a simple
tools or strategy for
improving reading
comprehension
SQ3R. Is the use of Survey
Questions and the 3 R =
read, recite and review
Play rolls about the things
they are learning
Projects done by themselves
each month
Discussions in class

Institutional
LCD and TV
DVDs
Recorders
Institutional
curricular
planning
Classrooms
English labs

Teacher
Teachers guide
Flashcards
Videos
Reading books
Charts
Laptop
Photocopies
Worksheets
Tools TIC
Pictograms
Magazines
Story books

student
Students book
Cds
Videos
Internet
Dictionary
Magazine
Newspaper

15. Evaluation

The evaluation is done in a permanent way; every students effort is worth during the teaching
learning process.
According New Curricular Program, well evaluate students skills through essential indicators and
activities of evaluation
It will be specified in each block planning, level by level
QUIMESTRAL I = 3 ( partial )
GRADES ( modules) and ONE QUIMESTRAL EVALUATION ( exam)
PARTIAL = %80
EXAM = % 20

GRADE 1, 2, 3 = 4 FORMATIVE GRADES (HOMEWORK, CLASSWORK,


GROUPAL WORKS, ORAL LESSONS, salen de lastareas de aprendizajeevaluadas
con evidencias.)
AND

1 SUMATIVE EVALUATION (final module assessment)

16. Essential assessment indicators per school year.


Assessment indicators for every skill are given below:
PROFICIENCY LEVEL
LANGUAGE SKILLS

A1.1: 8thyear EGB

Listening

Reading

Identify the relation between the sound and spelling of English words within
their lexical range.
Recognize and distinguish the words, expressions, and sentences in simple
spoken texts related to the learners personal and educational background.
Distinguish phonemically distinct words related to the learners personal and
educational background (e.g. cat, at, not, etc.)
Recognize syllable, word, and sentence stress.
Understand instructions addressed to them carefully and slowly.
Understand speech that is clear, standard, and delivered slowly and
intentionally.
Extract the gist and key information items from simple informational texts.
Recognize cognate words and loan words from their L1.
Follow single- step written instructions.
Understand adapted and authentic texts which are simple and short.
Understand and identify short, simple informational texts (e.g. labels,
messages, postcards, timetables, etc.) by making use of clues such as visuals,
text shape and layout, and reading one phrase at a time.
Extract the gist and key information items from short, simple informational

texts especially if there is visual support.


Production
Pronounce words, expressions, and statements in their personal and
educational repertoire intelligibly, phonetically differentiating distinct words so
as to avoid misunderstandings.
Place stress on the correct syllables of mono- and polysyllabic words and
sentences in their repertoire.
Use simple phrases and sentences to describe themselves, what they do,
where they live, what they have, etc.
Read aloud a short set of written instructions which are clear and simple.

Speaking

Writing

Interaction
Deliver a very short, rehearsed monologue (e.g. introduce a speaker and use
basic greeting and saying good-bye expressions).
Participate in short conversations on very familiar topics within the personal
and educational domains.
Ask and answer simple display questions delivered directly to them in clear,
slow non-idiomatic speech and in areas of immediate need.
Ask people for things and give people things.
Ask and answer questions about themselves and other people, where they live,
people they know, things they have.
Respond with simple, direct answers given that the interviewer is patient and
co-operative.
Speech is clear at times, though it exhibits problems with pronunciation,
intonation or pacing and so may require significant listener effort.
Spell personal and educational details (e.g. own name, numbers and dates,
nationality, address, age, date of birth, school, etc.).

17.BIBLIOGRAPHY

Ministerio de educacin del ecuador (2010). Actualizacin y Fortalecimiento Curricularde la Educacin


General Bsica. Ecuador; Quito.
Direccin Nacional del Currculo, (2006). Programa curricular de ingls por competencias. Ecuador;
Quito, EDIMPRESPublishing.
Rodgers, R. (2003). Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching.USA, California; Daphne
Publishing.
Williams, R.(2006). Practical dictionary. Richmond Publishing.
www.englishraven.com. ESL/EFL Resources
www.eslstarter.com. The best for teachers on the web
Virginia Evans Jenny Doley access 2, EU, express publishing

Acuerdo No. 306-11. (2011). Quito, Ecuador: Ministerio de Educacin Ecuador.

Brown, D. (2007). Teachingby Principles: An Interactive Approach to Language Pedagogy. New York, NY: Pearson, Longman.
Council of Europe. (2003). Common European framework of reference for languages: Learning, teaching, assessment.
Cambridge,
UK: Cambridge University Press.
Harmer, J. (2010). How to teach English. (New ed.). Essex, UK: Pearson, Longman.
Ligthbown, P.M., &Spada, N. ( 2011). How languages are learned. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Ovesdotter, C. (2003). English in the Ecuadorian Commercial Context. World Englishes, 22, 143-158.

Richards, J.C., & Rodgers, T.S. (2001). Approaches and methods in language teaching: A description and analysis (2ed.).
NuevaYork, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Richards, J.C., & Schmidt, R. (2010). Dictionary of Language Teaching and Applied Linguistics. (4th ed.). UK: Pearson,
Longman.

van Ek, J.A., &Trim, J. L. M. (1998). Threshold 1990. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

van Ek, J.A., &Trim, J. L. M. (2009). Breakthrough. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.