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SEPTEMBER Vol. 37 • 1964 No. 4

Contents
FACT:
Deserter's Paradise Hellcat of Herschel Is They Live With Death Confessions of a Master Thief 6 II 14 26

FICTION:
Swamp Killer Point of Fact Isle of Change Yellcwstreok Hero 4 22 30 36

—,

FEATURES:
Pin-Up , 3 Telephone Belle 20-2! Cartoons: 8, 9, 12, 13, 24, 25, 28, 29, 32, 34, 35, 38, 39, 40, 4 1 , 42, 58.

Printed by Kenmure Press Pty Ltd, Derby and Wetherill Streets, North Lidcombe, NSW, lor Adam Magazine Pty Ltd, 142 Clarence Street. Sydney. Produced by The K. G. Murray Pub­ lishing Company Pty Ltd, Sydney. DISTRIBUTORS: GORDON & GOTCH (A/SIA) LTD, MELBOURNE • ADAM MAGAZINE PTY LTD, SYDNEY.

•p'LLIS

met

her

in

the

beer-

In the midst of a mangrove swamp, Don Ellis heard a kitten cry. It was so incongruous he began to laugh . . . But he didn't die laughing

FICTION

JAMES MEADE

JJJL

g a r d e n b e h i n d t h e h o t e l , and t h e y s a t a t o n e of 'the fixed w o o d e n t a b l e s in t h e fringed s h a d e of a c o c o n u t p a l m . T h e other tables w e r e vacant, and the lounge and the bar proper were closed. O n l y t h e d i s c r e e t l y r a i s e d w o o d e n flap allowed g l i m p s e s of t h e b e e r t a p , a n d y o u could n o t s e e t h e b e a c h . S e v e r a l local resi­ d e n t s , in s h o r t s a n d singlets, stood at the flap a n d placated their h a n g o v e r s w h i l e t h e y discussed the Sunday papers. "You might've phoned me," Ellis said, m o v i n g his s w e a t i n g beer bottle a r o u n d on the orangepainted table. "The sergeant w a s n ' t too h a p p y a b o u t m e com­ i n g u p t o d a y , even if I a m offd u t y . W h e n t h e o a n e s e a s o n ' s on, t h e r e ' s usually some strife a m o n g the cutters that keep Saturday n i g h t g o i n g on till t o d a y . A n d n o w y o u tell m e y o u ' v e g o t to be b a c k in C a i r n s b y h a l f - p a s t t e n . " T h e full-bodied b r u n e t t e , dress-

ed a n d too e l a b o r a t e l y m a d e - u p for t h e occasion, looked a t h i m through m a s k H i g sun-glasses. E v e n for a p o l i c e m a n , E l h s w a s very tall. H e w a s also v e r y t h i n , a n d his face w a s — u s u a l l y — amiable and unlined under a t h a t c h of rope-colored h a i r . H e w o r e t h o n g s , c o t t o n slacks, a n d a blue s p o r t s s h i r t , w i t h o u t e i t h e r sloppiness or distinction. The dark-haired w o m a n shrugged a n d lit a c i g a r e t t e . "Don, I told y o u t h a t I d i d n ' t k n o w myself u n t i l t h e l a s t min­ u t e , " s h e said. B l o w i n g s m o k e a t his b e e r bottle, s h e a d d e d , "Any­ way, a r e y o u s u r e t h e s e r g e a n t hasn't got m o r e t h a n one reason for n o t w a n t i n g y o u to c o m e u p here?" Ellis flushed a n d c l a m p e d h i s large hands together. "I got m y s t r i p e back," h e said. "You k n o w t h a t . A n d I d i d n ' t h a v e a d r i n k for t w o m o n t h s . B u t I ' m off-duty, so w h a t ' s w r o n g w i t h a few b e e r s ? "

The brunette shrugged again, smiling faintly as Ellis drained h i s g l a s s . S h e looked a t her watch. "I'll h a v e to go, D o n , " s h e said, standing up and taking car-keys f r o m h e r h a n d b a g . " P e r h a p s I'll see you next time you're in C3.irris " " J u s t l i k e t h a t ? " E l l i s did n o t stand up. " I ' m a f r a i d s o , " s h e said. " T h a t ' s really w h y I took t h e trouble to come out here this morning." " N i c e of you. E s p e c i a l l y s i n c e you obviously can't wait to get b a c k to whoever-he-is y o u m e t w h e n y o u w e r e d o w n in S y d n e y . I s u p p o s e h e c a m e in on l a s t n i g h t ' s p l a n e — did y o u m e e t h i m ? " "Now you're being difficult," s h e said i m p a t i e n t l y . " A f t e r all, there w a s never a really big thing between you and me. " N o ? " Ellis said. " T h e n w h y h a v e I b e e n d r i v i n g 50 m i l e s u p a n d 50 m i l e s b a c k e v e r y t i m e I could g e t o f f ? "

" Y o u s h o u l d k n o w , " s h e told h i m . "Bye-bye, D o n . S o r r y I c a n ' t s t a y , b u t t h e r e it i s . " She turned and walked through the beergarden, toward the grassy area where a blue sedan was parked. Ellis did n o t w a t c h h e r go, b u t he r e m a i n e d tense until he heard the car reverse out on to t h e r o a d a n d s t a r t off b a c k to Cairns. Oh, g r e a t , E l l i s t h o u g h t — a w o n d e r f u l s t a r t to a d a y a t t h e beach. She's not only got a hus­ band, and m e — n o w she's got boy-friends coming up from Sydney. And that's the d a m e I've b e e n r i s k i n g m y j o b for, g e t t i n g r o a s t e d b y t h e s e r g e a n t for, c h a s ­ i n g aU t h e w a y u p h e r e f o r a f t e r they demoted and transferred me. Ellis d r a n k morosely at the table u n d e r t h e coconut palm for a n o t h e r h o u r . W i t h o u t r e a l inter­ est he w a t c h e d Barton, the pub­ lican, c o m e d o w n f r o m his l i v i n g q u a r t e r s . B a r t o n s t o p p e d to t a l k with a G e r m a n crocodile shooter, and the German's Torres Straits wife. Shortly a f t e r w a r d s , While Ellis was refilling his glass. Barton strode across toward him. " M o r n i n g , D o n , " B a r t o n said, sitting at the orange table. "Haven't seen you up h e r e for a w h i l e . Still d o w n in G u n d o o w i t h old S e r g e a n t P e a s l e y ? " "Hello, J a c k , " Ellis said, s m o t h ­ e r i n g a b u r p . "Yes, I ' m still t h e r e . " Barton, a lean and balding m a n in s h o r t s a n d a H a w a i i a n s h i r t , nodded and glanced over his shoulder. " Y e a h , well, t h i s m i g h t n ' t m e a n a n y t h i n g , " h e said. " B u t I ' v e j u s t been talking w i t h Rudolph and his wife. T h e y ' v e j u s t b e e n fish­ ing r o u n d a t Half M o o n B a y , a n d they reckon there's something a bit f u n n y g o i n g o n . " " F u n n y ? " Ellis said, s i t t i n g u p straighter. " W h a t ? " A s s u r e d of h i s a u d i e n c e . B a r t o n fitted a c i g a r e t t e t o a black h o l d e r a n d lit it w i t h c a r e . "A b o a t , " h e said, n o d d i n g con­ fidentially. "Rudolph seems to think that it's the one that w a s knocked-off f r o m S m i t h ' s C r e e k a b o u t a w e e k a g o . N o w i t ' s tiedu p in t h e c r e e k a r o u n d a t H a l f M o o n , a n d s o r t of c a m o u f l a g e d . " "Is that right?" Ellis said, t h r u s t i n g h a i r b a c k f r o m his fore­ h e a d . " I n t h a t case, I'd b e t t e r t a k e a look. T h a t w a s o n e of Macdonald's fishing dories, w a s n ' t i t ? A 17-footer, v a l u e d a t a b o u t 600 q u i d . " " T h a t ' s r i g h t , " B a r t o n said. Ellis squinted at him and nodded. "Thanks for the tip, Jack." Barton left him, and Ellis rubbed his eyes. His head was b e g i n n i n g t o a c h e , a n d h e felt beer-bloated. I'd b e t t e r g o a n d t a k e a look, ho t h o u g h t — if i t ' s f a i r d i n k u m , I'll d r i v e i n t o h e a d q u a r t e r s . T h e y w o n ' t k i c k u p a fuss a b o u t m e b e i n g u p h e r e if t h e b o a t ' s recov­ ered, b u t t h e y s u r e a s h e l l will otherwise. D a m n that black-haired (Continued on page ^7)
5

ADAM, September, 1964

For three months. Seaman Wolfgang Krupp — a hunted man — played king with the island-hopping "apostles of free love".

Desertefs
n o t a child m u r d e r e r . " "Then for disobeying orders, y o u will b e c o u r t - m a r t i a l l e d a n d s u m m a r i l y s h o t yourself. Do you h e a r ? S u m m a r i l y shot. Consider y o u r s e l f u n d e r a r r e s t . " H e nodded his big s h a v e n h e a d t o Moeller and Blatz. They reached for Krupp's arms. " I a m n o t g o i n g to b e shot, I a m n o t e v e n g o i n g t o t a k e one m o r e w o r d of a b u s e f r o m you," K r u p p shouted. H e slammed a h a n d i n t o t h e c h e s t of e a c h m a n . B o t h s a t d o w n on t h e floor. K l a u s n e r l e a p e d f r o m his c h a i r , baton slashing, his other h a n d c l a w i n g for h i s pistol. K r u p p par­ r i e d t h e b a t o n w i t h h i s elbow, t h e n s l a m m e d h i s fist i n t o t h e lieutenant's nose. Like Blatz and Moeller, K l a u s n e r s a t d o w n . "Goodbye, Klausner, you rat," Krupp shouted, and vaulted t h r o u g h the screening covering

But his native paradise was soon to end . . .

TT w a s on J u l y 2 a t t h e naval b a r r a c k s on Kwajalein Atoll t h a t S e a m a n W o l f g a n g K r u p p de­ cided t h a t h e w a s s i c k t o d e a t h of Lieutenant Ruppert Klausner and the whole Imperial Navy. The reason w a s a native boy n a m e d Paulus. P a u l u s w a s K l a u s n e r ' s houseboy. H e w a s 14 a n d h a d b e e n tempted to steal a shiny penknife a s a n y 14-year-old m i g h t . F o r t h i s , Klausner had ordered Paulus shot. H e called K r u p p i n t o h i s h e a d ­ q u a r t e r s t h a t d a y . T h e boy w a s s i t t i n g in a c h a i r , f l a n k e d b y Moel l e r a n d B l a t z , t w o s t r a p p i n g sea­ m e n n o t n o t e d for t h e i r i n t e l l e c t . K r u p p saluted. Klausner returned t h e s a l u t e sloppily w i t h his baton, t h e n said, " K r u p p , a s s e n i o r en­ listed m a n here, I ' m detailing you t o s h o o t t h i s thief." "Yes, l i e u t e n a n t , " K r u p p said,
5 ADAM, September, 1964

" b u t t h e b o y is o n l y 14. P e r h a p s the lieutenant would like to reconsider." "Krupp, you rat, you and your stinking n a m e h a v e been nothing but trouble to m e since you c a m e to m y g u n b o a t squadron a y e a r a g o . You h a v e b e e n c o n s t a n t l y t r y i n g t o m a k e a fool of m e . " "Yes, sir. B u t h e h a s o n l y 14 y e a r s , sir." " I d o n ' t c a r e if h e h a s o n l y 14 months. I ordered him shot a s an e x a m p l e t o t h e r e s t of t h e s e i s l a n d m o n g r e l s . H e s h a l l be s h o t . " Krupp stared straight ahead, bit h i s lip a n d said, " N o t b y m e h e w o n ' t , sir." Without even leaving his seat, Klausner whacked Krupp across t h e cheek w i t h his baton a n d o p e n e d u p a cut. " I d i d n ' t h e a r you, K r u p p , y o u r a t . " K r u p p r u b b e d t h e cut. " I c a n ' t s h o o t h i m , sir. H e ' s so y o u n g . I ' m

RICHARD GALLAGHER

m
t h e w i n d o w , c a r r y i n g s h r e d s of it with him into the yard. H e r a n d o w n t h e first p a t h h e c a m e to. I t led t o t h e s h o r e of t h e l a g o o n . He trampled down a y a m patch at a turn and the natives cursed him. F r o m behind he heard K l a u s n e r bellowing, " S h o o t K r u p p o n s i g h t , " then rounded a house and heard nothing more. H e stopped, confused. H e h a d n o place t o r u n to. Neither Kwajalein's j u n g l e n o r i t s seashore would h i d e h i m for l o n g . H e heard footsteps — someone run­ ning after him. H e crouched a g a i n s t t h e building, fist cocked to b r e a k t h e first n e c k t h a t c a m e into view. It was Paulus, motioning wildly t o K r u p p a s h e r a n by, s h o u t i n g , " C o m e ! C o m e ! " G r e a t lad, P a u l u s , Krupp thought. S o m e h o w h e too h a d b r o k e n loose a n d w a s t a k i n g him to a hiding place. P a u l u s w a s fast, and Krupp h a d t o s p r i n t to k e e p u p . T h e y turned to t h e lagoon. K r u p p w a s p a n t i n g by t h e t i m e they r e a c h e d the sand. S e v e r a l h u n d r e d natives w e r e on the beach, laughing and launching a fleet of f l o w e r - d e c k e d o u t r i g g e r canoes. K r u p p didn't know t h e m . All h e k n e w w a s t h a t t h e y w e r e called arioi, h a d arrived from someplace east a few days before, and had been banging tom-toms a n d raising hell on the beach ever since. N o o n e b u t n a t i v e s h a d paid attention to t h e m — certainly no G e r m a n s b e c a m e involved. K r u p p yelled a t P a u l u s . " W h a t have you done to me, stupid? I t h o u g h t y o u w e r e g o i n g to h i d e m e . W h a t c a n I do a m o n g t h e s e people?" P a u l u s t u g g e d a t h i s a r m , pull­ ed h i m t o w a r d a c a n o e . "Come, herr. Come, herr. Go away. A w a y ! "

"Go a w a y w h e r e ? " He heard Klausner shouting again, and t h r e e sailors with M a u s e r rifles r a n onto t h e beach, dropped to t h e i r k n e e s a n d fired. S p o u t s of s a n d k i c k e d u p a t h i s feet. Go a w a y a n y w h e r e , K r u p p r e a l ­ ised, a n d q u e s t i o n e d t h e b o y n o further. He r a n into the shallows, fell i n t o a c a n o e , a n d h i d o n i t s b o t t o m a m o n g t h e l e g s of b r o w n m e n and w o m e n w h o were laugh­ i n g a t his clumsiness a n d h a s t e . A f e w m i n u t e s l a t e r , h e felt t h e canoe bouncing in t h e w a s h over t h e r i m of t h e a t o l l , a n d h e k n e w he w a s free for t h e t i m e being. H e s a t up, realising h e owed a g r e a t deal to a small browns k i n n e d boy. T h e n a l o w voice s a i d , " W e h a v e w i t h u s a d a m n e d G e r m a n on the lam. Welcome aboard, German." I t c a m e f r o m a m a n s i t t i n g in the prow. H e wore a red native pareu and w a s as sun-browned as a native, but with the blond hair, there w a s no mistaking him. He was a white man. "Sprechen Sle E n g l i s c h ? " h e said. K r u p p did s p e a k s o m e E n g l i s h , c l u m s i l y , b u t still E n g l i s h , l e a r n ­ ed p a i n s t a k i n g l y in t h e S c h u l e n e a r his h o m e in B a v a r i a . The white m a n spoke some German, also clumsily, a n d learned lord knew where, and they got along in c o n v e r s a t i o n . H i s n a m e w a s P a t r i c k O'HEire, h e told K r u p p a s Kwajalein Atoll d i m i n i s h e d to n o t h i n g in the disADAM, September, 1964 7

dred yards ahead), "says that o n c e e v e r y 10 y e a r s t h e y leave P o l y n e s i a a n d c o m e t o t h e Mars h a l l s a n d w h o o p it u p on 10 dif­ f e r e n t i s l a n d s . R e a l l y s o r t of o u t of t h e i r w a y , b u t I g u e s s t h e y figure they got to convert the M a r s h a l l e s e t o O r o e v e r y so often. W h o cares anyway. They have smacko parties. Say, hand m e a banana." K r u p p handed h i m one. "What a r e y o u d o i n g wdth . . . " O ' H a r e c u t in. " W h a t ' s y o u r name, German?" "Krupp. Wolfgang Krupp." " K r u p p . O n e of t h e m u n i t i o n s c r o w d , a r e y o u ? B y golly, you s u r e d o n ' t look like o n e . " K r u p p g r e w indignant. "No. Not the munitions-making Krupps. Just the farmer Krupps from Bavaria. T h e n a m e c a u s e s a g r e a t d e a l of trouble. Everybody makes that mistake. Klausner, for instance, fawned over m e for a month before h e found out and has n e v e r f o r g i v e n m e for n o t telling him immediately, but I didn't think . . . " "Klausner?" K r u p p told h i m a b o u t Lieuten­ a n t R u p p e r t K l a u s n e r , a n d ex­ plained w h y he w a s r u n n i n g from K w a j a l e i n . O ' H a r e listened g r a v e ­ lyO ' H a r e p r e t e n d e d t o b e asleep. K r u p p queried him no more. He k n e w some things about the i s l a n d s , a n d o n e w a s t h a t you never pressed questions when a m a n didn't w a n t to answer. H e e x a m i n e d t h e n a t i v e s in t h e canoe. T h e y w e r e not t h e squat, s t o c k y M a r s h a l l e s e of K w a j a l e i n , but tall, lean m e n with heads round and h a r d a s shot and skins "The winner gets to frisk you b r o w n a s r i c h B a v a r i a n soil. T h e i r w o m e n w e r e willowy, b a r e - b r e a s t ­ ed t h i n g s w i t h h a i r t h a t fell t a n c e . " C e m e n t M i x e r O ' H a r e , tiiev s o l e m n d o g m a a n d r i t u a l . M e m ­ d o w n their backs like black b e r s of t h e o r d e r w e r e s o m e t h i n g call m e . F r o m Dublin, a n d I w e n t s h a w l s . "Alofm Dutchy haoli", o n e five r o u n d s w i t h J i m J e f f r i e s like t h e t r a v e l l i n g m i n s t r e l s of shouted a t him. the middle ages. They spent their once." " H e l l o G e r m a n w h i t e m a n your­ lives boating from island to "Congratulations, but where are self," h e r e p e a t e d a n d l a u g h e d i s l a n d , p r e a c h i n g l o v e of O r o t h e we going? W h o a r e these people? founder a n d o t h e r g o d s . T h e w i t h h e r , t h e n picked u p a n o a r W i l l t h e y t a k e m e t o a s h i p some­ i s l a n d e r s w e r e a l w a y s g l a d t o s e e t o p a d d l e h i s s h a r e of t h e load. where? Suddenly I think I m a d e t h e arioi flotilla sail i n t o t h e A s t h e w a v e s t h r e w s p r a y i n t o h i s a m i s t a k e . " H e p u t h i s h e a d on face, h e t r i e d to c o u n t t h e b o a t s lagoon, even though they would h i s k n e e s . T h e b o y ' s life d i d n ' t in t h e flotilla. A p p r o x i m a t e l y 50. eat their island bare, because they seem important any more. M o s t w e r e covered w i t h f l o w e r s . r e p r e s e n t e d t h e o n l y f o r m of "You're on your w a y t o a S o m e h e l d livestock, feet tied a n d o r g a n i s e d e n t e r t a i n m e n t f o u n d in party, German," O'Hare said. squealing. In others, the men the South Seas. F o r g e t e v e r y t h i n g else. Whether p o u n d e d a c a d e n c e for p a d d l i n g y o u l i k e i t o r n o t , y o u ' r e o n e of T h e arioi, like a n y religious on s h a r k - s k i n d r u r h s . us f o r a w h i l e . " group, h a d novices, priests, r a n k s K r u p p s u d d e n l y decided it would of office. T h e arioi celebrations "That's what 1 mean, Herr be b e t t e r if h e looked less like a l a s t e d f o r w e e k s a n d consisted of O ' H a r e . W h o a r e ' u s ' ? I t is m y sailor. H e scaled his c a p into t h e precision dances, mock battles, nature that I must know these water. morality plays, and lovemaking. things." " P o m p o u s d e v i l , " O ' H a r e said. A slim girl bellywhoppered I n fact, t h e l a s t w a s t h e m o s t "Well, to a n s w e r first questions from the nearest canoe and i m p o r t a n t f u n c t i o n a t a n y arioi first, I d o n ' t k n o w w h e r e w e ' r e retrieved it. S h e climbed b a c k celebration, t h e m o s t important g o i n g e x a c t l y , b u t w e ' r e g o i n g d o c t r i n e in t h e i r e n t i r e r e l i g i o n . a b o a r d , w a v i n g it a t h i m , shout­ t h e r e w i t h t h e arioi . . . " ing, " N o w D u t c h y is m y nui-nui!" T h e god, O r o , w a s t h e g o d of fer­ tility. N o t t h a t S o u t h S e a i s l a n d e r s N e x t h e t h r e w a w a y his blouse. T h e arioi. Once a g a i n that any encouragement t o A n o t h e r girl got w e t for t h a t meaningless n a m e . H e asked w h o needed b e g i n w i t h , O ' H a r e said, f o r t h e y t r o p h y , a n d climbed b a c k i n t o h e r or w h a t they were, a n d O'Hare s p e n t h a l f t h e i r lives m a k i n g l o v e c a n o e s h o u t i n g " D u t c h y my nuiexplained, having t o shout it ans'way, but m o r a l s w e r e even nui. K r u p p i g n o r e d t h e m a n d con­ o v e r t h e voices of n a t i v e s s i n g i n g l o o s e r w h e n t h e arioi w e r e visit­ c e n t r a t e d on p a d d l i n g . F r o m e v e r y as they paddled. ing. n e a r b y b o a t g i r l s t e a s e d . "Dut-chee "The missionaries call them nui-nui! D u t c h e e nuirnui! Krupp ' a p o s t l e s of f r e e l o v e ' , " h e said, " W h y d o t h e y c o m e so f a r ? " w a s b l u s h i n g . H e k n e w w h a t nuiand explained t h a t they were " D u n n o r e a l l y , G e r m a n . Chief nui m e a n t . apostles in a sense, for t h e arioi P o g — t h a t ' s h i m , t h e avae parai s o c i e t y w a s a r e l i g i o u s o n e . I t s b o s s m a n in t h e y e l l o w a n d r e d Yet, h e felt g r e a t . T h e fact t h a t e x p r e s s i o n of w o r s h i p , h o w e v e r , f e a t h e r s in t h a t c a n o e t h e r e " ( h e h e w a s a d e s e r t e r a n d w o u l d be w a s t h r o u g h sex a n d festivity, n o t p o i n t e d t o t h e l e a d c a n o e a h u n ­ s h o t if c a u g h t b e c a m e less fright8 ADAM, September, 1964

e n i n g in tiie Iiilarity of tlie arioi. Kwajalein was behind him. Klaus­ ner and the Kaiser's detestable militarism were behind him. And even if O ' H a r e d i d n ' t k n o w w h a t w a s a h e a d , h e did. T h e c o u r s e w a s n o r t h w e s t a n d t h e f i r s t a t o l l in t h a t direction w a s Wotho, some distance over t h e horizon. This gave him comfort. Only a few p l a n t e r s lived t h e r e , n o G e r m a n officials; a n d t h e p l a n t e r s w o u l d neither know nor care who he was. There he would crew onto one of t h e c o p r a ships, a n d he, Wolf­ gang Krupp, former Bavarian f a r m e r a n d M a x i m g u n n e r on Lieutenant Klausner's gunboats would be f r e e t o g o a n y w h e r e in the world — except Germany. And t h e w a y w a r h a d b e e n s h a p ­ ing u p in t h e B a l k a n s , G e r m a n y would be a good p l a c e t o s a y away from. Wotho Atoll w a s beautiful. N o o t h e r w o r d d e s c r i b e d it. I t w a s a jewelled r i n g — t h e m a i n island a big g r e e n a n d w h i t e s t o n e , t h e s m a l l e r c o r a l ones c l o s i n g the band around a blue lagoon. Rich p a l m s a n d r e d f l o w e r s g r o w i n g to t h e w a t e r ' s e d g e g a v e it color. Ocean b i r d s a n d s c o r e s of p e o p l e w a v i n g a n d s h o u t i n g on t h e b e a c h g a v e it life. Chief P o g a n d t h e o t h e r s i n t h e f i r s t line c a r e l e s s l y let t h e i r canoes glide o n t o t h e sand a n d j u m p e d out, s t o r m i n g u p t h e b e a c h like a n a s s a u l t p l a t o o n of I m p e r ­ ial M a r i n e s . T h e w o m e n of W o t h o ran from the palm jungle and

"Yes, I still have the same old dishwasher! c o u n t e r c h a r g e d t h e arioi i n v a s i o n , throwing their a r m s around the tattoed priests and kicking up a s t o r m of s a n d . T h e i r b e h a v i o r w a s startling to K r u p p . L i k e l o g s in a m i l l - r a c e , t h e o t h e r c a n o e s piled u p o n the beach and were discarded a s the natives bounded out and into the

Why?"

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welcome celebration. K r u p p held onto O'Hare, a n d as O'Hare had advised, he got a quick education o n t h e s e x h a b i t s of t h e arioi. T h e priests went after the island w o m e n , a n d t h e c h i e f s of t h e isleind went after the arioi females. ' T t is a l w a y s like t h i s ? " K r u p p shouted. "Always," O'Hare said. "You m u s t be a very tired man." " C o m e o n a n d m e e t Old P o g . If I d o n ' t p r e s e n t y o u to h i m n o w , h e ' l l b e o f f e n d e d a n d m a y b e ex­ communicate me." H e pulled K r u p p by the hand. H e shoved K r u p p f o r w a r d to the thrones. Pog had been telling a funny story, but quieted and frowned when he s a w Krupp. H e s t a r e d a t his w h i t e b e l l - b o t t o m sailor p a n t s . T h e n he stood. T h e Wotho chief remained seated behind him. Obviously, Krupp t h o u g h t . When t h e arioi arrive, l o c a l c h i e f s r i d e in b a c k of t h e coach. " P o g , old son-of-a-Bee," O ' H a r e said. " M e e t m y n e w f r i e n d f r o m Kwajalein. Wolfgang Krupp. No relation to the munitions Krupps a s if t h a t w o u l d m e a n a n y t h i n g t o you. A r e a l g o o d haoli. P o g leaned f o r w a r d on his s p e a r and touched Krupp's pants. " D u t c h y fella from K w a j a l e i n ? " "Yes." " D u t c h y n o g o o d haoli," Pog said, t h e n flicked t h e s p e a r l i k e a w o m a n sweeping with a broom and whacked Krupp across the shins. It hurt. K r u p p yelled a n d h o p p e d o n o n e foot. W h i l e h e w a s off b a l a n c e , P o g r a m m e d h i m i n the stomach w i t h t h e shaft, and h e collapsed. "Dutchy smell like squid," Pog shouted. T h e W o t h o chief n o d d e d , " L i k e s q u i d . " "Guess they don't like G e r m a n s , (Oontinvsd on page 5S)

kOPM. September, 1964 9

HELLCAT
OF HERSCHEL ISLAND
FACT A flame-haired pleasurewoman turned an Arctic island into a madhouse of violence and vice for every Pacific whaler and water rat.
T^HE s t u r d y l o g w a l l s of t h e saloon b a r s e e m e d t o b e b e n d i n g f r o m t h e e a r - s p l i t t i n g din inside. T h e smoke-filled r o o m w a s crammed to bursting point with r o a r i n g m e n a n d s c r e e c h i n g girls, t h e a i r solid w i t h l i q u o r f u m e s , c h e a p p e r f u m e , t h e r e e k of oil l a m p s a n d t h e s t e n c h of u n w a s h e d bodies. T h e m e n o u t n u m b e r e d t h e girls six t o o n e , b u t t h a t w a s n ' t b o t h e r ­ i n g t h e m . E v e r y t a b l e h a d its wasp-waisted, heavily painted female. M o s t of t h e m e n w e r e t o o d r u n k to care anyway. T h e y w e r e t h e s w e e p i n g s of a d o z e n A m e r i c a n whaling ports, mixed with Rus­ sian, S c a n d i n a v i a n a n d J a p a n e s e w a t e r f r o n t r a t s , d r e s s e d i n a fan­ t a s t i c v a r i e t y of l e a t h e r , f u r a n d eloth. But they all shared one item— every m a n h a d a fighting weapon somewhere concesded in his clothing. O n e w o m a n in t h e r o o m s a u n t ­ e r e d t h r o u g h t h e ibedlam l i k e a q u e e n . S h e w a s a tall, s t r i k i n g creature with a magnificent crown of a u b u r n h a i r piled h i g h o n h e r head a n d a l m o n d - s h a p e d green eyes. As s h e flounced along, she traded wisecracks with t h e men, s m i l i n g a t t h e m all, b u t n e v e r tangling with any. Then — just as she swished past his table — one of t h e s a i l o r s l e a n e d f o r w a r d a n d gave her a resounding whack on h e r well-shaped r u m p . T h e girl w h i r l e d a r o u n d a s if s h e h a d b e e n stabbed. W i t h o n e swift m o v e m e n t s h e w h i p p e d off a s h o e a n d c r a s h e d i t — full force a c r o s s h i s h e a d . T h e r o o m fell d e a t h l y silent. T h e sailor — a g i a n t S w e d e — clutched his skull. T h e n h e looked up and s a w the w o m a n standing

JOHN GODWIN
of A m e r i c a n w h a l i n g s h i p s b o u n d for t h e A r c t i c . A n d d u r i n g t h o s e m o n t h s t h e island w a s overrun with hard-bitten seamen who had b e e n cooped u p in f i l t h y q u a r t e r s and badly wanted a spree. But apart from a primitive trading store Herschel h a d nothing t o offer — u n t i l P a u l i n e c a m e along. S h e took o n e long, hard l o o k a t t h e p l a c e a n d decided t h a t t h i s w a s h e r p r i v a t e gold­ mine. She bought a former warehouse that had been used as a storage depot for sealskins. Within a few w e e k s s h e h a d it converted into a two-storey establishment that contained a saloon b a r below a n d bedrooms above. S h e christened it Manhattan Tavern, then returned to N e w York t o get h e r stock in trade. W h e n t h e first Shipload of funhungry whalers came whooping dovwi t h e g a n g p l a n k P a u l i n e w a s there to greet them — and to pick o u t t h e half dozen huskiest g u y s in t h e bunch. F o r t h e s l u g g e r s of h e r c h o i c e t h e d r i n k s w e r e free. A l l t h e y h a d t o do i n r e t u r n , P a u l i n e i n f o r m e d them, w a s t o give h e r a h a n d in c a s e of t r o u b l e . " B u t d o n ' t d o n o t h i n g 'less I holler," she added. " A n d I won't h o l l e r often." S h e didn't h a v e to. F o r t h e g r e e n - e y e d r e d h e a d could more t h a n t a k e c a r e of herself. T h e first thing she h a d to r a m into h e r customers' cast iron skulls w a s that — n o matter w h a t t h e y did w i t h h e r girls — S H E w a s n o t to be touched. T h e seamen took this merely a s a come-hither joke, b u t it didn't t a k e t h e m l o n g t o discover t h a t a n y o n e w h o t h o u g h t so literally t o o k h i s life i n h i s h a n d s . Nor had Pauline been kidding w h e n s h e promised h e r girls t h a t she would u s e similar methods to k e e p T H E M i n line. O n e of t h e ladies, k n o w n t o h e r c l i e n t s a s "Apache S u e " found t h a t out w i t h i n a w e e k of a r r i v a l . The Manhattan Tavern was run on a v e r y simple business prin­ ciple — w h a t e v e r t h e g i r l s could m a k e or steal from their admirers was theirs. Whatever w a s spent on liquor w e n t to Pauline. B u t
ADAM, September, 1954 II

over him, t h e shoe heel pointing a t h i s face. She waved h e r t h u m b at the door. H e r voice c a m e in a l o w snarl, "Get outa here. Get out a n d n e v e r s h o w m e t h a t m u g of y o u r s a g a i n . N o t if y o u w a n t to k e e p Whole." T h e S w e d e ' s e y e s glazed o v e r with rage. H e tried to j u m p up, b u t t w o of h i s s h i p m a t e s g r a b b e d his a r m s . T h e S w e d e s h o o k h i m s e l f free, m u m b l e d a s t r i n g of c u r s e s a n d s h a m b l e d t o t h e door. A s t h e i c y blast from outside hit h i m h e h e a r d t h e l a u g h i n g s h o u t of t h e r e d h e a d , "AU r i g h t , b o y s , t h e n e x t r o u n d is o n t h e h o u s e ! " I t w a s a t y p i c a l F e b r u a r y even­ i n g of 1903 i n t h e p l a c e t h e y called "the toughest hole in Canada" — Herschel Island. And the unfortunate Sven had come up against t h e N e w York gal w h o r a n it w i t h a m a n i c u r e d fist. Her name w a s Pauline Summers, but on Herschel Island she w a s k n o w n a s T h e Hellcat. S h e got her nickname partly from t h e fact that s h e hailed from Hell's Kitchen, partly from h e r be­ havior. P a u l i n e g r e w u p i n t h e fester­ ing slum territory b y t h e Hudson River docks on Manhattan's West S i d e W h e r e cops, i n t h o s e d a y s , w e n t only in pairs. According to h e r o w n recollection s h e b e c a m e a fuUy-fledged b o r d e l o i n m a t e a t t h e a g e of 18. Pauline m a y have lacked m o r a l s , b u t s h e h a d p l e n t y of brains. I t didn't t a k e h e r long to figure out t h a t t h e people w h o made the real money w e r e the ones w h o didn't work — t h e madames. Henceforth her ambition w a s to become one. B y t h e t i m e s h e t u r n e d 25 s h e had t h e cash t o start her o w n h o u s e . A l l s h e h a d t o find w a s a suitable location. P a u l i n e first s i g h t e d H e r s c h e l Island during a trip she took a s t e m p o r a r y w i f e of a P r o v i d e n c e whaling skipper. T h e 11-mile-long island, a b l e a k m a s s of r o c k off t h e n o r t h w e s t c o a s t of C a n a d a , w a s i n h a b i t e d b y s o m e 2000 E s k i m o s f o r m o s t of the year. But from J a n u a r y to M a r c h it b e c a m e t h e r e n d e z v o u s

s i n c e tiie g i r l s f r e q u e n t l y d o u b l e d as waitresses the temptation to " t i c k l e t h e tUl" w a s s t r o n g . Too strong for Sue, who w a s n ' t s m a r t e n o u g h to notice w h a t a sharp eye Pauline kept on her r u m takings. T h e p l u m p little brunette couldn't resist pocketing t h e p r i c e of e v e r y t h i r d o r f o u r t h round she brought t o h e r table. F o r t w o days Pauline let h e r think she w a s getting away with it. B u t o n t h e a f t e r n o o n of t h e t h i r d S u e f o u n d herself r o u g h l y s h a k e n o u t of h e r b e a u t y s l e e p . T h e m a d a m s t o o d b y h e r bed­ side, w i t h o n e of h e r b u l l y b o y s grinning over her shoulder. The H e l l c a t ' s voice w a s p u r r i n g d a n ­ gerously w h e n she said: "Now, honey, I reckon you owe m e — l e t ' s s e e — 15 b u c k s 47." T h e g i r l s a t bolt u p r i g h t in bed. " T h a t ' s a d a m n lie," s h e s c r e a m e d . "I don't owe you nothing." Pauline smiled, s h o w i n g her p e a r l y t e e t h . " A n d j u s t for t h a t , " s h e d r a w l e d , " y o u o w e m e a bit m o r e . AU r i g h t , J i m — g r a b h e r . " The saUor seized the girl's wrists and brutally twisted them up on her back. S u e screamed blue m u r d e r , b u t PauUne didn't even raise h e r voice as s h e w e n t on: " I w o n ' t m a r k y o u w h e r e it shows, honey, b u t t h i s is g o n n a hurt, just the same." S h e took t h e girl's long dark h a i r m h e r fist, Ufted it f r o m h e r n e c k a n d p u U e d it u p s h a r p l y . Then she produced a heavythonged horsewhip, held t h e girl's head steady by the hair and s l a s h e d a t t h e e x p o s e d b a c k of her neck. Then Pauline s t r a i ^ t e n e d up, breathing hard, while the sobbing girl fingered h e r blistered neck. "I l e a r n e d t h a t i n A u n t i L u ' s j o i n t in N e w Y o r k , " s h e s a i d softly. " T h a t i s w h e r e t h e y did it t o m e . A n d r e m e m b e r — you'll get a n o t h e r

Hi, beautiful!

Got a

match?"

o n e f o r e v e r y doUar y o u s t e a l . " P a u l i n e ordy h a d t o a d m i n i s t e r t h e t r e a t m e n t once more. T h e n h e r g i r l s w o u l d r a t h e r h a v e lost a f i n g e r t h a n k e e p a d i m e of h e r r u m money. Her customers didn't learn quite so f a s t . Pauline wasn't merely the best l o o k e r in t h e M a n h a t t a n , s h e w a s

"Miss Carter
12

sure knows

how to teach

Egyptian

history!"

a l s o s o m e t h i n g of a c h a l l e n g e to the tough dockland Romeos. A g a i n a n d a g a i n s o m e liquorfired w h a l e r would t r y a pass at her, always with g r i m results. T h e m a d a m reacted according to h e r mood at t h e moment. And a s h o e a c r o s s t h e skuU w a s t h e m i l d e s t of h e r r e a c t i o n s — it s h o w e d t h a t s h e w a s in a good temper. W h e n reaUy annoyed she would s i g n a l t o h e r selected b r u i s e r s , w h o closed in gleefuUy. If t h e offender g o t off w i t h a few b u s t e d r i b s h e c o u l d consider h i m ­ self l u c k y . Not that the HeUcat was averse t o lovers. But now that s h e h e l d t h e Chips s h e w a n t e d t o exercise t h e greatest privilege h e r s t r e e t g i r l ' s m i n d could i m a g i n e — to pick h e r o w n boyfriends. And just as she carefuUy selected her bodyguards from e a d i shipload, so s h e c h o s e h e r b e d m a t e for t h e season. H e w a s always American, invariably hand­ s o m e , a n d n e v e r u n d e r s i x foot. A n d for h i m E V E R Y T H I N G w a s on the house. S o t h e p a t t e r n of P a u U n e ' s r u l e of H e r s c h e l I s l a n d w a s e s t a b l i s h e d . " T h r e e m o n t h s of t h e y e a r I r u n t h i s b u r g , " s h e w a s fond of s a y i n g . " T h e r e s t of t h e t i m e I h a n d it back to t h e Eskimos." As far as she w a s concerned the Canadian government didn't rate a t h o u g h t . A n d for s e v e n heUraising, money-making years she w a s right. T h e r e w a s n o l a w o n t h e island, n o t a s i n g l e cop, c u s t o m s official

ADAM, September, 1964

o r coast g u a r d . A p a r t f r o m t h e w h a l e r s a n d P a u l i n e ' s staff t h e only w h i t e p e o p l e w e r e t h e s t o r e ­ k e e p e r ' s famUy, w h o w e r e g l a d t o be left a l o n e . B u t t h e E s k i m o s w e r e n ' t left alone. W h i l e P a u l i n e a n d h e r t h u g s laid d o w n t h e l a w in a n d a r o u n d t h e M a n h a t t a n T a v e r n s h e didn't give a d a m n w h a t w e n t on other­ wise. T h e u n a r m e d , helpless E s k i ­ m o s soon f o u n d life o n H e r s c h e l h a d b e c o m e hell. D r u n k e n s a i l o r s spilled o u t of t h e s a l o o n l o o k i n g for t r o u b l e . If t h e y h a d n ' t b e e n able t o g e t n e a r o n e of P a u l i n e ' s g i r l s t h e y picked o n a n y n a t i v e female t h e y sighted. If t h e i r m e n ­ folk objected t h e s a i l o r s w o u l d use their knives or guns. On s e v e r a l o c c a s i o n s reeling Yankee whalers used Eskimos as m o v i n g T a r g e t s for their re­ volvers, killing s o m e outright, c r i p p l i n g o t h e r s for life. The Eskimos had no money, but they had sealskins which Pauline cheerfully accepted as p a y m e n t for h e r r o t g u t l i q u o r . Soon t h e d r u n k e n r i o t i n g s p r e a d from t h e Manhattan to t h e native s e t t l e m e n t s . T h e E s k i m o s could t a k e booze e v e n less t h a n R e d Indians — t h e y w e n t crazy on Pauline's "white lightning." F r o m J a n u a r y to March every year Herschel Island became a m a d h o u s e . K n i v e s flashed, g u n s barked, belaying pins crashed on s k u l l s all o v e r t h e island. M e n f o u g h t a n d killed e a c h o t h e r o v e r w o m e n , o v e r liquor, o v e r n o t h i n g a t all. A n d w h i l e t h e l i n e s f o r m e d o u t s i d e t h e b u s y b e d r o o m s of t h e M a n h a t t a n t h e r e s t of t h e i s l a n d t u r n e d i n t o a bloody, r u m - s o a k e d shambles. Every time the ships sailed t h e y left b e h i n d t h e m a l o n g r o w of c o r p s e s a b a n d o n e d in t h e s n o w l i k e u n u s e d firewood. T h e n — i n J a n u a r y , 1903 — a grim report found its w a y to t h e desk of a Police C o m m i s s i o n e r in Ottawa. In dry, statistical t e r m s the report stated that the native p o p u l a t i o n of H e r s c h e l I s l a n d h a d s h r u n k f r o m 2000 to a n e s t i m a t e d 500 in t h e c o u r s e of a f e w y e a r s . T h e island, t h e r e p o r t concluded, w a s obviously in d i r e n e e d of police p r o t e c t i o n . A n d so it c a m e t h a t on t h e m o r n i n g of F e b r u a r y 21 five m e n m a r c h e d t h r o u g h t h e s n o w to­ ward the Manhattan Tavern. They wore scarlet coats and they m a r c h e d w i t h t h e e a s y s w i n g of m e n w h o feel p r e t t y s u r e of themselves. Pauline watched their approach from a n upstairs window. H e r m o u t h c u r l e d scornfully. " C o p s , " She said. " F i v e of ' e m . Hell, b a c k home they use twice that m a n y j u s t to break u p a barroom brawl." H e r lover of t h e s e a s o n — a jiant Norfolk m a t e named Steve 3enrick — frowned thoughtfully. "Yeah, b u t t h e m a i n ' t j u s t c o p s , " he murmured. "They're Mounties." T o s e n d five t r o o p e r s t o t a m e 300 of t h e t o u g h e s t s a i l o r s God e v e r m a d e w a s t y p i c a l of t h e a l m o s t f a n a t i c a l m a n p o w e r econ­ o m y of t h e R o y a l N o r t h - W e s t M o u n t e d Police. A few years

e a r l i e r t h e y h a d u s e d all of 2 5 m e n t o a r r e s t Chief S i t t i n g Bull a n d 200 of h i s S i o u x b r a v e s . A n d t h e five w h o l a n d e d o n H e r s c h e l w e r e led b y a l e g e n d a r y c h a r a c t e r — S e r g e a n t E d Fitz­ gerald, known to his fellow Mounties a s t h e "Wild I r i s h m a n . " S i x foot t w o of solid b r a w n , with i m m e n s e shoulders and a head as handsome as a young lion's, F i t z g e r a l d h a d e a r n e d h i s n i c k n a m e t h r o u g h a s e r i e s of fan­ tastic single-handed exploits. Pauline didn't know Fitzgerald, but there was something about t h e m a n t h a t r a n g a l a r m beEs in her shrewd mind. She t u r n e d to H e n r i c k . " K e e p o u t of t h e w a y When t h e y c o m e in h e r e , h o n e y . I'U h a n d l e t h i s . " F i t z g e r a l d k n o c k e d politely o n the door and w a s m e t by a smiling Pauline. "Are you Miss S u m m e r s , the o w n e r of this-er-establishment?" he asked. Pauline beamed. "That's me. Sergeant." " T h e n I t a k e it y o u h a v e a l i q u o r licence," s a i d F i t z g e r a l d . "Why, certainly. Sergeant," the g i r l p u r r e d . " C o m e i n t o m y office, I'll s h o w it t o y o u . " P a u l i n e ' s "office" t u r n e d o u t t o be a small r e a r parlor, equipped w i t h a low, p l u s h - c o v e r e d couch.

T h e girl leaned back a m o n g t h e cushions a n d daintily hoisted her skirts, revealing long, shapely l e g s e n c a s e d i n b l a c k m e s h stock­ i n g s h e l d u p b y vivid r e d g a r t e r s . H e r s m U e s p a r k l e d a n invi­ t a t i o n . " H e r e ' s m y licence. Ser­ geant" she murmured. "I'm sure you'U find it i n o r d e r . " F i t z g e r a l d d i d n ' t b a t a n eyelid. "There's a d r a u g h t in this room," h e said dryly. "You'd better p u l y o u r d r e s s d o w n . Miss, b e f o r e y o u c a t c h cold." T h e n he turned on his heel a n d s t a m p e d o u t of t h e office. P a u l i n e w a t c h e d h i m go a n d t h e r e w a s m u r d e r in h e r g r e e n e y e s . B u t w h e n H e n r i c k j o i n e d h e r half a n hour later she had recovered her spirits. "That sergeant think's he's pretty d a m n tough," she sneered. "Well, we'U s e e h o w t o u g h h e acts w h e n h e finds out we've got no jaUs in t h i s b u r g a n d h e can't arrest nobody." F i t z g e r a l d d i d n ' t h a v e t o find this out. H e already k n e w t h a t Herschel Island boasted neither prisons, courts, nor magistrates. B u t t h e n h e w a s n ' t figuring on making any arrests. Fitzgerald selected a large (Continued on page Ji2)

"I'm one of those angry young

men but the trouble

is Pm over

40.'
13

ADAM, September, 1964

THEY LIVE WITH DEATH
What is it that lures men into motor cycle racing in which death is common­ place, broken bones a trivial inconveni­ ence? Only one thing — ifs a sport that's in the blood . . .

FAQ
l^OR

KEN RAYMOND
H a r r y Hinton. F r o m critical his c o n d i t i o n b e c a m e g r a v e , t h e m im­ proved, then hopeful. Then, a c o u p l e of d a y s b e f o r e h i s d e a t h , t h e u n d a m a g e d l u n g on which he h a d b e e n b r e a t h i n g collapsed. H e h a d l o s t h i s good f i g h t . F i n a l l y , t h e d e v o t i o n of H i n t o n ' s friends and relatives maintained h i g h h u m a n i n t e r e s t i n h i s lifedeath drama. Australian fellow riders Ken K a v a n a g h and Alan T r o w , w h o h a d r a c e d in t h e Gold C u p , k e p t in t u r n round-the-clock watches at his bedside w h e n they might have been riding the Euro­ p e a n c i r c u i t f o r big m o n e y . Hin­ t o n ' s m o t h e r flew f r o m S y d n e y to s h a r e t h e i r vigil. A n d brother Eric, w h o w a s with the Englandbound Australian motor cycle team aboard Oronsay when Harry crashed, hastened from South h a m p t o n as soon as the ship d o c k e d to j o i n t h e m . All f o u r w e r e w i t h H a r r y w h e n h e died. Hinton's body w a s shipped home in t h e I t a l i a n l i n e r A u s t r a U a for b u r i a l in t h e S y d n e y s u b u r b of C a m p s i e . A n I t a l i a n s e a m e n ' s dis­ pute involving Australia's crew held t h e body strike-bound In Melbourne for nearly a week u n t i l t h e W a t e r s i d e W o r k e r s ' Fed­ e r a t i o n h a d It t a k e n f r o m the s h i p a n d flovm t o S y d n e y . Such w e r e t h e elements t h a t m a d e a fortnight-long newspaper story and a m a c a b r e epilogue to a tragic event. It m u s t have caused m a n y , m a n y people to ask, without finding a n a n s w e r — W h a t is i t t h a t l u r e s m e n i n t o t h i s s p o r t in w h i c h d e a t h Is commonplace, broken bones a trivial inconvenience? If y o u w e r e t o a s k t h e m e n t h e m s e l v e s t h e y could n o t tell you, precisely. T h e y would talk v a g u e l y of t h e t h r i l l of speed, t h e c h a l l e n g e of c o m p e t i t i o n , t h e b i g m o n e y t o b e w o n . B u t n o n e could e x p l a i n w h y h e yields t o t h e s p o r t ' s i r r e s i s t i b l e pull, a n y m o r e clearly than a tightrope walker could teU y o u Why h e t r e a d s t h e h i g h w i r e w i t h o u t a s a f e t y net. O n e t h i n g Is for s u r e — w h e n t h e m o t o r cycle r a c i n g b u g g e t s you, it's f o r e v e r . N o o n e could k n o w t h i s b e t t e r than the great Aub Lawson, a potentate of t h e world's dirt t r a c k s f o r n e a r l y 30 y e a r s . A u b ' s b u r n i n g ambition has always been to b e c o m e a f a r m e r . Indeed, h e once gave a w a y speedway racing, a c q u i r e d a 250-acre p r o p e r t y n e a r Q u i r i n d l , N S W , a n d settled d o w n t o h i s d r e a m life. B u t w i t h i n a y e a r h e w a s b a c k on t h e t r a c k s . T h a t w a s n e a r l y 14 y e a r s a g o . A u b is still in t h e s p e e d w a y b u s i n e s s , a s p r o m o t e r a n d r i d e r . I n h i s 50th y e a r h e c a n r i d e t h e e a r s off y o u n g s t e r s half his age. But he still y e a r n s for t h e f a r m e r ' s life. Well, w h y n o t b e a f a r m e r ? H e h a s t h e m o n e y t o s t a k e himself t o a p r o p e r t y , h e h a s achieved j u s t a b o u t all m a n c a n o n t h e r a c e t r a c k , h e is h e a l t h y a n d v i g o r o u s , h e loves t h e land. If y o u w e r e to a s k A u b h e w o u l d s h r u g a n d say, " W h e n t h i s g a m e g e t s y o u y o u ' r e in It for good. T h a t ' s t h e w a y It is. I g u e s s I'll k e e p r i d i n g a s l o n g a s I hold m y form.^' I t ' s in t h e blood. Aub Lawson is f a r m bred. W h e n t h e depression engulfed t h e w o r l d in t h e l a t e 1920s e c o n o m i c necessity forced h i m t o leave his father's f a r m at Warialda at t h e

t w o w e e k s of A p r i l , 1959, daily hospital bulletins on t h e condition of m o r t a l l y - w o u n d e d Australian motor cycle racing s t a r H a r r y H i n t o n , J u n i o r , in­ voked the s y m p a t h y and prayers of m i l l i o n s t h r o u g h o u t t h e w o r l d . Hinton's 500 cc Norton had c r a s h e d i n t h e I n t e r n a t i o n a l Gold Cup race a t Imola, in n o r t h e r n I t a l y . T h e m a c h i n e failed to t a k e a c u r v e in t h e 19th l a p , c r a s h e d t h r o u g h a fence a n d piled t o t a k e a farmhouse courtyard. Hinton s u f f e r e d a c r u s h e d chest, a r u p ­ t u r e d l u n g a n d f r a c t u r e s of t h e s h o u l d e r a n d left e l b o w . H e l a y unconscious in hospital at Imola u n t i l h e died t w o w e e k s l a t e r . H e w a s 26 y e a r s old. T h e c a u s e of H i n t o n ' s d e a t h w a s n o t in itself e x t r a o r d i n a r y . I n d e e d , s u c h is t h e m o r t a l i t y r a t e of t h e d e a t h - c h a l l e n g i n g s p o r t of m o t o r cycle r a c i n g t h a t a f a t a l crash rarely rates more than a f e w p a r a g r a p h s In t h e local p r e s s . But Hinton's two-weeks fight f o r life m a d e a n international n e w s p a p e r s t o r y of h i g h d r a m a . F i r s t , h e w a s o n e of a f a m i l y of c e l e b r a t e d m o t o r cycle r a c e r s — h i s f a t h e r , v a r i o u s l y called t h e W i z a r d a n d Old H a r r y ( t o dis­ t i n g u i s h h i m f r o m son Y o u n g H a r r y ) , w o n m o r e T T titles t h a n h e could r e c o l l e c t ; Y o u n g H a r r y had taken three overseas titles; year-younger brother Eric was a Test Match rider for Australia. S e c o n d l y , daily c a b l e s r e p o r t i n g t h e f l u c t u a t i o n s of t h e uncon­ scious Hinton's battle with death w r u n g t h e h e a r t s of countless people w h o had no interest what­ e v e r in m o t o r cycle r a c i n g a n d w h o h a d n o t p r e v i o u s l y h e a r d of
14 ADAM, September, I 9 M

Australians Vic Duggan (left), Lionel Van Praag and Aub Lawson take a well-earned rest after the sec­ ond Speedway Test against Eng­ land in 1947.
••'V"

Among those who liked Aub Lawson's form was speedway pro­ moter Frank Arthur—who later persuaded Lawson to try his skill on the race track. mmm Harry Hinton, Snr, displays the style and skill that made him a champion—in the sport that was to kill his son.

ADAM, Septsmber, 1964

lb

a g e of 14 to s e e k w o r k in S y d n e y . H e f o u n d a j o b a s a tele­ g r a m boy and b e g a n steadily to s a v e f r o m his m e a g r e w a g e to­ w a r d the day w h e n h e had enough m o n e y to g o back on the land. W h e n h e w a s 21 A u b h a d r e a c h e d t h e e m i n e n c e of p o s t m a n . A s a hobby h e had joined t h e militia s i g n a l c o r p s a s a m o t o r cycle despatch rider. H e took to t h e machine a s eagerly a s a cater­ p i l l a r t o a c a b b a g e p a t c h . S o it is not surprising t h a t he found a p l a c e in t h e c o r p s r i d i n g t r o u p e that g a v e its first performance a t a military display in Sydney. Among those who saw the show w a s speedway promoter Frank A r t h u r . H e liked L a w s o n ' s f o r m and later persuaded h i m to t r y his skill o n t h e r a c e t r a c k . U n d e r A r t h u r ' s guidance he m a d e his first professional appearance on Sydney's old Shepherd's Bush t r a c k i n 1937. H e did r e m a r k a b l y well for a n e w c o m e r and w a s i r r e v o c a b l y c o m m i t t e d t o a life­ t i m e of d i r t t r a c k r a c i n g . Within two years Lawson was so w e l l e s t a b l i s h e d a s a r a c e rider that the celebrated Sydney and international dirt track star Lionel V a n P r a a g took h i m to England to join the Wembley Lions. As partners Lawson and Van P r a a g became a devastatingly successful combination. T h e y w o n t h e p a i r s championsship of E n g l a n d and represented Australia in Test m a t c h e s a g a i n s t t h e Old D a r t . B o t h q u a l i f i e d t o c o m p e t e in t h e world championship — a n aston­ ishing achievement for Lawson, w h o w a s in h i s t h i r d y e a r of r a c e r i d i n g a n d h i s f i r s t s e a s o n in England. B u t w a r came before the c h a m p i o n s h i p final a n d t h e event w a s caUed off. Lawson r e t u r n e d to Australia a n d rejoined his militia unit. H e transferred to the A I F and went to Malaya as a despatch rider Aub

w i t h t h e E i g h t h Division. As Singapore w a s tottering and about to fall L a w s o n w a s o n e of s e v e n despatch riders sent to Sourabaya to establish a signals base. T h u s they escaped the Japemese in S i n g a p o r e b u t t h e y could not carry out their assignment. Jap­ anese b o m b e r s s a n k the ship tak­ ing t h e m to Sourabaya. T h e seven despatch riders survived the bombing a n d rescue craft took t h e m t o J a v a . B u t aU t h e i r equip­ m e n t w a s a t t h e b o t t o m of t h e sea, S i n g a p o r e h a d fallen a n d t h e y h a d n o t h i n g with w h i c h to e s t a b ­ lish t h e p r o p o s e d b a s e . I n M a r c h , 1942, a s h i p b r o u g h t t h e m b a c k t o Australia. Lawson's w o r k as a despatch r i d e r wdth t h e E i g h t h Division had been outstanding. H e was r e w a r d e d f o r it w i t h p r o m o t i o n t o t h e r a n k of l i e u t e n a n t . W i t h his n e w r a n k c a m e a posting as a section leader in t h e Seventh D i v i s i o n S i g n a l s C o r p s , o n e of t h e f i r s t u n i t s a s h o r e in t h e Balikpapan landing. While in Borneo Lawson received a persuasive letter from h i s old f r i e n d a n d r a c e t r a c k p a r t n e r Lionel Van Praag, urging h i m to ride a t the S p o r t s Ground, Sydney, w h e n he was discharged from the army. The letter aroused a g r e a t n o s t a l g i a f o r t h e t r a c k in Lawson. Moreover, he saw the prize m o n e y to be w o n to supple­ m e n t his deferred pay as a short c u t t o t h e f a r m h e stUl believed h e w a n t e d a b o v e e v e r y t h i n g else. So when the w a r ended he w a s quickly back on t h e track, racing t o t h r i l l h u g e c r o w d s e a g e r for n e w f o r m s of e x c i t e m e n t after t h e l o n g t e n s i o n s of w a r a n d , incidentally, adding considerably to his growing f a r m savings accoimt. I n 1947 h e r e c e i v e d a cabled offer t o r i d e w i t h t h e W e s t H a m C l u b in E n g l a n d . L a w s o n did n o t a

h e s i t a t e . H e b o a r d e d a p l a n e in S y d n e y o n e S a t u r d a y , a r r i v e d in E n g l a n d o n t h e following Tues­ day and rode the next night. He s t a y e d w i t h W e s t H a m u n t i l 1951, meanwhile becoming the club captain. In t h e English winters h e r e t u r n e d h o m e t o r i d e in Sydney. I n 1951 h e c o i m t e d h i s s a v i n g s , reckoned h e had enough to buy h i s longed-for f a r m a n d a n n o i m c e d his retirement from the track. He t h e n b o u g h t t h e f a r m a t Quirindl. Aub tended his farm with the p r i d e a n d s a t i s f a c t i o n of a m a n d o i n g t h e t h i n g h e l i k e d best to do. B u t within a few m o n t h s he yielded — n o t a l t o g e t h e r un­ willingly — to p r o m o t e r s ' pleas to ride n o w a n d t h e n a t t h e S j ^ n e y S p o r t s G r o u n d " j u s t t o help t h e show along." H e h a s t e n e d b a c k t o his f a r m from each appearance. But F a r m e r L a w s o n w a s t o k n o w no peace. P r o m o t e r s pestered him by mail a n d by telephone t o race a t t h i s o r t h a t m e e t i n g in v a r i o u s p l a c e s . S o m e offers h e accepted, some h e rejected. FinaUy a phone call from England interrupted his milking o n e d a y . T h e call w a s f r o m Nor­ wich, England's premier club, which wanted Lawson to captain i t s t e a m . T h e p r e s t i g e r a t i n g of s u c h a p l a c e in t h e s p e e d w a y w o r l d a n d t h e financial offer w e r e j u s t too good to refuse. L a w s o n accepted. H e left t h e f a r m in t h e h a n d s of a l o c u m t e n e n s a n d flew t o E n g l a n d t o lead N o r w i c h t o a s M n g of v i c t o r i e s in t h e 1952 s e a s o n . A t t h e e n d of it t h e C l u b offered L a w s o n a r e n e w a l of h i s con­ t r a c t , a t even m o r e attractive t e r m s , for t h e following s e a s o n . L a w s o n p h i l o s o p h i c a l l y decided t h a t a s long as h e w a s able to t h r o w a leg a c r o s s a racing m a c h i n e h e w o u l d n o t b e left t o t h e g e n t l e p u r s u i t of f a r m i n g . So h e c a m e h o m e , sold h i s f a r m a n d r a c e d In t h e A u s t r a l i a n s e a s o n until he had to r e t u r n to Norwich. He captained Norwich until 1957, w h e n h e a c c e p t e d t h e j o b of managing P e r t h's Claremont Speedway, the West's head­ q u a r t e r s of t h e b o o m i n g s p o r t . The Australian Control Board t h o u g h t so h i g h l y of L a w s o n ' s c h a r a c t e r a n d p r e s t i g e t h a t it allowed h i m to r a c e a s well a s t o m a n a g e t h e t r a c k . H e is t h e only A u s t r a l i a n s p e e d w a y m a n allowed to do t h i s . N o t l o n g a f t e r w a r d L a w s o n b e c a m e m a n a g e r also of t h e W e s t m e a d S p e e d w a y , Sydney, a j o i n t j o b h e w a s able t o h a n d l e v e r y a d r o i t l y w i t h a n occasional r a c e r i d e to r e l i e v e r o u t i n e . In his distinguished career Lawson captained Australia in more than 100 T e s t matches a g a i n s t E n g l a n d , h a s r a c e d In Japan, England, Wales, Scotland, I r e l a n d , Holland, P o l a n d , S w e d e n , Norway, Denmark and New Zealand, and has broken m o r e b o n e s t h a n h e t h o u g h t h e had. H i s w o r s t s m a s h , h e believes, w a s a t C l a r e m o n t in 1958. H i s bike, r a c i n g a t 70 m U e s a n hour, c r a s h e d Into a fallen c o m p e t i t o r ' s

Lawson (right) seen here with young Graham Warren, was always major Australian hope in the Speedway Tests against England,

.16

ADAM, September, 1964

machine. A u b w a s hurled high into t h e a i r a n d c a m e d o w n t o h a n g l i k e a b a g of s a n d a c r o s s t h e safety fence. H i s i n j u r y — t w o dislocated t h u m b s . T o d a y A u b L a w s o n still d r e a m s of s e t t l i n g into t h e f a r m e r ' s life. But he reckons he's too young a n d active t o give a w a y s p e e d w a y riding just yet. So it s e e m s t h a t p r u d e n c e is n o p a r t of a s p e e d w a y r i d e r ' s m a k e ­ up. T h u s i t is ironic t h a t A r t h u r (called B l u e y ) W i l k i n s o n , a n o t h e r g r e a t A u s t r a l i a n r i d e r of t h e L a w s o n m o u l d , s h o u l d h a v e died while r i d i n g h i s m o t o r cycle w i t h g r e a t d e c o r u m , w i t h i n t h e speci­ fied speed limit, in a R o s e B a y , Sydney, s t r e e t . I t w a s j u s t o n e of those things — a truck swerving t o avoid a c a r c r u m p l e d t h e bike, killing W i l k i n s o n a t o n c e a n d seriously i n j u r i n g h i s wife, w h o w a s r i d i n g pillion. T h a t w a s in J u l y , 1940, a f e w d a y s b e f o r e 29year-old W i l k i n s o n w a s t o e n t e r the RAAF. B l u e y W i l k i n s o n crowded so m u c h a c h i e v e m e n t Into 12 of h i s 29 y e a r s t h a t h e w a s i n t e r n a t i o n ­ ally a c k n o w l e d g e d t h e g r e a t e s t s p e e d w a y r i d e r of h i s d a y . O n e n e w s p a p e r said of h i m i n i t s o b i t u a r y , " H e r a n k e d w i t h Lindrum, Bradman, Crawford a n d Opperman a s a worldbeater in his field — a n d t h e finest p o s s i b l e t y p e of A u s t r a l i a n s p o r t s m a n . " Of all t h e g r e a t t r a c k c h a m p i o n s h e is t h e o n l y o n e t o find a place in M a d a m e T u s s a u d ' s w a x w o r k s f i g u r e p a r a d e of t h e i m m o r t a l s . I n boyhood W i l k i n s o n e s t a b l i s h ­ ed himself a s s o m e t h i n g of a p e s t in h i s n a t i v e B a t h u r s t , i n t h e N S W Central West. This w a s because of h i s a n n o y i n g a n d q u i t e a l a r m ­ ing h a b i t of r i d i n g h i s p u s h b i k e along crowded footpaths, m a k i n g a g a m e of w e a v i n g among p e d e s ­ t r i a n s . N o t u n n a t u r a l l y , m a n y of the townsfolk w e r e greatly re­ lieved w h e n B l u e y g r a d u a t e d f r o m the footpaths to t h e roads, a s a motor-cyclist.

W h e n h e left school a t 16 t h e happy-go-lucky youngster with the flaming red curly hair had found a job a s a butcher boy. F r o m h i s first p a y p a c k a g e h e b o u g h t a w e a r y old b e l t ^ l r i v e n D o u g l a s m a c h i n e f o r £3/10/-, o n t e r m s of £1 d e p o s i t a n d five shillings a week. N o t long before this a Sydney team of s p e e d w a y r i d e r s h a d introduced their sport to Bathurst, with t h e first dirt track meeting held t h e r e . T h i s p r o v e d s o p o p u l a r t h a t a g r o u p of local b u s i n e s s m e n formed a syndicate to promote regular meetings at the Bathurst Sports Ground. I n hardly a n y t i m e a t aU B a t h u r s t b e c a m e p a r t of t h e c i r c u i t f o r p r o f e s s i o n a l r i d e r s . B u t t h e s e fellows d i d n ' t have the show all to themselves for B a t h u r s t produced its o w n c r o p of r a c e r i d e r s , a m o n g w h o m w a s 17-year-old B l u e y W i l k i n s o n . The youngster, riding his ram­ shackle Douglas, competed in every race for which h e and his m a c h i n e w e r e eligible. H e r a c e d w i t h s u c h n a t u r a l skill a n d n e r v e ­ less daring t h a t a n O r a n g e m o t o r cycle d e a l e r p r o v i d e d h i m w i t h a n e w D o u g l a s r a c e r , i n r e t u r n for half of W i l k i n s o n ' s r a c e w i n n i n g s . T h i s w a s j u s t w h a t B l u e y need­ ed t o r o a r i n t o n a t i o n a l a t t e n t i o n . His performances on t h e n e w bike w e r e sensational. H e shat­ tered track records visiting s t a r s h a d s e t a n d piled u p r a c e wins s o fast that n o t even t h e handicapper could k e e p p a c e w i t h h i m . H i s name w a s already known to speedway fans far a n d wide w h o had never seen h i m race. W i t h n o l o c a l r i d e r s c a p a b l e of m a k i n g a r a c e of i t w i t h W i l k i n ­ son, the Bathurst promoters brought t h e celebrated Lionel V a n P r a a g t o t h e t o w n f o r a s e r i e s of match races with him. T h e series w a s billed a s t h e C h a m p i o n s h i p of N S W . T o t h e d e l i g h t of B a t h u r s t , t h e local idol m o r e t h a n m a t c h e d t h e vastly experienced V a n Praag,

Test matches bettceen England and Australia always attract huge crowds eager for new forms of excitement — in the sport that thrills and kills. w i n n i n g t h e g r a n d final r a c e a n d t h e title b y t w o l e n g t h s . Not long before Wilkinson's triumph over the great Van P r a a g , a g r o u p of A u s t r a l i a n r i d e r s i n c l u d i n g V a n P r a a g , Vic Huxley and Frank Arthur, had introduced dirt track racing to E n g l a n d . T h e s p o r t w a s a n in­ s t a n t h i t . T r a c k s m u s h r o o m e d aU over t h e nation a n d t h e huge c r o w d s t h e i r m e e t i n g s d r e w boom­ ed t h e s p o r t a s b i g b u s i n e s s . Be­ c a u s e of t h i s r i d e r s w e r e a b l e t o m a k e m u c h bigger money in E n g l a n d t h a n in Australia — topl i n e r s could e a r n a s m u c h a s £200 a week. I n pre-war sterling that w a s a c o n s i d e r a b l e s u m of m o n e y . After Wilkinson's sensational d e f e a t of V a n P r a a g , a B a t h u r s t citizens' committee opened a n appeal fund to send t h e yoimgster to E n g l a n d . W i l k i n s o n f a n s a t Bathurst a n d elsewhere eagerly s u b s c r i b e d a n d soon t h e r a c e track prodigy w a s on his w a y to England. H e arrived in London j u s t b e f o r e t h e o p e n i n g of t h e 1929 s e a s o n a n d clinched a n engagement a s a rider with t h e W e s t H a m Club, w h i c h h e l d i t s m e e t i n g s o n E a s t L o n d o n ' s Dock­ l a n d t r a c k . I n s p i t e of h i s A u s ­ t r a l i a n successes Wilkinson w a s virtually unknown in England and h e w a s very m u c h on trial a t his f i r s t m e e t i n g . T h e occasion scared Wilkinson. H e w a s to race before a bigger crowd than h e had ever seen a t one track. And, watching earlier races, h e w a s astonished a n d a little d a u n t e d b y t h e r a c e riding tactics. R i d e r s chopped across each other's machines, freely used their elbows to force rivals into corner broadsides a n d used other intimidating tactics such a s h e h a d n e v e r s e e n . H e d o u b t e d if h e
ADAM, September, 1964 17

The

thrill

of speed,

the challenge

of competition,

keep

drawing

the champions

back to the track year after

year.

h a d t h e skill a n d t h e n e r v e f o r such competition. B u t h i s d o u b t s left h i m t h e moment he was astride his machine. Nevertheless, h e deter­ mined to avoid trouble while h e c o u l d a n d h e took off a t full throttle when the starter sent the field a w a y . W i l k i n s o n ' s m a c h i n e shot to t h e front and his brilliant r i d i n g k e p t h i m t h e r e for a n allthe-way win. A s h e w a s s o o n t o discover, W i l k i n s o n w a s r a c i n g in p r e t t y rugged company a n d his rivals s a w t o it t h a t h e d i d n ' t a g a i n catch t h e m napping, a s in his first race. So he had to m a t c h t h e m a t their own g a m e , u s i n g all the r o u g h riding tactics and dar­ i n g h e could c o m m a n d . H e took hair raising risks t h a t should h a v e b r o u g h t h i m a n d h a l f t h e field down m a n y times, yet astonish­ ingly got away with them. One London newspaper nick­ named him The Red-Headed Miracle, a n a m e that stuck. Of c o u r s e h e h a d m a n y falls, w h i c h b r o u g h t h i m a s h a r e of b r o k e n b o n e s . B u t n o n e of t h e s e w e r e of g r e a t s i g n i f i c a n c e i m t i l , o n e n i g h t i n 1930, h e t o o k a header from his machine and w a s knocked unconscious. The fallen m a c h i n e whirred and s p u n itself off t h e t r a c k l i k e a r u n a w a y Catherine wheel. W h e n Wilkinson c a m e to and discovered t h a t all h i s b o n e s w e r e i n t a c t h e g r o g g U y e x a m i n e d h i s b i k e to s e e if it w a s fit to r i d e in h i s n e x t
18 ADAM, September, 1964

race. H e found that the left handle-bar had been bent inward b u t decided t o r i d e t h e b i k e a s it w a s . H e w o n t h e r a c e so easily t h a t h e w a s convinced t h e bent handle-bar had helped. Whether the bent handle-bar actually gave Wilkinson a n y real h e l p i n r a c i n g o r w h e t h e r i t s eflfect w a s p u r e l y p s y c h o l o g i c a l is o p e n to doubt — and immaterial. But it i s t r u e t h a t , f r o m t h i s p o i n t on, h e w o n a s t r i n g of r a c e s i n t h e next nine years that brought him recognition as the world's greatest rider. Wilkinson first rode for Aus­ t r a l i a in a T e s t m a t c h a g a i n s t E n g l a n d a t S t a m f o r d B r i d g e in 1930. H e failed t o s c o r e . B u t h e piled u p 359 p o i n t s — m a n y m o r e t h a n a n y o t h e r c o m p e t i t o r of t h e t i m e — in 37 s u b s e q u e n t T e s t s . T h r o u g h t h e 1930s W i l k i n s o n I'ode c o n t i n u o u s l y — e x c e p t f o r i n j u r y p e r i o d s — in E n g l a n d a n d t h e C o n t i n e n t a n d , b e t w e e n sea­ sons, in Australia. H i s b a n k a c c o u n t g r e w spectac­ u l a r l y . A n d , a s b e c o m e s a m a n of financial substance, h e w a s m o s t discriminating in his glooming. S t r o l l i n g o n e d a y t h r o u g h Lon­ d o n i n a s u p e r b p i e c e of S a v i l l e Row tailoring and accessories i n c l u d i n g g r e y gloves, h e called in a t t h e W i m b l e d o n t r a c k to visit f e l l o w - A u s t r a l i a n r i d e r Vic H u x l e y . B l u e y f o u n d Vic was putting a new machine through a s e r i e s of t r a c k t e s t s . A t t h e e n d

of o n e c i r c u i t h e told W i l k i n s o n he t h o u g h t the machine needed a co u p l e of a d j u s t m e n t s t o g i v e it a better performance. Wilkinson disagreed. " L o o k , I'll p r o v e it," h e said. T h r o w i n g a n e l e g a n t l y clad leg over t h e saddle he pushed the m a c h i n e i n t o a s t a r t a n d w a s off on a wild, dust-raising, broads i d i n g circuit. H i s h a t b l e w off and hooped along t h e dirt track o n i t s b r i m . T h e w i n d c a u g h t his c o a t a n d b a l l o o n e d it a b o v e h i s h e a d . W i t h o u t s l a c k i n g speed Wil­ kinson began t o work t h e coat free. W h i l e t h u s e n g a g e d h e failed to s e e a r a k e a maintenance w o r k e r h a d d r o p p e d a s h e scam­ pered from the track before the oncoming racing machine. The b i k e ' s f r o n t w h e e l hit t h e r a k e a n d t h e m a c h i n e skidded f r o m u n d e r Wilkinson. W i l k i n s o n r e l e a s e d h i s hold a n d g o t u p u n h u r t , e x c e p t for t h e b e g i n n m g s of t w o b l a c k eyes. H i s Saville Row suit w a s in shreds, his s h i r t i n r i b b o n s , h i s s h o e s soleless a n d h i s e l e g a n t g r e y gloves trackburned. B u t h i s self-possession w a s unwrinkled. H e told t h e worried Huxley, w h o came running along the track, "there's nothing wrong w i t h t h a t bike, Vic." I n 1963 W i l k i n s o n m a r r i e d E n g ­ lish g i r l M u r i e l Vick. T h e y honey­ mooned in Australia. Back in E n g l a n d in the next y e a r Wilkinson w a s a hot tip to win the world championship which

w a s decided o n a c o m p l i c a t e d points score s y s t e m o n e v e n t s h e l d long b e f o r e t h e s e r i e s of t i t l e finals. But again the championship eluded h i m . W h i l e r a c i n g a t Man­ c h e s t e r a w e e k b e f o r e t h e finals he severely i n j u r e d a k n e e in a fall a n d h a d t o s c r a t c h f r o m t h e championship. B u t h e r e c o v e r e d in t i m e for t h e A u s t r a l i a n s e a s o n - - a n d local fans s a w W i l k i n s o n ride a s n e v e r before. H e w a s a t t h e a b s o l u t e p e a k of f o r m in a n u n b r o k e n sequence of 37 w i n s in S y d n e y . When Wilkinson r e t u r n e d to E n g l a n d for t h e 1938 s e a s o n ho took his m o t h e r w i t h h i m " t o see me win the world championship." Before t h e c h a m p i o n s h i p s e r i e s began W i l k i n s o n g a v e his m o t h e r and his wife — h i s m o s t devoted fan — a special thrill b y l e a d i n g A u s t r a l i a in a T e s t s e r i e s w i n in which h e scored 80 of his t e a m s possible 90 p o i n t s . T h e n h e w o n the championship of Scotland, lowered r e c o r d s in v a r i o u s p a r t s of E n g l a n d and finally, with A r t h u r A t k i n s o n as p a r t n e r , w o n t h e C o r o n a t i o n Gold C u p for t h e W e s t H a m Club. Wilkinson's brilliant riding earned him the m a x i m u m eight bonus p o i n t s b e f o r e t h e w o r l d c h a m p i o n s h i p finals and he w a s u n b a c k a b l e f a v o r i t e to t a k e t h e title. B u t it s e e m e d t h a t h e w a s doomed n e v e r to b e c o m e c h a m p i o n of t h e world. On t h e n i g h t before t h e final s e r i e s he s u f f e r e d a painful and, it s e e m e d , d i s a b l i n g s h o u l d e r i n j u r y in a r a c e fall. B u t n e i t h e r disability n o r w a r n ­ ing could s t o p Bluey W i l k i n s o n in his h o t p u r s u i t of t h e world title h e had m o r a l l y w o n so m a n y times. H e won t h e first t h r e e of t h e four final r a c e s . A f t e r his t h i r d win h e k n e w h e h a d o n l y to r u n second in t h e f o u r t h r a c e to be­ c o m e w o r l d c h a m p i o n . H e did r u n second a n d so b e c a m e t h e u n d i s p u t e d m o n a r c h of t h e w o r l d ' s m o t o r cycle s p e e d s t e r s . N o w a c o m b i n a t i o n of factors a r o u s e d in Bluey W i l k i n s o n a nos­ talgia for h i s h o m e l a n d . . . h i s m o t h e r ' s visit, his wife's l o v e of Australia and the menacing s o u n d s D e r F u h r e r w a s m a k i n g in Europe . . . the prospect that his shoulder injury would keep him out of t h e saddle for a long, l o n g time. T h e D e r F u h r e r ' s a n g r y noises exploded into w a r and Bluey enlisted in t h e R A A F . While a w a i t i n g h i s m a r c h i n g - i n call h e w a s s p e n d i n g a blissful last few days as a civilian w h e n d e a t h r a n him down in a q u i e t R o s e B a y street. M a y b e if Bluey Willtinson had survived t h e w a r h e a n d his wife would h a v e s e t t l e d on t h a t s h e e p station t h e y h a d t a l k e d of b u y i n g . But one d o u b t s if B l u e y could have made the break from the track. It's a sport that's in the blood . . . • Aub Lawson decided that as long as he was able to throw a leg across a racing machine he would not be left to the gentle pursuit of farming — an ambition he once wanted above everything else.

Lionel Van Praag partnered tion. Van Praag established

Lawson in a devastatingly successful combina­ himself as an international dirt track star.
ADAM, September, 1964 19

20

ADAM, September, 1944

4 haunting voice to break the silence of a still and l o n e l y r o o m to m a k e a date or break a date — to arrange a secret rendezvous . . . to tempt and taunt and yet remain u n s e e n . . .

ADAM, September, 1964

21

FICTION

GEOFF W Y A T T

A Point of fact
They circled desperately and wearily in the dust — two stubborn men who didn't really want to f i g h t . . . but right or wrong they had to save face

OY

clambering awkwardly up on to the b u n k a n d straddling h i s c h e s t , b y c o m m e n c i n g a stac­ cato movement with h e r beak as she pecked out t h e grass seeds from the rumpled shirt over his s t o m a c h , t h e old l e g h o r n h e n drill­ ed h i m to c o n s c i o u s n e s s . H e open­ ed h i s e y e s a n d s t a r e d u n c e r t a i n l y for s o m e seconds at t h e tattered tail feathers, then he d r e w back t h e d r y c o r n e r s of h i s m o u t h a n d went, "SSSSSStttttt", piercingly. T h e old h e n t h r e w u p h e r h e a d in indignation and f r i g h t . She s q u a w k e d and flopped hurriedly to t h e floor, t h e n w a d d l e d fiercely out t h r o u g h the opened door, adjusting her outraged feathers. His head dropped back to the c o a t pillow, a h a n d c a m e u p t o h i s face a n d t h e s p r e a d f i n g e r s d r a g g e d a t a puffed eyeball. H e then blew out his cheeks, and the r e l e a s e s e n t h i s lips c l a t t e r i n g soundlessly together. H e clamped h i s e y e s s h u t a n d b r e a t h e d softly. Sleep would not come again. The same hand reached up again and, fingertips commencing at the temple, wiped roughly the Whole of t h e face, d r a g g i n g b r u t ­ ally a t t h e flesh. H i s e y e s open­ ed a g a i n a n d t h e h a n d d r o p p e d
?2 ADAM, September, 1964

s l u g g i s h l y to t h e b e d s i d e floor a n d g r o p e d m e c h a n i c a l l y for t o b a c c o and papers. H e fashioned a trav­ e s t y of a c i g a r e t t e a f t e r a l m o s t a minute's fumbling, then stroked a m a t c h to life. T h e acrid, sul­ p h u r o u s smoke plummeted down into d o r m a n t l u n g s and evoked a s e a r i n g s p a s m of r e t c h i n g a n d cough ng. "Hell!" h e choked, and immedi­ ately flung himself from the b u n k a n d s t a g g e r e d o u t to t h e well. H e h u n g o v e r t h e p u m p for a b o u t t h r e e m i n u t e s , t h e smoul­ dering cigarette smoking clean blue between his limp fingers, his f r a m e t e n s i n g a n d r e l a x i n g alter­ nately as he retched, heavily and p a i n f u l l y . T h e h e a v i n g slowed in r a t i o to t h e p a s s a g e of t i m e u n t i l h e w a s a t l a s t a b l e to s t r a i g h t e n h i s t o r t u r e d body. " H e l l , " h e said, a n d f l i m g his c i g a r e t t e to t h e g r o u n d , g r i n d i n g it i n t o t h e e a r t h w i t h h i s b a r e heel. " H e l l ! " After massaging his cramped a b d o m e n for a w h i l e , h e w o r k e d on t h e p u m p , d a r t i n g h e a d a n d h a n d s d o w n to c u p t h e sluice of water, snorting and blowing t h r o u g h t h e b i t i n g cold. H e t h e n shook the excess w a t e r from his

h e a d , a n d t h e s h o w e r of d r o p l e t s s p a t t e r e d d o w n o n t h e v e e of his exposed chest. H e shuddered. The sulky was rammed hard up a g a i n s t t h e t a n k s t a n d . I t leaned o v e r to t h e b r o k e n w h e e l a n d a s p l i n t e r e d s h a f t b r a n c h e d sickeningly a t r i g h t a n g l e s to itself like a snapped matchstick, pointing in a c c u s a t i o n a t h i m . 'The h a r n e s s l a y in a t a n g l e d h e a p t w o o r t h r e e yards from the wreck. He thought t h e n of J e n n y . H e looked wildly about, his panic subsiding as he s a w h e r s t a n d i n g a t t h e r e a r of t h e old p l o u g h . " J e n n y ! " h e called, a n d she s n i c k e r e d a n d p a w e d n e r v o u s l y in t h e w e e d s . H e w a l k e d o v e r to her, c a l l i n g soft e n c o u r a g e m e n t to her as he came, soothing away the skittishness and the tendency to b a c k c r a b w i s e a w a y . T h e r e w a s a l o n g red g r a z e all t h e w a y d o w n h e r black flank, a n d w h e n h e t o u c h e d h e r neck she bounced sideways and away, h e r flesh s h u d d e r i n g . H e spoke low, a n d s h e halted. Once a g a i n h e s t r o k e d h e r s h i n i n g neck, and this time she quivered but remained still. H e w a l k e d all a r o u n d h e r , i n s p e c t i n g t h e nicks a n d c u t s , u g l y a n d g l a r i n g on h e r

fine body. H e c a u g h t tlie m a n e b e h i n d iier r i g h t e a r a n d led h e r , u n p r o t e s t ing, t o t h e shed. H e t o o k d o w n t h e s a l v e a n d g e n t i y clotted t h e b r o k e n t u f t s of flesh, m u r m u r i n g m e a n w h i l e so t h a t s h e w o u l d u n d e r s t a n d t h e n e c e s s i t y of it. S h e nickered once or twice, but r e m a i n e d o b e d i e n t l y still. T h e n h e g a v e h e r h e r n o s e b a g of r i c h oatg r a s s . S h e s n u f f e d e a g e r l y i n t o it, blowing u p a little cloud of g r a i n dust. H e r e g a r d e d h e r s i l e n t l y for s o m e seconds, a n d t h r o u g h tearb l u r r e d e y e s said, "Hell, I ' m s o r r y , Jen." He turned about, and stumbled back to t h e house. H e d r e w on his b o o t s o v e r b a r e feet a n d laced t h e m t i g h t l y . T h e n , k i c k i n g aside t h e old b l a n k e t s a n d coats w h i c h h a d slid o n t o t h e floor h e s t u m ­ bled o v e r to t h e m a k e s h i f t t a b l e . T h e r e w e r e flies in t h e h o n e y j a r , a n t s in t h e m e s s of b u t t e r , a n d t h e o p e n face of t h e b r e a d s h o w e d a faint t i n g e of g r e e n . H e shook himself a n d s c o o p e d all these up and bundled t h e m into a b o x on t h e cold stove. H e s a t d o w n t h e n on t h e e d g e of t h e table, and h e began to r e m e m b e r last night.

A few seconds later he j u m p ­ ed d o w n t o t h e floor a n d h u r r i e d o u t of t h e c r u m p l e d h o u s e , p a s t the mangled sulky a n d forlornly snarled harness, over the dying fence, a r o u n d t h e t i m e - r e d d e n e d p l o u g h g r o w i n g o u t of t h e w e e d s , quickly down the path, t h r o u g h the g r o a n i n g gate, and on to t h e treelined road. There he stopped and made as if t o r e t r a c e h i s s t e p s t o t h e house. H e stood irresolutely, but t h e n m a d e d o g g e d l y off in t h e d i r e c t i o n of t o w n . T h e r e w a s a n a u r a of e a r l y m o r n i n g q u i e t a b o u t the trees. They smoked gently w h e r e t h e s h a f t s of s u n l i g h t bar­ relled d i a g o n a l l y i n t o t h e u n d e r ­ g r o w t h and on the road Where the treetops allowed entry. T h e b a r k of t h e t r e e s w a s i m m o b i l e a n d b l a c k and s h a g g e d f r o m t h e recent s u m m e r holocaust. The g r a s s r i o t e d wild a n d g r e e n a s a c o n s e q u e n c e — a n d all a b o u t , t h e strange, hauntingly familiar m o a n i n g silence t h a t i s t h e s o u l of t h e f o r e s t . H e w a l k e d b r i s k l y , a n d in a little w h i l e b e a d s of s w e a t b e g a n to f o r m o n h i s f o r e h e a d a n d t e m ­ ples, e v e n t h o u g h t h e a i r w a s y e t c r i s p . H i s b o d y b e g a n to un-

limber as he marched, and the fall of h i s a r m s w a s f r e e . With each step t h e r e w a s a c u r s e f o r D a v e , a n d t h e n for h i m ­ self. L a s t n i g h t b e g a n t o s h a p e itself f r o m t h e m i s t s of f o g g e d m e m o r y . H e c h a s e d it d o w n f r o m the pub to the night-darkened s t r e e t , i n t o t h e s u l k y (still Shout­ ing curses and threats), through t h e wild, m a d d r i v e h o m e , t h e n e r v e - r e n d i n g collision w i t h t h e gate, t h e ithundering crazily u p t h e p a t h , t h e c a r e e n i n g into t h e t a n k s t a n d , a n d t h e c o l l a p s e of t h e s u l k y . B i t t e r l y h e c u r s e d himself, a n d s o r r o w e d for J e n n y . " H e U ! " h e c r i n g e d i n s i d e of himself. His brow furrowed earnestly as h e t r i e d to r e c a l l t h e a r g u m e n t , i t s c a u s e s a n d effects. T h e y h a d all b e e n laughing m a t e s when Ted c a m e around and paid them. They had t h r o w n their a x e s o n t h e w a g o n , a n d shout­ i n g , h a d u r g e d t h e t e a m into town, t u m b U n g into t h e p u b even before the reins had been d r a w n taut. A f t e r t h e f i r s t l a y e r of d u s t w a s g o n e h e h a d g o n e o u t to t h e paddock behind t h e pub, w h e r e he a l w a y s left J e n d u r i n g t h e w e e k . After a fond head-rolling-andADAM, September, 1964 23

"Hide,

that's a pirate

ship."

-tossing g r e e t i n g lie h a d led h e r to t h e s t a b l e s a n d h a r n e s s e d h e r i n t o t h e s u l k y in p r e p a r a t i o n for the drive home after the pub closed. J e n w a s a good g i r l — h e could e v e n g o t o s l e e p o v e r t h e reins and she would t a k e him home. Back into the p u b then, he had g o n e , a n d t h e l o g g i n g t e a m set­ tled d o w n t o s o m e s e r i o u s drink­ i n g . A b o u t f o u r o'clock D a v e a n d N i g g e r g o t u p a n d did a d a n c e , and afterwards Herb sang, "They C u t D o w n T h e Old P i n e T r e e " , a n d " W i l d Colonial B o y " . A d e e p melancholia then settled over the m a u d l i n l o g g e r s , r e m a i n i n g un­ broken until Barney and Dogger s u r g e d l i k e t i g e r s all a b o u t t h e b a r in t e r r i f i c c o m b a t . B a r n e y had casually told Dogger he w a s uglier t h a n Mrs Cowper, the pub­ l i c a n ' s wife. S h o r t l y a f t e r t h i s brief, b u t furious encounter, while Barney still bled p r o f u s e l y f r o m t h e n o s e , M r s C o w p e r , h o m e l y a s a cow, paddled into t h e bar with the c u s t o m a r y suitcase-full of h e a v y sandwiches. The men converged o n h e r , g r e a t calloused h a n d s , a m a z e of black-nailed, d i s l o c a t e d thumbs and gnarled fingers, reaching out and clutching choked c h u n k s of r o u g h b u t w h o l e s o m e sandwiches, and pressing them wolflshly i n t o s h a r k l i k e j a w s . A b o y b o u n d e d into t h e b a r , breathlessly reporting the coming of a c a r . T h e m e n t h r u s t b e e r s and sandwiches hurriedly aside and pushed and struggled outside
24 \DAM, September, 1954

i n t o t h e s t r e e t , l e a n i n g on o n e another's shoulders. They watched e a g e r l y t h e b i l l o w i n g cloud of dust churning a n d boiling along the main street. I t c l a t t e r e d a n d g r o u n d , it b o r e wildly a l o n g t h e clay, a n d t h e d r i v e r g r i p p e d t h e big w h e e l for d e a r life. I t s h u d d e r e d p a s t t h e astounded men, and the driver h u n c h e d o v e r t h e big w h e e l a n d looked s t r a i g h t a h e a d o v e r t h e s t e a m i n g cap on the bonnet. It s h u d d e r e d a t t h e hill a n d floun­ d e r e d in a foot-deep d u s t p o o l , t h e n

it s c r e a m e d a c r e s c e n d o of a n g e r , a n d finally t o t t e r e d t o t h e b r o w of t h e hill a n d d i s a p p e a r e d . T h e y t r o o p e d b a c k inside t h e pub. " W h a t w a s i t ? " Dogger asked, his a r m about Barney's shoulder. "A T-Model," D a v e supplied. " I t w a s n o t , " M a c k said, " I t w a s a Panhard." D a v e f r o w n e d . " I t w a s T-Model," h e s a i d finally, a n d t u r n e d t o his beer. M a c k s p a t on t h e floor a n d roUed a c i g a r e t t e . H e g l a r e d a t D a v e ' s b a c k a n d said to D o g g e r , " I t w a s a P a n h a r d . I s a w t w o of t h e m in t h e city a c o u p l e of months ago." Dogger snorted and reached for t h e a c c o r d i o n h a n g i n g on t h e wall. H e t u r n e d his back to the b a r , b r a c e d his h a n d s on it, a n d h e a v e d h i m s e l f t o a s i t t i n g posi­ tion, f r o m w h e r e h e could s u r v e y all. T h e accordion s t r a p settled c o m f o r t a b l y a b o u t h i s neck, h e l e a n e d i n t o it g e n t l y . W h e n h e h a d evoked the right notes he s w u n g s u d d e n l y i n t o " D a n n y Boy", t h e loggers' favorite. T h e y l i s t e n e d to t w o c h o r u s e s , t h e i r e y e s m i s t y a n d f a r off, a n d then Barney started a jig. Soon t h e p u b s h o o k t o t h e p o u n d i n g of the boots. T h e s e n t i m e n t a l c r y of t h e ac­ c o r d i o n e v e n b r o u g h t a h i n t of m o i s t u r e to M r s C o w p e r ' s eyes. They danced and they roared the t u n e , a n d w h e n it died its d e a t h of r e p e t i t i o n , t h e y rollicked u p " T h e Old P i n e T r e e " . B u t When t h e coffin w a s m a d e , t h e y s a n g l o w a n d sad, a n d D o g g e r c a r e s s e d t h e s t r i a t e d i n s t r u m e n t until only a faint, a l m o s t inaudible m o a n p u l s e d f r o m it. W h e n t h e s o n g finished t h e y stood d r i n k i n g q u i e t l y until t h e m o o d p a s s e d . G r a d u a l l y t h e noise of s p e e c h a n d s o n g r o a r e d a g a i n from the pub. D u m p y Mrs Cowper stretched a r o u n d t h e b a r l i g h t i n g t h e kero­ s e n e l a m p s . T h e t a l k i n c r e a s e d in volume and outside the night c a m e d o w n black a n d s t a r l e s s . Suddenly Dave whirled about

"Martha,

you shouldn't

carry a heavy load like that. Make two

trips."

a n d said to Mack, "T-Model!" Mack reeled a little, a n d h e shifted u n c e r t a i n l y b e f o r e h e f o u n d Dave. " I tell y o u it w a s a P a n h a r d , " h e said e m p h a t i c a l l y . " H o w would y o u k n o w ? " D a v e stated, a n d l a u g h e d . "A d a m n e d s i g h t m o r e t h a n you." Dave put down his glass. N o other person had heard these r e m a r k s , n o one had especially observed t h e t w o m e n , b u t a s soon a s D a v e placed t h e g l a s s o n t h e bar, all s o u n d s a n d m o v e m e n t ceased a b r u p t l y . All t h e h e a d s swivelled to face t h e m . S o m e m e n smiled, o t h e r s w a i t e d i m p a s s i v e ­ ly. " S a y t h a t a g a i n , " D a v e said softly. M a c k r e p e a t e d t h e w o r d s slow­ ly a n d e v e n l y in u n m i s t a k a b l e d e l i b e r a t e n e s s . "A . . . d a m n e d . . . sight . . . more . . . than . . . you." D a v e b r e a t h e d in deeply. H e rubbed his p a l m s slowly over his t h i g h s , a n d t h e n r u b b e d t h e b r i d g e of h i s n o s e . " O u t s i d e , " h e said. T h e l o g g e r s p a r t e d to f o r m a n aisle for t h e t w o m e n . W h e n Mack a n d D a v e h a d d i s a p p e a r e d o u t t h e door, t h e y t r o o p e d o u t behind. A m a n c a m e back into the bar. "We want a lamp," he explained to M r s C o w p e r , " T h e y c a n ' t see a thing out there." " T h e r e ' l l be n o l a m p r e m o v e d f r o m m y w a l l s , " s h e said finally. " A n d t h e r e ' l l be n o m o r e f i g h t i n g in m y h o t e l t o n i g h t , e i t h e r . " W i t h t h a t s h e p l o u g h e d in behind t h e b a r and e m e r g e d w i t h a s t e r n looking c h u n k of willow, s h a p e d like a r o u g h shillelagh. " A w , " t h e m a n said, for h e k n e w M r s C o w p e r . H e w e n t o u t into the darkness. The men returned presently, a n d in d e f e r e n c e t o M r s C o w p e r ' s ruling, t h e y stood b e t w e e n t h e bristling p a i r . M a c k a n d D a v e . S u d d e n l y D a v e said, " T o m o r r o w , therr." "What time — and w h e r e ? " Mack agreed eagerly. " O u t s i d e h e r e — 10 o'clock." "All r i g h t , y o u bull-headed cow." D a v e m a d e a s p r i n g at Mack, b u t t h e m o v e w a s stalled by t h r e e of t h e l o g g e r s . T h e y p i n i o n e d h i s a r m s and m a d e him promise to wait. H e g l o w e r e d sullenly a n d s h r u g g e d himself free. "Til w i p e t h e d a m n e d s t r e e t with y o u , " h e said, a n d scooped up a d r i n k . Mack s n a r l e d a n d d r a n k a p i n t without drawing breath. Then he left t h e b a r a n d s t o r m e d o u t i n t o t h e d a r k n e s s . H e leaped a w k w a r d ­ ly into his s u l k y , g a t h e r e d u p t h e reins, a n d s t a r t l e d J e n n y into sudden flight. T h r e e black m i l e s t h e y t h u n d ­ ered, J e n n y s n o r t i n g a n d fireeyed, Mack s t a n d i n g d r u n k e n l y on t h e p l a t e , s h o u t i n g a n d flailing t h e r e i n s like a n a n c i e n t chariot­ eer. O v e r t h e rain-eroded r u t s a n d wheel-ditches, t h e c a r t lifting a n d b o u n c i n g crazily f r o m side to side, they went. Only by staring u p n o w a n d t h e n to t h e faint s h o w of l i g h t a b o v e t h e r o a d w h e r e the trees halted could Mack

"You're rubbing

me the wrong

way!"

define t h e r o a d , a n d in h i s m a d ­ ness a n d anger, missed the turnoff to h i s h o u s e a n d o v e r s h o t it b y half a m i l e . H e slewed about and careened off t h e b a n k a n d s t r a i g h t e n e d u p for h o m e . H e p e e r e d a t t h e g a t e ' s d i m o u t l i n e a n d b r o k e it a w a y a s he charged through, not stopping all t h e w a y u p t h e t r a c k t o t h e h o u s e , g r a z i n g t h e old p l o u g h a n d c o m i n g finally to a c r a s h i n g halt against the tankstand. He leaped out, hustled squealing J e n n y from the harness, and as h e w a s a b o u t to look a t h e r , s h e bolted. H e c u r s e d h e r wildly in t h e darkness, and w h e n h e realised she would not come he staggered into t h e h o u s e a n d collapsed on the bunk, dropping as was his u n a l t e r a b l e h a b i t , h i s tobacco a n d m a t c h e s n e a r t h e bed. All t h i s w i t h o u t b o t h e r i n g to find a l i g h t . And the hen had wakened him — and now he was going to t o w n for t h e fight. H e h a d n o s t o m a c h for t h e f i g h t

now, n o n e a t all. B u t h e h a d to face D a v e o r else h e w o u l d n e v e r live it d o w n . T h i s m o r n i n g t h e argument seemed childish and stupid, without reasonable basis o r logical e x c u s e . W h a t did h e care whether the new car had b e e n a T-Model o r a P a n h a r d . He even suspected Dave was r i g h t , a n d it d i d n ' t m a t t e r m u c h , e i t h e r w a y . T h e t h i n g w h i c h in­ c e n s e d h i m w a s t h e s t u p i d i t y of it. E i t h e r face a m a n in s e n s e l e s s f i g h t o r b e looked on f r o m t h a t d a y f o r w a r d in s c o r n . T h a t no m a n could e n v i s i o n . H e s a t d o w n to r e s t , a n d to roll a cigarette. This one he w a s able to h a n d l e , l a s t n i g h t ' s effects b e g i n n i n g t o m a r c h o u t of h i s r a v a g e d s y s t e m . T h e s h a f t s of gold b e g a n to m o v e t o w a r d t h e perpendicular, and with a reckon­ i n g of t h e s u n w h i c h w a s n e a r perfect, h e g a u g e d t h e t i m e to b e g e t t i n g o n t o w a r d 9.45. H e w o u l d h a v e t o h u r r y to m a k e it b y 10. T h e bull a n t m u s t h a v e leaped (Continued on page 52)
25

ADAM, September, 1954

FACT

ANDREW BONAR

CONFESSIONS

26

ADAM, September, 1964

OF A MASTER THIEF
He was a smooth-talking con man whose lightning-fast hands and in­ credible charm and hold over women amassed him 18 million dollars in jewels
TT w a s a big e v e n i n g f o r t h e •'•rich y o u n g s p i n s t e r s of Chi­ cago. T h e b e j e w e l l e d d a u g h t e r s of beer barons, clothing manufac­ turers, corn traders and meat­ packing m a g n a t e s waited for their c h a n c e to d a n c e w i t h t h e D u k e of O t r a n t o . T h e y w a t c h e d h i m glid­ ing a n d s p i n n i n g i n a n i m p e c c a b l e w a l t z a c r o s s t h e floor of t h e brownstone mansion, located just off A s t o r S t r e e t . T h e D u k e , t a l l and muscular, with a tic working n e a r h i s m o u t h e v e r y few m i n ­ u t e s , w a s in t h e c l u t c h of b l o n d e M a r g a r e t Willkeit, w h o had come in f r o m M i l w a u k e e for t h e e v e n t , especially t o m e e t h i m . T h e n t h e g i r l s l o s t s i g h t of h i m a s h e w h i r l e d his p a r t n e r i n t o t h e m i d d l e of a k n o t of d a n c e r s . Miss W i l l k e i t w a s s a y i n g , " T h e y tell m e y o u r f a m i l y o w n s a l o t of p r o p e r t y o n t h i s side of the ocean." "You m i g h t c-call it e x t e n s i v e , " the D u k e r e m a r k e d , "in N o r t h American t e r m s . It includes a b o u t h a l f t h e s t a t e of V i r g i n i a a n d m - m o s t of t h e p r o v i n c e of O n t a r i o . " His r i g h t e y e t w i t c h e d i n w h a t looked l i k e a w i n k . "Gee whiz," said Margaret breathlessly, winking back a t h i m as the waltz ended. The Duke bent to kiss h e r hand, and she jumped. H e excused himself. "No, n o , i t ' s n o t t h a t . My bracelet, m y d i a m o n d bracelet— it's g o n e ! " The bracelet h a d indeed vanished, a n d t h e h o s t of t h e p a r t y w e n t into a f u r y w h e n h e l e a r n e d a b o u t it. T h e D u k e ' s h a n d s w e r e s h a k ­ ing. H e s u g g e s t e d c a l l i n g in t h e police i m m e d i a t e l y t o s e a r c h a l l the guests. H e himself was the first to submit to the search. The other guests were less g r a c i o u s a b o u t l e t t i n g t h e police pat them and fumble through their pockets. An h o u r l a t e r t h e police con­ cluded t h a t o n c e a g a i n it w a s t h e " g e t a w a y t h i e f " w h o ' d b e e n pil­ laging Chicago — and they hur­ ried off t o a l e r t a l l t h e city p r e ­ cincts. A t t h a t point, T h e D u k e of Otranto, alias George Mercadente, alias Prince Lahovary, christened G e o r g e M a n o l e s c o , t h e m o s t suc­ cessful j e w e l t h i e f i n h i s t o r y , delicately r e t r i e v e d t h e b r a c e l e t from t h e host's breast pocket, w h e r e it h a d lain for t h e p a s t h o u r a n d a half, a n d c o n s o l e d M i s s Willkeit by reminding h e r t h a t it w a s insured. "I feel partly responsible," Manolesco told her, " a n d I m u s t m - m a k e this u p to you. Will you b e t h e g u e s t of h o n o r a t m y I n d e p e n d e n c e D a y b a l l in t w o w e e k s ? " Miss Willkeit cheered u p a n d said s h e w o u l d . M a n o l e s c o escorted h e r back to her suite in t h e Hotel Vermont. I t took him four hours to say good night. T h e n h e got back into his e l e g a n t evening dress, walked down one flight, found a n open door, re­ moved a gold h u n t e r watch, a p a i r of p l a t i n u m cuff l i n k s a n d a diamond stickpin from a dressing table, while the owner snored d r u n k e n l y five f e e t a w a y — a n d w e n t back t o his o w n hotel w i t h a n i g h t ' s h a u l of s o m e 6000 d o l l a r s , s h a k i n g l i k e a v i c t i m of the plague. M a n o l e s c o h a d b e e n in Chi­ cago for seven m o n t h s , and his J u l y 4 b a l l g a v e h i m t h e oppor­ tunity to repay Chicago high society for its hospitality. T h e b a l l w a s t h e e v e n t of t h e s e a s o n . E i g h t y guests drove t o t h e Per­ m a n e n t Exhibition Grounds in four-in-hand mailcoaches. They visited t h e M i d w a y P l a i s a n c e t o w a t c h t h e G e r m a n H a g e n b e c k cir­ cus. T h e y w e n t o n t o t h e E x h i b i t i o n r e s t u a r a n t f o r a 15-course d i n n e r , and then Manolesco announced with a stutter t h a t he had hired t h e Chicora, t h e latest model in propeller-driven steamers, for a floating, all-night celebration on L a k e Michigan. After dancing, eating, drinking and making merry, the guests a p p e a r e d on d e c k f o r a b l e a r y eyed b r e a k f a s t . A s M a n o l e s c o s a i d good-bye a n d t h - t h a n k y o u f o r coming to t h e last guest, M a r g a r e t W i l l k e i t , h e t o o k h i s bill f r o m t h e c a p t a i n of t h e Chicora. T h e cele­ b r a t i o n h a d cost h i m a l m o s t 7000 dollars. H e paid this sum without a n y difficulty b y g o i n g t o a n a d d r e s s on F i r s t D e a r b o r n Street, w h e r e h e c a s h e d t h e 12,500 d o l l a r s in broaches, pins, bracelets a n d n e c k l a c e s w h i c h h e h a d collected d u r i n g t h e n i g h t in t h e Chicora's dressing rooms. T h a t a f t e r n o o n h e p u l l e d o u t of U n i o n P a c i f i c S t a t i o n in a P u l l ­ m a n coacih. G e o r g e M a n o l e s c o w a s t r a v e l l i n g W e s t to G o l d e n Calif­ ornia. In his abandoned hotel room sat two messages which he would never read. One was a letter on embossed stationery from M a r g a r e t Willkeit, implor­ i n g t h e D u k e of O t r a n t o t o m e e t her father, t h e richest m a n in Wisconsin. T h e other w a s a s h o r t request on plain notepaper from t h e P o l i c e C o m m i s s i o n e r of Chi­ cago, imploring the Duke of Otranto to explain a mysterious t h e f t of 1600 d o l l a r s i n c a s h f r o m t h e n e x t r o o m in t h e hotel. T h e trip to California lasted for five p l e a s a n t d a y s . I n t h e parlor car Manolesco played p o k e r w i t h t w o b a k e r s a n d a blueblood from Boston. H e apologised f o r h a n d l i n g t h e c a r d s so c l u m s i l y —he had always wanted to learn t h i s g a m e of p o k e r , h e e x p l a i n e d , b u t h a d n e v e r h a d t h e c h a n c e be­ f o r e . H e a l s o a p o l o g i s e d f o r win­ n i n g 7300 d o l l a r s , it w a s a b s u r d beginner's luck. I n t h e d r a w i n g r o o m c a r h e e x c h a n g e d p o l i t e con­ v e r s a t i o n in p a s s i n g w i t h s e v e r a l young ladies, w h o were dis­ appointed t h a t t h e good-looking, if n e r v o u s , g e n t l e m a n did n o t spend more time with them. But m o s t of M a n o l e s c o ' s w a k i n g h o u r s a n d p a r t of h i s n i g h t s w e r e de­ v o t e d t o a n a t t r a c t i v e , 30-year-old lady with whom he shared a table in t h e d i n i n g c a r . J a n e t Reid, m a r r i e d to the o w n e r of a s t e e l m i l l in C l e v e l a n d , h a d decided t o visit h e r p a r e n t s in S a n Francisco. She found the C o n t i n e n t a l m a n n e r s of t h i s y o u n g m a n charming. Was he English? F r e n c h ? R u s s i a n ? I t w a s h a r d to tell f r o m his s t a m m e r i n g accent. H e t a l k e d a b o u t his family i n Brit­ a i n , h i s f r i e n d t h e D u c h e s s e de Trevolle in P a r i s , his cousin t h e Prince Lahovary in the Balkans. Obviously, he h a d m o n e y and p l e n t y of it. J u s t a s o b v i o u s l y , he made a dramatic contrast with her husband, w h o seemed to be inter­ e s t e d i n n o t h i n g b u t t h e p r i c e of p i g i r o n a n d w e e k l y figures of t h e o u t p u t of h o t - r o l l e d s t e e l p l a t e . Manolesco, in t u r n , found Mrs Reid m o s t engaging. H e admired her slim but appealingly rounded figure, h e r open blue eyes, h e r light but intoxicating perfume a n d , m o s t of a l l , h e a d m i r e d t h e pearl necklace she wore every night to dinner. By the last morning of the
27

ADAM, September, 1964

trip J a n e t Reid h a d invited h e r companion to come to her family h o m e on N o b Hill a s often a s h e wished. She w a s not w e a r i n g h e r necklace at that moment. It rested in her alligator bag on the seat beside her while she attacked a medium-boiled egg. T h e t r a i n w a s o n t h e l a s t s t a g e of t h e j o u r n e y , approaching Stockton, when J a n e t w e n t to h e r b a g f o r a h a n d k e r ­ chief a n d n o t i c e d t h a t t h e n e c k ­ lace had disappeared. She men­ t i o n e d it t o M a n o l e s c o , w h o p a n ­ icked. H e assured h e r t h a t s h e could n o t h a v e b r o u g h t it t o b r e a k f a s t w i t h her, since he h a d sat with her for a l m o s t a n hour. T h e y m u s t g o b a c k a n d look i n her roomette. In the meantime, h e would inform t h e conductor. A t Stockton police boarded t h e train, and the passengers were w a r n e d to sit tight. Manolesco a n d J a n e t w e r e still t u r n i n g h e r belongings upside down when the police d e p u t y a c c o s t e d h i m . T h e blueblood from Boston stood in t h e background, g r i n n i n g t o himself.

"This m a n tells m e you spent a h e l l u v a l o t of t i m e o n t h e t r i p with the lady." T h e deputy mas­ s a g e d his hip w i t h a pistol. Manol­ esco stood up s t r a i g h t . His eye w a s twitching furiously a n d he t o o k o u t a m o n o c l e t o s t e a d y it. " I n c a s e y o u a r e a c c u s i n g m e of complicity in this th4heft, I think I had better reveal m y identity. Will you come with m e , p-please?" H e led t h e w a y to his roomette. F r o m a briefcase he produce a ) a r c h m e n t w r i t t e n in fine, t a p e r m g script and studded with w a x seals. I n t h r e e l a n g u a g e s it asked all authorities to co-operate with t h e b e a r e r , t h e M a r c h e s e di P a v anno. It w a s signed by t h e King of I t a l y . ( T h i s w o r k of a r t h a d c o s t M a n o l e s c o 45 d o l l a r s — h e h a d h a d it prepared by t h e most skilled f o r g e r in Buffalo, NY.) " E x c u s e me," s a i d t h e d e p u t y , blinking a t t h e seals, "I don't a i m to start no Italian-American wars." "Of course not, m y d-dear fellow," said M a n o l e s c o . H e r e a c h ­ ed i n t o h i s w a l l e t . " Y o u w e r e

d o i n g y o u r d-duty." H e h a n d e d IW) dollars to t h e deputy, who turned t o t h e blueblood w a i t i n g d o w n t h e aisle. " M i s t e r , " h e said, " I t h i n k y o u b e t t e r g e t off t h i s t r a i n w i t h me." After two hectic m o n t h s with J a n e t Reid in S a n Francisco, M a n o l e s c o faced a difficulty. H e still h a d t h e n e c k l a c e . H e could d i s p o s e of it — s e v e r a l fences h a d offered h i m o u t r i g h t c a s h . B u t h e w a n t e d full v a l u e ; h e f i g u r e d t h o s e p e a r l s o u g h t to b r i n g in a t l e a s t 10,000 d o l l a r s . T h e n h e h a d a n idea, a n d it w a s t o l e a d t o t h e m o s t i n g e n i o u s j e w e l coup of a l l time. H e put on a heavy beard which clipped o v e r h i s e a r s , a n d t o o k a cab down to the B a r b a r y Coast a r e a t o s p e a k t o o n e of t h e fences w h o h a d offered h i m 7500 d o l l a r s . T h e fence, a l i t t l e , s h a r p - f a c e d m a n , recognised the beard, which M a n o l e s c o h a d w o r n before, a n d t o l d h i m t h e p r i c e w a s n o w dowm t o 6500 d o l l a r s . B y b a r g a i n i n g h a r d a n d l e t t i n g t h e fence lick t h e pearls "to t a s t e their quality," Manolesco pushed the price back t o t h e o r i g i n a l f i g u r e . T h e n , his p o c k e t s full of bills, h e left t h e s t o r e a n d m a d e f o r t h e m o r e dis­ r e p u t a b l e b a r s in t o w n . H e r e , in his fine clothes, he w a s liable to be attacked and, a s he hated v i o l e n c e b e c a u s e h e said it w r i n ­ kled his jacket, he assumed a limp. Even in the roughest q u a r t e r s of t h e d o c k cities of t h e world he had found t h a t nobody w o u l d s t r i k e a cripple. After several hours and about a fifth of s t r a i g h t b o u r b o n , h e d i s c o v e r e d t h e m a n h e w a s look­ i n g for, a s h a b b y , quiet-looking barfly, w h o had been nursing one shot for over a n hour. Manolesco approached him and, after some casual talk, asked the m a n — an e x - s c h o o l t e a c h e r b y t h e n a m e of W a r n e r — if h e w o u l d l i k e t o m a k e 500 d o l l a r s a n d a n e w out­ fit. W a r n e r w a s only t o o a n x i o u s . M a n o l e s c o o u t l i n e d his p l a n . H e w o u l d g i v e W a r n e r o n e of h i s o w n suits — W a r n e r would go to t h e police a n d confess t h a t h e h a d s t o l e n t h e p e a r l n e c k l a c e on t h e t r a i n a n d t a k e n it to t h e fence, s p e n t t h e m o n e y a n d t h e n repented. H e would t a k e the p o l i c e t o t h e fence's h i d e o u t a n d point out the necklace. "You'll be i m p r i s o n e d , " Manol­ esco told h i m . " T h a t ' s w h y I ' m p a y i n g y o u t h e 500 d o l l a r s . W h e n y o u c o m e o u t you'll h a v e a n n e s t egg." W a r n e r laughed. "I wish I h a d 500 b u c k s for e v e r y t i m e I ' v e b e e n in t h e cUnk." T h e following m o r n i n g W a r n e r f i n g e r e d t h e fence, t h e n e c k l a c e w a s recovered and returned to a delighted Janet Reid. Warner r e c e i v e d t w o m o n t h s in j a i l a n d a n e x t r a 200 d o l l a r s f r o m M a n o l e s c o for good b e h a v i o r . T h e fence received a one-year sentence. T h e i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n y w a s also de­ l i g h t e d , b u t n o t for long. T h a t n i g h t , to c e l e b r a t e t h e r e t u r n of t h e p e a r l s , M a n o l e s c o took J a n e t R e i d on t h e t o w n . T h e y dined a t the lush Baldwin Hotel and went o n to a d a n c e a t t h e Pacific Club.

"You have a choice . . . roll it up or roll it
28 ADAM, September, 1954

down,"

"You never used to read in bed before u>e were J a n e t had the pearls back on her white throat. During the evening s h e d r a n k a lot of c h a m p a g n e , and accepted quickly w h e n Man­ olesco a s k e d h e r b a c k t o his s u i t e in t h e C a l i f o r n i a H o t e l , S a n F r a n ­ cisco's n e w e s t , f o r a n i g h t c a p . I t t u r n e d o u t t o be t h e m o s t effect­ ive n i g h t c a p s h e e v e r d r a n k . A t 2.15 t h e n e x t a f t e r n o o n w h e n she woke up with a head t h a t felt like d a m p l e t t u c e , M a n o l e s c o w a s m o v i n g o u t of S a n F r a n c i s c o B a y in a first-class c a b i n a b o a r d t h e SS Meriwether. The captain h a d locked t h e p e a r l s a n d a h e a v y c a s h b o x s a f e l y in t h e s h i p ' s s t r o n g room, and Manolesco strolled on deck to w a v e g o o d b y e t o t h e Golden G a t e a n d look for s o m e action — a rich passenger who'd t e a c h h i m h o w to p l a y p o k e r . T h a t w a s t h e c l o s e of G e o r g e Manolesco's first visit t o the United S t a t e s . L e s s t h a n a y e a r e a r l i e r h e h a d left P a r i s w i t h only 200 f r a n c s a n d 16 s u i t s . H e n o w h a d , n o t c o u n t i n g t h e neck­ lace, 112,000 d o l l a r s in c a p i t a l , 31 suits. 46 silk s h i r t s a n d a n a s s o r t ­ m e n t of w a t c h e s w i t h o t h e r m e n ' s initials c a r v e d o n t h e m . M o s t important, he had spent well over 50,000 d o l l a r s . A s h e often r e ­ marked, "It's not how m u c h you h a v e , b u t h o w nicely you live."

married!"

Manolesco h a d been b o r n in a s m a l l t o w n in R u m a n i a 25 y e a r s e a r l i e r , in 1872. H i s m o t h e r d i e d while he w a s a n infant. His grandmother, a stern but highly educated lady, taught young George to speak French, Russian a n d English, as well a s his n a t i v e language. To overcome his nerv­

ous habits, a n d his trembling, h e studied conjuring a n d card tricks. B y t h e t i m e h e w a s 11, h e w a s s o jroficient a t simple card g a m e s .ike T w e n t y - O n e that he won l a r g e s u m s of m o n e y f r o m h i s schoolfriends. A m a j o r scandal erupted in t h e t o w n w h e n t h e f a t h e r of o n e f r i e n d n o t i c e d , in t h e w i n d o w of a local p a w n s h i p , a costly vase, a c a r r i a g e clock and a set of encyclopedias t h a t had vanished from his h o m e . T h e boy h a d stolen t h e m to p a y George a g a m b l i n g d e b t . W h e n a b o u t 50 o t h e r , s i m i l a r t h e f t s w e r e un­ covered, Manolesco senior saved h i s son f r o m r e f o r m s c h o o l b y sending him a w a y for training a s a n a v y cadet. H e soon b e c a m e u n h a p p y a b o u t the discipline at the cadets' i n s t i t u t e . A t t h e a g e of 14 h e stowed a w a y aboard a Turkish t r a m p s t e a m e r a n d s n e a k e d off w h e n t h e ship docked at Constan­ t i n o p l e . T h e r e h e lived a s a s t r e e t urchin for three years, playing sailors out of their pay and sleeping free a t a mission for t h e homeless. H e g r e w into a h u s k y youth who spent as much as he could steal keeping himself g r o o m e d a n d d r e s s e d . A n d h e add­ ed Greek, Italian and some T u r k i s h t o h i s s t o r e of l a n g u a g e s . One day he rescued a poodle which had almost run under a streetcar on the Grande Rue. T h e dog's n a m e w a s Diamond ("That name—it was a prophecy," M a n o l e s c o r e c a l l e d in h i s m e m ­ o i r s ) , a n d it b e l o n g e d t o V a l e r i a , the Comtesse de Boulogne a n d w i f e of a n a g i n g F r e n c h d i p l o m a t . V a l e r i a w a s 37 b u t s h e l o o k e d 10 years younger with her tall, m a g n i f i c e n t body. S h e t o o k o n e l o o k a t t h e well-built 17-year-old, a t h i s c r o p of t h i c k b l a c k h a i r , ruggedly good-looking features and tailored suit. Then she smothered him in a lengthy embrace. At dinner t h a t evening she discribed t h e incident to h e r hus(Continued on page 4Jf)

"I don't

have everything

. . . I don't

have that blonde

across the

street."
2?

ADAM, September, 1964

FICTION •

HAL ABBOTT

Tabutiri — the "Changing Island" — was an idyllic paradise from afar . . . and a hell-on-earth to live on. The native belief of evil spirits could well be justified...
a a ng TaHrtEfh e wt rolddne " Rwoeitnyudmsatw"u msabglaebidnusmtdpoitwhne wh he th t h e g a n g p l a n k h e r d e d b y o u r ginsodden skipper. "Here comes double trouble," the m a t e growled. I paused to admire t h e display of l e g s a n d l i n g e r i e a n d t h e in­ t i m a t e p i l o t i n g of C a p t a i n H i g g s . The two girls m u s t have thought t h a t he had m o r e clinging hands t h a n a n octopus. H e reached the deck without falling a n d glared a t the mate. " W e s a i l in a n h o u r , m i s t e r . Get t h e ladies' b a g s on board and s t o w t h a t e x t r a l i f e r a f t o n t h e foredeck." H e p o i n t e d t o a l o a d e d truck that had stopped alongside. " W h e n did t h i s w o r m - e a t e n s c o w get a passenger certificate?" the m a t e demanded. "At noon today, mister. The Consul here w a n t s these w o m e n taken to N o u m e a as quickly as p o s s i b l e , so w e g o t o u r o r d e r s . " T h e m a t e snorted. "There's no room here for w o m e n , captain. W h e r e the hell can w e stow t h e m ? " Higgs showed his teeth. "You, a n d t h e s e c o n d mate h e r e , will h a n d o v e r y o u r c a b i n s to t h e passengers. Get cracking, mister." We stared mutinously at his retreating back. T h e s m a U diesel e n g i n e c h u t t e d t h e " R o t u m a " o u t of P a g o - P a g o o n t h e e v e n m g tide, and once c l e a r of h a r b o r a l l sail w a s s e t for t h e Caledonie Isles. T h e m a t e a n d I shared the same lumpy mattress on t h e after hatch, w h e n not keeping watch. "Pity w e don't r u n to double berth cabins. Dean. I wouldn't m i n d s h a r i n g o n e w i t h t h a t doll." T h e m a t e jerked his t h u m b . K a y Collins w a s a big, straw­ b e r r y blonde, a b o r n showgirl. S h e g a v e us a n a p p r a i s i n g eye. T h e captain w a s leaning over Julie Vardon pointing to an i m a g i n a r y porpoise while t h e slim, brownhaired girl wriggled away. T h e
30 ADAM, September, 1964

mate nudged me. " S l i m y old feUow, a i n ' t h e ? I'd l i k e t o t e a c h h e r a b i t of j u d o . " I grinned at him. "I bet you would. It beats m e how those two opposite types came to be cobbers." "They ain't. J u s t happened to be stranded at Pago-Pago at the same time." That night the wind sharpened and the schooner r a n for t w o days w i t h a b o n e in h e r w o r n t e e t h . W e altered course to avoid t h e gale but the wind changed too and trapped us. W h e n the hull strained a n d g r o a n e d u n d e r h e r w e i g h t of canvas, I gave the wheel to the Fijian bosun and w e n t below for orders. T h e saloon w a s h a v i n g a party. O n t h e s t a r b o a r d s e t t e e t h e skip­ p e r w a s p a w i n g t h e evasive bru­ n e t t e , w h o h a d l o s t m o s t of h e r p o i s e a n d s o m e of h e r b u t t o n s . The redhead w a s engaged, rather unenthusiastically, wrestling with t h e m a t e . I picked a path t h r o u g h the e m p t y bottles a n d separated the wrestlers. "The wind h a s reached gale force, c a p t a i n , a n d I r e q u e s t per­ m i s s i o n t o r e d u c e sail." H i g g s focused bloodshot eyes a n d told . m e in f o u r - l e t t e r w o r d s w h a t I could do w i t h t h e sails. I s h r u g g e d and turned to the rough riders. T h e big blonde put her a r m s I c l a w e d f r e e of t h e s a l o o n en­ around me. t r a n c e a s a n i a g a r a of w a t e r "Hi, h a n d s o m e . H a v e a little crashed across the deck and swept d r i n k w i t h K a y Collins, t h e hot­ m e i n t o t h e s c u p p e r s . T h e s t e e r i n g t e s t s t r i p p e r w e s t of S a n F r a n ­ w h e e l was buried under the cisco." t a n g l e d w r e c k a g e of t h e main­ mast, and the crippled schooner "Some other time, honey. I w a n t fought t h e screaming wind with the mate." "I'U p r o v e it, h a n d s o m e . Y o u n o h u m a n h a n d s to a i d h e r . S h e w e n t o v e r and d o w n l i k e a b e a t e n w h i s t l e i n s l o w t i m e a n d I'll do m y sizzling a c t r i g h t h e r e . " She boxer and a swinging s p a r smash­ ed m e i n t o t h e sea. I w e n t t o c l a m b e r e d o n t o t h e t a b l e a n d be­ g a n t o s w a y . I p u l l e d t h e m a t e sleep in t h e w a r m w e t n e s s . to his feet a n d shook him. T h e s u n burning into m y aching " U p o n deck, m i s t e r ! T h e s h i p b o d y i n f o r m e d m e t h a t I still w o n ' t c a r r y it all a n d w e ' l l h a v e lived. M y p r o b i n g f i n g e r s f o u n d a to—" There was a splintering m e s s of bloodied h a i r o n t h e b a c k crash topside and the " R o t u m a " of m y h e a d . I g r o a n e d a n d s a t u p . s h u d d e r e d a n d tUted o v e r . " H i , sailor," t h e b i g b l o n d e said.

S h e w a s s i t t i n g o n t h e e d g e of t h e liferaft w i t h h e r b a r e l e g s i n the water. " A r e y o u t h e second m a t e ? " an­ o t h e r voice asl^ed. E v e n after shipwrecli Julie Vardon m a n a g e d to look n e a t a n d p r i m . "Yes. I ' m B a r r y D e a n . W h a t happened after w e got on d e c k ? " I asked Kay. "The mate dragged Julie and m e to t h i s r a f t a n d c u t it free. H e told u s t o h a n g on w h i l e h e w e n t b a c k for t h e c a p t a i n . W e d r i f t e d clear when the ship went down." " A n d all t h e o t h e r s ? " "It was terrible, Mr Dean." JuUe answered me. "The raft spun and tossed until the sea

CEdmed d o w n , a n d w h e n d a y l i g h t c a m e t h e r e w a s n o t h i n g t o be seen." "Not a flaming thing," Kay echoed, " u n t i l y o u f l o a t e d a l o n g , sailor, all t a n g l e d u p w i t h r o p e s o n a long pole. W e pulled you up here and you've slept ever since." " S t u n n e d , m o s t likely. O n e of you girls h a v e a look a t m y head." Julie cleaned and dressed the w o u n d , u s i n g t h e flrst-iaid b o x fit­ ted to the raft. I t o o k s t o c k of t h e r e s t of o u r equipment. There was a mast and a sail, a t i n of h a r d b i s c u i t s , a k e g of w a t e r , a b u c k e t a n d a boathook.

"All m o d c o n s p r o v i d e d , g i r l s . " " W a i t f o r it, s a i l o r ! " K a y point­ ed g r i m l y t o t h e s m a l l b a r r e l . I t u r n e d it o v e r a n d t h e m i s s i n g b u n g told m e t h a t it w a s e m p t y . T h e s t o r m h a d r o b b e d u s of w h a t w e needed most. "What a r e our chances, sailor?" the redhead asked. I stepped the m a s t and spread t h e scarlet sail. It h u n g like a w e t sheet on a sagging clothes line. " F a i r l y good. P l e n t y of s h i p s u s e t h i s a r e a a n d o u r sail c a n b e s e e n for m i l e s . " K a y g a v e m e a mock salute. "Aye, aye, skipper. Up flaming a n c h o r and set course for—" S h e stopped abruptly. " W h e r e the heck
ADAM, September, 1964 31

do w e m a k e for, s a i l o r ? " I h e l d m y throfebing h e a d a n d tried to think. The " R o t u m a " had f o u n d e r e d a b o u t 500 m i l e s s o u t h ­ w e s t of N u k u a l o f a , i n t h e T o n g a s , so N o u m e a lay w h e r e t h e s u n would set. " W e s t , g i r l s , a n d t h e w i n d ' s in o u r favor." "What wind?" Julie moaned. I stood u p a n d s t a r e d a t t h e v a s t loneliness. O u r whole world w a s steel-blue s k y a n d w a t e r in­ habited only by a crimson speck. T h e n I s a w t h e 20-foot l o n g , g r e y s h a p e m a k i n g for the raft. "Get y o u r legs u p ! " I shouted. " G o t o h e l l , " K a y said, w i t h o u t moving. I jumped and grabbed and yanked at her as the shark streaked underneath us. The raft t i l t e d a n d I fell o n t o p of t h e struggling blonde. " W h a t ' s the big idea, sailor?" she raged. Julie whimpered and gestured with a shaking hand. T h e w h i t e p o i n t e r h a d circled f o r another attack. T h e huge, blunt head c a m e out of t h e sea, t h e c a v e r n o u s m o u t h gaping, and the great, dark eye f o r c e d i t s look of f e r o c i o u s w a t c h ­ fulness into m y shuddering mind. I stabbed frantically with the pronged boathook and the mon­ ster swerved. T h e raft spun like a flywheel and Julie screamed. " S h u t u p ! " K a y yelled. She

strcughtened her tumbled clothing and glared a t me. I couldn't stop m y body trembling. " O k a y , sailor, so y o u s a w a shark. M a y b e it's a n easier death t h a n d y i n g of t h i r s t . " "You didn't see Linda," I mut­ tered. " L i n d a w h o , for P e t e ' s s a k e ? " Kay snapped. " W e w e n t on a picnic to t h e h a r b o r a n d s u d d e n l y m i s s e d Lin­ da. S h e w a s s t a n d i n g o u t on a rock in the water, laughing and waving. W e launched the boat and rowed like madmen." I d i d n ' t r e c o g n i s e t h e h a r s h voice a s mine. "I r e m e m b e r how the sunlight turned t h e droplets from her a r m s i n t o l i t t l e j e w e l s . T h e s h a r k reach­ ed h e r f i r s t a n d w h e n w e pulled h e r into t h e boat t h e r e w a s noth­ i n g left b e l o w h e r w a i s t . S h e w a s still b r e a t h i n g w h e n w e g o t h e r ashore." I stopped as the day w e n t black. T h e s t i n g of s p i r i t i n m y t h r o a t m a d e m e cough into consciousness. K a y p u t the brandy back into t h e first-aid b o x a n d c h e c k e d the dressing on m y head. "Lucky t h a t you've got a thick skull, sailor. A n d stop soaring t h e p a n t s off u s , wiU y o u ? " s h e grumbled. W h e n the sun went down the breeze c a m e u p like a blessing

"Are you the party that called for a
32 ADAM, September, 1964

babysitter?"

and the raft began to move with a p u r p o s e . K a y p o i n t e d to t h e m a n - e a t e r t h a t circled m e n a c i n g l y . "Will M i s t e r B i g a t t a c k in t h e night?" she asked. " I t m i g h t , so w e c a n ' t r i s k be­ ing rolled into t h e sea. We'll h a v e to tie o u r s e l v e s t o g e t h e r , girls." " T r u s t a sailor to think up a g a g l i k e t h a t , " t h e b l o n d e jeered. "You h a v e a choice," I r e m i n d e d her. I used m y belt to lash m y body to the mast. " O k a y , sailor, b u t k e e p y o u r h a n d s t o y o u r s e l f o r I'll t i e t h e m t o o , " K a y p r o m i s e d . F u m b l i n g in the dark, the woman fastened t h e m s e l v e s to e a c h o t h e r a n d to me, using their garments as b o n d s . J u l i e w h i s p e r e d timidly b u t t h e blonde only giggled. The cramped, fitful hours d r a g g e d on. S l e e p w a s i m p o s s i b l e w i t h f r i g h t f u l d e a t h h o v e r i n g in t h e n e a r b l a c k n e s s . Twice, w e felt t h e m o n s t e r n u d g i n g a t t h e raft and w e huddled together like scared rabbits. T h e d a w n b r o u g h t a d a y of blazing torment. W e soaked our c l o t h i n g in t h e s e a a n d w r a p p e d t h e m a r o u n d o u r e x p o s e d skin. W e chewed grittily a t biscuits w i t h n o s a l i v a to m o i s t e n t h e m . F r o m t i m e to t i m e w e t o o k a m o u t h f u l of b r a n d y each, b u t it s t u n g o u r parched throats and retched o u r e m p t y s t o m a c h s . Mercifully, t h e wind blew strongly, or we c o u l d n o t h a v e lived in t h e fur­ nace t h a t engulfed us. T h e great s h a r k p r o w l e d u n c e r t a i n l y , dubi­ o u s of t h e b o b b i n g r a f t in t h e r i p p l e d s e a . I m u s t h a v e s u n k into a c o m a , b e c a u s e it t o o k b o t h girls to shake m e awake. "Land," K a y w a s repeating and I struggled to m y knees. A queer s h a p e d h u m p w a s r i s i n g o u t of t h e s h i m m e r i n g ocean, r i g h t in o u r p a t h of drift. I p u t m y a r m s around Kay and J u h e and we s t a r e d a n d w e p t like w a i f s b e f o r e a lighted Christmas tree. Hope b r o u g h t n e w s t r e n g t h i n t o o u r tor­ t u r e d bodies. Two hours later we saw that t h e strange rock w a s a small island, s h r u b c o v e r e d a n d reef encircled. Inside w a s a calm lagoon a n d a curved, p a l m fringed beach. "Tabutiri!" I exclaimed. The w o m e n stared. "The native name for the "Changing Island", because t h a t odd looking crag changes shape w h e n approached from different d i r e c t i o n s . T h e n a t i v e s s a y it is t h e a b o d e of evil s p i r i t s a n d s t a y away." "Any h u m a n population?" Julie asked. " N o t a n y m o r e . A n u m b e r of t r a d e r s h a v e w o r k e d it for c o p r a a n d g u a n o b u t it n e v e r paid. T o o f a r off t h e b e a t e n t r a c k , I sup­ pose, b u t t h e r e ' s w a t e r a n d f r u i t there." " L e a d m e to it, sailor." I rolled u p t h e sail a n d g a v e K a y o n e of the paddles. " K e e p c l e a r of t h e reef u n t i l w e find t h e p a s s a g e i n t o t h e l a g o o n . K a y a n d I wiH p a d d l e o n o p p o s i t e sides a n d J u l i e will s t a n d a t t h e m a s t a n d a c t a s pilot."

"/ have nothing

against you personally, Shapiro stand stupidity."

. . . it's just that 1 can't

W e s k i r t e d tiie p o u n d i n g s u r f u n t i l w e r e a c h e d t h e g a p in t h e coral r i n g a n d t h e c u r r e n t s w e p t u s a g a i n s t o n e of t h e j a g g e d f a n g s . I t r i p p e d o n e side off t h e r a f t a n d it w a s a l m o s t s u b m e r g e d w h e n it h i t t h e b e a c h . W e d r a g ­ ged each o t h e r o n t o t h e w a r m sand. "Home, sweet home," K a y sang shakily. " L e t ' s l o o k it o v e r , " I s a i d a n d helped t h e m t o t h e b a s e of t h e rock. S o m e p l a c e in its v o l c a n i c h e a r t a life-giving s p r i n g of p u r e w a t e r bubbled, a n d t h e n c h u c k l e d down a stony ladder into a slaty basin. W e b a t h e d o u r s c o r c h e d faces a n d d r a n k o u r fill. I n e v e r t a s t e d a d r i n k so s w e e t . F o r m e r r e s i d e n t s h a d left t h e i r s i g n s of o c c u p a t i o n . A t i m b e r h u t held t w o r o u g h b e d s a n d packing-case furniture and tin c r o c k e r y . Beside t h e s p r i n g - b o w l a l a r g e , slate-like s l a b b o r e c r u d e e t c h i n g s . T h e first s c r i b e had scratched the famous epigraph to womankind: "THE FEMALE O F T H E S P E C I E S IS M O R E DEAD­ LY T H A N THE MALE" and u n d e r n e a t h t h e l a s t five w o r d s a number of j e s t e r s h a d added t h e i r o p i n i o n s of w o m e n t o Kip­ ling's. A few w e r e witty b u t m o s t w e r e obscene. J u l i e t u r n e d h e r s c a r l e t face a w a y a n d K a y g l a r e d at me. I grinned. "Men!" she sneered disgustedly. I climbed t h e t r a c k w i n d i n g u p the steep crag. T h e crest was a m a z e of w e i r d w o r n r o c k s w i t h spires and turrets and arches, and

t o p p e d w i t h a flat s l a b that a f f o r d e d a c l e a r v i s t a of t h e v a s t , e m p t y Pacific. T h e g i r l s w e r e waiting for m e a t t h e hut. " T h e hill t o p is a n a t u r a l w a t c h t o w e r , g i r l s . W e ' l l b u i l d a sig­ nal fire and keep r e g u l a r w a t c h for p a s s i n g s h i p s a n d s e a r c h t h e island for fruit a n d eggs a n d

shellfish a n d a n y t h i n g e d i b l e . " " T h a t t a k e s c a r e of t h e d a y s , sailor, b u t w h a t do w e do a t n i g h t ? " the blonde asked. "Except for t h e w a t c h e r up t o p , w e s l e e p , " I said. "Where, and with whom, sailor?" "Kay!" Julie w a s shocked. " L o o k , w e a r e all y o u n g a n d healthy and we know about the b i r d s a n d t h e b e e s . W e could b e s t u c k h e r e for m o n t h s w i t h n o t h ­ i n g t o d o b u t w a i t . L e t ' s f a c e it, Julie, w e a r e bound to w a n t him sooner or later." T h e slim girl w a s t a u t w i t h emger. "You a r e welcome t o him, y o u ginger cat" — "Hold it!" I barked, "and get t h i s s t r a i g h t . I h a v e a w i f e in Sydney, a n d I a m only at sea to p a y off o u r h o u s e a n d s t a r t a small business together." "So what, sailor? This ain't Sydney," the blonde jeered. " S o I sleep a l o n e , a l w a y s . " " W a n t t o b e t ? " K a y scoffed. "I've seen paddock scarecrows with m o r e appeal than you," I growled and stamped away from her taunting laughter. I spent a restless night between the bare r o o t s of a l a r g e ti-tree. Splashing merriment woke m e u p . I n t h e m i n i m u m of u n d e r ­ w e a r the two girls w e r e wrestling in t h e w a t e r , a n d I w a s e n j o y i n g t h e spectacle w h e n t h e triangular fin c r a c k e d t h e s m o o t h s u r f a c e of t h e lagoon. I yelled a n d r a n . Julie was tugging at the stumbling blonde w h e n I sped into the shallows and dragged t h e m clear. T h e m a n - e a t e r b e a c h e d half i t ' s enormous body before threshing back into deeper water. Mister B i g w a s still h u n t i n g u s . I slap­ p e d K a y ' s face. " T h a t ' s t w i c e I ' v e h a d t o puU you away from that damned shark, you stupid female!" I

"He didn't have any success with the hard sell or the soft sell. Now he's trying the wet sell."
ADAM, September, 1964 33

"Fm glad you asked that question."
s h o u t e d , a n d lifted my hand a g a i n . J u l i e ' s fist s m a c k e d me o n the mouth. "Leave h e r alone!" she storm­ ed, a n d h e l p e d t h e s o b b i n g K a y toward the hut. T h e useless d a y s dragged by. W e s t a c k e d a heap of brush and l e a v e s o n t h e s u m m i t of t h e c r a g , and, in turns, stared for weary h o u r s over t h e blank ocean. T h e f o l d e r of m a t c h e s K a y h a d r e s ­ cued from t h e "ROTUMA" w a s stored u n d e r t h e flat rock. A t first w e t a l k e d h o p e f u l l y of o u r f u t u r e p l a n s b u t a s t h e Wcuting g r e w l o n g e r s p e e c h b e c a m e e r r a t i c £md evasive. K a y suggested t h a t w e r i s k u s i n g t h e r a f t a g a i n b u t it w a s beyond repair. O u r nerves b e c a m e frayed and t e m p e r s flared. A t t h e h e i g h t of a b i t t e r q u a r ­ rel between t h e t w o w o m e n Hogan's lugger arrived a t Tabutiri. K a y and I w a t c h e d t h e s m a l l vessel a n c h o r outside t h e reef a n d a b o a t p u t off. T w o n a t i v e s w e r e a t t h e o a r s a n d a m a s s i v e , blackbearded m a n used t h e tiller. W h e n it g r o u n d e d t h e i s l a n d e r s c a r r i e d t w o casks to t h e spring a n d t h e white m a n came t o us. H e wore a p e a k e d c a p a n d soiled d u n gareee trousers and w a s as broad a n d h a i r y a s a grizzly bear. "Hi, folks! I'm Brad Hogan," h e b o o m e d . " S o r r y t o b r e a k in o n y o u r h o n e y m o o n b u t I ' m s h o r t of water." " D o n ' t j u m p a t conclusions, cap­ t a i n , " I said stiffly. " W e a r e s u r ­ v i v o r s of t h e s c h o o n e r " R o t u m a " . I a m second mate, B a r r y Dean, a n d t h i s i s M i s s K a y Collins, p a s ­ senger. W e w e r e bound for Nou­ m e a . " H o g a n h a d n o t taken h i s a d m i r i n g g a z e off t h e g i r l a n d the blonde preened. "Well, I ' m n o t m a k i n g f o r t h e C a l e d o n i e s t h i s t r i p , folks, b u t I'll get you there sooner or later," H o g a n said. J u U e a p p e a r e d , flush34 ADAM, September, 1964

ed a n d b r e a t h l e s s f r o m h e r r u n from the summit. "Oh, B a r r y , I ' m s o s o r r y ! I fell asleep a n d " — She saw H o g a n and stopped abruptly. " T w o of t h e m ! A l l t o y o u r s e l f . N o w , i s t h a t fair, m i s t e r D e a n ? " H o g a n ' s h o t eyes stripped Julie n a k e d a n d h e Ucked t h e h a i r f r o m

h i s t h i c k lips. "Miss Vardon is also a passen­ g e r f r o m m y lost ship, c a p t a i n . I d e m a n d t h a t you t a k e us all on b o a r d y o u r vessel." "Don't give m e orders. Dean. I o w n a c a r g o boat n o t a n ocean l i n e r , a n d t h e a c c o m m o d a t i o n is limited." H o g a n scratched in his thick beard a n d then grinned. " O k a y , m i s t e r m a t e . I'll t a k e y o u off t h i s isle o n e a t a t i m e — starting with a woman." Julie c r i n g e d b e h i n d m e a s H o g a n ad­ vanced. K a y stopped him. "You've got yourself a n e w c r e w m e m b e r , c a p t a i n . I'll w o r k m y p a s s a g e t o N o u m e a . " I tried to stop her. " D o n ' t b e a d a m n fool, K a y . H e won't take—" " S h u t u p , b u s t e r ! I ' m sick of y o u t w o a n d t h i s r o t t e n island. I t gives m e t h e creeps." S h e drew herself u p to expand h e r magni­ ficent body. " D o I go a b o a r d with you, captain?" s h e asked. "Too flaming r i g h t y o u do, blondie." H o g a n p u t h i s a r m s a r o u n d K a y a n d I pulled h e r free. "You w o n ' t g e t a w a y with this, H o g a n , " I s n a p p e d , " I ' l l b l a c k ball y o u in e v e r y p o r t f r o m B r i s b a n e to Panama, you dirty swine!" H o g a n ' s fist s e n t m e dazed o n t o t h e sand. W h e n m y s e n s e s stopped whirl­ i n g I w a s l y i n g o n t h e b o t t o m of a m o v i n g boat. I s a t u p a n d s p a t blood. H o g a n w a s c u d d l i n g t h e blonde on the stern seat and t h e t w o n a t i v e s w e r e r o w i n g t h e filled w a t e r casks back t o the lugger.

"TOO popular if you ask mel"

"Where's JuUe?" I croaked. "Who cares?" leered t h e busy Hogan. " W h a t h a p p e n e d to J u l i e , K a y ? " T h e blonde girl didn't m e e t m y eyes. " W e a s k e d h e r to c o m e w i t h u s , Barry, b u t she r a n away into the brush." "So y o u left h e r t h e r e , k n o w i n g t h a t s h e wiU g o c r a z y a l o n e ? " I accused. K a y t o o k r e f u g e b e h i n d anger. " W h a t t h e heU could I do, b u s ­ ter? T h e captain h e r e w a s in a h u r r y t o leave." " L o r d h e l p y o u , K a y , " I said, a n d dived c l e a r of t h e s w e e p i n g oars. I w a s half w a y b a c k to t h e beach before I r e m e m b e r e d the white pointer, and then m y mind c h u r n e d in p a n i c . I n t h a t n i g h t ­ m a r e r a c e to s a f e t y I d i e d a d o z e n deaths from monster teeth tearing a w a y m y c r i n g i n g flesh. I d i d n ' t know that the hoarse screaming w a s c o m i n g f r o m m y o w n slob­ bering throat until JuUe p u t h e r arms around m e on the damp sand. "Hush, Barry, hush! It's all r i g h t , y o u ' r e safe. T h e h o r r o r faded in t h e comfort of h e r w a r m , v i t a l b o d y , a n d t h a t night we clung together under t h e bright stars, a castaway A d a m and Eve in a haunted, tropical Eden. T h e d a y s of w a i t i n g b e g a n a g a i n . I told J u l i e w h a t I h a d h e a r d about Brad H o g a n around t h e Is­ l a n d s . A l o n e wolf a m o n g t h e r o v i n g t r a d e r s , s u s p e c t e d of s m u g ­ gling, p o a c h i n g a n d r a i d i n g , b u t too c u n n i n g f o r t h e v a r i o u s Gov­ e r n m e n t a u t h o r i t i e s t o g e t proof. H e changed frequently his vessels a n d h i s c r e w s , s o a s to c o v e r h i s trips, and only employed natives that he w a s able to terrorise. " W h a t win H o g a n d o w i t h K a y , Barry?" " D u m p h e r o n o n e of t h e b i g islands a s s o o n a s h e g e t s t i r e d of h e r . L e t ' s h o p e t h a t s h e r e m e m ­ bers to send help to us, JuUe." She shook h e r head. " H o g a n is a l u s t f u l outlaw, B a r r y . H e ' l l kUl K a y a n d c o m e b a c k to m u r d e r u s . " " W h y should h e ? H e can deny a n y s t o r y of o u r s a n d h i s f r i g h t ­ ened c r e w wiU b a c k h i m u p . H o g a n has been w o r k i n g t h e s a m e r a c k e t successfully for years." Julie wagged her head again. "He won't risk letting u s testify a g a i n s t h i m , B a r r y . " S h e lifted her head t o listen to the eerie wind whispering a r o u n d t h e weird crag and shivered. Hogan returned to Tabutiri with t h e s t e a l t h of a night-hunting jungle prowler. A w o m a n ' s shriek brought me scrambling down from t h e w a t c h t o w e r , a n d I p a u s e d in t h e p a l m s h a d o w s t o regain m y breath. Julie w a s on h e r knees in t h e s a n d w i t h H o g a n holding h e r t w i s t e d h a i r a n d K a y w a s front­ i n g t h e m , t h e i r f i g u r e s g h o s t l y in t h e h a z y U g h t of t h e w a n i n g m o o n . K a y ' s voice c u t l i k e a w h i p . "Let h e r go, lover. I ' m y o u r woman now, for keeps. You said

"Can ANYONE

come out and

play."

so. B r a d . " " I t ' s j u s t a brief p a r t i n g , a n g e l . I'll l e a v e y o u h e r e w i t h D e a n a n d t a k e his girl friend for a s h o r t c r u i s e . W h e n I g e t b a c k w e ' l l aU m a k e for N o u m e a together. That's a promise, angel, a n d y o u k n o w me." " S u r e I do, lover. Too d a m n weU," K a y said t h r o u g h h e r t e e t h . A knife blade glittered in h e r hand, a n d she moved closer to Hogan. "Back to t h e boat, lover. J u s t y o u a n d m e , o r I s w e a r I'U kiU you. Brad." H o g a n l e t g o of J u l i e a n d shrugged his great shoulders. Then he jumped at Kay. He twisted t h e blonde's a r m inward and u p w a r d a n d forced t h e knife viciously i n t o her body. Kay s l u m p e d , a sick s c r e a m b u b b l i n g from h e r throat. Julie r a n for t h e palm trees with the big t r a d e r in fierce p u r s u i t . K a y w a s q u i t e still w h e n I dropped beside her. I got u p t o follow t h e l i v i n g . H o g a n h a d c u t J u l i e off f r o m r e a c h i n g t h e brush, so s h e t u r n ­ e d Uke a h u n t e d d o e f o r t h e h o r n of t h e reef. S h e r a c e d a l o n g t h e c u r v i n g c o r a l a r m u n t i l stop­ ped by t h e surf sweeping across the lagoon. W h e n H o g a n reached

the cowering girl h e gathered h e r up against his chest a n d started b a c k to t h e b e a c h . W e m e t o n a n a r r o w l e d g e o n t h e reef. " O u t of m y w a y . D e a n , y o u ' v e h a d y o u r f l i n g w i t h h e r . N o w it'js m y turn," H o g a n snarled. S u d d e n l y , J u l i e k i c k e d a n d claw­ ed h e r s e l f free, t h e f u r y of h e r s t r u g g l e f o r c i n g t h e t r a d e r oft h i s b a l a n c e . H e w a s still t e e t e r i n g when I charged and butted m y s k u l l i n t o h i s r a g i n g face. H i s great bulk catapulted into t h e lagoon, s m a s h i n g t h e phosphorusthick w a t e r into eerie light. H o g a n surfaced, p u t both h a n d s t o h i s b r o k e n face, g r o a n e d a n d went under. His body w a s turn­ ing over, in slow motion, w h e n t h e s h a r k attacked. Mister Big w a s a t o r p e d o of g r e e n f i r e i n t h e boiling w a t e r a n d H o g a n never had a prayer. T h e ravenous mon­ s t e r ripped a n d g o r g e d In t h e twi­ light depth. Sickened, I stumbled back onto the beach. K a y lay stark on t h e stained sand and Hogan's boat h a d gone. I looked for Julie. S h e w a s still o n t h e reef, j i g g i n g a n d clapping a n d m o u t h i n g with glee as s h e watched t h e c a r n a g e below. (Continued on page 51)

ADAM, September, 1964 35

The shameful saffron brand would never be blotted from Tige Ellis, until he either killed — or was killed by — the one man he both loved and hatedl

.YELLOW
pounced on t h e kid again. Marcel s c r a m b l e d t o h i s feet, lifted h i s Colt from the holster and s m a r t l y rapped the barrel over the man's head. H e collapsed. Marcel turn­ ed, s a w t h e w o m a n w i t h t h e rifle. H e warily eyed her. "Is he dead?" she asked. There w e r e still t r a c e s of b e a u t y in h e r lips a n d e y e s . M a r c e l s h o o k h i s head. "Non, h e w i l l live, I t h i n k . I a m sorry, but you u n ' e r s t a n d ? " "I'm sorry you didn't hit harder," she answered. Marcel heard a sound behind him a n d t u r n e d in t i m e t o s e e t h e kid r a c e a w a y a c r o s s t h e coulee, s c a l e u p t h e wall like a goat a n d d i s a p p e a r beyond the rim. The woman sighed. "That's Tige. B r a n t would h a v e killed h i m . " S h e looked s h a r p l y a t the unconscious m a n and then at Marcel. "Maybe you'd better ride o u t w h i l e h e ' s still a s l e e p . N o telling w h a t B r a n t ' l l do." Marcel shrugged. "I a m not afraid." "I a m . Mister. You got m y t h a n k s , b u t I w i s h y o u ' d r i d e on. It's better that way." M a r c e l t u r n e d to h i s h o r s e a n d mounted. He watched the woman p u t aside the rifle and kneel d o w n b e s i d e B r a n t H a r l a n , still sprawled and unmoving. She looked u p , a t o u c h of a n n o y a n c e in h e r face. M a r c e l p o i n t e d t o w a r d Brant. " H e is a l w a y s t r e a t t h e l i t t l e one that w a y ? " " W h e n B r a n t ' s d r u n k or mad, he's crazy, Mister. Other times he a t l e a s t k e e p s h i s h a n d s off T i g e . W i l l you p l e a s e r i d e o u t b e f o r e there's more trouble?" "Qui," M a r c e l n o d d e d . " I ride. B u t tell h i m t h a t I w i l l c o m e t h i s way again and I ask about the boy." "I'm telling him nothing that'll rile him more," the woman a n s w e r e d . H e r voice lifted in plead­ i n g . " M i s t e r , p l e a s e g e t o u t of sight!" Marcel neck-reined t h e horse a n d r o d e b a c k d o w n t h e coulee. S o it w a s t h a t h e f i r s t m e t Tige Ellis and B r a n t H a r l a n . H e e x p e c t e d t r o u b l e , b u t it d i d n ' t develop. The spring round-up t o o k m o s t of h i s t i m e . I t w a s a m o n t h o r m o r e b e f o r e M a r c e l re­ t u r n e d to t h e coulee. This time Brant was not at home. H i s w i f e looked ill a n d w o r n b u t s h e m a d e M a r c e l wel­ come. T h e kid w a s a little larger, l e g s t o o l o n g for t h e t i g h t , f a d e d j e a n s , b o n y w r i s t s p r o t r u d i n g be­ y o n d t h e f r a y e d e d g e s of h i s clean shirt. H e had a thin body and pinched face t h a t needed feeding, d a r k eyes t h a t w e r e a little too l a r g e and defiant, a sullen mouth. H e scowled a n d n e r v o u s l y r u b b e d o n e b a r e , d i r t y foot a g a i n s t t h e o t h e r . M a r c e l ' s Gallic h e a r t w a s t o u c h e d with pity and he hinted that he w o u l d be g l a d t o h e l p . Mrs H a r l a n instantly became d i s t a n t a n d cold. M a r c e l s e n s e d a n d a p p l a u d e d a self-pride t h a t would admit no charity. A few m i n u t e s l a t e r . M a r c e l a r o s e to g o . H e g l a n c e d s h a r p l y a t Tige, s a w no m a r k s on t h e lad's face or legs. " H e is w e l l t r e a t e d , e h ? " "Well enough, considering," Mrs H a r l a n a n s w e r e d s t i f f l y a n d it w a s a final dismissal. Marcel never returned again as long as M r s H a r l a n w a s alive. B u t w h e n e v e r a n y m a n on h i s Diamond D payroll was near the coulee, on M a r c e l ' s o r d e r s , t h a t m a n s t o p p e d b y t h e sod h o u s e . T h e m e n h a d n o t h i n g good t o r e p o r t of B r a n t H a r l a n b u t t h e y h a d a d e e p r e s p e c t for his wife's c o u r a g e . T i g e w a s a p p a r e n t l y run­ n i n g wild a n d M a r c e l w o r r i e d a b o u t his s c h o o l i n g . " T h i s t h i n g is n o t good," h e said t o h i s d a r k - e y e d d a u g h t e r , Louise. " H e is y o u r a g e , ma petite, a n d h e c a n n o t so m u c h a s spell, I b e t c h a . " " T h e n you c a n b r i n g h i m h o m e , P a p a , a n d h e c a n g o to school with me." M a r c e l t u g g e d r e f l e c t i v e l y a t his m u s t a c h e a n d s h o o k his r o u n d h e a d . "Pardieu, t h a t w o u l d be h a r d ! His M a m a would say 'no' b e c a u s e s h e is p r o u d . H i s P a p a w o u l d r e f u s e b e c a u s e h e is v e r y bad and m e a n . I wonder w h a t s o r t of a m a n h e w i l l b e c o m e ! " Two years passed and then, just b e f o r e t h e first s n o w fiurries, o n e of t h e m e n r e p o r t e d t h a t M r s H a r l a n h a d died. M a r c e l s a d d l e d u p , looked t o h i s Colt, a n d r o d e t o t h e coulee. T h e sod h o u s e a p p e a r e d t h e same. T h e y a r d w a s m o r e littered and Harlan had managed to build a lean-to s h e l t e r for his h o r s e s . N o t f a r a w a y w a s a fresh mound, the r a w clay surmounted by a c r u d e w o o d e n cross. T h e d o o r w a s closed a s M a r c e l dis­ mounted, d r o p p i n g t h e reins over the horse's head. H e h a d j u s t r a i s e d h i s fist to knock when he heard an outburst of p r o f a n i t y . G l a s s c r a s h e d a s f u r n i t u r e w a s k n o c k e d over. H e h e a r d a t h u d , a w h i m p e r i n g cry t h a t a b r u p t l y c h o k e d off. M a r c e l c l e a r e d his c o a t f r o m his holster, p u t his beefy s h o u l d e r to t h e d o o r a n d p u s h e d it open. B r a n t H a r l a n was drunk. He whirled around as Marcel entered, eyes w i l d a n d s t a r i n g . T i g e stood plastered against the far wall, f a c e w h i t e w i t h f e a r , a t r i c k l e of

FICTION •

LEE E. WELLS

T T w a s t h e t i m e of t h e s p r i n g ••• r o u n d u p a n d M a r c e l D u c l o s drove himself a s hard a s a n y m a n of h i s c r e w . T h e y were w a n t i n g t h e braises along the n o r t h w e s t c o r n e r of t h e r a n c h , a bad section in which to h u n t for strays. T h e coulee appeared a l i k e l y p l a c e in w h i c h t o find t h e m a n d M a r c e l t u r n e d i n t o it. U p a t t h e far end, h e saw B r a n t Har­ l a n ' s sod h o u s e . H e had heard that a n e w family h a d c o m e in u p t h i s w a y , b u t h e w a s s u r p r i s e d to find t h e m so Close t o h i s o w n h o l d i n g s . T h e g r a s s - s h a g g y w a l l s of t h e sod h o u s e b r o k e n b y a s i n g l e , low, p l a n k e d door, e x t e n d e d o u t f r o m t h e clay bank and there w a s already a careless litter a r o u n d it. N o t f a r off, a b a r e p o l e c o r r a l h e l d a c o u p l e of h o r s e s , a d e c r e p i t buckboard pointed its shafts to t h e sky. Marcel had t i m e for no m o r e t h a n a swift, all-inclusive g l a n c e . Then a woman screamed and he j e r k e d u p r ' g h t in t h e s a d d l e . T h e J l a n k e d d o o r o p e n e d a n d a longe g g e d k i d c a m e f l y i n g o u t of t h e house. The woman screamed again, a m i n g l e d s o u n d of f r i g h t a n d fury. A man bellowed angry obscenities. H e r u s h e d after t h e boy, a b i g b u l l - w h a c k e r w h i p i n his hand. His a r m flashed back a n d the l o n g l a s h u n c u r l e d a h e a d of h i m , s n a k i n g o u t t o w a r d t h e kid. I t w r a p p e d around the boy's legs and h e s p r a w l e d h e a d l o n g , face plow­ ing into the dirt. The man pounced on him, jerked h i m to his feet. M a r c e l h e a r d t h e flat s m a c k of t h e m a n ' s h a n d a c r o s s t h e b o y ' s face. T h e k i d ' s h e a d r o c k e d on his shoulders as t h e m a n ' s punishing blows continued. "Sucre bleu!" r i p p e d f r o m M a r ­ cel's lips. H e s e t t h e s p u r s a n d raced forward. A w o m a n appear­ ed i n t h e d o o r w a y , a r i f l e in h e r hands. Marcel brought his horse to a sliding halt a n d dropped from t h e saddle. H e grabbed the m a n ' s a r m , s w u n g h i m half around. M a r c e l h a d a g l i m p s e of a l e a n , d a r k face s t r a i n e d w i t h fury, t h e b l a c k e y e s wild, a l m o s t d e m e n t e d . With an amazingly powerful s w e e p of h i s a r m s , t h e m a n s e n t M a r c e l s t a g g e r i n g b a c k a n d he
36 ADAM, September, l % 4

STREAK HERO,

blood a t t h e c o r n e r of h i s m o u t h . H e h a d g r o w n a good foot o r m o r e since M a r c e l h a d l a s t s e e n h i m . H a r l a n ' s eyes w e r e c r a z y wild. "Get out!" Marcel glimpsed the over-turned chair, t h e b r o k e n b o t t l e , t h e d a m p spot on t h e w a l l b e s i d e T i g e ' s h e a d w h e r e t h e m a n h a d f l u n g it. H e s h o o k his h e a d . "I'm taking h i m h o m e with me." "Like hell!" M a r c e l lifted t h e Colt i n t o h i s h a n d , let it d a n g l e a t h i s side. "Get y o u r clothes, T i g e . W e g o — now." "I a i n ' t l e a v i n g , " t h e b o y r a s p e d .

Marcel watched H a r l a n and spoke w i t h o u t m o v i n g his eyes. "Get your clothes. At the D i a m o n d D t h e r e is n o t t h e fist and t h e curse. I give you nothing —^you w o r k f o r it. You a r e h i r e d on m y r a n c h . " "Like hell—!" H a r l a n leaned f o r w a r d . M a r c e l lifted t h e Colt. "You a r e close t o D i a m o n d D l a n d , m'sieu — m a y b e o n it. I do n o t know. Until n o w I do not care. But sometimes the cow d i s a p p e a r . You d o n o t w o r k f o r a n y r a n c h , y o u h a v e n o c o w of y o u r o w n . You d o n o t f a r m . I t h i n k m a y b e I look i n t o t h i s , e h ? " "Accusing m e — ! " "Non. T h e sheriff, h e w i l l find

o u t , e h ? U n l e s s , of c o u r s e , y o u a r e g o n e . T i g e , y o u a r e r e a d y per­ haps?" So Tige Ellis c a m e to t h e D i a m o n d D, a n d s h o r t l y after­ w a r d t h e sod h o u s e in t h e c o u l e e w a s a b a n d o n e d . S o m e said H a r l a n h a d j o i n e d t h e w i l d b u n c h in t h e badlands. About a week after Harlan left t h e coulee, a s l u g c r a s h e d through the kitchen window, m i s s e d M a r c e l ' s h e a d by a w h i s p e r a n d b r o k e a m i r r o r on t h e f a r wall above the washbasin. The a m b u s h e r e s c a p e d in t h e con­ fusion t h a t followed a n d M a r c e l ordered his crew not to talk about it a r o u n d T i g e E l l i s .
ADAM, September, 1964 37

"// you'll just be seated it tvill be all over in just a F o r Tige w a s a problem then — a n d in t h e y e a r s to follow. H e w a s uncertain about Louise until h e a c c e p t e d h e r a s a p a r t of h i s n e w life. S c h o o l w a s another problem. Time and again, Marcel felt like t h r o w i n g his h a n d s u p in surrender. T i g e m a n a g e d to c o n f o r m t o t h e r u l e s . B u t first, h e h a d t o w h i p e v e r y b o y h i s a g e a n d o n e or t w o older. T h a t done, T i g e t u r n e d to h i s l e s s o n s . H e did w e l l , s t r i v i n g for superiority in knowledge a s w e l l a s in g a m e s a n d fists. Tige grew and f i l l e d out, f i n i s h e d his s c h o o l i n g a n d t o o k h i s s h a r e in t h e r a n c h w o r k . O n weekends he'd ride into town with the crew. T h e town w a s c a l l e d S u n u p t h e n , a s t r i n g of false-fronted saloons and stores, a f e w box-like f r a m e h o u s e s t h a t s e r v e d a s a s u p p l y c e n t r e for t h e ranches. The Diamond D always c a m e racing into town, blowing off s t e a m w i t h wild c o w b o y yells, g u n s blasting u p into the sky. From Saturday until Monday m o r n i n g there was seldom a time when the guns were entirely s i l e n t . I t w a s m o s t l y in fun but, e v e n so, t h e S u n u p graveyard steadily grew. T h e druggist started collecting cartridge cases and placing t h e m in the hard-packed g r o u n d before his store. The doctor's knowledge of g u n s h o t s u r g e r y g r a d u a l l y in38 ADAM, September, 1964

minute."

creased and he almost forgot how to treat measles, croup and lumbago. At least once a month, t h e r e w a s a d a n c e i n t h e big l i v e r y b a r n a t t h e e d g e of t o w n . F o l k s would a t t e n d for a h u n d r e d miles a r o u n d . F i d d l e s s a n g u n t i l Sun­ d a y d a w n while cowboys kicked their heels and swung their partners. Tige treated Sunup as h e h a d t h e school, a p l a c e w h e r e i n t o p r o v e his ability to h a n d l e his fists. B y n o w h e w a s a h a n d s o m e kid, p r e s s i n g 19. H e w a s t a l l a n d m u s c u l a r , w i t h a n easy smile, black hair that was always a touch unruly. Louise had turned into a beautiful w o m a n with the d a r k coloring, brilliant eyes a n d l o v e l y f i g u r e of h e r l o n g - d e a d m o t h e r . S h e had swains for miles a r o u n d b u t n o n e of t h e m w e r e for Louise. It w a s Tige she w a t c h e d , a n d T i g e w a s blind. M a r c e l s o o n r e a l i s e d h o w it w a s w i t h his d a u g h t e r . Heretofore, he had t a k e n Tige's escapades a n d f i g h t s a s a m a t t e r of c o u r s e . N o w , s i n c e his d a u g h t e r w a s in­ volved, h e c o n s i d e r e d a n d w e i g h e d t h e m . I t did n o t m a k e a p l e a s a n t picture and Marcel was sure Tige w o u l d n e v e r c h a n g e . H e s p o k e to Louise one Saturday night when they were alone at the ranch. "You do n o t g o t o t o w n , ma petite."

"No." S h e lowered h e r embroid­ e r y a n d s t a r e d a t t h e l a m p . Mar­ cel puffed o n his pipe, eyes s h a r p a n d c l e a r u n d e r t h e h e a v y lids. " B u t t h e r e is t h e d a n c e , e h ? Sacre bleu, is it t h a t t h e r e a r e n o t t h e y o u n g m e n to t a k e y o u ? " She laughed and h e detected a b i t t e r n o t e . "Oh, t h e r e ' s p l e n t y . P a p a . B u t I just — didn't w a n t to go." H e considered that. "But Tige, h e does n o t a s k , e h ? " " I — " S h e h e s i t a t e d t h e n lifted h e r s h o u l d e r s in t h e a n c e s t r a l G a l l i c s h r u g . " T h a t ' s it. P a p a . " "I see this thing for some time. I t is n o t good. H e t h i n k s too m u c h of t h e m u s c l e . " "He'll change. P a p a . " " M a y b e — m a y b e . T h a t I do not know. I tell him that real courage comes from the heart— t h a t a l o s e r is — plus brave — s o m e t i m e s , t h a n a wrinner. Ah, h e listens but h e does not under­ stand." "You l i k e h i m . P a p a ? " " A l m o s t a s m u c h a s you, ma petite. I g r o w old a n d s o m e d a y there m u s t be one to take m y place. I think m a y b e Tige can d o it. I t h i n k m a y b e h e v.'ill m a k e y o u a good h u s b a n d . T h e n — I a m not sure!" They both heard the rapid beat of h o o f s a n d a n excited voice called t h e house. Marcel opened t h e d o o r a n d s a w o n e of his c r e w r a c e into the light. "Rustlers! T h e y hit t h a t bunch w e w a s h o l d i n g on B u c k C r e e k . Shorty's bad shot and Windy got creased." " T h e boys a r e a t S u n u p , " M a r ­ cel said. " I g e t t h e m , a n d t h e sheriff. W e r e t u r n t o pick you u p . Saddle a fresh horse and be ready. By gar, m a y b e we catch those thiefs!" I t w a s a big p o s s e t h a t picked up the trail just before d a w n a n d followed it i n t o t h e b a d l a n d s . Once within the broken country t h e r u s t l e r s t r i e d to lose t h e i r pursuers. Sheriff Mitchum k n e w t h e country fairly well and Tige E l l i s h a d s h a r p e y e s t h a t picked u p t h e f a i n t s i g n s . J u s t before noon, t h e y c a u g h t u p wdth t h e o u t l a w s . T h e r e w a s n ' t m u c h of a b a t t l e , b u t T i g e E l l i s w a s in t h e thick of it. A flurry of s h o t s , a b a n d i t downed, a n o t h e r unsaddled when h i s h o r s e w a s hit, a swift f l i g h t for s a f e t y a n d it w a s over. F o u r bandits got a w a y — two were captured besides the m a n who lost his h o r s e — o n e w a s killed. N o o n e in t h e p o s s e w a s h u r t . T i g e E l l i s c a m e b a c k from a v a i n p u r s u i t of o n e of t h e rene­ g a d e s a n d t r o t t e d up to t h e m e n b u n c h e d a r o u n d t h e captives. H e d i s m o u n t e d , p u s h e d into t h e circle a n d s t o p p e d dead, face p a l i n g . His step-father. B r a n t Harlan, was o n e of t h e p r i s o n e r s . H e g l a r e d w i l d l y a t M a r c e l , lips w o r k i n g , t h e n his s t a r i n g eyes r e s t e d on Tige. H e took a deep breath. Tige sat between Marcel and Louise when B r a n t H a r l a n was s e n t e n c e d to 10 y e a r s . A s he w a s led out. h e looked b a c k o v e r his shoulder. H e had only contempt for T i g e , b u t h i s eyes f l a m e d r a w

hatred for Marcel, whose bullet h a d killed h i s h o r s e a n d p r e v e n t e d his e s c a p e . There was no more rustling a r o u n d S u n u p a n d life w e n t o n a s u s u a l . T h e d r u g g i s t collected m o r e c a r t r i d g e s e a c h w e e k to p l a c e be­ fore his s t o r e , t h e s h e l l s f o r m i n g a brass p a v e m e n t that c a m e to be known as the Cartridge Walk. Tige assumed m o r e duties on the Diamond D, b e c o m i n g a second f o r e m a n w i t h i n t w o y e a r s . T h e n , w i t h o u t w a r n i n g , h e sud­ denly realised that Louise w a s a beautiful and desirable w o m a n . H e t o o k h e r to t h e d a n c e s . S h e b l o s s o m e d a n d m o v e d in a cloud of h a p p i n e s s . M a r c e l d r e a d e d t h e day when Tige would come to him. It happened one S u n d a y morn­ ing. T h e r e h a d b e e n n o d a n c e t h e night before a n d Tige had gone into t o w n w i t h o u t L o u i s e . H e h a d a m o u s e u n d e r his eye w h e n he c a m e i n t o t h e r a n c h office a n d nervously sat down. Marcel swung around from t h e battered r o l l t o p d e s k , p e e r e d closely a t T i g e ' s face. "I h a v e h e a r d of t h e f i g h t , " h e said. "You w o n ? " "Sure," Tige answered and b r u s h e d it aside. " I c o m e t o t a l k about Louise." "This m a n , h e w a s a good fighter?" Marcel asked gently. Tige shrugged. "Good. B u t t h a t ' s n o t w h a t I come to t a l k about." "Louise," Marcel nodded sagely. H e folded h i s h a n d s o v e r h i s s t o m a c h a n d looked t h o u g h t f u l l y o u t t h e w i n d o w on t h e n e a t r a n c h y a r d . " T h i s fight, h e is a l s o im­ p o r t a n t to m e — a n d L o u i s e . " " I d o n ' t g e t it," T i g e said, look­ i n g b l a n k . M a r c e l smiled. " I a m old m a n , T i g e . I a m once voyageur from Canada with the Northwest Company. I a m Indian scout and guide with the army. I am rancher. I see many men, e h ? " "I s u p p o s e so. B u t — "

"Harry is a good "So m a y b e I k n o w some little thing about men, eh? Always I see t h e m a n w h o fight — for good reason or none. H e fight just to s h o w h e is b r a v e , e h ? O r good m a n w i t h h i s fists, o r h i s k n i f e , o r m a y b e f a s t w i t h t h e g u n . You a r e l i k e t h a t , mon fils. I a m n o t s u r e it is good. M y L o u i s e n e e d a m a n with courage—" "But I'm not afraid!"

provider."

"How can I be sure this isn't just another

shipboard

romance?"

"Of o t h e r m e n , n o , " M a r c e l a g r e e d . "Of s o m e t h i n g y o u r h a n d s can touch a n d y o u r fists b e a t down, no. T h a t w a y you a r e not a f r a i d . B u t a l w a y s w i t h y o u it is a t e s t . I see t h a t . I n y o u r h e a r t , you a r e not sure. When you are a boy. B r a n t H a r l a n b r a n d s a n d b u r n s you w i t h fear. So even n o w y o u f i g h t t o p r o v e to e v e r y o n e t h a t is n o t so — y o u do n o t f e a r . B u t n e v e r d o y o u p r o v e it t o yourself, n'est-ce pas?" Tige stared a t him, s t a r t e d to j r o t e s t a n d t h o u g h t b e t t e r of it. Marcel nodded, knowing he had scored. "It will t a k e s t r o n g m a n t o keep Diamond D after I a m gone. I t w i l l t a k e b r a v e m a n to f a c e d r o u g h t a n d t h e blizzard. H o w you knock t h e m d o w n ? H o w you fight low prices and no m a r k e t s , e h ? T h e s e t h i n g s I see, T i g e , w h e n I t h i n k of y o u a n d L o u i s e . " Tige arose. "Then you don't think t h a t I'm right for h e r ? " " T h a t I d o n o t s a y . I do n o t know. Let us wait yet awhile. I a m s t r o n g for m a n y y e a r s m o r e perhaps. I think about this and t h e n I decide, e h ? " "Years!" Tige said and his eyes flashed. Marcel chuckled. " S e e ! You f i g h t d e l a y . You w a i t , t h i s is a l l . N o , I do n o t t a k e y e a r s . I know how young men are and it is g o o d t h a t y o u t h i n k of L o u i s e . It will not be long." T h e round-ups came and then the winter clamped down with a n
ADAM, September, 1964 39

Iron hand. Tige waited but Marcel said nothing, n o r would Louise go against her father's wishes. At times Tige w a n t e d t o force mat­ t e r s . A g a i n , h e t h o u g h t of r i d i n g off, f o r h e could e a s i l y g e t a j o b e l s e w h e r e . H e m a n a g e d t o con­ trol these impulses. Marcel saw and approved. Winter passed and spring's first greening w a s in t h e grass. One Saturday morning, Tige rode into Sunup with Marcel and Louise. They h a d no m o r e t h a n stepped down from the saddle when t h e sheriff hurried up. Mitchum was a blunt and direct man. "Marcel, h a v e you seen any s i g n of B r a n t H a r l a n ? " " H a r l a n ! " Tige exclaimed. " H e broke loose from t h e pen, killed a g u a r d . I got a t e l e g r a m a b o u t it l a s t n i g h t . H e m i g h t b e heading this way, and he never liked you folks none." "We'll w a t c h for him," Marcel said. "Point is," Mitchum continued, "Harlan's gone killing insane. I a l w a y s t h o u g h t t h e m wild spells of h i s w o u l d w o r k i n t o s o m e t h i n g . Y o u b e c a r e f u l , a l l of y o u . "

The news depressed t h e m until they assured themselves that every lavwnan in t h e S t a t e search­ ed f o r B r a n t H a r l a n . T h o u g h t h e penitentiary was not far away, H a r l a n could n e v e r g e t t h r o u g h the cordon. There was a dance that night and Tige took Louise while Marcel r e m a i n e d a t his favorite poker t a b l e in t h e Red Dog Saloon. Tige forgot B r a n t H a r l a n in t h e g a y r h y t h m of t h e m u s i c , L o u i s e ' s smiles and soft eyes. T h e fiddles a n d t h e r h y t h m i c p o u n d of b o o t s o n t h e r o u g h floor drowned out t h e shots. Tige had just "promenaded" toward the door w i t h Louise on his a r m w h e n o n e of t h e D i a m o n d D c r e w h u r r i e d in. H e c a u g h t T i g e ' s attention, motioned him over. S o m e t h i n g in t h e m a n ' s face m a d e T i g e s t e p o u t of t h e d a n c e , L o u i s e still o n h i s a r m , a n d p u s h t h r o u g h the onlookers to him. " B r a n t H a r l a n ' s i n tovwi," t h e m a n said i n a low, t e n s e w h i s p e r . "Slipped in somehow." " P a p a ! " Louise said in a l a r m . T h e p u n c h e r shook his head. '^Marcel's s a f e i n t h e R e d D o g so far. T h e Sheriff spotted H a r l a n

in f r o n t of t h e d r u g s t o r e a n d tried to arrest him. Mitchum's down — dead, maybe. You'd b e t t e r s e e w h a t y o u c a n do w i t h H a r l a n , T i g e , b e f o r e h e kills any­ o n e e l s e •— o r finds M a r c e l . " T i g e o r d e r e d L o u i s e t o s t a y in t h e b a m . H e s l i p p e d o u t wdth t h e p u n c h e r a n d they entered the Red D o g f r o m t h e r e a r . M a r c e l stood a t the bar, restrained by two or three men. " B e c a u s e of m e h e c o m e s h e r e , " Marcel argued. " H e find m e , h e w i l l n o t kill a n y o n e m o r e . 1 t h i n k m a y b e I c a n t a k e c a r e of myself." " W h e r e is h e ? " T i g e a s k e d . T h e m e n t u r n e d a n d o n e of t h e m gestured toward the batwings. " S t i l l in f r o n t of t h e d r u g s t o r e . W e o u g h t a s h o o t h i m d o w n like w e would a m a d dog before he m u r d e r s a n y o n e else." " H e ' s loco," T i g e s h o o k his h e a d . " H e d o n ' t k n o w w h a t he's doing." "But who'll get him there?" someone demanded. "He's armed." "Turn out t h e lamps," Tige ordered. The Red Dog darkened and T i g e looked o u t o v e r t h e batwings. He saw Brant Harlan standing before the drugstore. The sheriff lay huddled a n d unmoving a t h i s feet. L i g h t g l i n t e d o n t h e o l d c a r t r i d g e c a s e s in t h e w a l k . B r a n t ' s head moved slowly from s i d e t o side, t h e big Colt in his hand making a threatening arc t h a t followed t h e s w e e p of his eyes. Tige k n e w t h e sensible thing w o u l d be t o s h o o t t h e c r a z e d killer. Yet t h a t w a s n o t r i g h t . M a y b e a n a s y l u m w o u l d s t r a i g h t e n h i m out. I t w o u l d b e f a r b e t t e r t h a n killing his step-father as though he were a r a v e n i n g dog. T i g e licked his lips, u n b u c k l e d h i s g u n b e l t so t h a t t h e s i g h t of it w o u l d n o t f u r t h e r excite B r a n t H a r l a n . H e stepped o u t i n t o t h e s h a d o w s of t h e p o r c h . " B r a n t ! " h e called. The m a n on the cartridge walk instantly swung toward him and t h e C o l t Ufted, levelled. Brant's h e a d w a s h u n c h e d between his shoulders, eyes peering a t the shadows. "It's Tige, B r a n t . I'm glad you're free again." T h e r e w a s a silence a n d t h e n H a r l a n c h u c k l e d . " T h e y couldn't hold me. N o one can. Tige? Tige? I u s e d t o l a r r u p t h e hell o u t of you." " T h a t y o u did. B r a n t . Maw d i d n ' t l i k e it." "Helen don't k n o w how to raise a y o u n g ' n . F i n e girl, though. W h e r e is s h e ? " T i g e t h o u g h t of t h e m o u n d in t h e coulee. H e r u b b e d his sweat­ ing h a n d s on his j e a n s and sharply studied t h e demented m a n . H e t h o u g h t s u d d e n l y of w h a t M a r c e l h a d said. Here was something t h a t fists a n d g u n s c o u l d n ' t con­ q u e r . H e w o n d e r e d if h e h a d t h e w i t s a n d cold c o u r a g e n e e d e d t o get t h a t Colt from H a r l a n ' s hand. "Maw ain't far away. Brant," T i g e said. " S h e w a n t s t o s e e you." " I g o t t a kill a m a n first,"

' / / I I I
40 ADAM, September, 1964

,
filthy,

"You'll find this a wonderful little town, doctor . . . it's disease-ridden."

Brant answered. "I gotta shoot him dead. H e sent m e to jail. H e killed m y h o s s . H e r u n m e o u t of t h e coulee." " M a w w a n t s to see you right a w a y . You c a n kill t h e man afterwards." B r a n t considered it. H e s w u n g t h e Colt a t h i s side. "All r i g h t . You t a k e m e t o h e r . " T i g e s t e p p e d off t h e p o r c h a n d started across the street. H e took measured steps, t h o u g h every i n s t i n c t cried o u t to r u s h a c r o s s t h e s t r e e t a n d g r a b t h e Colt. B u t h e d a r e d not. H e f o u g h t t o h o l d down the rising panic and his breathing w a s short, shallow. H e was three-fourths across the street when Brant abruptly crouched b a c k a g a i n s t t h e d r u g s t o r e win­ d o w a n d t h e Colt lifted. I n s t a n t l y Tige halted, balanced on his toes. " M a w told m e to b r i n g you," h e said swiftly. H e could see B r a n t ' s w i d e eyes n o w , t h e g a u n t e d , s t u b bled c h e e k s , t h e b o n y j a w . T h e m a n ' s lips w o r k e d a n d h e t h r e w wild g l a n c e s f r o m s i d e to side. T h e n he smiled a t T i g e . " T h e y t r i e d to s t o p m e , T i g e , b u t I w o u l d n ' t let ' e m . I b r o k e o u t a n d I ' m g o n n a kill that d a m n e d Duclos. I a i n ' t m a d a t you, T i g e . Y o u ' r e j u s t a w o r t h l e s s s k u n k t h a t r u n off f r o m m e a n d H e l e n . W h e r e is s h e ? " "Not far. Around t h e corner. I'll t a k e you." He started forward again. His boots t o u c h e d t h e c a r t r i d g e w a l k a n d t h e sheriff l a y a t h i s feet. T h e r e w a s blood on M i t c h u m ' s shirt but h e w a s alive, injured and playing possum. He watched T i g e f r o m b e n e a t h l o w e r e d lids.

"Perfect

husbands

are like parking spaces . . . somebody you to them."

always

beats

Tige c a m e closer to t h e w i n d o w a n d his muscles tightened. J u s t a f e w m o r e feet. H e c o u l d n ' t h u r r y . Steady step and keep the strain a n d i n n e r p a n i c o u t of h i s face. Another step. "I k n o w you!" H a r l a n suddenly e x c l a i m e d . "You h e l p e d p u t m e away!" T h e Colt blurred u p w a r d . T i g e t h r e w himself forward, taloned fingers spread and straining. H e missed his grip on H a r l a n ' s a r m ,

but he deflected t h e g u n j u s t a s it e x p l o d e d . H e g r a p p l e d with t h e m a n a n d it w a s l i k e h o l d i n g d o w n a w a g o n l o a d of s p r i n g s . Tige w a s flung aside, but h e g r i m l y h e l d on, b o t h h a n d s t i g h t on H a r l a n ' s gun wrist. Boots p o u n d e d close a n d a w a v e of m e n smothered the maniac. It w a s over in a c o u p l e of m i n u t e s , B r a n t Harlan threshing but harmless . . . T i g e E l l i s n e v e r f o r g o t t h e car­ t r i d g e w a l k . I n t h e s h o r t t i m e it t o o k h i m to l e a v e t h e s h e l t e r of the Red Dog and cross the street, he learned what courage was. B r a n t died in t h e a s y l u m . T i g e and Louise were married and, in t h e c o u r s e of t i m e . M a r c e l D u c l o s w a s buried beside his wife on t h e Diamond D. S u n u p changed into a typical m o d e r n c o w t o w n , a collection of neat frame houses and small store buildings, fronted with modernistic glass and chrome, topped by g a r i s h n e o n s i g n s in b l u e s , r e d s , g r e e n s , a n d y e l l o w s . T h e r e is a concrete sidewalk. All t h o s e c h a n g e s , b u t T i g e never forgot. His g r a n d s o n will d r i v e u p in f r o n t of t h e d r u g s t o r e in t h e s t a t i o n w a g o n a n d T i g e will g e t out, l e a n i n g h e a v i l y o n h i s c a n e . H e will l o o k f o r a l o n g t i m e a t t h e c o p p e r y s h e e n of t h e shells in t h e cement. He'll t o u c h the spot w h e r e B r a n t Harlan stood a n d T i g e l o s t f o r e v e r t h e b r a n d of f e a r . H e ' l l l o o k c o n t e m p ­ t u o u s l y a t t h e Tic-Toe C l u b w h e r e n e o n , g l a s s a n d Venetian b l i n d s a r e p o o r m a r k e r s of t h e old R e d Dog. S o l o n g a g o ! B u t still, s t a n d i n g o n t h e c a r t r i d g e w a l k , t h e old man, like Atlas, gains new s t r e n g t h f r o m t h a t o n e s q u a r e of bullet-studded p a v e m e n t . So long a s h e lives, it w i l l a l w a y s b e there. •
ADAM, September, 1964 41

"Yes, I agree with you. He was a very bitter

man."

HELLCAT OF HERSCHEL ISLAND
(Continued from page 13) deserted log cabin a s maliesliift h e a d q u a r t e r s f o r h i s force. F r o m there he assigned "beats" to his m e n — each Mountie patrolling a b o u t a s q u a r e m i l e of t e r r i t o r y . T h e first clash occurred several miles a w a y from there. Con­ stable Gustavo Rochon, a FrenchCanadian former lumberjack, came across a drunken Nor­ w e g i a n r o a r i n g o n t o p of h i s voice a n d firing a r e v o l v e r i n t o the air. R o c h o n called s h a r p l y , " D r o p that gun!" The seaman roared with laughter and made the snow s p u r t with a slug a few inches from t h e Mounty's leg. Rochon dodged aside. T h e n — with one leap — he hurled his 180 p o u n d s a t t h e N o r w e g i a n ' s midriff in a flying tackle. T h e s a i l o r w e n t d o w n w i t h m o s t of h i s breath knocked out of him. Rochon hoisted him u p by his collar and exploded a straight left a g a i n s t h i s c h i n . T h e n — seizing h i m by his jacket front— h e h i t h i m f o u r — five — s i x s m a s h i n g blows in t h e face. W h e n the constable opened his fist t h e s a i l o r d r o p p e d l i k e a s a c k . F o u r of h i s f r o n t t e e t h h a d g o n e , h i s left e y e w a s c l o s e d a n d his nose w a s a bloody m e s s . Rochon stuck t h e revolver in his belt and addressed the huddled f o r m a t h i s feet, " Y o u m u s t n o t discharge firearms in publeec p l a c e s . M o n s i e u r . " T h e n h e con­ tinued on his beat. At t h e t r a d i n g store, Seattleb o r n C o n s t a b l e J i m M a l o n e sur>rised t w o N e w E n g l a n d w h a l e r s n t h e a c t of b a r t e r i n g a b o t t l e of r u m a g a i n s t a n Eskimo's hand­ m a d e fur boots.

"You m u s t n ' t give liquor to Eskimos," Malone c u t in quietly. " S e z w h o ? " s n a r l e d o n e of t h e sailors. "Says the law," said the constable. T h e n e x t second Malone ducked to avoid t h e r u m bottle t h a t c a m e flying a t h i s h e a d . H e c a m e o u t of h i s c r o u c h w i t h both fists swinging. T h e bottle thrower caught a right hook t h a t s e n t h i m c r a s h i n g a g a i n s t a shelf in t h e background. H e bent down to r e a c h for t h e knife in t h e top of h i s b o o t w h e n M a l o n e f i n i s h e d h i m off w i t h a n u p p e r c u t . T h e other sailor hadn't had time to intervene. N o w — finding him­ self o n e t o o n e a g a i n s t M a l o n e — h e w i s e l y t h o u g h t b e t t e r of it. Malone w e n t on walking his beat. Throughout the island that a f t e r n o o n a n d e v e n i n g e i g h t sea­ men got themselves horribly beaten u p — but n o one was a r r e s t e d . N o n e of t h e M o u n t i e s h a d d r a w n h i s six-shooter, t h e y had settled m a t t e r s with their fists alone. Fitzgerald smiled grimly w h e n h e heard their reports t h a t night. "They aren't really m a d yet," he commented, "just surprised. I reckon tomorrow a t the latest you'll need y o u r guns." Fitzgerald k n e w his onions. As the seamen chewed over the s t a r t l i n g e v e n t s of t h e d a y it slowly d a w n e d on t h e m t h a t t h e r e w e r e o n l y five c o p s o n t h e i s l a n d . Exceptionally tough cops, but o n l y five. A n d t h a t n i g h t g u n s w e r e oiled, b e l a y i n g p i n s s w u n g . T h e Mounties were out early next morning. Fitzgerald and Rochon arrived a t t h e dockside j u s t in time to pounce on four men from the whaler "New Bedford" w h o w e r e lugging a

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c r a t e of r u m o n boai^i. T h e s e r g e a n t p o i n t e d a gloved h a n d a t t h e c r a t e . "You c a n ' t t a k e t h a t l i q u o r o n y o u r s h i p , " h e said evenly. "There's been no duty p a i d o n it." O n e of t h e m e n looked u p wildly. "Listen, Mountie, w e paid for that r u m , and we're going to t a k e it a n y p l a c e w e d a m n e d well please." F i t z g e r a l d s h o o k h i s head. "You m a y t a k e it b a c k t o t h e Man­ h a t t a n a n d g e t y o u r d o u g h re­ f u n d e d . B u t y o u ' r e n o t t a k i n g it on a n y ship." F o r o n e s e c o n d t h e r e w a s com­ p l e t e silence. T h e n all f o u r sailors reached for their weapons. The man who had spoken pulled a G e r m a n automatic from h i s b r e a s t p o c k e t a n d g o t it levelled w h e n t w o s h o t s from Rochon's Webley smashed his arm. Fitzgerald felt a t u g n e a r his r i b s w h e r e a six-inch d a g g e r h a d lunged and missed. H e took h i m b y t h e belt, lifted h i m h i g h in t h e a i r a n d s e n t h i m s p i n n i n g into t h e icy g r e y w a t e r . T h e m a n s p l a s h e d f o r a m o m e n t b e f o r e his h e a v y clothing d r a g g e d him down. When the sergeant turned a r o u n d h e s a w t h e r e m a i n i n g two —^their h a n d s o v e r t h e i r h e a d s — covered by Rochon's gun. Again Fitzgerald pointed at the crate. "All right, you two," he o r d e r e d , "lift t h a t c r a t e a n d t a k e it b a c k w h e r e y o u g o t it f r o m . " Sweating and cursing the sailors hoisted the heavy burden b a c k t o t h e M a n h a t t a n . O n e of P a u l i n e ' s g i r l s , red-eyed a n d y a w n ­ ing, stood behind t h e bar. "I w a n t you to refund these g e n t l e m e n t h e i r m o n e y , " said t h e sergeant. "They're returning your liquor." T h e two astonished s e a m e n got t h e i r m o n e y back. B u t o n e of their shipmates w a s dead and a n o t h e r would never be able to use his right a r m again. T h e r e w e r e n o further incidents until late that afternoon, when things began h u m m i n g at the M a n h a t t a n . A dozen s a i l o r s f r o m t h e N e w Bedford h a d b e e n drink­ ing steadily — their nerve and t h e i r f u r y r i s i n g wdth e v e r y g l a s s . A l b e r t Rifling, t h e beefy, redfaced s e c o n d m a t e , c r a s h e d h i s fist o n t h e t a b l e . " W e o u g h t to b r a i n t h a t cop for w h a t h e d o n e to Sloane," h e roared. Pauline heard him and turned from t h e window. " W h y don't you, t h e n ? " s h e asked sweetly. "He's just wafldng past — him and that frog." R i l l i n g g o t u p . " C o m e on, y o u b i m c h of s w a b s , " h e yefled. " G e t 'em now!" T h e s w a r m of m e n s u d d e n l y erupting from t h e tavern took the Mounties by surprise. They were surrounded before they c o u l d g e t t h e i r b a c k s t o a wall. T h e white cords attached to their revolver butts flashed as they swiftly y a n k e d t h e g u n s from their holsters. T w o — three shots r a n g out from t h e mob, b u t the sailors w e r e l o u s y m a r k s m e n a n d half

42

ADAM, Seotember, 1964

d r u n k t o boot. A s t h e s l u g s whipped past their ears the Mounties opened lire b u t Rochon was hit by a belaying pin. F i t z g e r a l d fired a t t w o m e n blocking his path, d u c k e d t h r o u g h a n d g o t h i s b a c k a g a i n s t t h e tav­ e r n wall. B u t w h e n h e p u l l e d t h e trigger again his g u n merely Clicked. I t w a s e m p t y . T h e r e w e r e n i n e s e a m e n still o n t h e i r feet. N o w t h e y g a v e a s i n g l e bellow of t r i u m p h a n d closed i n . At t h a t m o m e n t a piercing whistle blast cut t h r o u g h t h e din. The mob turned their heads and s a w M a l o n e s t a n d i n g 15 f e e t s w a y , his W e b l e y c o v e r i n g t h e m . "AU r i g h t , y o u m e n — d r o p y o u r hardware!" rapped t h e Mounty. The sailors hesitated. They failed t o h e a r t h e r a p i d s e r i e s of clicks t h a t c a m e f r o m F i t z g e r a l d reloading his own weapon. B u t an instant later there w a s another gun covering them. Two aimed revolvers w e r e too m u c h for t h e crowd. Soundlessly a s m a l l a r s e n a l of g u n s , c l u b s and knives pattered into t h e snow. F i t z g e r a l d w a v e d h i s g u n to­ ward the anchorage. "Now get b a c k t o y o u r s h i p s — t h e l o t of you," h e ordered. " A n d so help m e , if I s e e a n y of y o u r m u g s a g a i n TU m a k e s u r e y o u r o w n mothers wouldn't b e a b l e to recognise them." Even before t h e m e n w e r e o u t of s i g h t t h e S e r g e a n t w a s bend­ i n g o v e r h i s fallen R o c h o n . "Is h e aU r i g h t ? " a s k e d M a l o n e . Fitzgerald grinned. "Sure. It'd t a k e a piledriver t o crack that l u m b e r j a c k s k u U of h i s . B u t I ' d sure hate to have his headache when he comes to." H e straightened u p and survey­ ed t h e d o o r of t h e M a n h a t t a n . "And n o w , " h e said grimly, "I t h i n k we'U call o n t h e l a d i e s . " E v e r y soul in t h e saloon h a d watched t h e battle through t h e windows. Now, as the two Mounties entered, t h e smokel a d e n b a r feU a s s i l e n t a s a churchyard. F i t z g e r a l d w a l k e d slowly u p t o Pauline, w h o stood leaning gracefuUy a g a i n s t a t a b l e w i t h o n e hip. " A b o u t t h a t licence of y o u r s . Miss S u m m e r s , " h e said. " I d o n ' t t h i n k i t ' s in o r d e r . M a t t e r of fact, I don't think y o u h a v e one." " T h e n I'U a p p l y f o r o n e . Ser­ g e a n t , " said P a u i n e . "You s h o u l d h a v e d o n e t h a t sooner. Miss. B e s i d e s — " h e j e r k e d a t h u m b a t t h e painted girls a t t h e tables, " — y o u ' l l n e v e r g e t a Ucence t o r u n T H I S k i n d of a place. S o I ' m c l o s i n g y o u d o w n . Now." "Are you, S e r g e a n t ? " smiled Pauline. "Watch o u t ! " screamed Malone. Fitzgerald wasted no time turn­ ing around. H e let himself d r o p w h e r e h e stood. T h e r e w a s a c r a s h a n d a rifle b u l l e t s h a t t e r e d t w o bottles b e h i n d t h e b a r . A second s h o t followed t h e first so fast t h e y s o u n d e d a l m o s t l i k e a s i n g l e explosion. B u t t h e s e c o n d crash came from Malone's g u n .

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ADAM, September, 1954 43

O n e of P a u l i n e ' s b o d y g u a r d s l e t a Winchester drop from his lap a n d collapsed over t h e table. T h e o t h e r five t h u g s h a d r i s e n , b u t m a d e n o m o v e to a d v a n c e . T h e y stood g a p i n g a t t h e i r d e a d pal. F r o m the bar came Pauline's voice, s h r i l l w i t h f u r y : " W h a t ' r e y o u w a i t i n g for, y o u y e l l o w r a t s ? Get 'em!" Still t h e m e n didn't stir. Only S t e v e H e n r i c k ' s h a n d crept, slowly a n d cautiously, to his hip. F i t z g e r a l d s t o o d u p , his r i g h t fist r e s t i n g c a s u a l l y o n h i s hol­ ster. "Listen, sailor," he said quietly, "reach for t h a t rod a n d y o u ' r e d e a d b e f o r e y o u g o t it o u t . W h y don't you put up your mitts i n s t e a d ? M a y b e y o u c a n lick m e . . . maybe." Henrick's hand dropped away from his pocket. F o r a m o m e n t h e stood undecided, looking from P a u l i n e to the s e r g e a n t and b a c k t o the girl. T h e n h e t u r n e d a r o u n d a n d w a l k e d h e a v y f o o t e d o u t of t h e saloon. One by one t h e other f o u r b u l l i e s followed h i m . T h e sergeant waited until the l a s t of t h e m h a d filed t h r o u g h the door. T h e n h e t u r n e d calmly to Pauline: " L i k e I said w h e n I w a s i n t r e r u p t e d — t h i s p l a c e is closed. "The l i q u o r is c o n f i s c a t e d . A n d I t h i n k you and y o u r ladies better leave t h e island on the n e x t ship." N e x t morning the whalers rub­ bed their eyes incredulously w h e n they found the Manhattan T a v e r n b a r r e d a n d bolted. A l o n e redc o a t e d t r o o p e r s t o o d g u a r d in t h e doorway. With the liquor supply dried u p at the source Hershel Island grew strangely q u i e t . S o m e of the sailors relieved t h e i r feelings by s h a k i n g fists at t h e patrolling Mounties. But they knew better than to launch any further attacks. Pauline and her girls took t h e n e x t US-bound freighter home. And when the whaling ships departed for the Arctic that M a r c h t h e y left b e h i n d t h e l a s t rip-roaring season Hershel was e v e r to see. F i t z g e r a l d a n d h i s m e n headed back to the Canadian mainland, leaving b e h i n d an island that has stayed cleaned u p to this day. T h e g i r l s of t h e Manhattan r e t u r n e d t o t h e i r old h a u n t s in N e w York. Only P a u l i n e w e n t to S e a t t l e i n s t e a d . P e r h a p s s h e felt t o o b e a t e n to s h o w h e r face a r o u n d Hell's Kitchen again. H e r m o n e y vanished in a few bad real estate speculations. With­ in t w o y e a r s t h e Hellcat w a s w a l k i n g a beat once m o r e . W i t h h e r looks fading even faster than her cash she began drinking heavily — t h e s a m e rotgut r u m s h e h a d fed h e r c u s t o m e r s . I n October, 1912, a 42-year-old h a g n a m e d P a u l i n e S u m m e r s died in t h e c i t y alcoholic w a r d . H e r last delirious w o r d s w e r e those that had once been her m o t t o — "All r i g h t , b o y s , t h e n e x t round is on the h o u s e ! " •
44 ADAM, September, 1964

CONFESSIONS OF A MASTER THIEF
(Continued from page 29) band and insisted on taking George into t h e household to p u t h i m i n c h a r g e of t h e T u r k i s h s e r v a n t s , "if o n l y o u t of g r a t ­ i t u d e . " G e o r g e , h i s f e e t shuffling u n d e r t h e table, his h a n d s m a k i n g e a t s ' c r a d l e s a n d h i s r i g h t eyelid clicking like a m o r s e tapper, a c c e p t e d t h e position. H e felt o v e r w h e l m e d b y V a l e r i a ' s frag­ r a n c e a n d h e r lovely p r e s e n c e . George settled comfortably into his "job." Supervising the s e r v a n t s t o o k u p o n l y a s m a l l f r a c t i o n of his day. In the afternoon he a c c o m p a n i e d V a l e r i a o n h e r shop­ p i n g j a u n t s — in t h e e v e n i n g h e e s c o r t e d h e r to d a n c e s . O n e n i g h t , during a mazurka at the French embassy, he slipped on the polished floor a n d s p r a i n e d h i s ankle. Valeria took him home, h e l p e d h i m i n t o bed a n d b r o u g h t h i m a g l a s s of h o t G r e e k w i n e . " T h i s will h e l p y o u t o s l e e p , " s h e said. G e o r g e finished t h e w i n e , coughed, a n d found t h a t he'd n e v e r felt m o r e a w a k e i n h i s life. He lay back comfortably. A c h u r c h clock n e a r b y s t r u c k 1 1 . T h e r e w a s a k n o c k on t h e door. H e h o p e d it m i g h t b e M a r i e , Valeria's pretty brunette maid, w h o h a d c o m e t o find o u t h o w h e w a s . B u t it w a s V a l e r i a herself, d r e s s e d in a l i g h t p e i g n o i r . " T h a t night," he reported later, "I became a man." The romance continued for t h r e e m o n t h s . A t t h e end of t h a t time George suspected that V a l e r i a h a d developed an i n t e r e s t in a n e w s e r v a n t , a G r e e k b o y of 19. H e did n o t h i n g a b o u t it u n t i l he heard from Marie the maid that Madame was planning to p a s s h i m on, like a sold s t e e r , to h e r friend t h e B a r o n e s s Felicia di Stratonia at the Italian Embassy. H e w e n t s t r a i g h t to V a l e r i a a n d s t a m m e r i n g l y a s k e d h e r if s h e h a d g r o w n tired of h i m . S h e whitened with anger. "How dare you question m e about what I do!" she screamed. She s w u n g her pocketbook, lashing it b a c k a n d f o r t h a c r o s s his face. " G e t o u t , " s h e said. " T h i s is for y o u r s e r v i c e s . " S h e f l u n g a gold coin a t h i m . H e w e n t s l o w l y o u t of t h e r o o m , h i s face b r i g h t r e d w h e r e she had struck him. H e stopped in t h e d r a w i n g r o o m o u t s i d e , look­ i n g a b o u t a n d g r o p i n g in h i s m i n d for s o m e k i n d of r e v e n g e . T h e n h e saw the glass cases a g a i n s t t h e wall, containing the Count's collection of precious a n t i q u e s . Coolly h e scooped u p six c a s k e t s inlaid w i t h gold, gar­ nets, sapphires and emeralds. And left t h e h o u s e f o r e v e r . N e a r t h e h a r b o r h e sold t h e b o x e s f o r 50,000 d r a c h m a s a n d lit o u t f o r W e s t e r n E u r o p e a n d a n e w c a r e e r . H e a r r i v e d a t Mar­ seilles in F r a n c e a n d soon f o u n d work with a fellow-Rumanian. Anatole Carcola had a dingy

office, f r o m w h i c h h e b o u g h t a n d d i s p a t c h e d s h i p c h a n d l e r s ' equip­ m e n t . On t h e side ( a n d t h e side, a s h e e x p l a i n e d to Manolesco, w a s greater then the centre), he t r a d e d in p o r n o g r a p h i c l i t e r a t u r e a n d erotica, a n d h a d c o n n e c t i o n s w i t h t h e m o s t r e l i a b l e fences in France. M a n o l e s c o ' s j o b w a s t o sell r i s q u e p o s t c a r d s t o sailors. A f t e r he unloaded his first batch, Carcola counted the money and a s k e d , " I s t h a t all you h a v e ? " M a n o l e s c o stiffened. H e a s k e d if Carcola w a s accusing him of c h e a t i n g . " C o m e , c o m e , m y boy," C a r c o l a said, s m i l i n g . "You g o aboard the boats — you see t h i n g s l y i n g a b o u t in t h e cabins. If y o u d o n ' t h e l p y o u r s e l f n o w a n d then you're either a coward o r a fool." R e l u c t a n t l y M a n o l e s c o produc­ ed s o m e w a l l e t s , p e n s a n d c h e a p jewellery from his pockets. H e told Carcola h e h a d also taken s h i r t s a n d ties. " I d i d n ' t like t o l e a v e t h e m t h e r e , " h e explained. "Someone m i g h t steal them." " Q u i t e so," s a i d C a r c o l a . " I n t h e f u t u r e , t h o u g h , I e x p e c t y o u to d o better t h a n this. F o r heaven's sake don't bother with shirts and w a l l e t s . W h a t I w a n t is m e r ­ c h a n d i s e I c a n u n l o a d a t a decent profit." T h a t w a s t h e b e g i n n i n g of o n e of t h e g r e a t p a r t n e r s h i p s in c r i m e . As Manolesco b e c a m e m o r e daring a n d m o r e efficient, a s he m o v e d a b o u t E u r o p e a n d collected b i g g e r a n d r i c h e r p l u n d e r , h e w o u l d ship it b a c k to Carcola in simple, b r o w n - p a p e r p a c k a g e s and receive cash p a y m e n t by return mail. T h e y o p e r a t e d on a perfect, recip­ rocal a r r a n g e m e n t . In two years Manolesco had g a i n e d e n o u g h m o n e y a n d experi­ e n c e to t a k e h i m t o P a r i s a n d l e t h i m s e t u p in h i g h s t y l e a t a s u m p t u o u s h o t e l . Before v e n t u r ­ i n g o u t on his first j o b t h e r e h e cased Fontana's, an expensive s t o r e in t h e a r c a d e s of t h e P a l a i s R o y a l . T h i s a l s o g a v e t h e sales­ m e n a chance to recognise him as h e s t u d i e d s o m e of t h e finest pieces on d i s p l a y . T h e n he w e n t b a c k to his h o t e l r o o m a n d prac­ tised u n c e a s i n g l y for t h r e e w e e k s , all d a y e v e r y d a y . H e had k n o w n f r o m t h e t i m e w h e n h e b e g a n to teach himself conjuring that the s e c r e t of t r i c k i n g a s p e c t a t o r is t o k e e p h i s a t t e n t i o n on one h a n d while you m a n i p u l a t e with the other. H e worked with glass b e a d s a n d a velvet-lined tray, switching and changing. With his dignified a p p e a r a n c e , fine clothes and naturally hesitant manner, h e b a n k e d on b e i n g t a k e n for a nobleman. P r o m p t l y o n e m o r n i n g a t 11.50 h e d r o v e u p to F o n t a n a ' s in a hired carriage. The salesman k n e w h i m i m m e d i a t e l y as Mon­ s i e u r d e Manolesco, a n d b e c a m e s e r v i l e . M a n o l e s c o , k n e w t h e sales­ m a n w o u l d b e in a h u r r y to g e t a w a y for l u n c h b y noon. H e w a n d e r e d about t h e store, t a k i n g his t i m e , w h i l e t h e salesma.! w a i t e d to lock u p . S u d d e n l y , a t 12.10, a s t h o u g h t h e idea h a d j u s t

occurred to him, Manolesco aslied, "Do you have a n y unmounted d i a m o n d s ? I vs^ould lilse t o p r e s e n t th-them to Madame and let h e r choose h e r own settings." The salesman brought out the tray. N o w Manolesco's practising w a s p u t to t h e test. Jewellery salesmen always watch a cust­ omers hands carefully. Manolesco toyed with several of the diamonds until the salesman's e y e s w e r e f i x e d o n h i s right hand. H e lifted o n e of t h e s t o n e s off t h e t r a y a n d held it u p to t h e l i g h t ; t h e s a l e s m a n ' s g l a n c e fol­ l o w e d it. A t t h e s a m e t i m e h e removed two stones weighing about seven c a r a t s with his left hand and palmed t h e m into a small pocket inside his sleeve. H e c o n t i n u e d t o t u r n t h e d i a m o n d in his right hand, flashing it about. "Good," h e said after a m o m e n t , "no flaws in this one. Will you p-please h a v e it w r a p p e d a n d sent t o 179 r u e d e M o n c e a u , c a s h o n delivery?" "With pleasure. Monsieur," said t h e s a l e s m a n , so i n t e n t o n g e t t i n g h o m e to his l u n c h t h a t h e did n o t bother to check the house num­ b e r s on t h e f a s h i o n a b l e r u e d e M o n c e a u , w h i c h o n l y go u p t o 156. H e p u t t h e t r a y a w a y i n a r u s h , a n d M a n o l e s c o left t h e s t o r e with the other two diamonds in his sleeve. T h a t w a s t h e f i r s t of a l o n g s e r i e s of b a f f l i n g t h e f t s i n P a r i s . W i t h i n six m o n t h s M a n o l e s c o h a d s t o l e n j e w e l s to t h e v a l u e of o v e r four million dollars, a n d a m a s s ­ ed a p r i v a t e f o r t u n e . N o w he could really begin to spend money — a country house and a t o w n h o u s e , r a c e h o r s e s , a n ex­ panded wardrobe and parties, parties every weekend. M e a n w h i l e , all t h e b i g j e w e l l e r y stores in Paris had taken on private detectives w h o posed a s salesmen. " T h i s is like closing the stable door after the horse h a s bolted," r e p o r t e d a p r o m i n e n t evening paper. But this w a s not quite true. The fact is that Manolesco w a s n o w bold e n o u g h t o lift j e w e l l e r y f r o m u n d e r t h e detectives' noses. Nobody in F r e n c h society w h o a t t e n d e d Man­ olesco's parties or asked him back had a n y inkling t h a t the handsome young dandy with the faint E u r o p e a n accent w a s any­ thing o t h e r t h a n h e claimed to b e —^the r i c h s o n of a R u s s i a n e a r l w h o w a s looking for a F r e n c h wife. A t one p a r t y in P a r i s h e w a s introduced to t h e D u c h e s s e de Trevolle. She w a s a s u p e r b lady of 40 w h o c e l e b r a t e d h e r 2 5 t h birthday every Bastille Day. I n 15 m i n u t e s t h e y h a d r e t i r e d t o t h e t e r r a c e . I n 35 m i n u t e s t h e y w e r e travelling a t top speed back t o h e r h o u s e in a c a r r i a g e l i n e d w i t h w h i t e silk a n d r e d v e l v e t cushions. They had unmasked. G e o r g e h a d told t h e D u c h e s s t h a t h e r f a c e w a s of a c l a s s i c a l p e r ­ fection t o m a t c h h e r figure. The Duchess had remarked that the B a r o n de Mercadente, as Man­ olesco now described himself, would r u i n m a n y w o m e n , "pos­

sibly even myself, cherie, a l t h o u g h it will be, conservatively speaking, about the ten thous­ a n d t h t i m e t h a t I h a v e been so ruined." A s t h e l o v e r of t h e r i c h e s t a n d m o s t n o t o r i o u s w o m a n in F r a n c e , Manolesco now had to move with c a r e . T h e p o l i c e w e r e still i n v e s t i ­ g a t i n g his crimes. T h e y had built u p a f a i r l y a c c u r a t e p i c t u r e of h i m f r o m descriptions offered by different jewellery salesmen. H e k n e w that he had to conquer his nervous mannerisms, which might

one day give him away, and he tried hard, but without success. Meanwhile, he w a s living the easy life. T h e D u c h e s s i n s i s t e d o n giv­ i n g h i m l a r g e s u m s of m o n e y a n d s h o w i n g h i m off e v e r y w h e r e . But the Duchess was a jealous w o m a n . S h e a c c u s e d M a n o l e s c o of p a y i n g too m u c h attention to h e r friends — he pleaded innocent, but he w a s lying. T h e affair c a m e to an end when the painter Toulouse-Lautrec told t h e D u c h e s s that h e had seen Manolesco riding in a coach with the beautiful

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In under 12 nnonths, and from a working "bank" of only £80, foo. Our client who turned his £80 to £15,586 had NO RACING KNOWLEDGE when he bought our bookl And he has never yet been on a race track eitherl 127 WINNING DAYS . . . IN 1 3 3 The stiU-being-added-to most remarkable and unbeaten score of any Racing System ever devised, these results of THE PATARINA SYSTEM at Melbourne since 23 June, 1962. Equally effective at all tracks, "Patarina" is the only system with this vast profit-making potential. (Copyright No. 64333 ensures your pro­ tection.) FORMULA II: Level Stake Winner! All bets early on race day or the day before, and if used in conjunction with the superb Formula II Staking Method it produces greater profits still. (Copyright No. 64412.) THE OVEBLANDER: Simple WIN bets only, with Winners Prices of 3:1, 7:2, 5:1, a:l, 7:1, giving 90% Profitable fixtures. An average of Two Select Bets per meeting, and features "Built-in" safeguards which virtually mean you just cannot lose! (Copyright No. 64979.) The racing game is filled with uncertainty, but these three Mathematically Computed Systems represent the Absolute Ultimate in reducing this element of chance to its barest minimum. There are many winning plans to make you a profit, IF you have a "bank" of £2000 or don't mind 10 or 12 bets a racel But not here. Our Systems are for Mr Average Punter, and that's most of us. ("Patarina's" necessary bank is £4, for example.) Check all the claims else­ where, read "between-the-lines", too, and you'll see how much more we really have to offer you! Check our value-for-money features, The 5 Star Guarantee! CLIENTS HAVE WRITTEN SAYING: "Since purchasing your Patarina System late last year I've had nothing but success, apart from a couple ot minor set-backs, but these have been far outweighed by the volume of money I have won during the other wonderful winning weeks. Please accept my humble thanks for allowing me to purchase this system. Please find enclosed M.O. for one copy of your 'Overlander' system: should this prove to be half as good as your 'Patarina', there is only one way to describe you people, and that is the fact that you're wizards." (Mr. J.P., Alberton, S.A.) — "You certainly have a realistic approach. You may be interested to know that from a humble £16 my bank has grown in a few short weeks to £243." (Mr. E.P., New Farm, QLD.) — "I can honestly state that it is the ONLY method I have come across that shows a profit AFTER purchase. Many thanks to you, and keep up the good work." (Mr. J.L., Hunters Hill, NSW.) "RACEGOERS' GUIDE." A Free Book with our Systems, over 120 pages of Vital Information, crammed with such a Store of Knowledge that you could never otherwise accumulate. 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With or without Newspapers, plus Staking Methods and detailed examples. * ONE FULL YEAR'S RESULTS, Clearly explaining the Selection, Amount Wagered, Amount Won, etc., etc. Full and Convincing Proof! * Statistical Analysis of System Operations. * Our Own QUICK REFERENCE TABLES—ODDS and TOTE DIVIDENDS. * Most Suitable for use when the Odds are Not Known. * Advice or Help Freely Given. ALL Letters from our Clients answered. "FIGURES CAN'T LIE!" Not one, but TWENTY, Proven, Slmple-to-follow Ideas with examples, of how SIMPLE ARITHMETIC BEATS THE ODDS. Do YOU know how to back 8, 10, or even more Selections in one race, and still make an acceptable Profit, NO MATTER WHICH ONE WINS? Or how to make the equivalent of a given Profit on every bet of a series of say 14 cf/nsecutive bets, when 13 of them were losers? Can YOU successfully wager for Profit with odds and prices completely unknown? IT'S ALL THERE, and MUCH MORE TOO I FIVE STAR GUARANTEE * Your money refunded if any statement herein proved to be untrue. * Each of the 3 Systems will win you money. * £1000 to any recognised charity if the Original Letters of which the extracts appear here are not on our files. * The Publishers have carefully checked both legality and claims made * We are a Registered Business, members of The Victorian Chamber of Manufactures and a Firm you can trust I ACT NOW! Tear out this advt., enclose your full and only payment of tS (register cash or postal notes please), and clearly print your name and address You'll get your 3 Systems, Plus "Racegoers' Guide", Plus "Figures Can't Lie"" sent by return air-mail, plain wrapped and sealed, marked "Personaf and fully as advertised. B A R I N G H U P E N T E R P R I S E S ( A D ) , B o x 7 2 , M T . W A V E R L E Y , Vic.

20

20

ADAM, September, 1964 45

Helene Deschoux. Confronted, Manolesco admitted t h a t he h a d " a c c e p t e d a 1-lift." T h e D u c h e s s turned him out. T h a t night he w e n t to a gam­ b l i n g c a s i n o a n d l o s t s e v e n mil­ lion f r a n c s a t r o u l e t t e , a g a m e t h a t g a v e h i s skills n o c h a n c e . T h e next day h e found himself almost broke and, without think­ i n g , w e n t t o a j e w e l l e r on t h e r u e S t A u g u s t i n — n o t to steal b u t t o b u y a gift f o r t h e D u c h e s s a n d r e s t o r e himself to h e r favor. The salesman recognised him, in s p i t e of M a n o l e s c o ' s n e w a n d luxuriant moustache. He was arrested on t h e spot. I t w a s t h e first time he'd been apprehended and t h e first t i m e he'd entered a jewellery store to m a k e an honest purchase. H e r e c e i v e d a s e n t e n c e of t w o years at hard labor in the Prison d e Gaillon. C a r r y i n g r o c k s f o r 10 h o u r s a d a y on a r e p a i r g a n g , M a n o l e s c o h a d p l e n t y of t i m e t o look back on h i s r e s p l e n d e n t p a s t and think forward to his future, which looked bleak. W h e n h e w a s released from jail i n 1896 M a n o l e s c o w a s a l m o s t p e n n i l e s s . Old acquaintances a m o n g t h e F r e n c h nobility snub­ bed h i m in t h e streets. F o r t h e time being he m a d e up his mind to let his r e p u t a t i o n in E u r o p e cool d o w n a n d t o t a k e a l o o k a t the United States . . . Now, here h e w a s a year later, s a i l i n g f r o m S a n FVancisco b a c k

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t o h i s beloved F r a n c e , w i t h 112,000 dollars, a pearl necklace a n d other assorted valuables. H e landed a t Marseilles a n d w e n t straight t o Carcola. "Very interesting, American p e a r l s , e h ? " said Carcola, touch­ ing them with his tongue. " T w e n t y thousand francs, a n d Til b e g l a d t o b u y all t h e d o l l a r s you have." H e thought for a n instant. "But I understood you w e r e i n P a r i s . A n d so do t h e police." H e p r o d u c e d a P a r i s n e w s ­ p a p e r of t h e d a y before. T h e headline yelled: "Manolesco T r i u m p h s — A n o t h e r G r e a t Rob­ b e r y in t h e R u m a n i a n Tradition." T h e s t o r y w e n t on t o d e s c r i b e h o w a thief, p r e s u m e d t o b e Manolesco, had cleaned u p i n several stores along t h e r u e de la Paix. " T h i s is n o n s e n s e , " M a n o l e s c o s t u t t e r e d . " S - s o m e b o d y is imitat­ i n g m - m y t e c h n i q u e s , t h e d-dog." " I m i t a t i o n is t h e s i n c e r e s t f o r m of f l a t t e r y , " C a r c o l a l a u g h e d . W h o e v e r t h e thief o r t h i e v e s w e r e Manolesco did n o t w a n t t o risk his neck by r e t u r n i n g to P a r i s t o find o u t . I n s t e a d , h e w e n t off o n a g r a n d t o u r of E u r o p e G e r m a n y , I t a l y , A u s t r i a , Switzer­ land, Poland — using t h e n a m e of P r i n c e L a h o v a r y , a R u m a n i a n dignitary whose watch and chain h e h a d once stolen. Headlines in f o u r l a n g u a g e s followed h i m a s h e "blazed a t r a i l of i n f a m y a n d impudence." I n Germany h e mar­ r i e d a y o u n g h e i r e s s a n d t h e n dis­ covered that h e r family had squandered its fortune. H e desert­ ed h e r a n d w e n t s o u t h , b u t w a s a g a i n a r r e s t e d , t h i s t i m e in Leip­ zig. A t t h e t r i a l h e c o n d u c t e d h i s own defence by pleading insanity. H e gave his profession a s a "m-millionaire." N e x t m o r n i n g . M a y 28, 1902, George Manolesco w a s committed to t h e P r u s s i a n State Asylum. H e waited t h e r e until his wife h a d s e c u r e d a n a n n u l m e n t of t h e m a r ­ r i a g e , t h e n h e b r o k e o u t a n d fled —all t h e w a y t o N e w Y o r k . H e r e h e e n a c t e d o n e of h i s m o r e unorthodox crimes, purely a s a f a v o r f o r a friend. H e h a d found w o r k a s a w a i t e r in a hotel on Washington Square. T h e p a y w a s low, b u t e v e r y m o r n i n g Manolesco would stroll upstairs, take the hotel passkey from the s u p e r v i s o r ' s office a n d l e t h i m ­ self i n t o o n e of t h e r o o m s . T h e other waiters wondered how he

m a n a g e d t o dress in Kuppenh e i m e r s u i t s . O n e of t h e m , a likeable y o u n g Russian, got into c o n v e r s a t i o n o n e d a y . H e revealed t h a t h e w a s in love with t h e daughter of t h e G r a n d Duke A l e x a n d e r of L e n i n g r a d , w h o h a d crossed t h e Atlantic to m a r r y t h e g i r l t o a n A m e r i c a n billionaire's s o n . " A n d I h a v e followed h e r all t h e w a y f r o m L e n i n g r a d , b u t h e r f a t h e r will n o t l e t h e r s e e m e . " M a n o l e s c o could n o t r e s i s t t h i s e x c u s e to g e t b a c k into t h e b i g t i m e . H e t o o k t h e d a y off, p u t o n his finest shirl a n d monkey suit a n d invited h i m s e l f to t h e e n g a g e ­ m e n t reception in a n uptown hotel. T h e Grand D u k e and his e n t o u r a g e w e r e a l s o living in t h e h o t e l . M a n o l e s c o t o o k a l o n g look a t t h e w e d d i n g gifts o n display, w i t h t h e i r n e a t c a r d s in f r o n t t o label t h e d o n o r s , t h e n h e w e n t upstairs and broke into the Grand D u k e ' s r o o m w i t h a p i p e cleaner, w h i c h m a d e n o noise. H e d r e w h i s feet u p o n a c h a i r behind t h e c u r t a i n i n f r o n t of t h e F i f t h Avenue window a n d waited. H e s a t t h e r e l i k e a s p h i n x f o r five hours without moving. T h e d o o r o p e n e d a t 11.00 pm and the Grand D u k e entered with t h r e e g i g a n t i c C o s s a c k s , h i s per­ sonal servants. The Cossacks w e r e c a r r y i n g t h e w e d d i n g gifts, which included a diamond tiara t h a t M a n o l e s c o h a d observed, a p r e s e n t f r o m t h e C z a r of R u s s i a . T h e G r a n d D u k e u n l o c k e d a safe in t h e w a l l o v e r t h e bed a n d placed t h e p r e c i o u s t i a r a inside. T h e C o s s a c k s w e n t outside, t o stand guard, and the Duke and D u c h e s s w e n t t o bed. W h e n h e w a s s u r e t h e y w e r e asleep, Man­ olesco e m e r g e d from b e h i n d t h e curtains, gently pushed the bed a w a y f r o m t h e wall a n d o p e n e d t h e s a f e w i t h h i s p i p e cleaner. H e removed the tiara and, as a small consolation prize, a t o p a z r i n g for himself. T h e n h e p u s h e d t h e D u k e a n d h i s wife a n d t h e i r bed b a c k i n t o place, r e t u r n e d f o r t h e r e s t of the night in a squatting position. In the morning the alarm sounded. T h e Grand D u k e and his wife r u s h e d from t h e room, to be escorted dovm to t h e manager's office b y t h r e e h u l k i n g C o s s a c k s . Manolesco stood up, stretched lazily, b r u s h e d h i m s e l f d o w n a n d wandered out with the tiara. At the doorway he met the Grand D u c h e s s , w h o h a d c o m e b a c k for her pocketbook. She was about to scream when Manolesco placed a finger gently o v e r h e r lips. " N o t a m u r m u r , if y o u p l e a s e , y o u r g r a c e , " h e said g r a v e l y in R u s s i a n . " I a m a revo­ lutionary. I a m c-carrying a bomb in m y p o c k e t a n d it m a y g o off." T h e D u c h e s s froze a g a i n s t t h e doorpost as h e sauntered toward the nearest staircase. There, he s h o t d o w n 12 f l i g h t s a n d left b y t h e s e r v a n t s ' exit, t i p p i n g h i s h a t to o n e of t h e chefs. Back in his lodgings he w r o t e a discreet note to the Grand Duke a n d delivered it p e r s o n a l l y t o t h e hotel. I t explained that George M a n o l e s c o , of w h o m t h e G r a n d
46 ADAM, September, 1964

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Duke m u s t have heard, would n o t like to e m b a r r a s s anybody b y telling t h e A m e r i c a n p r e s s t h a t t h e t i a r a g i v e n b y t h e C z a r of a l l t h e R u s s i a s h a d b e e n so c l u m s i l y g u a r d e d t h a t a thief h a d b e e n a b l e t o r e m o v e it. T h e C z a r w o u l d certainly be annoyed. T h e n o t e promised that t h e tiara would be r e t u r n e d i n t a c t a s s o o n a s it h a d been publicly a n n o u n c e d t h a t t h e Grand D u k e ' s d a u g h t e r w a s forced to b r e a k off h e r e n g a g e m e n t . A s it h a p p e n e d , t h e r e w a s a y o u n g R u s s i a n g e n t l e m a n w o r k i n g in a hotel i n W a s h i n g t o n S q u a r e w h o w a s most devoted to t h e daughter of t h e G r a n d D u k e . . . T h e r e s t of M a n o l e s c o ' s s e c o n d s t a y i n A m e r i c a p r o v e d disap­ pointing. O n t h e i n v i t a t i o n of a F r e n c h newspaper h e w e n t back to Paris, f a r e paid, t o w r i t e h i s m e m o i r s . They w e r e syndicated all over E u r o p e and, for t h e first t i m e in h i s life, M a n o l e s c o w a s a n h o n e s t celebrity, w h o s e p h o t o g r a p h ap­ peared in every paper in t h e world. T h e m e m o i r s b e c a m e a best-selling book, a n d Manolesco r e t i r e d t o t h e w a r m c l i m a t e of Italy on t h e proceeds. H e married a n d h a d t w o c h i l d r e n , of w h o m h e w a s ridiculously proud. I n 1911, a t t h e a g e of 39, h e was stammering with excitement w h i l e p l a y i n g w i t h h i s five-yearold s o n . T h e s t a m m e r m a d e h i m choke, h e c o u g h e d v i o l e n t l y a n d b r o k e a blood v e s s e l i n h i s t h r o a t . Twelve hours later h e w a s dead. Eighteen thousand people c a m e f r o m a s f a r afield a s B u l g a r i a a n d F i n l a n d t o t h e f u n e r a l of G e o r g e Manolesco, t h e m a n w h o , d u r i n g h i s lifetime, h a d s t o l e n p r o p e r t i e s t o t h e v a l u e of o v e r 18 million dollars. •
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off h i s t h o n g s a n d h e l d t h e m l o o s e l y i n h i s left h a n d w h i l e h e plodded a l o n g o v e r t h e f i r m e r sand a t t h e water's edge. Behind t h e beach, scrubby sheo a k s a n d fat-leafed mangroves f o r m e d a t h i c k w a l l of v a r i e g a t e d greens that r a n down to flank t h e m o u t h of t h e c r e e k , o n t h e o t h e r side of t h e b a y . EUis s i g h e d , p u t on his thongs, a n d moved into the mangroves, following a faintly remembered suggestion, of a t r a c k t h a t r a n a p p r o x i m a t e l y parallel with t h e creek. The handcuffs were slippery b e t w e e n h i s s k i n a n d h i s belt. The sandflies w e r e eager a n d numerous, and his hands were equally busy pushing aside branches and slapping a t h i s s w e a t i n g f a c e a n d a r m s . A fish j u m p e d i n t h e m i d d l e of t h e sliding, yellow creek — its re­ e n t r y w a s s t a r t l i n g l y loud. H e a l m o s t missed t h e boat. It w a s moored amongst tall mangroves that obscured the m a s t , a n d a s c r e e n of d e a d w o o d a n d leafy b r a n c h e s h a d b e e n con­ structed to hide t h e hull from a n y casual observer on t h e bank. E l l i s g r i m a c e d , w i p e d h i s face, a n d bent to roll u p his pants. H e k i c k e d off h i s t h o n g s a n d , u s i n g mangrove roots as handholds, w e n t down cautiously into t h e mud. H e began moving toward t h e camouflaged boat, straining t o lift e a c h l e g u p f r o m t h e tenacious mud, nose wrinkling a t the stenches that rose from t h e t r a i l h e left b e h i n d . H e h a d reached the screen a n d had begun to dismantle it w h e n he h e a r d a sound so i n c o n g r u o u s that h e laughed wonderingly. A kitten w a s miaouing, a n d its little cries b e c a m e m o r e i m p e r a t i v e a s E l l i s p u l l e d a w a y m o r e of t h e leafy b r a n c h e s . H e r e a l i s e d t h a t t h e kitten w a s on board t h e boat, u n d e r t h e stained tarpaulin t h a t w a s l a s h e d d o w n o v e r t h e cock­ pit. E l l i s l o o s e n e d a n d lifted o n e corner of t h e t a r p a u l i n . T h e k i t t e n l o o k e d u p a t h i m expect­ a n t l y , b l a c k p u p i l s b e c o m i n g slits as i t s eyes adjusted to t h e sudden light. I t w a s a small kitten, a n d it h a d a w h i t e p a t c h o n i t s c h e s t . I t s a t o n t h e c o c k p i t floor, be­ t w e e n a n oil-can a n d t h e o p e n little h a t c h w a y above t h e gland a t t h e e n d of t h e d r i v e - s h a f t . Ellis rolled t h e t a r p a u l i n r i g h t back, noticing n o w a can t h a t had once held beans a n d — m o r e recently — milk. T h e kitten w o b b l e d a r o u n d t h e little h a t c h ­ way, miaouing again.

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J u s t w h a t t h e hell a r e y o u a f t e r ? " "Listen, mate, just t a k e it q u i e t l y , e h ? " Ellis said. " I h e a r d the kitten miaouing, so I came d o w n t o h a v e a look. HeUova p l a c e to h e a r a k i t t e n . " T h e m a n behind h i m made a s n o r t i n g noise. " M a y b e , " h e said. " B u t What b r i n g s y o u h e r e in t h e first place?" E l l i s q u i c k l y decided t o tell t h e t r u t h — s o m e of t h e t r u t h . " M y g i r l w a l k e d o u t on m e , b a c k a t t h e p u b , " h e said. " I g o t sick of t h e c r o w d t h e r e , s o I t h o u g h t I'd t a k e a w a l k . Used to c o m e a r o u n d h e r e fishing o n e time, and I s o r t of w a n d e r e d b a c k . " H e paused. "Usen't to b e a n y o n e much around here then." " Y o u ' r e a bit l u c k y , " t h e voice said. " I t could b e t h e w a y y o u s a i d it. Y e a h , a n d y o u ' r e l u c k y t h a t y o u r g i r l w a l k e d o u t . If s h e hadn't, she'd h a v e done t h e dirty on y o u . I k n o w — yeah, I know, all r i g h t . " The disembodied voice, the t h r e a t of t h e rifle, a n d h i s o w n helplessness w e r e combining to shatter Ellis's self-control. H e had to grip t h e gunwale to stop s h a k i n g . T h e n Ellis t h o u g h t of t h e b l a c k m a r k on h i s p e r s o n a l file a n d of S e r g e a n t P e a s e l y , a n d he began to get angry. Give m e a go a t h i m , h e thought. J u s t give m e o n e go a t this rat. T h e k i t t e n t r o d i n a s m e a r of oil a n d b e g a n s h a k i n g i t s p a w fastidiously. "All r i g h t . L u c k y , j u s t c l i m b u p h e r e , n i c e a n d e a s y , " t h e voice told Ellis. " I ' m g o i n g t o h a v e t o tie y o u u p , b u t I guess someone'll come looking for y o u sooner o r l a t e r . C o u r s e , t h e sandflies a n d m o s q u i t o s a n d m a y b e a crocodile o r two'll b e f e e d i n g b e t t e r t h a n y o u till t h e n , b u t t h a t ' s y o u r o w n fault for poking y o u r nose in where it's not wanted. A n d don't t r y looking at m e , because that's just when you'll stop being lucky." " F o r h e a v e n ' s s a k e , w h y a c t like t h i s ? " E l l i s said, t u r n i n g labori­ ously a n d s t a r t i n g back to t h e b a n k . " W h a t t h e hell a m I t o you?" "Nothing, Lucky. Nothing but a nuisance. You c a n thank that f u r r y l i t t l e m a t e of m i n e , P a l , t h a t y o u ' r e e v e n still in o n e piece. Y e a h , I ' m fond of P a l . H e ' s t h e only company I've had for quite a w h i l e . Good t h i n g f o r y o u t h a t y o u spoke to little P a l like y o u did, L u c k y . " T h e m a u d l i n t o n e of t h e voice i n f u r i a t e d Ellis. A p o t e n t i a l m u r ­ " P o o r l i t t l e feller," Ellis said, d e r e r w h o w a s a l r e a d y a thief leaning on t h e gunwale. "So you're (and probably worse) drivelling h u n g r y , a n d y o u e x p e c t t o b e fed. m a w k i s h l y a b o u t a n undistinguish­ E h ? G u e s s w h o e v e r o w n s y o u is ed k i t t e n w a s , t o Ellis, g r o t e s q u e . still a r o u n d t h e n . B u t w h e r e , D e s p i t e t h i s , h e o b e d i e n t l y clam­ Pussy?" bered u p t h e slippery bank and F r o m behind a n d above h i m avoided looking directly a t t h e c a m e t h e s l i g h t s o u n d of a rifle's dim figure n o w backed into t h e bolt being worked. Ellis j e r k e d mangroves. upright a n d began to turn, his movements hampered by the mud. "Okay, n o w lie down on your belly," t h e voice commanded. " N e v e r m i n d w h o it i s , " a d e e p "Come on, h u r r y up. You're not h a r s h voice t o l d h i m . " T h e w a y worried about your clothes, people come snooping around here y o u ' d t h i n k i t w a s L u n a P a r k . s u r e l y ? Y o u cOready look like ADAM, September, 1964

48

you've been dragged backwards t h r o u g h a pig-sty." Ellis took a d e e p b r e a t h , wish­ ing that his knees would stop trembling. If I ' m g o i n g t o d o a n y t h i n g , it'll h a v e to b e n o w , h e t h o u g h t . Once I ' m d o w n , I ' m finished. "No," h e said. " N o , I c a n ' t do t h a t . You'U h a v e t o m a k e m e d o that." " Y e a h , " t h e voice a g r e e d . "It looks like I will." T h e rifle s p o k e , s h o c k i n g l y loud, a n d Ellis felt a s t h o u g h h e h a d been p u n c h e d solidly i n t h e t h i g h . He staggered forward a n d began to fall. H e l l ! H e d i d it, h e t h o u g h t . H e r e a l l y did d o i t ! H e felt cold a n d sick, a n d h e groaned a s h e writhed amongst the saplings on the muddy earth. Then, using h i s o w n sounds a n d m o v e m e n t s to disguise w h a t h e w a s doing, h e clipped a h a n d c u f f t o h i s o w n vwist. H e l a y i n a foetal position, l i s t e n i n g t o t h e man approach him. " T o o b a d , " t h e voice said. " T o o bad f o r y o u . " T h e rifle b a r r e l p r o d d e d Ellis. H e rolled o v e r a n d r e a r e d u p , clamping t h e other handcuff on t o t h e w r i s t of t h e h a n d t h a t held t h e rifle. T h e m a n h e a v e d b a c k a n d Ellis followed t h e move­ ment, letting t h e other's strength pull h i m u p o n to h i s feet. 'The rifle d r o p p e d a l m o s t silently t o the ground. F o r a m o m e n t , t h e y stood f a c e to face. Ellis — a n d a t h i c k s e t m a n w i t h a n u n s h a v e n face w h o w o r e a m e c h a n i c ' s filthy blue overalls. T h e m a n ' s y e l l o w t e e t h w e r e bared, a n d h i s r e d - r i m m e d eyes were wide under curiously n e a t e y e b r o w s . Ellis could feel w a r m blood j e t t i n g o u t a n d r u n ­ ning down his thigh, a n d h e blinked r a p i d l y a s a g r e y film m o v e d in f r o m t h e e d g e s of h i s vision. " I ' m a police officer," h e said. "You're under arrest." T h e m a n b a r k e d w i t h incredu­ lous laughter, a n d his breath w a s s o u r in Ellis's face. "A c o p p e r , " h e said. "A s t i n k i n g copper. L i s t e n , I ' v e been fooling you fellows e v e r s i n c e I b r o k e o u t , a n d I ' m n o t g o i n g t o b e t a k e n in b y a m u g like y o u . " H e g r a b b e d s u d d e n l y a t Ellis's t h r o a t . Ellis j e r k e d on t h e c h a i n t h a t linked t h e m , a n d t h e convict s t u m b l e d off-balance. Ellis r e a c h ­ ed f o r h i s baton, b u t h e n e v e r did m a k e it. H i s w o u n d e d l e g g a v e u n d e r h i m , t h e first r e a l pain hit him, a n d h e toppled b a c k w a r d s off t h e e d g e of t h e m u d d y slope. M o m e n t a r i l y , t h e convict's w e i g h t held t h e m poised a t t h e limits of t h e i r l i n k e d a n d o u t s t r e t c h e d a r m s , t h e n t h e lip of t h e b a n k g a v e w a y a n d t h e y fell t o w a r d t h e boat. Ellis l a n d e d o n h i s b a c k in t h e m u d , b u t t h e convict, a r c h i n g o v e r h i m , crashed h e a d f i r s t into t h e b o a t a n d collapsed. H e l a y half­ w a y over t h e stern, h i s legs slack a b o v e Ellis's b r e a t h l e s s body, h i s

l i m p a r m still j o i n e d i r r e v o c a b l y to Ellis's. A n d i t will h a v e t o b e t h e b o a t , Ellis thought. I'd n e v e r g e t h i m back, n o t walking. Because this leg is bad, really bad. T h e w a y it's coming out, h e m u s t ' v e h i t a n a r t e r y . B u t if I c a n g e t t h i s t h i n g started, I've got a chance to g e t a r o u n d to Half Moon Bay. A n d I've got h i m , n o m a t t e r what, because t h e handcuff k e y s a r e still in t h e g l o v e b o x of t h e u t e . And I've got to m o v e n o w — I'll p a s s o u t if I d o n ' t m o v e q u i c k . H e c l a w e d h i s w a y u p o u t of t h e s l i m e , p a n t i n g a n d dizzy, h i s g u t s chilled b y t h e a w a r e n e s s of t h e blood h e w a s l o s i n g . T h e con­ vict d i d n o t s t i r — h e w a s a l s o l o s i n g blood, f r o m a w i d e s c a l p wound, a n d it trickled into his mud-spattered beard. T h e kitten, a h i s s i n g f u r r y ball, b a c k e d i n t o t h e c o r n e r of t h e c o c k p i t a n d flattened its ears. EUis h u n g o n t o t h e g u n w a l e and groped in t h e canvas b a g b e s i d e t h e o p e n fish-well. A m o n g s t a t a n g l e of f i s h i n g g e a r , h e f o u n d w h a t h e looked for — a knife w i t h a c u r v e d b l a d e a n d a ser­ rated back. H e used t h e knife to s a w t h r o u g h t h e line t h a t m o o r e d t h e s t e r n of t h e d o r y t o t h e m a n g r o v e s , t h e n h e leaned h i s face o n h i s f r e e a r m a n d sobbed. T h e r e w a s a n o t h e r line, h o l d i n g t h e b o w fast, a n d i t w a s 17 feet a w a y . E v e n if Ellis h a d n o t b e e n wounded, h e would n o t have been a b l e t o d r a g t h e u n c o n s c i o u s con­ vict w i t h h i m w h i l e h e c u t t h a t s e c o n d line. Ellis's vision w a s becoming more blurred, a n d he pawed a t his eyes as h e raised his head. H e saw dimly t h a t t h e for'ard line was m a d e fast to w h a t w a s only a s a p l i n g , a n d t h e r e a l i s a t i o n of this prodded h i m into dragging himself o n b o a r d t h e d o r y . T h e convict still d i d n o t s t i r , b u t t h e kitten hissed a t h i m furiously. H e looked d o w n a t h i s t h i g h . T h e blood h a d s e e p e d t h r o u g h h i s mud-caked trousers a n d w a s run­ n i n g d o w n h i s leg. W i t h t h e h a n d c u f f c h a i n limit­ i n g h i s r e a c h , h e s e t t h e fly-wheel of t h e little diesel e n g i n e a n d cranked. A n d cranked a n d crank­ ed, untU t h e e n g i n e fired. H e hastily shoved t h e gear-lever into reverse, a n d reached under t h e convict's slack-mouthed face to g r a b t h e tiller. T h e s t e r n of t h e b o a t s w u n g out into t h e stream. T h e for'ard line b e c a m e taut, w a t e r spinning o u t f r o m it in b r i g h t d r o p s . T h e sapling bowed a n d groaned a s it

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felt t h e t e n s i o n , t h e n t h e r e w a s a s n a p p i n g a n d s p l i n t e r i n g of w o o d . T h e d o r y w a s free, a l t h o u g h t h e leafy t o p of t h e s a p l i n g w a s still f a s t to t h e l i n e . Ellis p u s h e d t h e g e a r l e v e r i n t o t h e ahead slot a n d pulled on t h e tiller. Slowly, crankily, the boat c a m e a b o u t a n d headed down­ s t r e a m , t o w a r d t h e m o u t h of t h e c r e e k a n d Half M o o n B a y . N o w t h e convict's feet trailed laxly in t h e y e l l o w - w h i t e w a k e . EUis t r i e d , once, to d r a g t h e thick-set m a n further into the dory, b u t he had used up his strength. A w a r m blackness wrapped around him, slowly a n d comfortingly, and his h a n d b e g a n t o fall a w a y f r o m t h e tiller. Darcy Sullivan came-to as t h e d o r y yawned, its bow pointing n o w t o t h e left b a n k of t h e c r e e k . S u U i v a n s l i t h e r e d face-first into t h e cockpit and sat u p like a n ape. He grabbed the swinging t i l l e r w i t h h i s s h a c k l e d left h a n d , t h e n swore and used his right. Despite the impact that had opened his scalp, h e w a s a l e r t a n d a w a r e of h i s s i t u a t i o n . H e h a d h a d to develop this faculty ever

since, t h r e e m o n t h s previously, h e h a d b r o k e n o u t of S y d n e y ' s L o n g B a y Gaol, w h e r e h e h a d b e e n s e r v i n g a five-to-lO-year t e r m f o r a r m e d r o b b e r y w i t h violence. During those three months, he h a d e l u d e d t h e police, t h e i r infor­ mers, and two jealous women so successfully t h a t he had gone as far south as Melbourne before d o u b l i n g b a c k u p to Q u e e n s l a n d . T h e dory represented his ultimate form of t r a n s p o r t . I n it, he intended to h u g t h e coast until h e crossed to T h u r s d a y Island, from where h e planned to make the r u n t o N e w Guinea. " A n d t h a t ' s w h a t I ' m still go­ i n g t o do, c o p p e r , " h e s n a r l e d a t Ellis's motionless form. "And n o t y o u o r a n y o n e else i s g o i n g t o stop me." H e jerked savagely a t t h e links t h a t c h a i n e d h i m t o EUis, t h e n h e g r i n n e d a n d r u m m a g e d in h i s fishing bag. H e took out a h a n k of h e a v y c o t t o n Une a n d , a s t h e dory nosed out into Half Moon B a y , h e l a s h e d d o w n t h e tiUer s o that t h e boat would maintain a course out on to t h e blue w a t e r between the mainland and Double

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50

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Island. The kitten crouched s i l e n t l y a n d m i s e r a b l y in its cor­ n e r , a n d SuUivan clucked a t it reassuringly. " D o n ' t w o r r y . P a l , " h e said softly. "I'll j u s t g e t myself o u t of t h e s e cuffs a n d s e t t h e sail, t h e n I'll b e r i g h t w i t h y o u . N o s e n s e w a s t i n g fuel, i s t h e r e ? " S u l l i v a n k n e l t i n t h e cockpit a n d b e g a n s e a r c h i n g ElUs's pock­ ets. H e found money, and trans­ f e r r e d it t o h i s o v e r a l l s — t h e b a t o n he t h r e w , cursing over the side. H e did n o t find t h e hand­ cuff keys. He growled and s l a p p e d ElUs a c r o s s t h e face, twice and very quickly. The y o u n g m a n ' s h e a d lolled a s h e g r o a n e d , t h e n h e s i g h e d loudly and sagged into jointless im­ mobility. SuUivan cursed again a n d shook his shackled hand. EUis's h a n d flopped a r o u n d a t t h e o t h e r e n d of t h e s h o r t chain, and SuUivan s a w that h e w a s n o longer breathing. N o w t h e d o r y w a s weU o u t i n t o H a l f M o o n B a y , m o v i n g steadUy a c r o s s t h e sweU, t h e l i t t l e e n g i n e put-putting happily under the h i g h b l u e s k y . SuUivan s c r a t c h e d h i s s h a g g y h e a d , w i n c i n g a s his fingers touched his scalp wound. H e swallowed hard, several times, then spoke through clenched teeth. " I t ' s g o t t o b e done. P a l , " h e said to t h e whimpering kitten. "You see that, don't you. Pal? I ' v e c o m e t o o f a r t o let t h i s s t o p me." S w e a r i n g insanely, h e searched a r o u n d until he found w h a t h e wanted — a heavy-duty spanner. A few s h a r p jolts and the spring w a s r e l e a s e d . T h e effort had weakened him and set u p a t h r o b b i n g in h i s h e a d . W h e n h e w a s f r e e of h i s captor, h e l e a n e d o v e r t h e side a n d r e t c h e d , t h e e m p t y h a n d c u f f stiU a t t a c h e d t o h i s o w n w r i s t , clunk­ i n g a g a i n s t t h e huU a s h i s b o d y convulsed. The dory h a d almost r e a c h e d t h e o p e n s e a n o w , a n d its motion was becoming more erratic. T h e kitten w a s making insane noises — there w a s a s p a t t e r i n g of f r o t h a r o u n d its mouth, a n d its pink nose w a s crinkled. " N e a r l y finished. P a l , " SuUivan g a s p e d . " O n c e w e ' r e o u t of s i g h t of l a n d , we'U b e safe. D o n ' t you w o r r y . P a l — we'U b e aU r i g h t , because I ' m going to look after you." But t h e kitten gave a drawn-out, yowling cry t h a t m a d e Sullivan's scalp squirm, then jumped down t h r o u g h t h e little h a t c h i n t o t h e b i l g e b e s i d e t h e s p i n n i n g drives h a f t . S u l l i v a n c r i e d o u t fearfully and, a v o i d i n g t h e b o d y in t h e stem, scrambled toward the hatch. T h e kitten glared up a t him from the sloshing darkness. " C a r e f u l , P a l , " S u l l i v a n said. " D o n ' t b e l i k e t h a t . I h a d to d o it. N o other w a y for us to keep g o i n g n o r t h , d o n ' t y o u s e e ? Ah, c o m e on. P a l . Y o u ' r e m y little mate, and I wouldn't h u r t you." But, as h e stretched out his shackled hand, the kitten went i n t o a k i n d of fit a n d c l a w e d

ADAM, September, 1964

viciously a t S u l l i v a n ' s t e n t a t i v e fingers. SuUivan jerked his h a n d b a c k , t h e n bellowed w i t h r a g e a s h e w a s pulled d o w n flat o n t o t h e cockpit floor. T h e toothed, e m p t y handcuff, s w i n g i n g freely o n i t s r a c h e t , h a d h i t a n d locked itself a r o u n d t h e drive-shaft, w h i c h n o w w h i r l ­ ed inside t h e r i n g of t h e h a n d c u f f w i t h a metallic s t u t t e r . Sullivan filled h i s l u n g s w i t h a sobbing b r e a t h , h i s f a c e p r e s s e d a g a i n s t t h e h o t t i m b e r of t h e floor, feeling t h e v i b r a t i o n of t h e drive-shaft u p along the full l e n g t h of his o n c e m o r e s h a c k l e d a r m . And, only a few inches from h i s face, h e s a w t h e s p a n n e r . H e roUed o n t o h i s b a c k a n d l a u g h e d . T h e n o i s e f r i g h t e n e d off t h r e e c u r i o u s , w h e e l i n g gulls, a n d t h e kitten scrabbled around fran­ tically in t h e bilge. T h e d o r y pushed on out past the headland. •

ISLE OF CHANGE
(Continued from page 35} I closed m y e y e s b u t I c o u l d n ' t blot o u t t h e s i g h t of t h e m u r d e r ­ ed w o m a n , o r t h e f e a s t i n g kiUer, o r t h e r a n t i n g g h o u l in h e r c r a z y fandango. I rushed from the m a d hell b e l o w to t h e f a i n t s o u g h i n g on the crag's s u m m i t and s a n k into a n e x h a u s t e d sleep. T h e sun w a s climbing high w h e n I stood u p a n d s t r e t c h e d . I t reflected f r o m t h e g l e a m i n g g l a s s a n d p a i n t w o r k of a l a r g e , s l e e k luxury cruiser foaming northward. I l i t t h e b o n f i r e a n d w a i t e d for t h e t h i c k s m o k e t o coil i n t o t h e still air. U s i n g t h e sail f r o m t h e r a f t a s a b l a n k e t o v e r t h e fire, I regulated the smoke to three short puffs, t h e n t h r e e l o n g o n e s , a n d t h r e e s h o r t a g a i n , t h e time-honor­ ed S O S s i g n a l f o r a i d . T w o l o n g blasts echoed from t h e cruiser's s i r e n a s s h e a l t e r e d c o u r s e for t h e island. I left t h e f i r e b u r n i n g a s a n offering t o i t s gods. A s t r a n g e a n d t e n s e d J u l i e w a s w a i t i n g for m e at the spring. " T h e r e ' s a p a s s e n g e r s h i p com­ i n g for u s , " I said. " W h a t a r e y o u g o i n g t o tell them about you and m e ? " she demanded. " T h e r e wiU b e a c o u r t of e n q u i r y i n t o t h e l o s s of t h e "Ro­ t u m a " a n d we'll have to s p e a k the t r u t h , " I said sharply. " T h a t ' s fine, B a r r y . A f t e r s h e s a n k you a n d I drifted o n t h e r a f t to T a b u t i r i a n d w e h a v e b e e n alone h e r e ever since." I stared at her. " W h a t a b o u t t r a d e r B r a d Ho­ g a n ? " I asked. "Who was h e ? " she jeered. I sat down and p u t m y head on m y hands. "Hogan h a s vanished, Barry. His ship and it's native crew a r e a hundred u n k n o w n miles a w a y by now. W h o can prove t h a t h e was h e r e ? " t h e girl exulted. "Kay w a s with us, Julie, and

h e r body is Ijdng on t h e beach." "Your mind's wandering after t h a t crack on t h e head, Barry. Kay Collins d i s a p p e a r e d when o u r ship sank, weeks ago." I looked a t the white, e m p t y sands and the calm, blue w a t e r and the horror came creeping back. " W h e r e is K a y ? " I asked. Julie pointed a t the lagoon. " M i s t e r B i g w a s stiU h u n g r y , " s h e said. I d u g a t a p a r t b u r i e d l u m p of r o c k . " S o t h e b r u t e t o o k h e r in t h e end, t h a n k s t o you, J u l i e . " " H o g a n kUled h e r a n d I g a v e a quick funeral," t h e girl snapped. I shook m y head. " B u t w h y , J u l i e , w h y ? " I beg­ ged. " T o t a k e c a r e of m e , " s h e s a i d bitterly. "I've got nothing to go b a c k to, B a r r y . N o h o m e , n o p e o p l e a n d n o j o b . T h e r e is o n l y you to help me." "I can't do m u c h for you, Julie." T h e h u n k of r o c k c a m e f r e e . " I t h i n k y o u wdll, b e c a u s e a f t e r o u r l o n g i s l a n d idyU I c a n m a k e or break you. Mister Offlcer Dean." I stared at her sneering face. "What d o y o u m e a n , y o u nig­ gling h a g ? " I asked. "You w e r e either m y virtuous rescuer, or m y moral downfaU. T a k e y o u r pick, s a i l o r b o y . " " T h e n I do h a v e a choice?" I picked u p t h e j a g g e d rock. "Of c o u r s e . Y o u c a n t a k e m e to y o u r nice, n e w h o u s e in S y d n e y , o r go to prison for assault." I got up. " W h y s h o u l d t h e y beUeve y o u ? M y w o r d is a s g o o d a s y o u r s . " Her laugh was a taunt. " A r e y o u w U l i n g t o t e s t it w i t h y o u r sweet w i f e ? " she jeered. "No! You lying, scheming tramp," I shouted and raised the r o u g h s t o n e in m y fist. I h e a r d J u l i e b e g g i n g f o r h e r life t h r o u g h a r e d h a z e a n d seized h e r t h r o a t with m y free hand. A loud hail came from the lagoon and the m i s t seeped away. I l e t t h e p a n t i n g g i r l fall a n d stared u p a t t h e weird c r a g for t h e l a s t t i m e . T h e n a t i v e belief i n t h e evil s p i r i t s of T a b u t i r i could b e justified, b e c a u s e t h e a c c u r s e d isle h a d c h a n g e d u s aU. K a y , t h e t o u g h , self-possessed cynic, w h o h a d given h e r h e a r t a n d h e r b o d y t o a r u t h l e s s scoun­ drel. Julie, t h e demure, timid prude, who had danced over death a n d p l o t t e d h e r v i c i o u s Ues. A n d I, B a r r y D e a n , t h e s i m p l e , h o n e s t sailor, w h o h a d b e t r a y e d h i s v o w s and hurled a m a n t o his doom a n d s t o p p e d o n l y o n t h e e d g e of murder. T h e s t o n e w a s still i n m y h a n d . S a v a g e l y I s t r o d e t o t h e flat r o c k a n d s c r a t c h e d a n o t h e r l i n e of dog­ gerel on it's surface. I d r a g g e d J u U e t o h e r feet, a n d pushed her roughly toward the rescuing boat. W e walked silently b a c k t o civilisation. • ADAM, September, 1964 51

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(Continued from page 25) onto his trousers while h e s a t a n d smoked, t h e n it m u s t h a v e found its w a y down to his ankle as h e c o m m e n c e d w a l k i n g a g a i n . Without preliminary it pierced the flesh. H e b r o k e i n m i d - s t r i d e a n d yelled i n agony. A s h e landed a n d b e l t e d a t t h e l e a t h e r of h i s boot, t h e a n t m a d e a s e r i e s of lightning devastating raids about the immediate area. H e flopped c r a z i l y t o a s i t t i n g p o s i t i o n a n d c l a w e d a t t h e boot, dragging it brutally from his b a r e foot a n d t o s s i n g i t i n t o t h e scrub on his right. T h e a n t hopped a n d a s soon a s h i s h a n d c a m e n e a r it, i t h a u n c h e d b a c k l i k e a dog a n d made lunges a t h i m . I t had stopped biting. Fascinated, h e

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watched it sitting astride his ankle-bone, back down, head erect, pincers clashing together, tensing for t h e spring. H e even imagined h e could h e a r i t s t e e t h g n a s h i n g like a rabid dog's. Then t h e a n t bit h i m again. H e howled afresh and brought his hand savagely d o w n o n it. The stings began t o throb a s h e s e a r c h e d f o r t h e boot, f i n d i n g it a t t h e s a m e m o m e n t h e t r o d o n a b r o k e n b e e r b o t t l e . T h e flesh sliced n e a t l y a n d c l e a n l y a n d t h e b l o o d g u s h e d l i k e a r e l e a s e d flood. H e limped to the bank and cursed D a v e aloud. H e waited for s o m e m i n u t e s u n t i l t h e blood co­ agulated, then tore a strip from t h e tail of h i s s h i r t a n d b o u n d i t tightly about t h e wound. Then he forced t h e boot o n over t h e t o p of t h e r o u g h , b u t effective b a n ­ dage. As h e began limping h e w a s not sure which wound pained and ached t h e most — t h e a n t bites o r the gash. H e had reached t h e last big dip in t h e r o a d b e f o r e t h e hill l e a d i n g down into t h e town w h e n A r n o t t ' s bull, l o o m i n g h u g e a n d b l a c k , b l u n d e r e d o u t of t h e r o a d s i d e scrub and made straight for him. H e cried o u t a n d m a d e f o r t h e trees, t h e b u l l bellowdng a n d pounding in h o t pursuit. H e scaled a r a g g e d m e s s m a t e , tearing his trousers a n d mashing h i s i n j u r e d foot i n t h e p r o c e s s , a n d once safe, s a t cursing wildly t h e black f a t bull lowing a n d tossing beneath h i m . I t s head punched t h e air up a n d down a l t e r n a t e l y , a n d i t s r i g h t forehoof k e p t u p a t a t t o o i n t h e soft m o s s and earth. H e sobbed with rage. T h e c a r bullied u p t h e d u s t a s it c r e s t e d t h e h i l l f r o m t o w n , a n d then once descending, snorted a n d thundered its gathering speed. T h e b u l l t h r e w h i s h e a d , rolled his big juicy eyes, a n d galloped i n t o t h e s c r u b like a b l a c k j u g ­ gernaut, ripping aside vines a n d s m a l l b r a n c h e s in h a s t y p a s s a g e . As soon a s t h e bull t u r n e d his back Mack climbed a n d slithered to t h e ground a n d began limping quickly along t h e roadside. He sidestepped as the car g r o u n d past, a n d h e waved to t h e unseeing driver sitting tight a n d fierce a t t h e h u g e wheel. I t ' s a Model-T, h e t h o u g h t , e x a c t l y t h e s a m e one a s yesterday. I r r i t a t e d b e y o n d belief w i t h t h e b i t e s , t h e g a s h in ithis foot, t h e b u l l a n d t h e e n s u i n g r i p in h i s trousers, with the knowledge that he w a s about to fight because h e w a s w r o n g about a car, h e clump­ ed a n d s t r o d e o v e r t h e hill a n d down into town. T h e y w e r e t h e r e , o r m o s t of them. M a n y s a t on t h e p u b ver-

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anda, while some lounged on t h e tie-rail, a n d o n e e v e n s a t a s t r i d e his gelding, waiting. Dave w a s t h e r e , a n d a s h e s a w Mack, h e handed t h e pocket watch back to the m a n on t h e horse. T h e owner stooped across t h e gelding's neck a n d s t r a i g h t e n e d a s h e placed t h e w a t c h in his vest. M a c k c l u m p e d d o w n o n t h e sil­ ent group, a t t e m p t i n g all the while t o d i s g u i s e t h e l i m p . H e felt t h e w a r m s e e p of blood b e n e a t h h i s heel, a n d t h e s t i n g of t h e a n t w a s l i k e fire. " A l l r i g h t , " h e s a i d belliger­ ently. " I ' m late. B u t I ' m here." T h e m e n o n t h e v e r a n d a stood. T h e m e n o n t h e tie-rail s t r a i g h t ­ ened. T h e m a n on t h e gelding straightened also, gripping tightly t h e r e i n s of t h e n e r v o u s bridle. D a v e took h i s hands from his p o c k e t s w h e r e h e h a d placed t h e m scant seconds beforehand. They h u n g r e d a n d hairy from the w r i s t s like t w o g r e a t h a m s . "Well?" Mack asked. Dave cleared h i s throat, and shifted h i s feet. H e flickered a g l a n c e a t t h e m e n , b u t t h e i r ex­ pression w a s immobile. H e turned to Mack, a n d h e cleared h i s throat again. " M a c k , " h e said slowly, a n d h e g l a n c e d a t t h e m a n o n t h e geld­ ing, "Mack, I've been thinking about it since I . . . w e . . . we've b e e n w a i t i n g , a n d I ' m willing t o let b y g o n e s b e b y g o n e s if y o u a r e . I ' m wUling t o a d m i t I w a s w r o n g . It w a s a P a n h a r d as you say, n o t a T-Model." " I t w a s a T-Model. I j u s t s a w it. S o m u s t y o u h a v e . " "All r i g h t , t h e n . I t w a s a TModel. B u t i s i t w o r t h f i g h t i n g a b o u t ? I ' m i n n o mood f o r fight­ i n g t o d a y . I ' m t o o c r o o k . " H e add­ ed h a s t i l y , " I ' m n o t b a c k i n g d o w n m i n d y o u . B u t I t h i n k i t ' s ridicu­ lous to fight over a car, a n d all I w a n t n o w is a beer." M a c k c o n s i d e r e d , t h e h o r s e fid­ g e t e d i n t h e silence, t h e m a n s t a r e d b l a n k l y a t D a v e ' s back. "Hell!" h e winced inwardly a s a deep throbbing coursed through h i s i n j u r e d foot. " I ' m t e r r i b l y crook, t o o , " h e said finally, " A n d I w a n t a b e e r . " Dave advanced with his right h a n d o u t s t r e t c h e d , h i s w h o l e body s u d d e n l y r e l a x i n g . "Well, couldn't we forget t h e whole thing?" he suggested eagerly. " W e c o u l d , " M a c k replied un­ smiling, shifting t h e weight from h i s i n j u r e d foot t o t h e other. A s u d d e n r u s h of f i r e blasted a n d trembled t h e e n t i r e l e n g t h of i n j u r e d l e g . " W e could j u s t do that, Dave," h e continued grimly, " B u t I didn't w a l k all this damn­ ed w a y f o r n o t h i n g . N o w , g e t ' e m up!" A n d s o t h e y circled d e s p e r a t e l y and wearily in t h e dust, and the big gelding r e a r e d a n d whinnied s h r i l l f e a r a s t h e first m e a t y blow t h u d d e d i n t o a t i g h t l y d r a w n face. An agonising quarter-hour later t h e Model-T c h u r n e d p a s t , s t u t t e r ­ ing t h e other way, b u t no one noticed i t — n e i t h e r t h e pulped, bleeding, slugging antagonists, nor the mesmerised spectators. •
52 ADAM, September, 1964

DESERTER'S PARADISE
(Continued from page 9) even run-away ones," O'Hare said. "I'd lieard y o u r p e o p l e h a d p u t t h e blocks to t h e m a n d m a d e t h e m sore, b u t I d i d n ' t t h i n k t h e y w e r e this sore. Y o u ' r e o n y o u r own. Got a g a r d e n of m y o w n t o tend, you k n o w ? " H e s t e p p e d i n t o t h e n a t i v e crowd, m a k i n g his choice of a l l i a n c e clear. K r u p p was sore—not at O'Hare for h e h a d n ' t e x p e c t e d m o r e t h a n t h a t f r o m him, b u t a t t h e chief for h i s h a r s h m i s j u d g m e n t of h i m . "I a m n o t like t h e o t h e r s , " h e said, a n d w i t h u s u a l s h o r t t e m p e r , d r o v e h i s fist i n t o P e g ' s n o s e . P o g g r u n t e d a n d blood blotted o u t t h e t a t t o o e d l i n e s on h i s face. He countered with another spear jab at Krupp's stomach. Krupp sidestepped, t w i s t e d t h e s p e a r f r o m his h a n d s , a n d in t h e same m o t i o n , w a l l o p e d P o g in b a c k of t h e h e a d w i t h it. P o g s t u m b l e d . K r u p p cocked h i s a r m s t o b r e a k the spear over his head. Five h u s k y arioi p r i e s t s a l l t a c k l e d h i m a t once. His face ground into t h e c o r a l . S o m e o n e kicked his h e a d w i t h a c a l l o u s e d foot. T h e r e w a s immediate blackness, terrible nausea. W h e n h e c a m e to, t w o g i r l s h a d his h e a d a n d s h o u l d e r s in t h e i r laps, t a k i n g t u r n s w i p i n g h i s f a c e w i t h s w e e t - s m e l l i n g oil. P o g stood o v e r h i m . Krupp s t r u g g l e d t o his k n e e s , a n d w a v e r ­ ing, w a i t e d for P o g w i t h fists cocked. T h e n h e noticed P o g grin­ n i n g , a n d t h e W o t h o chief grin­ n i n g too. I n fact, the whole damned mob was grinning. They were no longer mad. Pog helped him up. Paulus was the answer. T h e b o y w a s s t a n d i n g beside O'Hare, looking a s though he had done something h e w a s proud of. "Whisht, you German rat," O ' H a r e s a i d . "If it w a s n ' t for t h e tad here, telling t h e m how you saved his t r i p e s b a c k on K w a j , t h e y ' d h a v e y o u a l o n g pig o v e r t h e cook p o t f o r w h a t y o u j u s t did." "Well, H e r r O ' H a r e , I k n o w it w a s n ' t y o u r e l o q u e n c e t h a t stop­ ped t h e m , " K r u p p said, a n d once a g a i n h e o w e d h i s life t o a l i t t l e b r o w n boy. The islanders had also accepted him as a guest, and he guessed h e o w e d t h e boy for t h a t , too. K r u p p looked t h e v i l l a g e over. H e h a d noticed s u c h h a p p i n e s s a m o n g the natives on Kwajalein, b u t t h e r e h a d been n o c h a n c e t o investigate their customs. Frat­ ernisation, o r m o n g r e l i s a t i o n a s K l a u s n e r called it, w a s f o r b i d d e n . It w a s infectious h a p p i n e s s , b u t he couldn't stay. It was time to see a b o u t a c o p r a ship. S o m e t h i n g fell b e h i n d h i m . H e s p u n a r o u n d , fists cocked. H i s n a v y h a t w a s l y i n g in t h e p a t h . T h e n s o m e t h i n g else fell f r o m directly above, a n d covered his face. I t w a s cloth — his n a v y

blouse. H e l o o k e d u p . T h e t w o girls who'd retrieved these items of c l o t h i n g f r o m t h e o c e a n w e r e s i t t i n g a m o n g t h e c o c o n u t s , jeer­ i n g , " N y a h - n y a h haoli. N y a h - n y a h haoli." "Kokonuss Maedchen verhauen," h e s h o u t e d , " a n d in c a s e y o u d o n ' t k n o w deutch, in m i s s i o n a r y t a l k it means, I'm going to spank the coconut girls' behinds." H e b a r r e d his t e e t h a n d s t a r t e d c l i m b i n g t h e palm. A t t h e t o p , h e s a t in t h e c e n t r e of t h e h u g e s p o k e s of t h e p a l m frond tree-top. H e g r a b b e d for the girls. They moved out onto the branches, frog-hopping from one to t h e other, t a u n t i n g him. T h e t r e e t e e t e r - t o t t e r e d in t h e m i l d w a r m wind a n d he h a d a fine v i e w of t h e v i l l a g e a n d l a g o o n . " B e f o r e I s p a n k you, you n e e d n a m e s , " h e said, l e e r i n g . "You g o t m y h a t , " h e said, p o i n t i n g a t t h e bigger one. " Y o u ' r e hat girl. Kappe, I'll c a l l y o u . " T o t h e o t h e r h e said, " B l o u s e g i r l . Bluse." He snuffled a t t h e m like a w i l d pig. They laughed, taunting him. H e reached out for the blouse girl. S h e dodged easily and h e b e g a n t o slip o u t of t h e t r e e , d o w n t h e f r o n d s like t h e y w e r e a P l a y g r o u n d slide. H e g r a b b e d wildy for one and swayed h a n g i n g by his r i g h t a r m 80 feet a b o v e t h e g r o u n d . H e c l a w e d for a g r i p w i t h h i s left. T h e g i r l s p u l l e d h i m b a c k u p b y h i s belt. H e l u n g e d for t h e c e n t r e of t h e t r e e and w r a p p e d both a r m s around the heart. F o r at least a minute he didn't move. The girls laughed and laughed. " I t h i n k I'll g o d o w n n o w , " h e said. B l u s e s h o o k h e r h e a d , a n d chat­ t e r e d s o m e t h i n g h e t o o k to m e a n : as long as you c a m e up you're g o i n g to s t a y . H e s t a r t e d d o w n , b u t s h e t o r e q u i c k l y a t h i s cloth­ ing and he lost balance a g a i n and hugged the tree. W h e n they w e r e finished t e a s i n g h i m , t h e y slid q u i c k l y d o w n t h e t r u n k . T h e y w a v e d once, t h e n r a n to the village, leaving him strand­ ed. H e w a i t e d for a lull in t h e

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wind a n d m a d e his w a y down, then trotted north again along the path. It w a s aknost dark when h egot back. T h e low-horizoned s u n bath­ e d e v e r y t h i n g i n y e l l o w a n d gold. H i s o w n m o o d w a s b l a c k . H i s life now depended on keeping on t h e m o v e . If h e s t o p p e d t o h i d e , h e would surely be found. A n d h e could b e s u r e of p r o t e c t i o n i n t h e n u m b e r s of t h e arioi f o r o n l y n i n e m o r e islands. W h e n they were finished with their mission in t h e M a r s h a l l s , t h e y m i g h t s i m p l y bid h i m alohoa a n d leave h i m behind for Klausner's gunboats. His trip w i t h t h e arioi m i g h t b e o n l y d e ­ laying action then, n o t escape a t all. H e d i d n ' t feel w e l l . T h e luuu h a d s t a r t e d , a n d n o one cared about the end, because t h e b e g i n n i n g w a s good a n d t h a t w a s all t h a t counted. T h e m e n and w o m e n w e r e s h o v i n g food i n t o their mouths, looking to Krupp like eating machines. A circle of n e a r - n a k e d girls closed in o n a t r i o of n e a r - n a k e d m e n in a s e r i o u s r i t u a l d a n c e t o p o r t r a y w h a t h a p p e n e d once ages b a c k w h e n t h e m e n of t h e i s l a n d s fell i n t o t h e w e b of t h e s p i d e r virgins. A f a t w o m a n with breasts tat­ tooed t o look l i k e h u g e e y e s h a n d ­ ed K r u p p a b i g c l a m s h e l l full of f e r m e n t e d kava r o o t a n d c o c o n u t w a t e r . H e g u l p e d it. I t b u r n e d . H e took another drink, then another.

T h e r e is n o need t o describe t h e A half-hour later h e w a s very landing on Island N u m b e r Two. I t drunk. H e s a w B l u s e w e a r i n g h i s w h i t e w a s a r e p e t i t i o n of N u m b e r O n e . b l o u s e a n d s t a g g e r e d t o w a r d h e r . T h e a c t i v i t y w a s d i f f e r e n t , how­ ever, because after the luau H e reached for h e r . S h e squealed h a p p i l y a n d r u b b e d h e r n o s e t h i n g s t u r n e d t o w a r m s t e a d of love. against his. H e pulled h e r into the bougainvillaea bushes a n d Pog raised his hand. T h e ring t h r e w h e r roughly to t h e ground. a r o u n d t h e cook p i t s fell silent. P o g stood a n d b e g a n t o s p e a k P a r a d i s e w a s full of h a n g o v e r s t h e n e x t m o r n i n g , a n d i t w a s n o o n s l o w l y , b o w i n g t o e a c h of t h e t h r e e chiefs a n d s m i l i n g . T h e b e f o r e P o g a n d t h e arioi party w h i p s could g e t e v e r y o n e t o g e t h e r c h i e f s a n s w e r e d w i t h e l a b o r a t e bows a n d contortions. to laimch t h e canoes. S u d d e n l y P o g bellowed. " K a i K r u p p w a s still reeling, b u t w a s k a i ! " a n d t h a t e n d e d it. T h e n a t ­ s o a f r a i d of b e i n g left b e h i n d , ex­ posed t o K l a u s n e r ' s sight, t h a t ives cheered. "What w a s h e talking about?" he staggered along with them. H e Krupp asked. h a d t o c a r r y O ' H a r e p a r t of t h e way. O ' H a r e w a s shaky-legged "Everybody will n o w begin a w i t h n a u s e a a n d h a d t o s t o p twice, big fight." even though he'd been retching "I think I'll just watch them," s i n c e d a w n . " T h a n k you, G e r m a n , " K r u p p said. h e said, a n d p a s s e d o u t a s K r u p p " B e t t e r n o t . B e t t e r g e t in it. p u t h i m i n t o a ceinoe. T h e y ' l l b e i n s u l t e d , s a y y o u lack m a n h o o d if y o u d o n ' t fight, a n d W h e r e t h e arrival h a d been so j o y o u s a n d noisy, t h e g o o d b y e s p r o b a b l y l e a v e y o u b e h i n d w h e n they leave." w e r e said wdth g r o a n s . N o f l u t e s O n c e a g a i n n o choice. "I'll d o or sharkskin d r u m s set cadence m y b e s t , " K r u p p said. for t h e paddlers, a n d n o sacrificial " J u s t w a t c h w h a t I do," O ' H a r e dancers o r love athletes w e r e a t said, " a n d m a y b e y o u ' l l b e a l l work on t h e platform boats. I t right." w a s m i r a c l e e n o u g h t h a t t h e 50 T h e w o m e n m a r k e d off a b i g canoes w e r e launched a t all. s q u a r e with powdered coral. Some Island N u m b e r T w o w a s Ujae 450 m e n , a t K r u p p ' s b e s t e s t i m a t e , Atoll, l o c a t e d a s f a r b a c k s o u t h a s l i n e d u p i n t w o e v e n r o w s , facing Kwajalein, b u t further west. It e a c h o t h e r . I s l a n d m e n a n d arioi t o o k t w o d a y s t o r e a c h it, a n d m e n were mixed in together. when they rammed t h e outrigger K r u p p w a s p a i r e d off a g a i n s t canoes into t h e w a r m coral beach, K r u p p found t h a t once a g a i n a n arioi of hua r a n k , a l e s s e r dig­ K l a u s n e r h a d b e e n t h e r e b e f o r e n i t a r y d i s t i n g u i s h e d b y fish t a t t o o ­ ed o n e a c h s h o u l d e r . H e w a s a him. G U A R A N T E E D > big m a n w i t h pineapple-sized fists, T h r e e chiefs d r e s s e d in cere­ muscles t h a t rippled. G O O D L U C K monial feather cloaks a n d wear­ " T h e idea," O ' H a r e explained, O R Y O U R M O N E Y ing shark bones in their kinky "is t o k n o c k h i m s a p p y . A n d if R E F U N D E D h a i r s i n g l e d h i m o u t in t h e c r o w d . y o u d o , l o o k a r o u n d f o r a n o t h e r T h e y c r o s s e d t h e i r a r m s a n d ex­ m a n w h o ' s k n o c k e d his o p p o n e n t a m i n e d h i m f o r a m o m e n t , t h e n s a p p y . A n d if y o u b e a t h i m , find the biggest said, " A m e s s a g e for a n o t h e r one, a n d so on, until you, H e r r K r u p p . " y o u ' r e k n o c k e d cold. O n c e y o u ' r e T o t a l s t r a n g e r s being able t o knocked out, you're out. You can't say his n a m e startled him again. )lay a n y m o r e . L a s t m a n s t a n d H e looked n e r v o u s l y a t t h e t r e e s , n g w i n s , a n d d o n ' t t h i n k you'U These Lucky "Hindu" Loodslonvt offend half expecting t o see sailors there. fool ' e m a n d j u s t l a y d o w n . in Australia for the first time, hove brought c o u n t l e s s G o o d Luck CEnd F o r f u n e T h e b i g chief h a n d e d h i m a n T h e y ' l l k n o w , m a y b e s t o n e y o u to people ail over the world. for cowardice . . . " envelope with a note. "Dear They are not a gimmick and for that reason w a sell them on a Money Back Krupp," it began. "You h a v e A yell from P o g interrupted G u a r a n t e e , m e a n i n g Iff y o u d o n o t have d e s e r t e d . W h e n c a u g h t y o u w^ll h i m . I t w a s t h e s t a r t i n g signal. good luck, good fortune in happiness, b e s u m m a r i l y s h o t . A m a l e r t ­ T h e t w o l i n e s l e a p e d a n d clashed, fflnancially, h e a l t h , etc., after g i v i n g these o trial y o u may return same a n d hove i n g e v e r y i s l a n d t o seize you. W i l l a n d K r u p p w a s lost in a r o a r your money refunded. c o n t i n u e s e a r c h p e r s o n a l l y u n t i l I w o r s e t h a n t h a t a t a soccer Price £ 2 . Complete ( n o m o r e to pay). m a t c h . A flst s m a s h e d h i s face a n d s e e y o u p u n i s h e d . Y o u a r e dis­ Available only from g r a c e t o I m p e r i a l N a v y t r a d i t i o n s . h i s k n e e s b u c k l e d . T h e hua w a s ASTRA ENTERPRISES, Dept. A D , coming a t h i m again, leaping at (Signed) Lieutenant Ruppert P.O. Box 6 1 0 South Brisbane, K l a u s n e r . P S : Your p a r e n t s h a v e least four feet in t h e a i r to crash Queensland AD d o w n o n h i m h e e l s first. K r u p p been notified." r o l l e d . T h e hua h i t o n l y dirt. K r u p p s a w natives falling back o u t of t h e b a t t l e l i n e a n d n o t IN THREE DAYS g e t t i n g u p . O ' H a r e , h e noticed, had already demolished one man, OR MONEY BACK and w a s dancing around another Stop smoker's cough, bad breath and catarrh quickly. Stop smoking, or and punching his ribs. And he cut il down, NOW, with Famous and Original Hampton Pope Stop also noticed t h a t t h e native m e n Smoking Tablets. N o willpower needed. Very pleasant to take. w e r e laughing, even though kilhng each other. K r u p p t h r e w a f l y i n g block I guarantee to stop you smoking in three days or Money Back. If you are not f r o m b e h i n d a t t h e vicious hua. It satisfied and I don't return your money as guaranteed, I will donate £1000 to Sydney Hospital or YOUR favorite charity. Don't go on puffing your cash away. c a u g h t h i m between t h e shoulders. Send money and feel fitter. Send 20/- by cash, cheque, money order or postal note T h e m a n g r o a n e d , looked back with your name and address to me today. Yoa will get promptly post free, under o v e r h i s s h o u l d e r in s u r p r i s e , t h e n plain wrapper, 100 Hampton Pope Stop Smoking Tablets, sealed in cellophane in handy pocket-size strips. Don't wait until your doctor tells you to quit smoking. passed out. DO IT NOW. K r u p p r e e l e d b a c k t o t h e scrim­ Adctress: H a m p t o n P o p e , D e p t . A D , m a g e . I t h a d b e e n g o i n g only a 302 lllawarra Road, Marrickville, Sydney, N.S.W. m i n u t e , b u t b o t h l i n e s h a d big

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ADAM, September, 1964

g a p s a n d m a n y m e n piled u p behind them. Fighters r a n u p and down, j u m p i n g into spots w h e r e there were new opponents. Krupp w a s v a g u e l y conscious of the women shouting lustily or groan­ ing savagely depending on w h a t was happening to their favorite champions. T h e n it w a s o v e r , n o m o r e fighting, o n l y m e n g r o a n i n g o n the ground and trying to stand. T o his s u r p r i s e , t h e r e w a s o n l y o n e m a n still o n his f e e t b e s i d e s himself. I t w a s O ' H a r e . T h e n a t ­ ives w e r e c l a p p i n g for t h e t w o of t h e m a n d P o g w a s d e l i g h t e d . K r u p p felt great, but exhausted a s h e m a d e his w a y toward O'Hare. "We won," he panted. "Not we, G e r m a n . Me," O ' H a r e said, c o c k e d h i s a r m a n d k n o c k e d Krupp unconscious with a sidearm slam to t h e head. The women bathed the men's wounds a n d bruises with coconut oil. T w o f a m i U a r w o m e n c a m e t h r o u g h t h e crowd to him, holding c l e a n t a p a c l o t h s t r i p s a n d oil. One wore a sailor hat, the other a sailor blouse. They doctored him. H e w a v e d to O'Hare to show that there were no hard feelings. O ' H a r e d i d n ' t r e c o g n i s e him. For the moment, Krupp o b s e r v e d , h e is c h a m p i o n of t h e world, too exhilarated to notice t h e i n d i v i d u a l s in it. H e p a t t e d the girls. "I like m y K a p p e and B l u s e puppchen — a l w a y s beirking a t m y feet w h e n I w a n t t h e m m o s t , " h e said. T h e y n o d d e d a n d pulled h i m t o h i s f e e t a n d r a n with him along the n a r r o w beach to a quiet spot on t h e n o r t h e r n end of t h e i s l a n d . T h e r e t h e t h r e e of t h e m s w a m , a n d t h e n l a y in t h e s a n d . I t w a s still w a r m f r o m t h e sun. T h e y l e a n e d o v e r h i m , w a t e r d r i p p i n g in his f a c e f r o m r i n g l e t s of t h e b l a c k h a i r , a n d competed to r u b their noses against his. W h e n they a w o k e in t h e morn­ ing, t w o s l e e k g u n b o a t s f l y i n g t h e Imperial G e r m a n Navy ensign w e r e r i d i n g a t a n c h o r in t h e lagoon. T h e f i r s t t h o u g h t w a s , it is o v e r so q u i c k l y . T h e n h e s h o o k K a p p e a n d B l u s e a n d t h e t h r e e of t h e m r a n back t o t h e village. A t t h e malae, t h e arioi p r i e s t s and other natives w e r e looking glumly through the trees. O'Hare w a s beside Pog, h a n g i n g onto his h o n o r a s l o n g a s h e could. K r u p p pointed at the lagoon and gasped, "Klausner". " W e k n o w , " O ' H a r e said. " T h e r a t a n d t h r e e of his g u n m e n h a v e been ashore already with t h e bad news. Either w e t u r n you over by n o o n or h e s t a r t s s h e l l i n g t h e canoes and the village." Krupp turned to O'Hare. His eyes filled. "You m e a n t h e y . . . y o u . . . K l a u s n e r vAll shell t h e m t o o . . . y o u a l l lied for m e ? W h o in B a v a r i a w o u l d believe i t ? " K r u p p t o o k hold of himself. " W e l l , " h e said. " I s u p p o s e t h e r e is only o n e t h i n g t o do. I s h a l l g o to them in a canoe." H e t h r e w

back his shoulders. "If a l l y o u G e r m a n s a r e s u c h d a m n gentlemen, you m u s t be terrible soldiers. W h a t ' s your rush. Y o u h a v e till n o o n . M a y b e s o m e thing'll come u p before then." Krupp had to admit the t r u t h in this, a n d sat on a log contem­ plating the gunboats on the sheet of b l u e w a t e r . There w a s activity aboard the b o a t s . O n t h e der Grosse, Klaus­ ner's flagship, t h e sailors w e r e l a u n c h i n g a skiff. T h e y r o w e d t o t h e o t h e r g u n b o a t , Beowulf, and t h e Beowulf, c r e w m e n c l i m b e d in w i t h t h e m . K r u p p r e c o g n i s e d Mo­ eller, B l a t z , K u g l , a n d o t h e r s , b u t Klausner. Krupp guessed he w a s T w o c a r r i e d rifles. T h e y r o w e d t o a s p i t of l a n d j u t t i n g i n t o t h e lagoon about a half-mile from t h e v i l l a g e a n d b e a c h e d t h e skiff. Krupp jumped up. "Klausner, you scum," h e said aloud, "it's n o t noon yet." T h e n he relaxed and sat again. T h e sailors undressed a n d w e n t in s w i m m i n g . K l a u s n e r had granted short leave. T h e g u n b o a t s w e r e d e s e r t e d ex­ cept for one m a n on skeleton w a t c h on e a c h , a n d n o s i g n of Klausner. Krupp guessed he w a s below deck to escape the brutal glare from the lagoon. It all g a v e him inspiration, an i m p o s s i b l e one, a n d d a n g e r o u s , b u t inspiration nonetheless. H e ran b a c k t o t h e malae and sought out O'Hare, who w a s resting u n d e r a bush. " H e r r O ' H a r e , " h e s a i d excited­ ly. " D o y o u t h i n k P o g a n d t h e others would do one m o r e thing for m e ? " " S u r e , G e r m a n . P r o b a b l y die f o r y o u if n e e d be. T h e y ' r e l i k e t h a t if t h e y ' r e fond of y o u . " "How heavy are those canoes? C a n t h e y be c a r r i e d ? " "Well, yes. In a clinch." K r u p p squatted beside him and e x c i t e d l y d e s c r i b e d w h a t h e h a d in mind. T h e m o r e he talked, the m o r e i m p o s s i b l e it s e e m e d , b u t h e pushed t h e idea. I t w a s all h e had. "Sounds all right to me, as long a s I d o n ' t h a v e t o d o a n y of t h e

carrying," O'Hare said when he finished. "Let's t a l k to P o g . " Pog grinned with delight when h e h e a r d a n d gleefully hurled his spear into a tree. "Ha! Kloozna fella," h e shouted, a n d stabbed the tree again. K r u p p left t h e e x p l a n a t i o n of details to O ' H a r e and r a n to t h e cooking pits, h u m m i n g , " W h e r e , oh were, h a s m y little dog g o n e ? " W o m e n w e r e f i x i n g food t h e r e . H e picked u p two goatskin b a g s full of t h i c k c o c o n u t oil a n d s u g a r m e s s t h a t t h e w o m e n used to r u b o n m e a t . T h e y held several gal­ lons each, and he strained u n d e r the weight. O n e of t h e w o m e n h o w l e d in p r o t e s t . H e k i s s e d h e r , then plunged into the lagoon wih t h e bags slung over his shoulders. H e paddled dog-fashion to avoid m a k i n g splashes, a n d kept his h e a d low. About h a l f w a y to t h e boats he heard violent splashing behind him. H e t u r n e d quickly, fearing a shark, t h e n cursed. Bluse a n d K a p p e w e r e swim­ m i n g after him, w e a r i n g their p i e c e s of h i s u n i f o r m a n d enjoy­ ing themselves by kicking up lots of f r o t h . " G o b a c k , " h e w h i s p e r e d , pointing to shore. They shook their heads and both pumped on him, pushing him under. H e came up, blowing bubbles, a n d said a n g r i l y , "Go back!"

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ADAM, September, 1964 55

They shook their heads a g a i n and pointed to the gunboats. They wanted to go with him. H e w a s afraid they would a r g u e a n d g i v e h i m a w a y . " A l l r i g h t , pupp­ chen, a l l r i g h t . B e q u i e t a n d m a k e yourselves useful. H e held h i s f i n g e r t o h i s lips. T h e y u n d e r ­ stood. S i l e n c e . T h e n h e s h i f t e d a h e a v y oil b a g t o e a c h , a n d s w a m on u n e n c u m b e r e d . In the shadow of Beowulf's prow, he took the b a g from Bluse and shinned u p t h e anchor chain with tremendous strain. H e padded across t h e deck a n d hid b e h i n d t h e t h r e e - i n c h g u n mount, then wiggled in behind t h e Maxim gun tub. The watch, a y e o m a n n a m e r B u e h l , w a s sit­ ting on t h e stern rail, looking g l u m l y t o w a r d t h e spit w h e r e h i s shipmates were swimming and picking b a n a n a s . Krupp thought for a moment

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that he should simply say, "Hello, Buehl. I ' m giving myself up", t h e n l a u n c h e d h i m s e l f a c r o s s t h e d e c k a n d k n o c k e d B u e h l cold with a rabbit punch. H e r a n b a c k topside, c r o u c h e d in t h e s h e l t e r of t h e cockpit, a n d unscrewed t h e big brass cap on t h e m a i n fuel t a n k . H e u p e n d e d the big heavy goatskin b a g a n d poured about five g a l l o n s of s y r u p y mess into t h e tank, t h e n ti.ghtened t h e d o g s o n t h e c a p a n d s l i p p e d b a c k o v e r t h e side i n t o t h e w a t e r . T h e c o o l n e s s felt won­ derful. W i t h h i s f e m a l e convoy, h e dogp a d d l e d t o Friedrich der Grosse. The girls were very quiet a n d s t a y e d h i d d e n i n t h e s h a d o w of the hull. They seemed to realise K r u p p w a s u p to s e r i o u s b u s i n e s s . He repeated the surprise attack on t h e w a t c h m a n . T h a l e r , b u t w a s m o r e s c a r e d t h a n before. H e w o n d e r e d w h e r e t h e devil K l a u s ­ ner w a s . As h e tugged Thaler's body to t h e hatch, h e found out. "KRUPP!" I t w a s K l a u s n e r ' s voice, b u t when he spun around, there w a s no Klausner. " K r u p p ! You d o g ! " It came from over t h e starboard side. K l a u s n e r w a s in s w i m m i n g . " K r u p p , you dog, I'll h a v e you s u m m a r i l y shot for this. S t a n d where you are." he swam toward t h e Jacob's ladder h a n g i n g into the water. K r u p p w a l l o w e d i n indecision— run or stay a n d hit Klausner over t h e head. Then h e s a w twin whirlpools appear between the lieutenant a n d the ladder, and Bluse a n d Kappe surfaced, blowing hair from their faces. T h e y split u p a n d k n i f e d through the water at Klausner f r o m o p p o s i t e sides. H e t r e a d e d water, looking at one, then t h e o t h e r , eyes wild w i t h disbelief. H e tried to shout. Nothing c a m e out. T h e girls pushed h i m under a n d his m o u t h filled w i t h w a t e r . K r u p p t w i s t e d off t h e fuel c a p , p o u r e d t h e s k i n f u l of s y r u p in, replaced t h e cap, then r a n for t h e rail. H e s a w a L u g e r a n d m a g a ­ zine b e l t o n a l u g i n t h e cockpit, a n d seized i t a s h e r a n by. H e h i t t h e w a t e r w i t h it h a n g i n g a r o u n d his neck. H e cut hard toward shore. T h e girls overtook him giggling, "Kloozna glub-glub. Glub-glub."

H e looked back. T h e u n f o t t u n a t e K l a u s n e r w a s g a g g i n g h i s break­ fast a n d salty brine all over his deck. K r u p p felt b o t t o m , t h e n r a n t h r o u g h t h e breakers, t h e girls a t his heels. A t t h e j u n g l e ' s edge, O ' H a r e a n d P o g waited. "Have them take t h e canoes n o w , " K r u p p shouted. " K l a u s n e r will u s e h i s g u n s a s soon a s t h e others a r e aboard." P o g yelled s o m e t h i n g unintel­ ligible, b u t it m a d e s e n s e to t h e arioi. T h e y b o l t e d f r o m t h e foliage a n d r a n for t h e canoes, neatly organised into squads, with seven o r e i g h t m e n a n d w o m e n to c a r r y each one. On a n o t h e r yell from P o g they hoisted t h e m to their shoulders, a n d w i t h a t h i r d yell, r a n w i t h t h e m back toward t h e jungle. T h e y w e r e q u i c k — n o confusion. W h e n they all converged a t the three main paths, they formed o r d e r l y lines a n d r a n a l o n g s q u a d by s q u a d i n s i n g l e file. Krupp g r a b b e d Bluse and Kappe a n d joined t h e exodus. T h e canoe bearers were grunting a fast r h y t h m to set t h e running pace a n d t h e jungle resounded wdth t h e i r a c a p e l l a c a l i s t h e n i c s . T h e children, w h o carried t h e food a n d s u p p l i e s , t h o u g h t it w a s great sport and r a n underneath the canoes and out again. Dogs and goats romped alongside t h e path. L i k e t h e c a p t a i n of a ship, K r u p p left t h e b e a c h l a s t , to m a k e sure there were no stragglers. A moment l a t e r , t h e first shell f r o m Friedrich der Grosse's t h r e e i n c h e r s c r e a m e d in a n d blew a n eight-foot c r a t e r i n t h e b u s h e s . T h e girls gripped h i m tight in f e a r , a n d t h e t h r e e of t h e m fell. He jerked them up a n d pushed them ahead. A s h e l l f r o m Beowulf landed just ahead, a n d h e ducked his h e a d i n t o t h e s p r a y of dirt. A s h r a p n e l s l i v e r s p e a r e d h i s shoul­ d e r a n d h e screamed. H e clawed at it a n d it came out red hot in his h a n d s . H e pulled t h e Luger f r o m t h e h o l s t e r still h a n g i n g a r o u n d h i s n e c k a n d e m p t i e d it a t t h e g u n b o a t s in futile r a g e . A f t e r t h i s , h e w a s a w a r e only of m o r e shells, t e r r i b l e p a i n in h i s s h o u l d e r , a n d b e i n g forced t o r u n f a s t e r t h a n h e e v e r h a d in h i s life. T h e girls guided h i m . As they emerged from t h e jungle o n t o t h e o t h e r s i d e of Ujae, h e s a w t h a t m o s t of t h e b o a t s w e r e bobbing on t h e w a t e r already and w e r e moving quickly away. T h e w a t e r w a s r o u g h ; open s e a w i t h o u t t h e p r o t e c t i v e r e e f s of t h e l a g o o n t h e y h a d j u s t c o m e from. P o g a n d O ' H a r e yelled t o h i m t o c o m e t o t h e i r c a n o e . H e stum­ bled i n t o it, h a n g i n g o n t o t h e s h o u l d e r s of h i s t w o girl friends. "I'm sorry this happened," he said. " I d i d n ' t a c c o u n t f o r K l a u s ­ ner doing that. W a s anyone h u r t ? " O ' H a r e shook his head. Seeing t h e chase over for a w h i l e , K r u p p fell b a c k o n t h e

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56

ADAM, September, 1964

b o t t o m of t h e boat, q u a k i n g in t h e first chills of shock. T h e flot­ illa m o v e d speedily off, t h e pad­ d l e r s s i n g i n g in a c h o r u s of h y m n of t h a n k s g i v i n g t o O r o , t h e i r p a t ­ r o n god. With some magical poultice, Bluse a n d K a p p e s t o p p e d his s h o u l d e r f r o m f e s t e r i n g . On t h e t h i r d d a y out, e x c e p t for s t i f f n e s s , the wound w a s healed. A f t e r five d a y s of p a d d l i n g , without error. Island Number T h r e e looked a h e a d . A i l i n g l a p a l a p — seven degrees n o r t h latitude, 169 e a s t longitude, a n d o n e of t h e b e s t of t h e M a r s h a l l g r o u p . W h e n the canoes w e r e beached, K r u p p f o u n d once a g a i n that w h e r e v e r he went, Klausner also w a s s u r e to h a v e gone. T h e chief of A i l i n g l a p a l a p , w h o h a d t h e m i s s i o n a r y - g i v e n n a m e of J u l i u s C a e s a r , said, " M e s s a g e for you, Herr Krupp." This one didn't surprise him. It w a s t h e s a m e a s t h e o n e on U j a e , a n d h e r e a d it, s h r u g g e d , a n d t u c k e d it in his pocket. H e w a s sure every island would be t h e same. B u t t h e t h e m e of a c t i v i t i e s o n A i l i n g l a p a l a p did s u r p r i s e h i m . W h e r e Islands One and Two were i s l a n d s of sex a n d violence, this I s l a n d N u m b e r T h r e e w a s desig­ n a t e d b y t h e arioi a s a n i s l a n d of virtue. T h e r e is h a r d l y a n y t h i n g un­ u s u a l w o r t h m e n t i o n i n g a b o u t Is­ l a n d s N u m b e r F o u r , F i v e a n d Six (Jaluit, Arno, Maloclap) except t h a t t h e r e w a s a note from Klaus­ n e r o n e a c h . Also, t h e n a t i v e s , w h o loved exciting gossip, w e r e r e p e a t i n g a n d e m b e l l i s h i n g wild r u m o r s t h a t the gunboats would be sailing into their lagoons at a n y m i n u t e t o c a p t u r e a n d ex­ e c u t e t h e D u t c h y haoli-nui. I s l a n d N u m b e r Seven, W o t j e Atoll, w a s a n i s l a n d set a s i d e f o r games a n d dancing. It was also t h e f i r s t i s l a n d , K r u p p noted, where t h e r e w a s an actual prize offered f o r a c c o m p l i s h m e n t . T h e p r i z e w a s t h e six-foot-three, m u s c l e - b o u n d A m a z o n d a u g h t e r of Wotje's chief, H i r i m a t u e t u e , a n a m e which means "strong leg" when loosely translated. Her name was Rama. T h e m a n w h o d a n c e d best t h a t n i g h t w o u l d h a v e h e r for a s l o n g a s t h e arioi stayed on Wotje. A f t e r t h a t , h e h a d n o responsibil­ ity. H e could t a k e h e r w i t h h i m o r l e a v e h e r behind a s h e chose. S h e w a s , so to s p e a k , a m i s t r e s s w i t h little f u t u r e . T h e r e s t of t h e d a y w a s s p e n t i n individual c o n t e s t s of h o r s e ­ p l a y a n d singing. O ' H a r e and Krupp went swimming under a waterfall with Bluse and Kappe. Krupp asked him m o r e about t h e competition t o w i n R a m a . "Any m a n w h o w a n t s her, b u t h e h a s to be a bloody chief o r a n arioi because she's a chief's daughter, any man who wants her k i c k s u p his heels in s o m e s o r t of a j i g . T h e o n e w h o does b e s t w i n s h e r for his v e r y own, t o d o w h a t e v e r h e w a n t s w i t h her. " W h a t e v e r h e w a n t s ? Even give

her away?" "Sure. Royalty or no, she's still o n l y a w o m a n . If h e r m a n s a y s so, s h e g o e s . " " W o u l d I q u a l i f y i n t h i s com­ petition?" "Sure, you crazy G e r m a n . You're white. They'd love t o h a v e you introduce some p a l e blood i n t o t h e tribe." "I would like to win her," K r u p p said. T h e t w o g i r l s a t t a c k e d h i m angrily, scratching and kicking. H e pushed t h e m a w a y a n d said solemnly, "I would like t o win h e r . I c a n t h i n k of n o t h i n g I would r a t h e r give H e r r K l a u s n e r a s a gift. H e h a s s u c h a p a s s i o n for s h o r t , t h i n g i r l s . " F o r t h e f i r s t t i m e since K r u p p h a d knovwi h i m , O ' H a r e l a u g h e d . T h e food a n d kava, as usual, w e r e t o o m u c h , so w h e n the d a n c i n g b e g a n t h a t n i g h t , m o s t of the m e n w e r e either too d r u n k o r t o o d o p e y f r o m food for s t r e n ­ uous activity. Krupp announced that he want­ ed t o t r y . T h e c r o w d b e c a m e seri­ ous and respectful. It w a s the f i r s t t i m e t h e haoli h a d p e r f o r m e d f o r t h e m . H e could tell t h e y w e r e f l a t t e r e d , y e t c r i t i c a l a n d expect­ ed a good s h o w . His dance w a s n ' t a dance a t all, h o w e v e r , b u t close o r d e r d r i l l h e had learned on the honor march­ i n g t e a m a t t h e Kiel n a v a l bar­ r a c k s . I t h a d n e v e r failed to t h r i l l h i m . H e h o p e d it w o u l d t h r i l l t h e natives. H e stomped up and back, pass­ ed t h e c l u b b a c k a n d f o r t h f r o m s h o u l d e r t o s h o u l d e r so f a s t it was a blur at times — between h i s k n e e s , i n t o t h e a i r , r i g h t shoul­ der, left s h o u l d e r , p r e s e n t a r m s , and finishing with t h e almost impossible Queen Anne Salute. K r u p p w o n t h e girl, of c o u r s e , but she didn't wait for him to come a n d claim her. S h e inter­ r u p t e d h i m in t h e m i d d l e of a victory bow, t h r e w him easily onto h e r right shoulder, and carried h i m w h e e z i n g for b r e a t h i n t o t h e p a v i l i o n t h a t h a d b e e n set a s i d e for h e r . S h e h a d w a i t e d 18 y e a r s for such a n i g h t a n d h a d no m o r e t i m e for social nicpties. O n t h e f o l l o w i n g d a y , K r u p p left R a m a h a p p y and w e n t back to Bluse and Kappe. They refused t o t a l k t o h i m a t f i r s t b e c a u s e of his c o n d u c t w i t h R a m a , b u t h e r e - c a p t u r e d t h e i r affection bv .giv­ ing t h e m each a shiny b r a s s cart­ r i d g e shell f r o m t h e L u g e r . T h e arioi s t a y e d on a t W o t j e for six m o r e d a y s . D u r i n g t h i s time, R a m a never bothered h i m again. She always greeted him warmly, but never m a d e another demand. T h e e i g h t h p o r t of call w a s t o b e A i l u k Atoll. O n l y t w o m o r e t o g o a f t e r t h a t , a n d t h e n t h e arioi would r e t u r n to the Phoenixes, beyond G e r m a n jurisdiction. K r u p p would go with t h e m . F o r t h e first t i m e since he climbed into t h e canoe a t Kwa­ jalein m o r e t h a n a m o n t h before, h e b e g a n t o feel e s c a p e w a s a solid possibility, n o t j u s t a flimsy hope. I t w a s m o c k e r y then, t h a t Ailuk

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I

was where Klausner's gunboats c a u g h t u p w i t h t h e arioi f l e e t f o r t h e second time. I t happened shortly before dusk, just as the canoes were riding t h e tidal w a s h over t h e coral reef t h a t r i n g e d A i l u k l a g o o n . Fried­ rich der Grosse a n d Beowulf came roaring out of ambush from b e h i n d a p a l m - t r e e d islet, a n d b o r e d o w n o n t h e m . V's of w h i t e w a t e r p a r t i n g in f r o n t of t h e i r prows. T h e closest boat w a s s m a s h e d a n d t h e m e n in it tossed into t h e w a t e r a s Beowulf axed the frail thing right across the outrigger. T h e n Beowulf zig-zagged t h r o u g h t h e formation and took four m o r e boats in t h e s a m e w a y before it e m e r g e d o n t h e f a r side. Fried­ rich der Grosse, churned along r i g h t b e s i d e it, w r e c k i n g t h r e e m o r e b o a t s itself. I n t h e p a n i c t h a t followed, t h e n a t i v e s c a u s e d d e s t r u c t i o n of al­ most as m a n y canoes themselves. S o m e s i m p l y d i v e d o v e r t h e side t o s w i m a s h o r e , l e a v i n g t h e i r pilotl e s s c r a f t t o t a n g l e w i t h t h o s e be­ ing manoeuvred frantically to a v o i d t h e s e c o n d r u n of t h e g u n ­ boats. K r u p p stood up, choking in a n g e r . H e h e a r d rapid rifle shots. S a i l o r s a b o a r d Beowulf, w e r e e a s i l y s h o o t i n g h o l e s i n t h e h e a d s bob­ bing on t h e w a t e r . T h e slaughter lasted perhaps five m i n u t e s , n o m o r e . R e s u l t — A t h i r d of t h e c a n o e s d e s t r o y e d . A t h i r d of t h e n a t i v e s d e a d o r d y i n g , a n d m o s t of t h e r e m a i n i n g twot h i r d s driving t h e i r canoes in aU directions a w a y from t h e scene. Krupp saw two men aboard Beowulf pointing a t his o w n canoe, a n d t h e big b o a t s w u n g a r o u n d and cruised slowly toward him. T h e sleek g r e y hull towered o v e r h e a d , e n g i n e t h r o b b i n g slowly. A figure leaned over t h e rail, grin­ n i n g . I t w a s M o e l l e r . " S o n i c e of you to s t a n d and let u s identify you, d e s e r t e r , " h e s a i d . "There w a s no need to r a m them," K r u p p said quietly, stooped f o r t h e L u g e r o n t h e c a n o e bot­ tom, and shot Moeller's j a w away. Blatz and Buehl were moving across t h e deck from t h e cockpit w h e n h e did it, w o r k i n g t h e b o l t s of t h e i r r i f l e s . C a l m l y , h e fed t h e m each a bullet in t h e stomach. T h e n h e bellowed, "Anybody else?" and vaulted to Beowulf's deck. Pog, O'Hare and four others followed h i m a b o a r d a n d stalked the two remaining crewmen with their clubs. Bluse a n d Kappe w e r e s c r e a m i n g shrilly, "Kai-kaikai-kai . . . " a s t h e y h e l d t h e c a n o e s t e a d y a g a i n s t t h e h u l l of t h e ship. Friedrich der Grosse came to life a n d c u t a c r o s s t h e w a t e r t o a i d Beowulf, and when she was a l m o s t alongside, h e r pilot reversed engines and t h e hulls smashed together. Krupp saw her crew hurl g r a p p l i n g hooks w i t h lines a n d tie t h e t w o ships together, t h e n leap t h e g a p w i t h bayoneted rifles. K r u p p g o t off o n e m o r e s h o t a n d a m a n died b e t w e e n t h e b o a t s .

Then the boarders overran Krupp, O'Hare and the natives, all falling in a kickmg, punching, biting m a s s t o t h e deck. T h e w e i g h t w a s lifted f r o m h i m a n d h e could s t a n d a g a i n . H e s w u n g t h e L u g e r f e e b l y a t a bluec a p p e d face, m i s s e d a n d fell g r o g gily a second time, a m o n g t h e corpses. H e heard a Maxim gun c l a t t e r a g a i n , a n d it t e r r i f i e d h i m . S o m e o n e h a d g o n e b a c k t o Fried­ rich der Grosse a n d t u r n e d i t o n t h e mob, shooting German and n a t i v e alike in his panic. K r u p p raised his head. It was Klausner. T h e M a x i m g u n w a s too m u c h opponent. The natives had done a l l t h e y could. T h e s t o p p e d sud­ d e n l y a n d p l u n g e d o v e r t h e side to their boats. T w o remembered K r u p p a n d heaved him into t h e w a t e r , t h e n j u m p e d i n o n t o p of h i m f e e t first, k n o c k i n g h i s l a s t wind t o hell. They pushed him back into Fog's o u t r i g g e r , a n d h e c o l l a p s e d be­ tween Bluse and Kappe. T h e t h r e e c a n o e s g r o u p e d to­ g e t h e r in V - f o r m a t i o n a n d m o v e d swiftly away, the m e n huddling low to present small targets. They w e r e joined later t h a t night by five o t h e r canoes a n d togetiier t h e eight sailed s o u t h a g a i n t o W o t j e A t o l l . T h e y w e n t i n t o hid­ i n g o n o n e of its s m a l l e r i s l a n d s . On the third day there, a native fisherman came and brought word t h a t m o s t of t h e s u r v i v i n g arioi h a d l o n g since g o n e s o u t h e a s t to­ w a r d the Gilberts, on their w a y t o t h e Phoenixes. H e said also t h a t t h e g u n b o a t s h a d g o n e b a c k to Kwajalein for crew replacements. K l a u s n e r w a s in h i g h temper, out s e a r c h i n g a g a i n o n 24-hour p a t r o l . K r u p p a n d h i s f r i e n d s could ex­ pect no help, t h e f i s h e r m a n said, because Klausner was now threat­ e n i n g d e a t h t o a n y o n e w h o shel­ tered them, and had burned one s m a l l v i l l a g e for n o r e a s o n a t a l l j u s t t o p r o v e t h a t h e m e a n t busi­ ness. T h e travel plan w a s t o island h o p a n d d o m o s t of t h e s a i l i n g a t n i g h t , if p o s s i b l e , u n t i l t h e y w e r e w e l l o u t of t h e M a r s h a l l s . T h e y stocked the canoes with fruit and w a t e r a n d sailed t h a t s a m e even­ i n g . T h e d a t e w a s S e p t e m b e r 6, 1914. At d u s k on t h e second day, t h e r e was a scare. Two dark, moving s h a p e s c a m e o u t of t h e s u n s e t , from the west, where Kwajalein lay. T h e y t u r n e d out t o be only a p a i r of l a z y w h a l e s . B u t t h e s h a p e s t h a t c a m e o u t of t h e west the following m o r n i n g were not whales. E v e r y o n e s t o p p e d p a d d l i n g £ind s t a r e d a s Friedrich der Grosse a n d Beowulf m o v e d d e l i b e r a t e l y to­ ward them. " W e l l , t h i s t i m e t h e r e is n o t h i n g to do but to give myself up," Krupp sighed. "The Phoenixes w e r e n e v e r m e a n t t o be. H e t o o k h i s b l o u s e f r o m B l u s e a n d stood, w a v i n g it slowly over his head in surrender. T h e big power boats m a d e a

wide circle a r o u n d them, bobbing t h e canoes in their wake. Then Friedrich der Grosse c h u g g e d i n s l o w l y . E n g i n e s w e r e cut. S h e drift­ ed w i t h t h e c a n o e s . A n olive f a c e w e a r i n g s p e c t a c l e s smiled down a t them. Other men, t i n y m e n , a l s o w i t h olive faces crowded the rail. "Good m o r n i n g , H e r r Krupp," t h e s p e c t a c l e d m a n said in sing­ s o n g , b u t p e r f e c t G e r m a n . "Lieu­ t e n a n t Hachijo, Imperial Japanese N a v y , a d d r e s s i n g you." Krupp didn't understand. " H e r r K l a u s n e r told us a b o u t y o u w h e n w e a p p r o p r i a t e d h i s fine gunboats. Would have preferred n o t t o c o n c e r n o u r s e l v e s w i t h chas­ i n g y o u so f a r , b u t u n d e r o u r gov­ e r n m e n t ' s a g r e e m e n t , w e m u s t in­ t e r n a l l G e r m a n n a t i o n a l s in t h e M a r s h a l l s . " H e p r e s s e d his s w o r d t o h i s l e g a n d b o w e d . "You a n d t h e others will come aboard, please." It was the lieutenant's turn to b e puzzled, t h e n h e s a i d , "Of c o u r s e . You h a v e n ' t h e a r d . AU G e r m a n colonies in t h e pacific h a v e b e e n m a n d a t e d t o J a p a n for a n I n d e f i n i t e t e r m by t h e allied nations. Germany, H e r r Krupp," t h e lieutenant said impatiently, " h a s b e e n a t w a r w i t h t h e r e s t of E u r o p e since A u g u s t first." T h u s did t h e J a p a n e s e occupy the M a r s h a l l Islands, not t o leave t h e m u n t i l A m e r i c a n forces d r o v e t h e m o u t s o m e 25 y e a r s l a t e r in World W a r Two. The outcome for Wolfgang Krupp was this: H e w a s forced to say goodbye t o Pog, Bluse, K a p p e and the others then and there. They were allowed to proceed home. He and O ' H a r e w e r e t a k e n back to Kwa­ j a l e i n . L a t e r , w h e n t h e o t h e r Ger­ mans were repatriated through n e u t r a l c o u n t r i e s , K r u p p w a s al­ lowed t o s t a y i n t h e i s l a n d s be­ c a u s e of t h e u n u s u a l circum­ s t a n c e s of his c a s e . A f t e r t h e a r m i s t i c e i n 1918, h e w a s r e l e a s e d and went to South America where h e b e c a m e a f o r m a n of a r u b b e r p l a n t a t i o n . H e is n o w living i n s e m i - r e t i r e m e n t in B u e n o s A i r e s . He never returned to Germany, but m o r e t o his regret, he never s a w a n y o n e of h i s arioi friends again. O'Hare, h e learned, didn't last out the war. I n a r e c k l e s s m o o d of p a t r i o t ­ ism, h e r e t u r n e d to E n g l a n d and joined t h e Royal Flying Corps. H e w a s b u r n e d t o d e a t h in a c r a s h a t Bar-le-Duc, F r a n c e , in 1916. H e had never heard a word a b o u t K l a u s n e r , b u t w h e n inter­ viewing h i m for this story, t h e w r i t e r w a s a b l e t o p a s s t h i s in­ f o r m a t i o n a l o n g t o h i m , f r o m old G e r m a n n a v a l r e c o r d s n o w i n Ber­ lin: On his r e t u r n to Germany, K l a u s n e r w a s a s s i g n e d t o a de­ s t r o y e r of t h e G e r m a n H i g h S e a s F l e e t . H e failed t o r e p o r t for d u t y w h e n t h e fleet sailed t o t h e B a t t l e of J u t l a n d o n M a y 31, 1916. H e w a s a r r e s t e d for desertion, court-martialled and summarily shot. •

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The g r e a t e s t , most i n f a l l i b l e 1 0 0 p e r cent certain m e t h o d o f w r e s t i n g a f o r t u n e f r o m the b o o k m a k e r e v e r p e r f e c t e d a n d p u t into the h a n d s o f the ordinary everyday racing e n t h u s i a s t . . , A n d if y o u d o u b t t h e t r u t h o f this s t a t e m e n t — TAKE A G O O D , L O N G L O O K a t t h e f o l l o w i n g WINNERS over the f o u r m e e t i n g s p r i o r t o this a d v t . g o i n g to press — e v e r y one guaranteed a genuine " R O Y A L R O U T I N E " CLEAN-UP.

COMPARE THEM WITH YOUR O W N EFFORTS!
NOTL: A d v e r t i s i n g r o p y h a s t o b e s u b m i t t e d (i w e e k s b e f o r e p u b l i c a t i o n , follow-on results will appear i n October ADAM. Rosehill tl/7/(>l Fleniinston 11/T/«I GOOD RKD WON X/l AURORA BOY WON \AVX;V. L O R D W O N «/I HAKANOR HON DARK FOIL WON 7/1 CONSERVATORY WON RAWVAIN W O N 6/1 WITH DISCRETION WON FINAL VICTORY WON 3/1 Flemington 4/7/81 Warwick Farm 4/-/S1 MAN OF GOLD WON SUMMER FIESTA W O N 12/1 .lOELAU WON I K i n , W O N 7/1 IMAN WON COl N T VITO WON Moonee Valley 37/6/«l SMOKEY LASS WON TALLI QUEEN WON COMIC OPERA WON R o s e h i l l ;>7/6/B1 NATIVE VILLAGE WON UNDERWRITER W O N 11/1 7/1 KATAB WON McLAU(!HLIN WON MYSTIC GIRL WON OLYMPUS W O N Wl'i (7/8 w a s bet) GOLD EARL WON 4/1 W a r w i c k F a r m 20/fi/64 C a u l f l e l d a0/6/«4 SCOTTISH SOLDIER \ > O N 14/1 TIEMPO WON FORDALLAS W O N 13/1 LINK WON FRAME UP W O N 4/1 ROSS WON SMOKEY LASS W O N 5/2 SIR WYNYAKD WON

2(1/1 1(1/1 1/1 7/2 10/1 !)/l

MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE
Turf Investments hereby guarantee to refund the purchase price in full if the " O A ROUTINE" does not show RYL a substantial profit in the six months' period immediately after purchase or if any statements made in this ad­ vertisement are proved incorrect. NOTE: You are dealing with the oldest established and most reput­ able firm of Turf Consultants in Australia. We have been in business at the one address for over 14 years.

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A v e r a g e o f WINNERS one in every t w o races . . . N o s h o r t - p r i c e d selections, a v e r a g e ocids b e i n g 6 / 1 . . . SIMPLE T O OPERATE a n d a l l bets PLAINLY S H O W N by c l e a r l y d e f i n e d rules, N O chance o f m i s t a k e s . . . No waiting and waiting f o r t h e o d d bet to crop u p as w i t h m a n y other m e t h o d s , t h e " R O Y A L R O U T I N E " g i v e s a BET I N EVERY RACE . . . c a n b e o p e r a t e d S.P. o r C o u r s e a n d o p p l i e d EQUALLY SUCCESSFULLY T O —

GALLOPERS-TROTTERS-OR DOGS
Also 35 Other SCIENTIFICALLY PROVEN WINNING METHODS
T h e " R O Y A L R O U T I N E " is the ABSOLUTE ULTIMATE in Racing S y s t e m s , b u t , f o r the e n t h u s i a s t w h o likes t o m a k e a c o m p l e t e s t u d y o f ALL TYPES of Systems a n d S t a k i n g Plans, w e i n c l u d e THIRTY F I V E o t h e r e n t i r e l y d i f f e r e n t W I N N I N G M e t h o d s o f T u r f Investment in the most comprehensive b o o k o f its k i n d e v e r p u b l i s h e d — w e l l k n o w n P r o f e s s i o n a l Punter JACK O ' B R I E N ' S —

THE SECRETS OF TURF SUCCESS
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F i n a l l y , a set of tables CLEARLY S H O W I N G h o w one w i n s — to make a book a g a i n s t the Bookie to b o c k several horses in t h e o n e race to S H O W EQUAL PROFIT, no m a t t e r which

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THE SECRETS OF TURF SUCCESS a n d " T H E PUNTERS GUIDE ' — c r a m m e d f u l l o f i n d i s p e n s a b l e Racing " K n o w H o w " t h a t the a v e r a g e p u n t e r c o u l d n e v e r h o p e to a c c u m u l a t e in a l i f e t i m e o f research a n d study. A n d the price is w e l l w i t h i n the reach o f a l l — JUST £5 for t h e f u l l a n d c o m p l e t e p u b l i c a t i o n . N o f u r t h e r p a y m e n t s o f a n y k i n d necessary f o r o u r f u t u r e service a n d assistance o f a n y racing p r o b l e m s w h i c h y o u m a y ever h a v e .
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This is t h e g r e a t e s t o p p o r t u n i t y t h a t w i l l ever come y o u r w a y to m a k e Racing as p r o f i t a b l e as it is e n j o y a b l e . D O N ' T LET IT PASS Y O U BY! Fill in the o r d e r i n g c o u p o n N O W — r i g h t this v e r y m i n u t e w h i l e y o u h a v e the a d . in y o u r h a n d — y o u w i l l never regret it. As a w i s e m a n once s a i d —
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