Wing 2009 Statistics

:
Volunteer Members: 673 senior members 329 cadets Squadrons: 23 Aircraft: 14 Cessnas Vehicles: 19 State Funding: $112,500* Finds: 17 Saves: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
Civil Air Patrol cadets sketch out aerodynamically sound creations during the Engineering Technology Academy held each summer at Auburn University and hosted by the Alabama Wing. Academy-goers were introduced to several engineering disciplines by completing hands-on projects and learning from professors and researchers at this leading engineering university. The academy is one of about 30 national courses and events that make summer special for CAPʼs more than 24,000 cadets. One of the organizationʼs premier events, Cadet Officer School, is held at Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala., which is also home to CAP National Headquarters. Cadets also worked on projects in their communities. For example, members of the Boaz Middle School Cadet Squadron watched Marty Hatleyʼs Boaz Intermediate School studentsʼ paper airplanes compete in the Northeast Alabama Regional Airportʼs sixth annual paper airplane competition. Hatley, a CAP aerospace education member, invites his fourth- and fifth-graders to participate every year as a way of increasing their advanced language usage. The cadets showed the students how to fold expert planes. The students chose one jet to throw for distance and one to serve as the glider, which was used for the time in flight competition. The students also competed in creative design. The event ended with a tour of the airport. ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Southeast Commander: Col. James M. Rushing jrushing@cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Lisa C. Robinson commander@alwg.us Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Joseph M. Saloon Thetafly72@cs.com Wing Mailing Address: 810 Willow St., Building 1208 Maxwell AFB, AL 36112-5903 Phone: 334-953-6465 Fax: 334-953-7637 E-mail: alwghq@juno.com Web Site: www.alwg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $2.1 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug in-

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
terdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are aligned with national academic standards. CAP

...
the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to real-world applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, grade-level-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009 Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problem-solving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 838 senior members 190 cadets Squadrons: 22 Aircraft: 22 Cessnas 1 Gippsland 5 Dehavillands 4 gliders Vehicles: 28 State Funding: $553,500* Assists: 7 Saves: 5

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Pacific Region Commander: Col. Larry F. Myrick lfmyrick@aol.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Carl L. Brown Jr. cjbrown@acsalaska.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Stuart Goering swgoering@goeringlaw.com Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6014 Elmendorf AFB, AK 99506-6014 Phone: 907-551-3147 Fax: 907-753-4560 E-mail: akhdqcap@gci.net Web Site: www.akwg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $2.6 MILLION

The Alaska Wing is over 1,100 members strong and continues a proud tradition of service to the great state of Alaska. In 2009 the wing flew numerous diverse missions, including veterans outreach, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration infrastructure safety compliance surveys, national weather surveys, search and rescue, U.S. Coast Guard flood surveys and food delivery flights to residents of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta and Bering Sea coast. High prices for food and energy coupled with winterʼs usual shutdown of ground transportation and hindrance of traditional hunting and fishing means many of the areaʼs residents, mostly native Eskimo, go hungry during the coldest months. Food is either not available at all or too expensive. Many Alaskan agencies, organizations and businesses have become involved in addressing the food shortage by collecting food donations and moving them to intermediate stops, such as Bethel. But getting the food to where it is desperately needed requires small aircraft and the manpower to fly them. Those just happen to be CAPʼs specialties. Food delivery flights in winter, however, can be dangerous, with possible whiteout conditions making flying and landing tricky. Dedicated Alaska Wing volunteers left their families and jobs for several weeks in order to see this mission through. Flights began in March with the delivery of 2,000 pounds of frozen food. Subsequent deliveries reached up ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS to 13,000 pounds every couple of weeks. At least 24 sorties were flown by the Alaska Wing.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 821 senior members 511 cadets Squadrons: 30 Aircraft: 13 Cessnas 2 gliders Vehicles: 16 Finds: 59 Saves: 13

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
One of the pioneers in cell phone forensics is Capt. Justin Ogden of Civil Air Patrolʼs Arizona Wing, whose expertise pinpointed the site where three missing North Dakota students had crashed, based on information he gleaned from the studentsʼ last cell phone hit. The coeds, reportedly out for an evening of star-gazing, had driven into a rural stock pond. They made frantic phone calls but perished when they could not extract themselves from their vehicle. Their calls, however, set in motion a full-blown search operation, eventually involving the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) and CAP, which provided aircrews from Dickinson and Bismarck, a ground team on standby and Ogden poring over cell phone data from a distance of more than 1,000 miles. It was Ogdenʼs work that yielded results. In a phone conversation with Lt. Col. William E. Kay, director of operations for the North Dakota Wing, Brent Pringle, emergency manager for Stark County, said the studentsʼ vehicle would not have been found without CAPʼs assistance. Under federal law, cell phone companies can voluntarily divulge cell phone data to federal agencies such as the AFRCC when it is being used for lifesaving purposes involving the owner. Ogden used this data to help the AFRCC search and rescue controllers refine the search area to within only 730 feet from where the studentsʼ bodies were finally located. When cell phones are involved, Ogden is a go-to resource for search and rescue operations. And while the North Dakota story in 2009 ended in sorrow, many of Ogdenʼs cell phone data searches yield positive results. In 2008 he participated in 27 search and rescue missions, resulting in rescues of 19 survivors. Keep in mind that these rescues through cell phone forensics all occurred in Ogdenʼs spare time as a CAP volunteer. During the day, he is employed by General Dynamics, where he is assigned to a newOLUNTEER a OURS project to develop nationwide communications system ALUE F for the U.S. Department of Justice.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Southwest Region Commander: Col. Joseph C. Jensen Joseph.Jensen@swr.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. John M. Eggen jeggenccazwg@cox.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Wes Waddle wesewaddle@yahoo.com Wing Mailing Address: 7383 N. Litchfield Road, Suite 1175 Luke AFB, AZ 85309-1175 Phone: 623-856-9964 Fax: 623-856-7699 E-mail: azwgcc@azwg.cap.gov Web Site: www.azwg.cap.gov

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $2.9 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 316 senior members 222 cadets Squadrons: 11 Aircraft: 9 Cessnas Vehicles: 16 State Funding: $40,000* Finds: 6

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
The Arkansas Wingʼs dedication to emergency preparedness was called into play last year as part of the massive search for missing Billy “Butch” Wheeler in the Jenny Lind area near Fort Smith. Wheeler, who was staying with relatives, was in his 60s and suffering from Parkinsonʼs disease and dementia. It was speculated Wheeler was barefoot when he left the house early in the morning. Capt. Holly Jones and fellow members of the 115th Composite Squadron navigated through heavy brush on the ground, working closely with canine teams and law enforcement personnel in the hilly, heavily wooded terrain, to search for the missing man. In the air, CAP crews flew numerous search grids overhead and also took aloft a local emergency management official to provide an overview of the search area. Even though 100 people from various agencies participated in a multiday search, Wheeler was never found. Regular training prepares the wingʼs citizen volunteers to conduct thorough searches as well as to cope with undesirable outcomes. The wing practices emergency response all year long and publicizes its skills and assets of manpower and equipment in such venues as last fallʼs Northwest Arkansas Emergency Preparedness exposition in Bentonville. There members maintained an outdoor display that included a squadron van and ground team F equipment, including backboards OURS that cadets demonstrated and litters ALUE OLUNTEER how to use.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Southwest Region Commander: Col. Joseph C. Jensen Joseph.Jensen@swr.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Robert B. Britton rbritto@sbcglobal.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. James Gilbert j.l.gilbert@sbcglobal.net Wing Mailing Address: 2201 Crisp Drive Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-376-1729 Fax: 501-374-6743 E-mail: arwingcap@sbcglobal.net Web Site: www.arwingcap.org
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $1 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 2,208 senior members 1,383 cadets Wing Headquarters: 1 Groups: 7 Squadrons/Flights: 68 Aircraft: 25 single-engine Cessnas 3 gliders Vehicles: 38 State Funding: $80,000* Finds: 142 Saves: 11

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Pacific Region Commander: Col. Larry F. Myrick lfmyrick@aol.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Kenneth W. Parris kwparris7521@yahoo.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Carl Morrison chmorrison@morrison-law.net Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 7688 Van Nuys, CA 91409-7688 Phone: 818-989-8100 Fax: 818-989-8108 E-mail: HQ@cawg.cap.gov Web Site: www.cawg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $8.8 MILLION

The 3,591 volunteer members of the California Wing have accomplished amazing things in support of emergency services, youth and aerospace education. During 2009, 127 California Wing pilots flew more than 5,500 hours. With the 27 aircraft assigned, the wing supported space shuttle landings at Edwards Air Force Base, assisted with wildfire suppression efforts and participated in counterdrug programs. Each year California Wing members locate lost aircraft, find and turn off electronic locator beacons and save pilots in aircraft mishaps. Civil Air Patrolʼs premier cadet program focuses on leadership and discipline. The California Wing annually conducts a large cadet encampment, normally at Camp San Luis Obispo. In 2009, 302 members participated, including 242 cadets. Each year, too, a cadet conference is attended by more than 200 members from throughout California. The wing has a strong integrated leadership program, training cadets in personal development programs. Volunteer members also provide aerospace education materials to schools and make presentations to community groups. During 2009, volunteers replaced 38 mountaintop repeaters. These devices are vital radio links for emergency services and constitute one of the largest coordinated radio networks in the state. The project defines wing membersʼ amazing dedication in support of vital efforts critical in finding lost aircraft and persons, saving lives and developing California youth. Here, Cadet Master Sgts. Rebecca Olson of San Diego Cadet Squadron 144 and James Aeschliman of Corona Cadet Squadron 29 study a direction finder to locate a transmitting beacon in a daylong training exercise. OURS ALUE F OLUNTEER

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:

Volunteer Members: 1,015 senior members 928 cadets Squadrons: 35 Aircraft: 13 Cessnas 1 Gippsland 3 gliders Vehicles: 18 State Funding: more than $130,160* Finds: 35 Saves: 2

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
Twenty people survived a night in 1978 in the harshest conditions imaginable, thanks to the efforts of a Civil Air Patrol ground team that relied on experience, knowledge of the area and available resources to find the downed airplane in a remote location. Ground team members led by Don Niekerk and Jerry Alsum, seen here loading an injured passenger onto a SnoCat for transport off Buffalo Pass, called the rescue a miracle. “If you know the story of Flight 217, you know one of the great stories of emergency services in the United States,” said Capt. Ed OʼBrien, historian for the Denver-area Black Sheep Senior Squadron. “There isnʼt one story that is much better than this one.” Thatʼs why OʼBrien set about creating a museum exhibit that would explain to the public what happened to Flight 217 and to honor not only those who lost their lives but also the CAP members who saved so many others. The effort included an expedition to the site in 2008, 30 years after the fact, during which members of the Thompson Valley Composite and Black Sheep Senior squadrons recovered artifacts from the crash, including a large portion of the Twin Otterʼs horizontal stabilizer. In 2009, 15 months after OʼBrien began his research, dozens of guests — including rescuers, victims, families and news media — met at the Wings Over the Rockies Air and Space Museum in Denver for the unveiling of the exhibit commemorating the rescue. Some Flight 217 crash victims hadnʼt seen each other since that frigid winter night in 1978, and most hadnʼt seen the rescuers since then, either. They gathered to view the display and to add their own personal mementos to it. For their efforts, Niekerk and Alsum were each awarded Civil Air Patrolʼs Silver Medal of Valor, the highest decoration for CAP members. The Medal of Valor recognizes “distinguished and conspicuous heroic action at the risk of life above and beyond the call of normal duty.” F ALUE OLUNTEER OURS The pair presented their medals to OʼBrien for inclusion in the museum exhibit.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Rocky Mountain Region Commander: Col. Donald G. Cortum mutroc@comcast.net

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Edward D. Phelka ephelka@comcast.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Col. Gary Tobey gtobey@tobeytoro.com Wing Mailing Address: 360 W. Otis St. Peterson AFB, CO 80914-3103 Phone: 719-556-8280 Fax: 719-556-6186 E-mail: ian.carman@cowg.cap.gov Web Site: www.coloradowingcap.org
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $4.5 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 359 senior members 360 cadets Squadrons: 15 Aircraft: 5 Cessnas Vehicles: 16 State Funding: $35,000* Finds: 5

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
In 2009 the Connecticut Wing continued to lead Civil Air Patrolʼs nine-state Northeast Region in hours flown per aircraft. A second glass cockpit was acquired, and six pilots qualified to fly these planes, while four members qualified to operate Airborne Real-time

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Northeast Region Commander: Col. Christopher J. Hayden Chayden@ner.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Lt. Col. Cassandra Huchko chuchko@juno.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Col. Frederick Herbert fredgherbert@att.net Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1233 Middletown, CT 06457-1223 Phone: 860-262-5847 Fax: 860-262-5848 E-mail: hq@ctwg.cap.gov Web Site: www.ctwg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $2.1 MILLION

Cueing Hyperspectral Enhanced Reconnaissance (ARCHER). The wing marked its third year working with the Long Island Sound Patrol, with aircrews patrolling for vessels in distress and spills in cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guardʼs surface response units. Members also continued their “eyes of the home skies” missions, photographing critical infrastructure for the stateʼs Department of Emergency Management and Homeland Security. Equipment upgrades were notable. The wing was the first in CAP to transition to narrowband radio frequencies, and its communications network is integrally tied to other state agencies. A Connecticut Wing van or aircraft can easily interact with police, fire, rescue and other entities anywhere in the state. Growth in cadet programs was marked by the formation of a new unit, the 801st Cadet Squadron at New Fairfield High School, under CAPʼs school program. The wing also expanded a pilot program that provides textbook covers to middle and high schools. And basic cadet encampment boasted its largest attendance in many years, while other cadet activities included participation in CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, Hawk Mountain Ranger Training School and National Emergency Services Academy. Above, Cadet Airman 1st Class Andrew Molinari and Cadet Senior Airman Patrick Dougherty try out the cockpit seats in a C-5 during a visit by the Thames River Composite Squadron to the 429th Airlift Wing at Westover Air Reserve Base in Chicopee Falls, Mass. In ALUE the wing saw a OLUNTEER membership — from 620 to 720 senior addition, F major increase in OURS members and cadets.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 286 senior members 163 cadets Squadrons: 9 Aircraft: 7 Cessnas Vehicles: 11 State Funding: $19,600*

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Middle East Region Commander: Col. Joseph Vazquez joevazquez@verizon.net

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Eugene Egry eegry@comcast.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Col. Robert Vawter bob.vawter@juno.com Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 11285 Wilmington, DE 19850-1285 Phone: 302-322-5493 Fax: 302-613-4608 E-mail: dewgcap@gmail.com Web Site: www.dewg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $1.3 MILLION

Delaware Wingʼs capabilities seem limitless. In 2009 the wing flew or dedicated more than 4,500 man-hours in support of Delawareʼs Department of Transportation. It depends on Civil Air Patrolʼs unpaid volunteers and their “eyes in the sky” to vigilantly perform daily flights to further ensure public safety on the roadways and to communicate timely notifications of traffic or homeland security concerns. The wing also partners with the Delaware Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) in technological (radiological) and natural hazard emergencies in the pre-event, response and post-event phases. Twice a year DEMA tasks the wing to provide a video of the Delaware coastline for use in determining coastal erosion or other negative effects from natural disasters, such as hurricanes. In addition, the wing is part of the incident management structure at DEMA during exercises and real-time operation. The wing also participates in DEMAʼs Communications and Citizens Corps programs, as well as its joint efforts to educate the public. Wing members spend countless hours training and working with government and police units so they will be prepared for any mission day or night. Future plans call for implementation of flights to monitor freight and passenger rail service along with reconnaissance of shipping lanes in Delaware Bay. Other services provided to state and local organizations include aerial reconnaissance and imaging, Wreaths Across America to honor veterans buried in the state and support for the Governorʼs Fall Festival, air shows, Delaware State Fair, Peach Festival and local parades. Volunteer hours in 2009 totaled 30,460. More than 1,600 hours were flown in support of the wingʼs missions for America. Cadet activities included leadership skill building, character development, color guard, drill team, aerospace education, emergency servicesOURS and national cadet activities. ALUE F OLUNTEER

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 2,096 senior members 1,690 cadets Squadrons: 86 Aircraft: 26 Cessnas 2 gliders Vehicles: 26 State Funding: $48,600* Finds: 113

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
Dramatic incidents have proven to be a hallmark for the Florida Wing. With their helicopter upended in the sea, sharks circling, communications out and a hurricane threatening, four Florida businessmen owe their very survival to a Florida aircrew that diligently searched for and found the stranded men waving from the chopperʼs floats off the Florida Keys. Members of the aircrew were subsequently honored with the prestigious AFNORTH Commanderʼs Award. As for the rescued men, who spent 19 hours waiting for rescue, they were given the gift of more time. One wrote: “Thanks to you and your team and people like yourselves…(You) are true heroes and role models.” Forever bonded, the helicopter crash survivors — John Roa, Christian Rodriguez, John Devoney and Willie Earle — stand interspersed with their CAP rescuers, in blue CAP shirts, from left, 1st Lt. John Yeninas, Lt. Col. Arnie Glauser and Maj. Gil Dembeck. Involved with 90 percent of Americaʼs search and rescue operations, CAP enjoys a close relationship with the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center, housed at Tyndall Air Force Base. Tyndall is also home to the Air Forceʼs Detachment 1, 823rd RED HORSE Squadron. Members of RED HORSE — an acronym for Rapid Engineering Deployable Heavy Operational Repair Squadron Engineers — are civil engineers and related construction and support personnel who can perform heavy damage repair to restore critical Air Force facilities and utilities, even constructing a base from the ground up. They welcomed CAP cadets from across the country for a taste of what itʼs like to run with the RED HORSEs in CAPʼs first civil engineering cadet academy. After blowing up an airfield, they worked with cadets to measure and map the resulting craters, determining which needed to be filled to make theOLUNTEER operational again. airstrip minimally ALUE F OURS

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Southeast Commander: Col. James M. Rushing jrushing@cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Christian F. Moersch III cmoersch@cap.gov Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Sergio Seoane sseaone@flwg.us Wing Mailing Address: 14750 N.W. 44 Court Opa Locka, FL 33054 Phone: 305-687-4090 Fax: 305-687-4092 E-mail: jlevitch@flwg.us Web Site: flwg.sercap.us
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $7.8 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 1,006 senior members 878 cadets Squadrons: 48 Aircraft: 14 Cessnas 1 Maule 4 gliders Vehicles: 23 State Funding: $128,000* Finds: 34

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Southeast Region Commander: Col. James M. Rushing jrushing@cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Tonya R. Boylan trboylan@wildblue.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Barry Loudermilk barry1@barryloudermilk.com Wing Mailing Address: 1501 First St., Building 931 Dobbins AFB, GA 30069-5010 Phone: 770-428-9031 E-mail: hq@gawg.cap.gov Web Site: www.gawg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

The Georgia Wingʼs year was filled with real-world applications of Civil Air Patrolʼs congressionally mandated missions of emergency services, cadet programming and aerospace education. In the photo above, Capt. Harold C. Lummus, left, oversaw a maintenance check of the CAP aircraft sent aloft to assess damage caused by flooding in northwestern Georgia when rain — sometimes as much as 22 inches — fell in September. First Lt. Charles Slaughenhaupt served as mission observer. Aerial reconnaissance photos taken from CAP planes during 17 flights were passed on to county government officials to assess damage or its potential. “The concern was to assess debris and how it was dangerous to bridges and dams,” said Lt. Col. Joseph Knight, Georgia Wing incident commander. As floodwaters started rising, CAP was asked to switch its mission to search and rescue. Cadet programs and aerospace education merged in programs like a weekend in Savannah, where cadets toured the Mighty Eight Air Force Heritage Museum, learned about technical training for modern business jetsʼ pilots and crews in corporate tours at FlightSafety International Inc. and Gulfstream Aerospace Corp., and inspected the U.S. Coast Guardʼs HH-65 Dolphin helicopter at Air Station Savannah. Another cadet group got a rare view of history from guest speaker Theodore “Dutch” Van Kirk, navigator of the Enola Gay, when it dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima during World War II. Across the state, cadets worked throughout the year on CAPʼs foremost community service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on veteransʼ graves. The ceremony held at Marietta National Cemetery is one of the largest in the country. In consideration of all the Georgia Wingʼs activity, it is little wonder one of its units, the Gwinnett County Composite Squadron, was named CAPʼs 2009 Squadron of the Year.

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $4.2 MILLION

VALUE OF CAP VOLUNTEER HOURS: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 318 senior members 223 cadets Squadrons: 11 Aircraft: 9 Cessnas 2 gliders Vehicles: 7 Grant Funding: $94,000 (Hawaii State Civil Defense Department)*

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Pacific Region Commander: Col. Larry F. Myrick lfmyrick@aol.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Roger M. Caires surveyor1@CLSHawaii.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Col. Stanley Y. Fernandez Sr. sonnyfernan@msn.com Wing Mailing Address: 419 Lele St. Honolulu, HI 96819-1821 Phone: 808-836-3417 Fax: 808-834-6595 E-mail: hiwgadmin@hawaiiantel.net Web Site: www.hiwg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $1 MILLION

The Hawaii Wing and its nine aircraft, including this Cessna 182 seen soaring over Waipio Valley on the Big Island, were poised to respond after the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center issued bulletins nine days apart in 2009 in response to earthquakes in the Pacificʼs Samoa Island region with the potential to generate tsunamis. While the bulletins were going out, Hawaii Civil Defense sent out automated cell phone voice and text messages to selected alert team personnel — including the wingʼs director of operations, Capt. Anthony Ferrara, and its squadron commanders. Members were notified to stand by for possible deployment to fly their regular designated tsunami routes around the islands to look for anybody on or near the shoreline. They were prepared to broadcast a warning about the impending danger through a speaker sound system attached to the outside lower portion of their planesʼ fuselages. In both instances, the warnings were eventually canceled. “If we had been notified to deploy, I feel we would have been very successful in our endeavor,” Ferrara said. “The time of day was good, the weather was good and we had available CAP personnel and aircraft ready to go. “We were lucky to have the time needed to prepare for whatever might hit, unlike those living in American Samoa, who were devastated by an immediate inundation from the tsunami waves,” he said. “We do our best to live up to the CAP motto, ʻSemper Vigilansʼ — Always VigilantF to always be ready whenever needed — as it is only a matter of time … ALUE OLUNTEER OURS before the next earthquake and tsunami will hit!”

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.
At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 231 senior members 192 cadets Squadrons: 12 Aircraft: 7 Cessnas 1 glider Vehicles: 15 Finds: 5 Saves: 7

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
The Idaho Wingʼs Mountain Eagle III Encampment brought 73 basic cadets from the Idaho, Montana and Nevada wings together for a week spent developing an array of emergency services-related skills at Gowen Field Air National Guard Base in Boise. The encampment included Ground Team Level I certification in emergency services, search and rescue exercises and training and certification in CPR and first aid through the American Heart Association. A special search and rescue exercise that focused on navigation, communication, first aid and leadership included rides in UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters provided by the Idaho Army National Guard, as seen here, and simulated movement of a search team from home base to a staging area. From there, cadet search teams practiced their navigating, map and compass skills to locate a downed pilot and an emergency locator transmitter. “The search and rescue exercise was one of the highlights of the Mountain Eagle III Encampment,” said Idaho Wing Commander Col. David Guzman. “It allowed the cadets to practice what they had learned using real-world, state-of-the-art equipment. Itʼs a simulation that cannot be duplicated anywhere else, except in a true emergency situation.” Cadets were also provided with training in aeronautics, with each spending time in an F-16 flight simulator. They traveled to Mountain Home Air Force Base for an extensive tour that introduced them to a wide range of fighter jet operations, from the machine shop and maintenance F areas to pilot OLUNTEER readiness. Cadets were also briefed by safety and combat OURS ALUE F-15 and A-10 Warthog pilots.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Rocky Mountain Region Commander: Col. Donald G. Cortum mutroc@comcast.net

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. David A. Guzman guzmanda@hotmail.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Don Butler butler1936@yahoo.com Wing Mailing Address: 1050 Airport Road Burley, ID 83318 Phone: 208-878-8880 Fax: 208-878-8880 E-mail: idadmin@pmt.org Web Site: www.idahowing.com

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $775,995

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 737 senior members 567 cadets Squadrons: 39 Aircraft: 9 Cessnas 3 gliders 1 balloon Vehicles: 17 Finds: 14

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Great Lakes Region Commander: Col. Charles L. Carr Jr. ccn15180@wowway.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Gordon A. Larson ccilwg@sprynet.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. John F. “Fred” Herschelman gra@ilwg.cap.gov Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 397 West Chicago, IL 60186-0397 Phone: 630-584-0177 Fax: 630-584-2080 Web Site: www.ilcap.org

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $3.3 MILLION

Cadet Senior Airman Rachael Gallant, left, Cadet 2nd Lt. Hannah Gottschalk, center, and Cadet Tech. Sgt. Sierra McGinness work on a balloon ground school problem at the Johnson Flight Academy — a weeklong Illinois Wing encampment where hot air ballooning instruction is offered. The Johnson Flight Academy is held every year at the beginning of June in Mattoon. “It provides an alternative to what people would normally consider CAP and aviation-type activities, like fixed-wing and gliders,” says Capt. Wayne Werner, the academyʼs balloon instructor. In Bolingbrook, 37 cadets and 23 senior members from four Illinois Wing squadrons did their part to make sure the 10th annual Cavalcade of Planes ran smoothly at Clow International Airport — a role that included stepping in when airport personnel twice detected emergency locator transmissions. CAP urban direction-finding teams quickly assembled, found the source, notified airport management and had the signals turned off. In ALUE60 Illinois Wing members contributed more than 700 hours of service during all, the F OLUNTEER OURS the air show, which drew more than 6,000 visitors.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 633 senior members 705 cadets Squadrons: 36 Aircraft: 8 Cessnas 1 glider Vehicles: 10 Finds: 13

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
The Indiana Wing is proud to be home to some of the stateʼs most outstanding citizens. Take, for example, Civil Air Patrolʼs 2009 Cadet of the Year, Capt. Kate A. Whitacre, now a senior member, shown here accepting her award from Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter, CAPʼs national commander. A pilot and certified radio operator, Whitacre has participated in four emergency services missions for CAP and holds the organizationʼs highest cadet honor, the Gen. Carl A. Spaatz Award. In her community, she has volunteered for the Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity and the Muscular Dystrophy Association. In sports, she was the Indiana state champion for archery in 2007, ranking 20th in the nation; holds a first degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do; and is a champion ice skater. In the arts, she is a talented musician who plays the French horn and mellophone. A junior at Indiana Institute of Technology with a 3.9596 grade point average, Whitacre is studying biomedical engineering and is considering medical school followed by a career in prosthetics to serve Americaʼs veterans. “I do everything at full speed,” Whitacre said, “and I always strive to do my best.” A living testament to CAPʼs cadet program, she credits CAP for giving her life experiences and for helping her develop a strong work ethic and determination. The Indiana Wing is equally proud of its late member, Lt. Col. David Ford, posthumously named CAPʼs 2009 Legislative Officer of the Year. The former state senatorʼs legacy includes ensuring passage of legislation in Indiana that provides employment protection for CAP members involved in emergency services. His example led ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS to a 99.8 percent CAP legislative membership rate in the General Assembly.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Great Lakes Region Commander: Col. Charles L. Carr Jr. ccn15180@wowway.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. W. Mark Reeves mreeves@cap.gov Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Ralph Bruns rljbeagle@yahoo.com Wing Mailing Address: Heslar Naval Armory 3010 N. White River Parkway, East Drive Indianapolis, IN 46208-4983 Phone: 317-925-5383 Fax: phone to coordinate E-mail: mreeves@inwg.cap.gov Web Site: www.indiana-wing.org

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $2.8 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 201 senior members 110 cadets Squadrons: 11 Aircraft: 6 Cessnas 1 glider Vehicles: 11 Finds: 2

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net North Central Region Commander: Col. Steven W. Kuddes bsrk01@neb.rr.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Ronald J. Scheitzach scheitzach@mchsi.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Col. Ronald J. Scheitzach scheitzach@mchsi.com Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 840 Carlisle, IA 50047 Phone: 515-205-5654 Fax: 563-556-8897 E-mail: cc@iawg.cap.gov Web Site: www.iawg.cap.gov
Iowa Wing cadets arrived at airports in Ames, Muscatine and Independence with their squadrons from Burlington, Cedar Rapids, Davenport, Des Moines, Dubuque, Ft. Dodge and Red Oak. Most had never flown in a small plane. About one-third had never been in an aircraft of any size. By the end of the day, the teenage Iowa cadets had handled the controls of a highperformance glider as part of the Civil Air Patrolʼs Cadet Orientation Flight program. Every CAP cadet is eligible to experience five glider flights and five powered flights. For many, itʼs a life-changing experience. The glider flight program in Iowa is one of the most active in the nation on a percentage basis, having tripled its total flights over the past year. CAP pilots who are Federal Aviation Administration-certified glider instructors and pilots ensure everyoneʼs safety. The orientation pilots follow a detailed syllabus, with the cadets following along on the controls. With their bubble canopies, stick control and front-and-back seating, itʼs not hard for the cadets to imagine theyʼre flying a fighter over the Iowa countryside — and that first orientation flight can be the start of something big. Itʼs not unusual for an Iowa cadet to come down from his or her first flight with thoughts ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS of making aviation a career. After all, the Air Force Academy is not that far away.

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $611,250

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 311 senior members 217 cadets Squadrons: 13 Aircraft: 5 Cessnas 1 glider Vehicles: 16 State Funding: $31,155* Finds: 11

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
The Kansas Wing grew by about 20 percent in 2009, adding units in Cunningham, Hays and Ellsworth, as its strength continued to reflect Civil Air Patrol's three missions: aerospace education, cadet programs and emergency services. The wingʼs accomplishments included orientation flights, presentations about aerospace to the public and professional

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net North Central Region Commander: Col. Steven W. Kuddes bsrk01@neb.rr.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Regena Aye rbaileyaye@embarqmail.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: 1st Lt. Leighton Davis firstdue@wavewls.com Wing Mailing Address: 3024 Arnold Ave., Room 104 Salina, KS 67401 Phone: 785-825-0009 Fax: 785-825-1116 E-mail: June@kswghq.kscoxmail.com Web Site: www.kswg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $983,755

development for members. In cadet programs, the wing continued to provide leadership opportunities through activities like its winter encampment, which brought over 100 CAP members from nine states to Kansas for training. In the photo, Cadet Maj. Sarah Wildman, a certified flight instructor and commercial pilot, sits at the controls of a Cessna 172 recently acquired by the wing and headed to the Hays Composite Flight in Hays. The Kansas Wing was credited with 11 finds in 2009, and it continued to train members to be of service to their communities, state and nation. Wing personnel delivered blood products for the American Red Cross, flew route surveys for the U.S. Air Force and searched for emergency locator transmitters. Kansas also expanded its communications capability by transitioning repeaters in partnership with several communities and entities. In Civil Air Patrolʼs seven-state North Central Region, Kansas Wing members were recognized with Incident Commander of the Year, Chaplain of the Year and Cadet Programs Officer of the Year honors, and the Emerald City Composite Squadron in Wichita received the Ground Team of the Year award.

VALUE OF CAP VOLUNTEER HOURS: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 418 senior members 200 cadets Squadrons: 18 Aircraft: 10 Cessnas 1 glider Vehicles: 17 Finds: 6

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Great Lakes Region Commander: Col. Charles L. Carr Jr. ccn15180@wowway.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Robert J. Koob bob.koob@insightbb.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Capt. Don Morgan dmorgan@METAMAP.com Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 4665 Frankfort, KY 40604 Phone: 502-564-0660 Fax: 502-564-0662 Web Site: www.kywgcap.org

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $1.3 MILLION

In an ice storm so devastating that it left 30 Kentuckians dead, 750,000 homes without electricity and tens of thousands without water last year, Civil Air Patrolʼs Kentucky Wing broke new ground in partnership with the Kentucky National Guard to provide disaster relief. The wing was initially asked to fly over 22 counties to survey for damage and take photos, but Maj. Bob Koob, incident commander, soon realized the scope of the work was more than his wing could handle alone. He called in support from three neighboring CAP wings — Indiana, Illinois and Ohio. More than 100 CAP members from the four wings spent six days flying 92 missions in 18 CAP aircraft. The number and quality of the photos allowed a mosaic to be developed, helping the power companies see where the ice was the heaviest. On the ground six CAP teams went house to house to check on people who, in many cases, hadnʼt had power for eight to 10 days. They both gathered and provided information, passing it and any emergency requests on to the Guard. For Cadet Master Sgt. Colin Burke of the Campbell County Composite Squadron, braving the cold proved especially worth the effort at one home, where a blind woman lived. When she answered their knock at the door, “she just started crying and said, ʻThank you so much for being here,ʼ” Burke said. They passed her plight on to the Guard, which contacted the womanʼs son in Louisville to make arrangements for him to get her that night. Then the ground team spent several hours at her home, lighting a fire in her fireplace ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS and feeding her assortment of dogs, cats and birds.

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: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 399 senior members 138 cadets Squadrons: 14 Aircraft: 10 Cessnas 1 Surrogate Predator plane Vehicles: 19 State Funding: $130,000* Finds: 18

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Southwest Region Commander: Col. Joseph C. Jensen Joseph.Jensen@swr.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Cecil A. Scarbrough LAWGCC@bellsouth.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Pat Yglesias pygelsias@cox.net Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 74670 Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4670 Phone: 225-359-9497 E-mail: lawghq@lawg.brcoxmail.com Web Site: www.lawgcap.org
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $1.1 MILLION

The Louisiana Wing continues to be a costeffective force multiplier for areas ranging from disaster preparedness to training for military assets. Working out of Fort Polk in air warrior exercises known as Green Flag East, the wing is on the cutting edge of 21st century Civil Air Patrol service. There its members are training in the new CAP Surrogate Predator program, where CAP planes are equipped with predator optics and used to train U.S. and allied nation forces for deployment to Afghanistan and Iraq. A sophisticated “Predator ball” placed under the left wing of a CAP Cessna 182 gives the Surrogate Predator the capability of mimicking the U.S. Air Forceʼs MQ-1 Predator, giving it the capability of locking onto a target and tracking it. This training, performed with CAPʼs civilian volunteers, is cost effective — a fraction of that charged by private contractors. The wing is also honing its skills in another advanced technology — aerial photos. Partnering with the National Incident Management Systems and Advanced Technologies Institute at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette as part of a focus on disaster management, CAP members go airborne to capture the images for real-time use or later e-mails. The data is invaluable in helping officials assess the extent of damage to critical facilities and make plans from there. The wing is fully integrated into emergency planning as well. As key participants in the newly formed Louisiana Air Operations Group, CAP emergency managers are part of a diverse team assembled to coordinate federal, state and general aviation support for natural, as well as man-made, disasters. Formed under the auspices of the Governorʼs Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness, the Louisiana Air Operations Group brings together federal and state aviation professionals to ensure effective, rapid ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS response to all emergencies.

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: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 249 senior members 119 cadets Squadrons: 11 Aircraft: 6 Cessnas Vehicles: 11 State Funding: $15,000* Finds: 7

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Northeast Region Commander: Col. Christopher J. Hayden Chayden@ner.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Daniel M. Leclair dleclair@mewg.cap.gov Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Jeffrey Weinstein LtColJeff@MediaGuys.net Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5006 Augusta, ME 04332-5006 Phone: 207-626-7830 Fax: 207-626-7831 E-mail: wmckinney@mewg.cap.gov Web Site: www.mewg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $779,144

Maine Wing citizen volunteers like Capt. David Barker (shown here) introduced firewatching to their skill sets over the last year to help protect the stateʼs citizens, their homes and natural resources. With a season running from early spring to fall, the wing sent aircrews aloft to follow routes determined by the Maine Forestry Service. During a mission, the aircrews stayed in constant contact with the appropriate forestry service dispatch office to report any fires. CAPʼs vigilance has made a difference. “Weʼve come across several uncontrolled burns,” said Maj. Marc Brunelle, wing director of operations. Wing Commander Col. Dan Leclair, who has flown several of the firewatch missions, elaborated. “Someoneʼs backyard burn got away from them, and we were able to direct firefighting apparatus to the fire,” Leclair said. The average firewatch mission is three hours, with the longest one lasting five — long enough to require the plane to be refueled. In the early spring, after the snowmelt but before the onset of rainier weather, everyday flights and multiple routes were common. The frequency then dipped, only to later increase again as late summer thunderstorms threatened to start forest fires. Meanwhile, the Maine Wing will forever be tied to CAPʼs sponsorship of Wreaths Across America, which honors veterans each holiday season by placing evergreen wreaths on fallen veteransʼ graves at cemeteries and memorials throughout the country and even around the world. The project was begun by the owner of the Worcester Wreath Co. in Harrington, who enlisted the help of a local Maine Wing squadron early on. From there, the partnership evolved and is now CAPʼs foremost ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS national public service project.

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: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 789 senior members 654 cadets Groups: 3 Squadrons: 28 Aircraft: 12 Cessnas 1 glider Vehicles: 25 State Funding: $38,500* Finds: 13

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
The Maryland Wing promotes its congressionally mandated missions yearround. Constantly training in emergency services, the wing supports Maryland with patrols over the Chesapeake Bay and aerial photography surveys, along with swan- and bear-counting surveys. The Cadet Program provides an annual encampment, Solo School Academy and Aerospace Academy. In 2010 the wing hosted eight International Air Cadet Exchange visitors and participated in the Middle East Region Cadet Competition, and a large numbers of cadets attend national activities. The aerospace education mission is promoted through cadet activities, the middle school program and the work of aerospace education members. In 2010 the Legislative Squadron also experienced a resurgence, growing from four to 46 members in six months. Above, Cadet Chief Master Sgt. Rachel Petro of the Maryland Wing enjoys the tow and waits for release above Frederick Municipal Airport on her first CAP glider orientation flight. It may not seem so from the air, but on the ground glider flying is a team sport. It takes several CAP volunteers to move an aircraft into position for takeoff, as well as a powered plane to provide the tow to get the glider airborne. Once aloft, there is only one chance to land. Thatʼs why novice flyers like Petro are always accompanied by a CAP senior member who is a licensed glider pilot. The orientation flights, whether in a CAP glider or a powered CAP Cessna, are always a big hit in the Maryland Wing, which boasts a youth volunteer force of more than 650 ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS cadets.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Middle East Region Commander: Col. Joseph R. Vazquez joevazquez@verizon.net

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Gerard W. Weiss jweiss@mdcap.org Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Rory P. Garnice rgarnice@mdcap.org Wing Mailing Address: 7427 Zachary Lane Glen Burnie, MD 21061-8341 Phone: 410-553-6394 Fax: 410-863-1242 Web Site: www.mdcap.org
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $3.5 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 497 senior members 382 cadets Squadrons: 19 Aircraft: 8 Cessnas Vehicles: 14 Finds: 3

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
The Massachusetts Wingʼs accomplishments in 2009 were truly memorable. The wing flew 1,300 hours in support of missions and training. Fourteen Air Force-directed search and rescue missions were launched, resulting in 10 nondistress finds. Eight search and rescue and disaster relief exercises were conducted to maintain a high degree of readiness. Orientation flights for cadets and members of the stateʼs Air Force ROTC detachments were provided, along with air defense intercept training for the stateʼs Air National Guard Squadron. In addition, the wing supported Hanscom Air Force Base with an aerial mapping flight to allow Air Force photographers to take more than 600 photos of areas of the base under development or planned for development in the near future. The photo mapping was the first comprehensive airborne photo session for the base in more than 30 years. Training initiatives included a wing summer encampment for more than 100 cadets and 20 senior members. Other training included squadron leadership courses, emergency services academies, corporate learning courses, incident command training, communications leader training, first aid and first responder training, basic leadership school and numerous flight training clinics, including a preflight check presentation led by Capt. Steve Goldman, above, of the Hanscom Composite Squadron. Community service projects included support for numerous state, county and municipality events with communications, staffing and expertise. These events ranged from the world-famous Boston Marathon to a 5K road race on Cape Cod. The wing laid more than 4,000 wreaths at five state cemeteries as part of the CAP “Wreaths Across America” program; stocked, wrapped and prepared more than 1,800 Christmas packages for troops overseas in conjunction with the Hanscom Air Force Base Junior Officer Council; and conducted aerospace education workshops for the Central Massachusetts Cub Scouts. During the class the scouts designed, built and launched model rockets. The initiatives were complemented by new alliances formed with the Massachusetts Red Cross disaster assessment teams and the mounted search and rescue teams of New ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS England; members participated with the latter in an actual search effort.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Northeast Region Commander: Col. Christopher J. Hayden Chayden@ner.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. William H. Meskill wmeskill@verizon.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. John Postl johnpostl@aol.com Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 656 Bedford, MA 01730-0656 Phone: 781-377-7023 Fax: 781-377-7293 Web Site: www.mawg.cap.gov

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $2.5 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 769 senior members 486 cadets Groups: 9 Squadrons: 43 Aircraft: 5 Cessna 172s 4 Cessna 182s 1 Schweitzer 232 glider Vehicles: 15 (3 being turned into the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office) Finds: 14 Saves: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Great Lakes Region Commander: Col. Charles L. Carr Jr. ccn15180@wowway.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Michael A. Saile sailem@oakgov.com (w) 248-858-5078 (c) 248-425-2571 (h) 248-681-5717 Wing Government Relations Advisor: Capt. Alfred Pheley apheley@albion.edu (c) 517-554-0783 Wing Mailing Address: Building 1414, Room #67 25090 Altus Avenue Selfridge ANGB, MI 48045-4918 Phone: 248-239-2270 Fax: 248-239-6795 E-mail: wal04@miwg.comcastbiz.net Web Site: www.miwg.cap.gov

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $2.9 MILLION

The Michigan Wing is a complete package of outstanding personnel and service. Its director of operations, Lt. Col. Jonathan E. Reid, left, was named Civil Air Patrolʼs 2009 Senior Member of the Year. A Lutheran pastor in Woodland, Reid asked that his CAP responsibilities be written into his letter of call to the church. The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 spurred Reid, already a pilot, to join CAP. He has since become well-versed in all three of CAPʼs congressionally mandated missions — cadet programs, emergency services and aerospace education. He helped establish the Ionia Flight, where he still serves as aerospace education officer. He helps cadets as both an orientation flight and glider tow pilot and works yearly with the Great Lakes Region cadet encampment, most recently as its commander. He traveled to the Cessna Aircraft Co. factory in Kansas with a fellow Michigan Wing volunteer for training on the Garmin G1000 system; they now conduct yearly classes to teach the G1000 curriculum to fellow Michigan Wing members. Regarded as the wingʼs most active incident commander, Reid has participated in intercept missions with the Air Force and Coast Guard and has flown counter-drug missions. “With CAP,” Reid said, “I get the sense Iʼm part of something larger than myself, my local unit or my wing.” The Michigan Wing stands ready to serve its state, as in Monroe County last spring when flooding was rapidly making roads impassable, hampering evacuations. Local CAP aircrews from the Monroe Composite Squadron took to the air to take photos to aid officials in determining which residents needed to be notified and in planning for unobstructed escape routes. This was CAPʼs second aerial reconnaissance mission in the area in a ALUE OLUNTEER OURS matter of months;F Monroe Fire Department had requested similar help, also because the of flooding, the previous December.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 767 senior members 503 cadets Squadrons: 29 Aircraft: 17 Cessnas 1 glider Vehicles: 23 State Funding: $65,000* Finds: 19 Saves: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
Cadet Capt. David Johnson of the Minnesota Wingʼs Red Wing Composite Squadron provides instruction to candidates for Ground Team Member 1 ratings. They were among 80 cadets and senior members who attended the wingʼs annual Ground Team Academy at Camp Ripley. “There are so many things that can go wrong in any search and rescue mission. You never know what you may encounter,” said Lt. Col. Chet Wilberg, the wingʼs director of emergency services and Ground Team Academy commander. “That is the reason why Civil Air Patrol invests so much time and effort in properly training its members so they are prepared when the call comes.” After some classroom instruction on carrying out land navigation, tracking electronic locator transmitters, conducting a line search and working with search dogs and first aid training, the academy participants spent several days in the recesses of Camp Ripleyʼs 53,000 acres honing their newly acquired skills under a variety of search and rescue scenarios. Wilberg said the academyʼs goal is to get everyone attending to complete one level of CAP Emergency Services training. “Ground Team Academy is an intensive event designed to help prepare our members mentally, physically and technically to deal with lifethreatening emergencies,” he said. Last year, the wing logged 103 actual or training missions totaling 14,929 personnel hours, 593 flights and 9,120 air hours. “Weʼre ready to go on a search-and-rescue mission, anywhere, anytime,” Wilberg said. “Itʼs kind of like a life insurance policy. We pay the premium with training events like ALUE F OLUNTEER Ground Team Academy. We get our dividend on that OURS every time weʼre called out premium on a mission.”

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net 586-246-3940 North Central Region Commander: Col. Steven W. Kuddes bsrk01@neb.rr.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Thomas B. Theis thomastheis@msn.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Col. Kevin F. Sliwinski ga@mncap.org Wing Mailing Address: 6275 Crossman Lane Inver Grove Heights, MN 55076 Phone: 651-291-0462 Fax: 651-522-7007 E-mail: cc@mncap.org Web Site: www.mncap.org
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $3 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.
At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 278 senior members 137 cadets Squadrons: 15 Aircraft: 9 Cessnas 1 balloon Vehicles: 12 State Funding: $60,000* Finds: 7 Saves: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
Mississippi Wing has established itself as a key player in the three missions of Civil Air Patrol: emergency services, cadet programs and aerospace education. Emergency Services: The wingʼs expertise in Emergency Services saved an aviatorʼs life in 2007. Oregon pilot Dennis Steinbock, center with rescuers, crashed near Oxford during a cross-country flight back home. Due to excellent training, quick response and the dedication of Mississippi Wing ground and aircrews, he fully recovered from his injuries. This rescue made national news and included an interview on “Good Morning America.” From statewide emergency services to ongoing coastal Sundown Patrols on the Gulf Coast, communities across the state benefit from our membersʼ service-before-self dedication to duty. Cadet Programs/Youth Leadership: Thanks to the dedication of the cadet programʼs leadership, three wing cadets received the Gen. Carl A. Spaatz Award, CAPʼs highest cadet award. Wing cadets participate in encampments annually and in various color guard/honor guard events, Wreaths Across America and numerous cadet competitions, aerospace education and community service projects. Aerospace Education: Cadets and senior members are actively engaged in aerospace education on many levels. In 2009, Cadet 2nd Lt. Charles M. Hussey Jr. received the national Frank G. Brewer Memorial Aerospace Award as Outstanding Aerospace Education Cadet. Public Relations: The wing has established collaborative relationships with key emergency services organizations and members of local and statewide media outlets, routinely assisting and educating their members on CAPʼs value. Homeland Security: The wing is a viable member of the homeland security team. Recently, members participated in “American Shield,” a joint Canadian/U.S. Army homeland defense exercise in Biloxi. National Award Winners in 2009: The wing is extremely proud of Senior Chaplain ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS of the Year Chaplain Maj. Hal B. Lee Jr. and Logistician of the Year Lt. Col. Carlton R. Sumner Jr.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Southeast Region Commander: Col. James M. Rushing jrushing@cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Tillman C. Carroll tcarroll@mswg.cap.gov Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Johnnie P. Combs Jr. coombs@dixie-net.com Wing Mailing Address: 1635 Airport Drive, Hawkins Field Jackson, MS 39209-3402 Phone: 601-353-1020 Fax: 866-467-3892 E-mail: ms.wg@hotmail.com Web Site: www.mswg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $819,719

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 625 senior members 467 cadets Squadrons: 41 Aircraft: 7 Cessnas Vehicles: 21 State Funding: $14,822* Finds: 11

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net North Central Region Commander: Col. Steven W. Kuddes bsrk01@neb.rr.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. John A. Mais jmais@sbcglobal.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Capt. Michael Smith msmith@midriverscap.com Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5044 Whiteman AFB, MO 65305 Phone: 660-687-3847 Fax: 660-687-3848 E-mail: hq@mowg.cap.gov Web Site: www.mowg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $2.2 MILLION

Cadets and senior members from Civil Air Patrolʼs Missouri Wing and six neighboring wings came together for a weeklong Missouri Wing Summer Encampment, which immersed participants in a wide range of skills, values and concepts vital to success in CAP and in life. U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Scott Harvey, the Missouri Wing reserve coordinator, arranged for a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter, above, to be flown in for display at the encampment. Cadets had the opportunity to question the aircrew about the chopper and its capabilities. They also got to investigate the Black Hawk by sitting in it and taking a close look at the cockpit. During one encampment session, the wingʼs chief of staff, Lt. Col. Erica R. Williams, discussed CAPʼs relationship to the Air Force as well as the history of flight. Participants also attended classes on rockets, aerospace, map and compass reading, safety, career opportunities and emergency services. The class many found the most challenging was drug demand reduction. Maj. Tammi L. Miller, the instructor and the wingʼs drug demand reduction administrator, had the cadets participate in a simulated sobriety test. Wearing special goggles that reproduced the effects of intoxication, the cadets were asked to walk a taped line on the floor. They had ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS a lot of fun – and little success – in trying to walk straight or follow the line.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.
At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 167 senior members 137 cadets Squadrons: 10 Aircraft: 5 Cessnas Vehicles: 6 Finds: 1 Saves: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Organization Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Rocky Mountain Region Commander: Col. Donald G. Cortum mutroc@comcast.net

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Herbert C. Cahalen cahalene@comcast.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Paul Tweden ptweden@180com.net Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1887 Great Falls, MT 59403-1887 Phone: 877-529-5538 Fax: 406-731-3245

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $462,898

Wreaths Across America is a very important and highly anticipated annual event for Montana Wing. Squadrons from across the state adorn the graves of veterans each December with red-ribboned evergreens and, in the process, draw together families of the fallen while also inviting the public to participate. In this endeavor, CAP has found its most pervasive community initiative as one of the projectʼs foremost sponsors. Lewis and Clark Composite Squadron hosted the 2009 observance at Fort Harrison Veteranʼs Cemetery in Helena, above, which was organized by Maj. Dennis Coulson. Units in Missoula and Great Falls hosted similar events. The Helena wreath laying ceremony featured Air Force Lt. Col. Mike Rand, who holds the same CAP rank as a member of the Lewis and Clark squadron. Joe Macklin, CAP Montana state director, served as master of ceremonies. The wing has participated in Wreaths Across America since CAP became involved in this annual salute to the nationʼs veterans in 2006. This season, with the help of CAP and donations from corporations and individuals, more than 161,000 wreaths were placed on the graves of American soldiers in observances at 405 cemeteries and memorials across the nation, while another 24 ceremonies were conducted at American cemeteries and memorials abroad. With the resources of CAP and its 58,000 citizen volunteers, close to half of the ceremonies were orchestrated by CAP units, with CAP color and honor guards ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS participating at many more locations.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 856 senior members 648 cadets Squadrons: 41 Aircraft: 10 Cessnas Vehicles: 20 State Funding: $148,906 (as of Nov. 30, 2009)* Finds: 14 Saves: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Middle East Region Commander: Col. Joseph R. Vazquez joevazquez@verizon.net

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Roy W. Douglass rdouglass@ncwg.cap.gov Wing Government Relations Advisor: Col. Larry J. Ragland LRagland@ncwg.cap.gov Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 2082 Burlington, NC 27216-2082 Phone: 336-570-6894 Fax: 336-570-6883 Web Site: www.ncwg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $3 MILLION

Communications has been a special emphasis of Civil Air Patrolʼs North Carolina Wing over the past year. As one example, the Burlington Composite Squadron has begun a weekly communications network that connects central North Carolina senior members and cadets with the U.S. Air Force and other emergency service providers. A similar radio network was first established by the Fayetteville Composite Squadron, and squadrons in Raleigh and Chapel Hill have begun regular communications practice. “Communications is one of the Civil Air Patrolʼs most important responsibilities,” said Capt. Kertis Henderson, communications officer for the Burlington squadron. “The ability to communicate effectively is vital to efforts in large- and small-scale emergency situations.” Meanwhile, cadets from the Burlington squadron have taken up the banner for communications savvy as one of only eight teams from across the country as well as Japan to advance to the finalist round of the Air Force Associationʼs CyberPatriot competition. Teams are presented with various computer problems to solve in a race against one another and the clock. Above, CyberPatriot team member Cadet Maj. Will J. ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS Buslinger checks for attacks on the Windows 2000 server operating system.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 189 senior members 109 cadets Squadrons: 9 Aircraft: 6 Cessnas 1 glider Vehicles: 10 State Funding: $111,418* Finds: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
The North Dakota Wing proudly serves its state and nation in many capacities. Of late, the wing has demonstrated its leadership and excellence in aerial imagery, supporting the wildland firefighting of the North Dakota Forest Service in the late summer of 2007 and, most recently, several federal, state and local response agencies and officials during the catastrophic flooding in the state in the spring of 2009. The wing has never been involved in any single incident that lasted as long as this response to flooding. Aircraft and crews from throughout the state participated for eight weeks, providing aerial imagery and reconnaissance assistance, primarily to the State Emergency Operations Center and to the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Local emergency management, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the National Weather Service and the North Dakota State Water Commission are just a few of the many other organizations that also benefitted from the North Dakota Wingʼs imagery — such as the photo here of water over Interstate 29 near Oslo — to make key and timely decisions. Well over 6,000 aerial images of the disaster were taken and uploaded onto the Internet for these agencies to use, and the wing received numerous favorable comments from the state and federal agencies involved regarding the quality of the images and the timeliness of the wingʼs action in providing them. As always, this work was conducted by an unpaid force of volunteers taking time away from their workplaces and families to give back to their state and nation. The North Dakota Wing continues to stand ready to answer calls to service. Thanks to the outstanding support of Congress, state leadership, the North Dakota Department of Emergency ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS Services and its own volunteer force, the wing will be ready when that next call comes.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net North Central Region Commander: Col. Steven W. Kuddes bsrk01@neb.rr.com

Wing Contact Information:
Interim Wing Commander: Lt. Col. Dean F. Reiter forcecon@minot.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Maj. Bill Golddammer bgbek@bektel.com Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 608 Bismarck, ND 58502-0608 Phone: 701-328-8190 Fax: 701-328-8191 E-mail: ndcap@midconetwork.com Web Site: www.ndcap.us
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $569,226

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.
At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 223 senior members 130 cadets Squadrons: 6 Aircraft: 3 Cessnas Vehicles: 8 Finds: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Middle East Region Commander: Col. Joseph R. Vazquez joevazquez@verizon.net

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Richard J. Cooper Jr. cc@natcapwg.cap.gov Wing Government Relations Advisor: Capt. Bernhard H. Charlemagne gra@natcapwg.cap.gov Wing Mailing Address: 200 McChord St., Suite 111 Bolling AFB, DC 20032-7700 Phone: 202-767-4405 Fax: 202-767-5695 E-mail: wa@natcapwg.cap.gov Web Site: www.natcapwg.cap.gov

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $1.2 MILLION

The only Civil Air Patrol wing based in the nationʼs capital, the National Capital Wing provides some unique services, such as logistics help with the presidential inauguration last year. A memorandum of understanding with the District of Columbia gives CAP a seat in the districtʼs Homeland Security Emergency Operations Center. Cadets helped monitor radio frequencies from the wingʼs new mobile communications center. For role models, National Capital Wing cadets need look no further than their own wingʼs outstanding senior members, such as Col. Gene Hartman, shown here in 1959 next to a T33 aircraft during basic flight school at Webb Air Force Base near Big Spring, Texas. Hartman recently joined the exclusive company of 1,300 pilots as a recipient of the Federal Aviation Administrationʼs Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award, which honors 50 or more consecutive years of safe flight operations. It is a badge of honor for those skilled and meticulous enough to attain it. Hartman served as pilot for the millionth War on Terror homeland security sortie in 2008, piloting a Gippsland GA8 Airvan that served as a mock intruder for Washington, D.C., Air National Guard F-16 fighters to compel to land. He also spent 30 days on the front lines of CAPʼs massive disaster response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, initially flying sorties and later serving as flight manager for missions out of Hattiesburg, Miss. ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.
At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 264 senior members 211 cadets Squadrons: 16 Aircraft: 5 Cessnas Vehicles: 16 State Funding: $30,700* Finds: 2

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
Nebraska Wing members were credited with saving two lives in 2009 through searches for individuals who, if not found, might have suffered severe injury or worse. One was an Alzheimerʼs patient who wandered away from a nursing facility, prompting a request for an air search. Three air searches for missing or late aircraft were conducted. Two of the aircraft were found in other states – the planes were scheduled to fly over Nebraska – and the third search ended with a trained Nebraska Wing aircrew locating the site of a fatal crash. The wing also assisted several state agencies in meeting objectives by flying personnel to conduct a deer survey and to photograph the Platte River to help decision-makers make plans in the event of ice jams during winter and spring thaws. The Nebraska Emergency Management Agency and county emergency management personnel have emergency contact information for the wing in the event of local disasters. While these activities are the most visible, accomplishments by the wingʼs cadets are the ones that make members especially proud. Three cadets were accepted to military academies in 2009. In Civil Air Patrol, cadets learn leadership, military bearing and community service. The wing hosted its eighth consecutive National Flight Academy for powered aircraft, one of seven offered nationwide. From Hawaii to Maine and Alaska to Florida, more than 20 cadets, including the one pictured here from the Florida Wing, spent two weeks at Camp Ashland, where they learned to solo in an aircraft. Three Nebraska cadets participated in the academy in 2009. An extensive communications system, which members are trained to use properly and efficiently, supports the wingʼs search and rescue and disaster relief missions and cadet ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS program initiatives. A series of repeater stations and airborne repeaters provides coverage over most of the state.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net North Central Region Commander: Col. Steven W. Kuddes bsrk01@neb.rr.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Robert K. Todd bltodd@radiks.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: 1st Lt. Barbara Kuddes Bsrk01@neb.rr.com Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 155 Ashland, NE 68003-0155 Phone: 402-309-7665 Fax: 402-944-4267 E-mail: wa@newg-cap.org Web Site: www.newg-cap.org
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $920,356

V

O CAP V

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: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.
At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 521 senior members 306 cadets Squadrons: 16 Aircraft: 10 Cessnas 3 gliders Vehicles: 16 State Funding: $53,319* Saves: 7

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
In air warrior exercises known as Green Flag West, the Nevada Wing is on the cutting edge of 21st century Civil Air Patrol service. At Nellis Air Force Base its members are trained in the new CAP Surrogate Predator program, where CAP planes are converted into mock predators to train Army and Marine forces for deployment to Afghanistan and Iraq. Predator training with CAPʼs civilian volunteers, required by the program to have prior military experience, totals only a fraction of the cost charged by private contractors. “Weʼre using a manned aircraft to simulate an unmanned aircraft,” said CAP-U.S. Air Force Commander Col. Bill Ward, explaining that a sophisticated “Predator ball” placed under the left wing of a CAP Cessna 182 gives the plane the capability of mimicking the Air Forceʼs MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper — remotely piloted aircraft that provide realtime data to the U.S. The Surrogate Predator starts by surveying targets and providing full-motion video to the brigade combat team. “Once a target is identified by the ground commander as hostile,” said Air Force Maj. Matthew Daniel, a Predator liaison to CAP, “the Surrogate Predator will dynamically re-task into the strike role and coordinate with a forward air control to simulate the delivery of precision ordnance onto a target.” Meanwhile, the Nevada Wing remains active in its more traditional role of search and rescue. In the last several months, such missions have taken CAP ground team members into the rough terrain of the Valley of Fire to extract hiker Ian Smith, who broke his leg, as well as an aircrew over Lake Tahoe to help direct rescuers to a seaplane that had flipped ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS and submerged.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Pacific Region Commander: Col. Larry F. Myrick lfmyrick@aol.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Ralph L. Miller rmiller@nvwg.cap.gov Wing Government Relations Advisors: Lt. Col. Ronald Cuzze, rcuzze@earthlink.net and Jack Schofield jackschofield@hotmail.com Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 339 Sparks, NV 89432-0339 Phone: 775-358-3700 Fax: 775-358-3757 E-Mail: ShawnBrewer@nvwg.cap.gov Web Site: www.nvwg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $1.7 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 288 senior members 255 cadets Squadrons: 10 Aircraft: 6 Cessnas 1 glider Vehicles: 11 State Funding: $61,000* Finds: 3 Saves: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Northeast Region Commander: Col. Christopher J. Hayden Chayden@ner.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Donald C. Davidson Sr. ealdon@comcast.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Col. Donald C. Davidson Sr. ealdon@comcast.net Wing Mailing Address: 51 Airport Road Concord, NH 03301-5322 Phone: 603-271-3225 Fax: 603-225-5964 E-mail: hq@nhwgcap.org Web Site: www.nhwgcap.org
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $1.3 MILLION

Qualified ground team personnel are of major importance to any search and rescue mission. To that end Maj. Robert Shaw, deputy director of emergency services, and Capt. Cameron Thompson, assistant emergency services officer, have worked tirelessly to provide Civil Air Patrolʼs New Hampshire Wing members with the quality training they need to become qualified ground team members. Weekend ground team training schools, above, are scheduled for one weekend each month regardless of the weather. These training sessions are held at the Hidden Valley Boy Scout reservation in Gilmanton. Other state search and rescue organizations are often invited to participate as well. The wing has also excelled in other phases of search and rescue, having won first place in CAPʼs 2009 Northeast Region Search and Rescue Competition. That performance included firsts in the incident command team, aircrew and ground team portions of the exercise. Qualified aircrew members staffed two primary crews each week from June to November to provide the stateʼs Forest Service with aerial surveillance in designated areas particularly prone to fire danger. Backup crews were also on alert. One of only two CAP teams that won an all-expense-paid trip to Orlando, Fla., for the CyberPatriot computer competition hails from the wingʼs Seacoast Composite Squadron. The team — Cadet Airman Basic Trevor Bergeron and Cadet Airman 1st Class James Mackaman — will “race” against other teams and the clock to isolate and correct vulnerabilities in a virtual computer image downloaded to their computer. An exciting new Department of Homeland Security mission for the New Hampshire Wing has been working with the U.S. Air Force in the fighter interceptor training missions Falcon Dart and Fertile Keynote. The CAP flights act as intruders to allow the fighter pilots to train in intercepting aircraft that go OURS slow. low and ALUE F OLUNTEER

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.
At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 622 senior members 672 cadets Squadrons: 30 Aircraft: 6 Cessnas 1 Maule 1 glider Vehicles: 16 State Funding: $5,000* Finds: 19 Saves: 2

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
In 2009, the New Jersey Wing served the people of New Jersey through the following accomplishments: The wingʼs aerospace education team presented aerospace programs at 32 schools and 35 outside organizations, teaching the fundamentals of flight, space exploration and aviation to more than 3,800 youth and

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Northeast Region Commander: Col. Christopher J. Hayden Chayden@ner.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. David L. Mull david.mull@njwg.cap.gov Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Wayne Fox wayne.fox@njwg.cap.gov Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 16099 McGuire AFB, NJ 08641-6099 Phone: 609-723-8200 Fax: 609-723-8470 E-mail: hq@njwg.cap.gov Web Site: www.njwg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $3.4 MILLION

300 teachers throughout the state. The cadet program actively promoted leadership skills, physical and mental fitness and good citizenship to more than 670 cadets who participated in weekly meetings and service projects. Cadets also attended state-level activities. Some 150 wing cadets attended the Basic Encampment and Noncommissioned Officers Academy at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, and 24 attended powered aircraft and glider flight encampments (see photo). The wingʼs drill team took first place in region competition and advanced to CAPʼs National Cadet Competition in Oregon. More than 115 cadets participated in 16 national cadet activities held throughout the country in 2009. The wingʼs emergency services mission provides training and credentialing to national standards for CAP officers in search and rescue (SAR), emergency mission management and disaster relief. The wing is a member of the New Jersey SAR Council and the New Jersey Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT); members participated in two state CERT exercises in 2009. The wing earned an excellent rating in the 2009 SAR evaluation conducted by the U.S. Air Force, and the wingʼs mission management team took third place at the Northeast Region SAR Competition. In 2009 the wing held 10 statewide SAR exercises, responded to 25 actual Air Force SAR missions and supported two Air Force training missions to improve the nationʼs capabilities to respond to threats. The wing also assisted state police counterdrug efforts by flying more than 60 hours of aerial ALUE reconnaissance missions. The wing holds a seat at the State Police/Office of F OLUNTEER OURS Emergency Management Regional Operations Intelligence Center.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:

Volunteer Members: 496 senior members 411 cadets Squadrons: 27 Aircraft: 12 Cessnas 1 GA-8 2 gliders Vehicles: 14 State Funding: $170,800 for July 1, 2009-June 30, 2010* and $220,400 for July 1, 2008-June 30, 2009* Finds: 3 Saves: 3

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Southwest Region Commander: Col. Joseph C. Jensen Joseph.Jensen@swr.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Richard F. Himebrook HimebrookR@totacc.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Louis Braddi lbraddi@hotmail.com Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5069 Kirtland AFB, NM 87185 Phone: 505-268-5678 Fax: 505-268-3469 Web Site: www.nmcap.org
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $1.8 MILLION

New Mexico Wing members serve their nation and state on a variety of fronts, including: Youth Leadership: New Mexico cadets participate in the Cadet Council, can attend several encampments and take airplane flights. They helped with Wreaths Across America, CAPʼs annual salute to the nationʼs veterans; served as color guards at many events, including some associated with the state Legislature; and were on hand for the Spaceport America ground-breaking, which was also attended by New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson. Aerospace Education: Maj. Ted Spitzmiller, external aerospace education officer for the wing, wrote a comprehensive space exploration history in two volumes — “Dawn of the Space Age” and “To the Moon and Towards the Future.” Astronaut Sid Gutierrez said these books taught him new things about the space program! Spitzmiller also released “Enchanted Wings — A History of New Mexico CAP 1941-2010.” In addition, the wingʼs aerospace education members influence the aerospace aspirations of students in classrooms across the state. Emergency Services: The wing flies summer “lake patrols” looking for those in distress, has developed a memorandum of understanding with the Department of Military Affairs and has participated in nine emergencies as well as training exercises, one involving four states. Homeland Security: The wing checked low-level routes for the U.S. Air Force, participated in Falcon Virgo to help train crews to defend Washington, D.C., and helped with customs radar calibrations. Training: The wing provided professional adult leadership training, hosting six-state ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS training activities in 2009.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.
At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 1,268 senior members 1,169 cadets Squadrons: 66 Aircraft: 13 Cessnas 1 Maule 1 Blanik glider Vehicles: 19 State Grants: about $120,000* Finds: 14

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
With more than 2,400 members, New York is the largest wing in Civil Air Patrolʼs nine-state Northeast Region. With a strong emphasis on emergency services, disaster relief and cadet programs, as well as counterdrug and homeland security, the New York Wing continues to raise the bar for itself, and it recently unveiled a state-of-the-art Operations Center at wing headquarters in White Plains, N.Y. Wing aircrews accumulated more than 3,305 flying hours in 2009. Those hours included search and rescue missions and exercises, homeland security tasks such as fighter intercept missions and military support for the state Air National Guard, weather damage assessment in cooperation with state agencies and Operation Vigilant Guard, a multi-agency exercise that simulated an earthquake in Buffalo. The wing also flew more than 570 counterdrug mission hours, assisting law enforcement agencies in reducing the amount of illegal drugs on the streets. The U.S. Air Force evaluated the wing on its emergency services capabilities and preparedness, rating New York as “outstanding” and as a “benchmark” for other wings. The wing also placed third in CAPʼs Northeast Region Search and Rescue Competition. Cadet programs excelled in 2009. The wing once again held a successful cadet leadership encampment and flight academy at Stratton Air National Guard Base in Scotia. Its championship color guard team won CAPʼs National Cadet Competition in Oregon and was invited to present the colors on the floor of the New York Senate (shown above). A Senate resolution honored the cadetsʼ achievement. In addition, the New York Wing conducted an aerospace education program in schools, fostered aerospace excellence, provided orientation flights for its cadets, ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS conducted Air Force ROTC orientation flights and took teachers to the skies in CAPʼs FlyA-Teacher program.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Northeast Region Commander: Col. Christopher J. Hayden Chayden@ner.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Kenneth J. Andreu KennethjA@aol.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Andrew Liddle aliddle@stny.rr.com Wing Mailing Address: 24 Loop Road, Building One Westchester County Airport White Plains, NY 10604-1218 Phone: 914-683-1000 Fax: 914-683-1005 E-mail: NewYorkWing@msn.com Web Site: www.nywg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $7.2 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 773 senior members 676 cadets Squadrons: 49 Aircraft: 7 Cessnas 1 glider Vehicles: 17 Finds: 13

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Great Lakes Region Commander: Col. Charles L. Carr Jr. ccn15180@wowway.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Dave Winters winters_dave@hotmail.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Maj. Bryan Lee br9an@aol.com Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3990 Columbus, OH 43218-3990 Phone: 614-338-8198 Fax: 614-338-8292 E-mail: glrohwa@gmail.com Web Site: www.ohwg.cap.gov

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $3 MILLION

Civil Air Patrolʼs Ohio Wing emphasized its cadet program over the past year, offering its young volunteers educational opportunities and real-world service. Dayton Aero Cadet Squadron 706 was given an actual mystery to solve when its members went out to track an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). EPIRBs are assigned to watercraft, but the signals were emanating from a landfill in the small town of Fostoria. With assistance from the landfillʼs maintenance supervisor, who operated the siteʼs heavy equipment, they found the beacon atop a 300-foot mound of rubble. A used boatʼs new owner, not realizing the significance of the EPIRB, had tossed it out. Cadet Airman Zachary Gregg, Cadet Airman 1st Class Joseph Schwartz and Maj. Mark Swigart used direction-finding equipment to track their target. Elsewhere in the state in a career shadow program, Cadet Sr. Airman Erin Fetters, above, of the Youngstown ARS Composite Squadron got the opportunity to trail U.S. Coast Guard helicopter pilot Lt. Sarah Wyne, a recent Coast Guard Academy graduate, on the job at Air Station Detroit. Besides taking a two-hour helicopter orientation flight aboard one of the stationʼs rescue helicopters, Fetters was introduced to various base personnel, ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS including rescue divers.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 422 senior members 265 cadets Squadrons: 17 Aircraft: 9 Cessnas Vehicles: 16 State Funding: $70,000* Finds: 4

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
The Oklahoma Wing actively supports cadet programs, emergency services and aerospace education through activities that are fun, instructive and beneficial to the community. In 2009, the wing hosted a weeklong National Flight Academy. During the activity 18 cadets from nine states received 10 hours of flight instruction from nearly a dozen instructors, flying up to two sorties each day in the wingʼs aircraft. The cadets also visited nearby Tinker Air Force Base, the wingʼs headquarters and home to the U.S. Navyʼs E6B aircraft and the U.S. Air Forceʼs Air Warning and Control System squadrons. More than 50 veterans, along with cadets and senior members from the Oklahoma City metropolitan areaʼs five squadrons, attended the annual Wreaths Across America ceremony Dec. 12 in what Maj. Russell Davis, event project officer, said was the largest turnout in the eventʼs four-year history. It also marked the first time the ceremony was organized and sponsored by the wing. Ceremonies featured a Civil Air Patrol color guard and active-duty members of the Air Force, Army, Marines, Navy, Coast Guard and Merchant Marine. Cadet Senior Master Sgt. Sarah A. Wood, pictured here, was part of the CAP color guard for the event. In November, along with members of CAPʼs Texas Wing, Oklahoma Wing cadets and senior members from squadrons at Altus, Enid, Muskogee, Norman, Oklahoma City, Tinker Air Force Base and Tulsa participated in a search and rescue exercise at Alva Regional Airport. Their practice sessions were put to the test in December, when aircraft from the Muskogee squadron assisted law enforcement officials in a missing vehicle search and, again in January, when two aircraft and crews were used to assist in the search for a missing Oklahoma University student. Aircraft were launched from Tulsa ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS and Norman airports within hours after law enforcement requested assistance.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Southwest Region Commander: Col. Joseph C. Jensen Joseph.Jensen@swr.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Robert H. Castle rcastle@cox.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Maj. Michael L. Galiga mike@asonegroup.com Wing Mailing Address: 3800 A Avenue, Room 309 Mail Stop L-39 Building 240 Tinker AFB, OK 73145-9117 Phone: 405-736-6044 Fax: 405-734-5518 E-mail: okwinghq@yahoo.com Web Site: www.okwg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $1.4 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 390 senior members 215 cadets Squadrons: 17 Aircraft: 8 Cessnas 2 gliders Vehicles: 22 Finds: 12 Saves: 3

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Pacific Region Commander: Col. Larry F. Myrick lfmyrick@aol.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Brian L. Bishop bbishop@cap.gov Wing Government Relations Advisor: Col. Brian L. Bishop bbishop@cap.gov Wing Mailing Address: 28735 Grumman Drive Eugene, OR 97402 Phone: 541-688-9408 Fax: 541-689-9509 E-mail: orwghq@yahoo.com Web Site: orwg.uscap.us

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $1.3 MILLION

Oregon Wing Capts. Winton Adcock, center, and Scott Bartholomew meet with Lina Ma, a research scientist for the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI). Ma is part of a geological team studying the majestic but unstable slopes of Mount Hood in an effort to prepare for potential disaster. The wing joined forces with the geologists from the state agency in 2009 to conduct photographic surveys of Mount Hoodʼs slopes and debris flows in the mountain valleys and to participate in a ground team exercise in which a minor volcanic eruption of the mountain was simulated. The photographs are being used in the stateʼs ongoing study of debris hazards on the peak, 50 miles east of Portland. “For the CAP members, at least the crew I served on, this was a rare opportunity to expand our knowledge of the geological formations on Mount Hood and the potential extent of debris flow dependent on the various causes of flow and to learn pieces of the science beyond what we see in a potential disaster scenario,” said Capt. Nick Ham. “We also developed an understanding of how to integrate the scientistsʼ maps with our aviation charts and to determine the safest way to accomplish their goals.” The wing flew six two-hour sorties in support of the mission, each using a two-member CAP aircrew. A representative from DOGAMI was on board as well. Some 24 man-hours ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS were spent on the mission.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 1,272 senior members 1,053 cadets Squadrons: 74 Aircraft: 13 Cessnas 1 Maule 2 gliders Vehicles: 42 Grants: $265,000* State Funding: $150,000* Finds: 18 Saves: 5

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Northeast Region Commander: Col. Christopher J. Hayden Chayden@ner.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Mark A. Lee ColMarkLeecap@prodigy.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Robert Meinert rlmeinert@gmail.com Wing Mailing Address: Building 3-108 Fort Indiantown Gap Annville, PA 17003-5002 Phone: 717-861-2335 Fax: 717-861-2164 E-mail: hq@pawg.cap.gov Web Site: www.pawg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $5.2 MILLION

2009 was an active year for Civil Air Patrolʼs Pennsylvania Wing. Cadets were busy helping veterans, packing Christmas boxes for deployed troops, above, and collecting coats for the needy, while senior members portrayed victims in Operation Red Rose IV, the National Guardʼs annual training exercise for counterterrorism. They also visited St. Luke's Good Shepherd Pediatric Center as part of a contingent of Pilots for Kids, a national volunteer organization supported by CAP and professional and military pilots. The wing continued its focused approach to professional development and training, as 2009 saw 98 members complete Squadron Leadership School, with 46 continuing on to complete basic training by earning CAPʼs Gen. Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Award. These numbers nearly doubled the national average for Level II completions. In addition, the wing set a new attendance record this year with eight members completing National Staff College and six going on to complete Level V for the Gill Robb Wilson Award — CAPʼs highest professional development award for senior members.

VALUE OF CAP VOLUNTEER HOURS: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.
At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 415 senior members 761 cadets Squadrons: 50 Aircraft: 3 Cessnas Vehicles: 10 Government Funding: $8,000* Finds: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Southeast Commander: Col. James M. Rushing jrushing@cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Rafael C. Roman rafael.roman@prwg.us Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Carlos Munoz carlos.munoz@prwg.us Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 9066521 San Juan, PR 00906-6521 Phone: 787-723-6001 E-mail: prwadm@prtc.net Web Site: www.prwg.us
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $1.4 MILLION

Thrilled to be U.S. citizens, Puerto Ricans are dedicated to giving back through volunteerism, as evidenced by the robust membership and activities of Civil Air Patrolʼs Puerto Rico Wing. The skills Cadet 2nd Lt. Luis Y. Rivera learned in the Mayaguez Cadet Squadron have been put to the test a remarkable two times, saving two lives. The first incident occurred during lunchtime at Riveraʼs school, where a man toting a can of gasoline in preparation for cutting the grass accidently set himself on fire. Rivera ran to help, pushing the man to the ground and rolling him to extinguish the flames. He then doused the remaining fire with water, told his friends to set up a perimeter, covered the man with damp blankets from a neighbor and called an ambulance. Then, during a school field trip to Old San Juan, he noticed a friend who was pale and still. Rivera jumped into action, making his friend raise his arms to facilitate breathing and covering him with a coat to keep him warm while the school bus detoured to a hospital. Unknown to Rivera, his friend was asthmatic. Riveraʼs actions, learned in CAP, helped save his life. The wingʼs senior members, meanwhile, have been schooling themselves in aerial photography. They took more than 90 photos above Caribbean Petroleum Corp. oil refinery in Bayamon, where 15 fuel tanks exploded. Rocking the nearby San Juan metropolitan area, the blast produced a huge cloud of black smoke, rising to 20,000 feet and prompting the Federal Aviation Administration to issue a temporary flight restriction. CAP, which received special permission to fly into the area, was the only agency that flew a photo reconnaissance mission in the explosionʼs aftermath. Images were delivered to the Puerto ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS Rico Emergency Management Agency.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.
At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 127 senior members 123 cadets Squadrons: 5 Aircraft: 3 Cessnas Vehicles: 9 State Funding: $20,000* Finds: 5

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Northeast Region Commander: Col. Christopher J. Hayden Chayden@ner.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Anthony Gagliardi tgagli14@yahoo.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Col. Anthony Gagliardi tgagli14@yahoo.com Wing Mailing Address: 644 Airport Road, Suite D Warwick, RI 02886 Phone: 401-737-8490 Fax: 401-732-0532 E-mail: ralphmaiorano@hotmail.com Web Site: www.riwg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $571,517

In 2009 the Rhode Island Wing conducted numerous activities in support of its legislatively mandated missions of emergency services, cadet programs and aerospace education. The wing assisted the Rhode Island Emergency Management Agency and the state police in conducting a missing person search. More than 90 cadets graduated from the wingʼs spring encampment, participated in numerous Memorial Day parades and assisted with the Amica Ironman Triathlon, which attracted 6,000 participants, and the CVS 5K, which featured more than 10,000 runners. Above, Lt. Gov. Elaine Roberts, a member of the wingʼs legislative squadron, poses with cadets. Other community service initiatives included assisting the state Air National Guard during its annual air show and the state Army National Guard during its international parachute competition, LEAPFEST, in which more than 20 countries participated. Since the wing certified 18 senior members in both Incident Command System courses 300 and 400, it will be compliant with the National Incident Management System for many ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS years to come.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 590 senior members 504 cadets Squadrons: 28 Aircraft: 9 Cessnas 1 glider Vehicles: 24 State Funding: $50,000* Finds: 13 Saves: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Middle East Region Commander: Col. Joseph R. Vazquez joevazquez@verizon.net

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Jay H. Lindler jay@lindler.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Brig. Gen. Phil Leventis, USAF (Ret) leventis@ftc-i.net Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 280065 Columbia, SC 29228-0065 Phone: 803-822-5470 Fax: 803-822-5326 E-mail: scwa@scwg.cap.gov Web Site: www.scwg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $2.1 MILLION

The South Carolina Wing worked regularly with Shaw Air Force Base in Sumter during 2009, providing targets for F-16 pilots involving intruders in U.S. coastal air space and portraying lost pilots and security risks within the state. This provides training for the U.S. Air Force and evaluations during inspections, as well as training for Civil Air Patrol in communicating with and working with the Air Force. Members have also been completing standardization education in working with the state Emergency Management Division. This includes recurrent training in CAP Cessna 182s and 172s to ensure CAP in South Carolina is ready for service during natural disasters, including floods, forest fires, tornados, earthquakes and hurricanes, as well as man-made disasters. Shown here, Maj. Francis H. Smith and Capt. Michael L. Moore pass over Lake Murray as they return to home base in Columbia in the wingʼs Cessna 182RG following an all-day flight clinic in Anderson. Cadets, who are the future pilots and airmen for the Air Force and enlisted personnel in other armed services, also received training during Cadet Training Weekends and the Wing ALUE F OLUNTEER Encampment. Cadets enroll in Solo Encampment OURS their license to fly, and they to earn participate in training flights in C-130s.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 207 senior members 158 cadets Squadrons: 11 Aircraft: 7 Cessnas Vehicles: 15 State Funding: $38,045* Finds: 3

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net North Central Region Commander: Col. Steven W. Kuddes bsrk01@neb.rr.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Teresa Schimelfening capsdwingcc@gmail.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Col. Teresa Schimelfening capsdwingcc@gmail.com Wing Mailing Address: 101 Saint Joseph St., Suite 103 Rapid City, SD 57701 Phone: 605-394-5206 Fax: 650-394-5208 E-mail: sdwa@earthlink.net Web Site: www.sdcap.us
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS $674,810

The South Dakota Wing has been active this past year. The wing sent aircraft and personnel to North Dakota to assist in relief efforts associated with the Red River flooding. The wing was also asked to provide photos of the James River (above), the Moreau River on the Cheyenne Reservation and Brown County flooding. Support for military organizations in the state included flying survey flights for both Ellsworth Air Force Base and the National Guard and looking for new towers along lowlevel flying routes as well as within the Powder River Military Operational Area. Training support was provided to the Guardʼs F-16s as they trained for their Air Defense mission. Further solidifying a longstanding relationship with South Dakota State University, the wing devoted 275 flight hours to animal tracking around the Black Hills and other areas of the state. Though no major fires occurred this year, the wing continues to support the Department of Agriculture with training for its Wildland Fire personnel. Overall, the wing flew 422 hours during South Dakotaʼs fiscal year in support of missions directly affecting the state. This constituted 31 percent of the wingʼs overall ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS flying hours.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 604 senior members 427 cadets Squadrons: 33 Aircraft: 9 Cessnas 1 glider Vehicles: 23 State Funding: $87,750* Finds: 5

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
Operating efficiently and unobtrusively in the background, the Tennessee Wing is on hand to serve its fellow citizens in a variety of circumstances. When Remote Area Medical Volunteer Corps (RAM) offered one of its free medical clinics in Knoxville, members of the Tennessee Wing handled the logistics of parking and directions for the thousands who showed up. RAM founder Lt. Col. Stan Brock, shown here piloting a C-47 that saw service in the Normandy invasion helping deliver both medical supplies and personnel for RAM, joined CAP as it became clear both organizations shared common assets and goals. As more American citizens desperately need health services, RAM is shifting its focus from third world countries to the U.S. Brock foresees increasing cooperation between his organization and CAP, supporting one another in response to disasters. Just last fall, the Tennessee Wing responded to a natural disaster by filling 12 computer disks with aerial images of flood damage. The photographs, each marked with a specific latitude and longitude to pinpoint a location, were passed on to the city manager and police chief in East Ridge. The local officials used the photos to assign ground crews, whether to aid in evacuations or to shore up critical infrastructure, and to help make the case for federal assistance. William R. Whitson, East Ridge city manager, described CAPʼs work as “an incredible resource,” adding, “I would wholeheartedly support having that resource ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS available in the future.”

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Southeast Commander: Col. James M. Rushing jrushing@cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Barry Melton tncap204@bellsouth.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Donald Miller dmiller@tnwg.cap.gov Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 250 Alcoa, TN 37701-0250 Phone: 865-342-4880 Fax: 865-342-4882 E-mail: tnwg@tnwg.cap.gov Web Site: www.tnwg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $674,810

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 1,734 senior members 1,582 cadets Squadrons: 74 Aircraft: 31 Cessnas 2 gliders Vehicles: 32 Finds: 40

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
Texas Wingʼs Maureen Louis Adams prepares for a training flight for Teachers in Space, a national program changing the way students learn about space exploration. She and six other teachers from across the country will soon travel in space and return to the classroom to inspire their students. Introduced at the NewSpace 2009 Conference as part of the next generation of space explorers, the selected group of teachers is named Pathfinder 7. “They will be the first astronaut teachers to fly in space and return to the classroom, paving the way for hundreds to follow,” said Edward Wright, project manager of the Teachers in Space program. The candidates are training to one day fly on reusable, suborbital spacecraft under development by private companies. Four of these teachers, including Adams, are Civil Air Patrol aerospace education members, or AEMs. Adams is an elementary school teacher and principal in Killeen. She established one of the first elementary robotics programs in the nation, has been a guest instructor at the U.S. Space Camp and has flown two weightless experiments on NASA aircraft. A CAP member since 2002, Adams says the organizationʼs resources for aerospace education are what led her to join. Suborbital spaceflights are expected to begin in the next two to four years. The flights have been donated by and purchased from five private suborbital companies. Unlike spacecraft used by the International Space Station, the new vehicles will be fully reusable. To train for the space expedition, the astronaut teachers toured facilities at NASA Dryden Flight Center, NASA Ames Research Center, Edwards Air Force Base and the Mojave Air and Space Port in 2009. They also completed high-gravity and zero-gravity aircraft flights. The Pathfinders will receive additional OURS and help develop the training training ALUE F OLUNTEER curriculum for future Teachers in Space candidates.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Southwest Region Commander: Col. Joseph C. Jensen Joseph.Jensen@swr.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Joe R. Smith jsmith@cap.gov Wing Government Relations Advisors: Maj. Robert A. Beeley bob@beeley.net and Lt. Col. Gordie L. White gordie@att.net Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 154997 Waco, TX 76715 Phone: 254-867-9328 Fax: 866-867-6764 E-mail: admin@txwgcap.org Web Site: www.txwgcap.org

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $7.9 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.
At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 352 senior members 286 cadets Squadrons: 14 Aircraft: 7 Cessnas 2 gliders Vehicles: 12 State Funding: $75,000* Finds: 15 Saves: 10

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
Cadet Capts. Rae Niedfeldt, left, and Arielle Weeks, members of Civil Air Patrolʼs championship drill team, celebrate their teamʼs first-place finish in the 2009 National Cadet Competition by posing in front of the 3-foot U.S. Air Force Chief of Staff Sweepstakes Trophy. The Utah Wing cadets and their 12 teammates took top honors during four days of competition at Linfield College and the Evergreen Air & Space Museum in McMinnville, Ore. The Utah Wing drill team was led by Cadet Lt. Col. Cheston Newhall. The team took first place in four of seven categories in the National Cadet Competition, known as NCC to cadets. It is held each summer after teams compete at both the wing and region levels to earn the right to compete nationally. Some even begin the journey by competing in a group-level competition. Because it takes so much time and hard work just to get to NCC, the event is often billed as “the Best Meets the Best.” The Utah Wing cadets, representing CAPʼs five-state Rocky Mountain Region, competed against teams from the seven other CAP regions. Events included a uniform inspection, a mile run and both indoor and outdoor military drill routines, such as posting and retrieving the American flag. Cadets were also tested on their knowledge of customs, courtesies and Air Force and CAP history through a written exam and on their knowledge of aerospace through a panel quiz similar to TVʼs “Jeopardy.” It was the Utah Wingʼs first drill team national title since 1956.

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Rocky Mountain Region Commander: Col. Donald G. Cortum mutroc@comcast.net

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Jerry E. Wellman jw7sar@gmail.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Jon Niedfeldt jon.niedfeldt@gmail.com Wing Mailing Address: Utah Wing Building 640 N 2360 W Salt Lake City, UT 84116 Phone: 801-533-5456 Fax: 801-532-0229 Web Site: www.cap.utah.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $1.2 MILLION

VALUE OF CAP VOLUNTEER HOURS: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 149 senior members 86 cadets Squadrons: 8 Aircraft: 3 Cessnas Vehicles: 10 State Grant: $60,000* Finds: 2

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Northeast Region Commander: Col. Christopher J. Hayden Chayden@ner.cap.gov

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Thomas P. Benckert Jr. tbenckert@gmail.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Michael Davidson vermontcap@gmail.com Wing Mailing Address: 65 NCO Drive South Burlington, VT 05403-5873 Phone: 802-660-5904 Fax: 802-660-5475 E-mail: VTWing@gmail.com Web Site: www.vtcap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $487,474

Civil Air Patrol's Vermont Wing is a valuable asset for citizens of the state. The wing continues to perform its congressionally mandated missions of emergency services, cadet programs and aerospace education while branching out into new missions in support of state needs. As a full partner in Vermont's Emergency Response Plans, the wing constantly trains to ensure its readiness in the event its members are needed. In the photo, Maj. Barbara Leary and Cadet Master Sgt. Max Danis are briefed by Sid Giradin, CAP-U.S. Air Force state director, during a recent search and rescue training evaluation. The Vermont Wingʼs cadet program, although small, continues to be a great example of the exceptional quality of these Vermont youth and their volunteer mentors. This past year the Green Mountain Composite Squadron, based at Burlington Air National Guard Base in South Burlington, was selected as CAPʼs Northeast Region Squadron of Distinction – a prestigious honor denoting the unit as the best one for cadets in the nine OURS wingsALUE up F region. OLUNTEER making the

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 808 senior members 620 cadets Squadrons: 31 Aircraft: 11 Cessnas Vehicles: 23 State Funding: $100,000* Finds: 21 Saves: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter
Department of Homeland Security. o 2,045 man-hours. o More than 600 flying hours. o 20,000 miles driven in mission support. Training missions – 16 major exercises, committing another 2,530 manhours, some carried out jointly with other search and rescue groups and the Virginia Department of Emergency Management. Statewide cadet encampments – Two, with more than 170 senior members The numbers tell the story for the and cadets participating each year. Virginia Wing during 2008-09: Cadets obtaining service academy Emergency services missions – 103, appointments – including: o U.S. Air Force Academy – three. o Extended aerial communication o U.S .Military Academy – two. support to local and U.S. Forest o U.S. Naval Academy – one. Service personnel fighting the 2008 o U.S. Coast Guard Academy – one. fire in the Dismal Swamp. Cadet orientation flights – 200. o Air and ground search and Orientation flights for Air Force communication support for a legally ROTC and Junior Air Force ROTC units blind hiker missing in Rockingham in Virginia – 152. County. Participation in aerospace o One other missing person search. education activities – o Two missing or downed aircraft o Several events at the Steven F. searches. Udvar-Hazy Center and other o 91 missions searching for activated aviation museums. emergency locator transmitters in o Support for local community service aircraft, emergency position events. indicating radio beacons in o Support for air shows at Langley Air watercraft and personal locater Force Base, Naval Air Station beacons carried by hikers. Oceana and Danville Regional o Two aerial photo missions. Airport. o Five other missions. Various drug demand reduction o Six counterdrug surveillance missions events for cadets with more than 100 sorties flown. ALUE F OLUNTEER Wing-wide support for Wreaths OURS o Several missions in support of the Across America

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Middle East Region Commander: Col. Joseph R. Vazquez joevazquez@verizon.net

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. David A. Carter dcarter001@msn.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Maj. James L. Quinn jquinnjr@jasquinn.com Wing Mailing Address: 7401 Airfield Drive Richmond, VA 23237-2250 Phone: 804-743-2220 Fax: 804-743-2223 E-mail: admin@vawg.cap.gov Web Site: www.vawg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS $3.4 MILLION

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 422 senior members 215 cadets Squadrons: 12 Aircraft: 6 Cessnas 1 glider Vehicles: 21 State Funding: $284,000* Saves: 2

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Middle East Region Commander: Col. Joseph R. Vazquez joevazquez@verizon.net

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Dennis D. Barron cadet411@earthlink.net Wing Government Relations Advisor: Col. Dennis D. Barron cadet411@earthlink.net Wing Mailing Address: 112 Airport Road Charleston, WV 25311-1056 Phone: 304-343-8866 Fax: 304-343-9487 E-mail: WVWingHQ@aol.com Web Site: www.wvwg.cap.gov
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS $1.2 MILLION

Saving lives is at the heart of Civil Air Patrolʼs mission to provide emergency services. Despite “above and beyond” efforts from West Virginia Wing search crews, the life of Dr. Kwan Kwok, pilot and sole occupant of his new Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, ended when his plane went down in the mountainous terrain of southern West Virginia. Kwokʼs family expressed its deep appreciation to the CAP volunteers who worked on this mission, aware that — without them — the body of their beloved son and brother might never have been located. Assisted from a distance by CAP members Capt. Guy Loughridge of the Rocky Mountain Region, an expert in radar analysis, and Capt. Justin Ogden of the Arizona Wing, a pioneer in cell phone forensics, West Virginia Wing members were able to narrow their search. The pilot was flying from Texas to the D.C. area, but no flight plan had been filed. Five CAP aircrews flew a grid pattern along the suspected flight path, with a sixth plane operating a high bird communications platform. Ground teams and search crews responded from across the wing, including the Charleston Cadet, Beckley and Lewisburg Composite and other squadrons. Following two days in the air, when the ALUE F OURS wreckage was spotted, it still OLUNTEER cadet members six hours to reach the took senior and heavily wooded scene of the crash.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 748 senior members 624 cadets Squadrons: 29 Aircraft: 11 Cessnas 2 gliders Vehicles: 21 Finds: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Pacific Region Commander: Col. Larry F. Myrick lfmyrick@aol.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. David E. Maxwell wawgcc@wawg.cap.gov Wing Government Relations Advisors: Col. Theodore Tax t2fly@aol.com and Capt. Mark Donges CaptDonges@comcast.net Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 4459 Joint Base Lewis-McChord AFB, WA 98438-0459 Phone: 253-982-7774 Fax: 253-982-7779 Web Site: www.wawg.cap.gov

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS $3.1 MILLION

The Washington Wingʼs accomplishments were on public display in 2009 as the wing delivered emergency services and showcased cadet achievements. Winter snows followed by heavy rains resulted in flooding and landslides in the western part of the state (see photo). The wing responded with aircrews, equipped with digital imaging equipment, to assess present and potential damage. Members from five composite squadrons made 21 flights over two days, taking about 800 images, which were passed on to officials who made decisions about evacuations, critical infrastructure and government aid. Aerial reconnaissance flights were coordinated by a “high-bird” plane. Photos and data were continually posted on CAPʼs Web Mission Information Reporting System (WMIRS) to keep those on the ground fully updated. The stateʼs citizens never know when helping hands from CAP volunteers will come in handy, as evidenced by two CAP members rushing to the rescue of a pilot in a homemade airplane, which started to burn after a hard landing at Chehalis-Centralia Airport. Grabbing a fire extinguisher from a nearby CAP aircraft, the two rescuers extinguished the flames, helped extract the pilot and contacted pilots still in the air to warn them to stay clear. This CAP brand of public service and commitment filters down to the cadet program, which helps shape outstanding Washington youth. One, Cadet 2nd Lt. Nicholas Rider of Monroe, has successfully melded his CAP experiences with his family history to pay tribute to veterans with a series of books documenting their stories of service. CAP, he said, is a big reason behind this endeavor, giving him “many wonderful opportunities to further my education and also learn real-world skills such as leadership and moral training, which I was ALUE F OLUNTEER OURS able to apply to this work.”

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 719 senior members 389 cadets Squadrons: 35 Aircraft: 14 Cessnas Vehicles: 22 State Funding: $19,000* Finds: 7 Saves: 1

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Great Lakes Region Commander: Col. Charles L. Carr Jr. ccn15180@wowway.com

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Donald J. Haffner donaldhaffner@yahoo.com Wing Government Relations Advisor: Lt. Col. Jeff Wiswell wisgroup1@aol.com Wing Mailing Address: 2400 Wright Street Madison, WI 53704 Phone: 608-242-3067 Fax: 608-242-3068 Web Site: www.wiwgcap.org
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS $2.4 MILLION

The Wisconsin Wingʼs year was highlighted by two unusual and very different missions for which Civil Air Patrol planes and personnel are uniquely qualified. The fighter jets of the Wisconsin Air National Guard — shown here inside a newly remodeled aircraft hangar at the Guardʼs 115th Fighter Wing in Madison — routinely practice with “low-and-slow” Civil Air Patrol Cessnas to perfect skills to track and force down small aircraft. Wisconsin Wing pilots and crews have served as practice intercept targets for the Guard since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Practice catapulted into reality last April when an intruderʼs small plane invaded U.S. airspace from Canada. While the intrusion turned out to be a misguided suicide attempt by a lovesick flight school student, never deemed a threat, the incident was still viewed as “a wakeup call to would-be intruders that our training to contain them is ongoing and we are ever vigilant,” said Lt. Col. Jeff Wiswell, the Wisconsin Wingʼs public affairs officer. The wing successfully shifted from homeland security to ecological endeavors when its aircraft and crews also proved to be a cost-effective answer to tally the stateʼs white-tailed deer. Partnering with The Wildlife Society, a student organization in the College of Natural Resources at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, CAP planes flew aerial surveillance at 1,000 feet above ground level near dusk, when the deer could be easily spotted. Counting deer from the air is a new approach that appears to yield more accurate data for distinct areas in the state. Information collected helps with management of the deer population.

VALUE OF CAP VOLUNTEER HOURS: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

Wing 2009 Statistics:
Volunteer Members: 165 senior members 60 cadets Squadrons: 10 Aircraft: 5 Cessnas Vehicles: 10 State Funding: $103,726.50* Finds: 3 Saves: 7

CAP’s volunteers are one of America’s most valuable assets, worthy of your full support.
CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter

Contact Information:
National Commander: Maj. Gen. Amy S. Courter courtera@earthlink.net Rocky Mountain Region Commander: Col. Donald G. Cortum mutroc@comcast.net

Wing Contact Information:
Wing Commander: Col. Stanley A. Skrabut wywg.cc@capwyhq.org Wing Government Relations Advisor: Col. William Morton seawolf71@q.com Wing Mailing Address: P.O. Box 9507 Cheyenne, WY 82003-9507 Phone: 307-773-4405 Fax: 307-773-4783 E-mail: wywg.wa@capwyhq.org Web Site: www.capwyhq.org
*Financial data provided by wing commander

VALUE OF WING’S VOLUNTEER HOURS: $499,110

With its squadrons widely dispersed across the state, it was all the more significant for the Wyoming Wing to bring together members at its first Orientation Flight Weekend, giving them the opportunity to socialize and discuss common issues and possible solutions. The highlight of the weekend for many, however, was the opportunity to fly in a glider. Twenty-five cadets from five squadrons and 18 senior members from eight squadrons and wing headquarters participated in the weekend. Lending a hand as well were four Colorado Wing members, who saw that two of their wingʼs gliders were towed safely more than 360 miles for Boulder to Lander so Wyoming Wing cadets could be introduced to powerless flight. Four of the wingʼs powered aircraft were also put to use during the weekend. Following a safety briefing from Wing Commander Col. Stan Skrabut and the orientation pilots, the cadets helped the Colorado crews with glider assembly and then learned glider launch and wing-runner procedures before they could settle into the gliderʼs passenger seat. Although the event confirmed the Wyoming Wingʼs commitment to a strong cadet program — cadets rate the opportunity to fly as one of CAPʼs main attractions — almost as many senior members wereOLUNTEERof them also experiencing their first flight on hand, some ALUE F OURS in a glider.

V

O CAP V

H

: $5,000,000.00

EMERGENCY SERVICES . . .
2009 was another banner year for Civil Air Patrol operations. CAP resources were put to work in support of communities across America, making the nonprofit, all-volunteer organization a true force multiplier for federal, state and local government agencies. CAPʼs citizen volunteers — bound by a strong sense of patriotism and commitment — were credited with saving 72 lives on search and rescue missions. Many of these are thanks to advances in technology in which CAP is the known leader. Through the use of cell phone and radar forensics, many lives were saved by getting search and rescue personnel to survivors quickly. This was accomplished entirely by dedicated volunteers using their talents and education to help others. CAPʼs flying operations increased 6 percent last year, with volunteers logging 112,000 hours in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft. This is directly attributable to an increase of Air Forceassigned missions, accounting for 73 percent of CAPʼs flying operations last year. Much of those increases are due to drug

Whether search and rescue or disaster relief, count on CAP
interdiction operations conducted in support of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and air intercept training and low-level route surveys flown for active-duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units nationwide. CAPʼs disaster relief response also provided critical support to communities nationwide. Personnel flew reconnaissance flights to assist emergency managers in combating forest fires, managing the effects of winter ice storms and dealing with massive flooding. In addition, CAP members across the country came together to complete the narrowband and frequency transition. Over the last 10 years more than $30 million has been spent to upgrade CAPʼs infrastructure and end-user radio equipment in preparation for the narrowband transition that was required to be completed in 2009. These upgrades position CAP to be a leader in interoperable communications resources in support of Americaʼs emergency services and disaster relief requirements.

At left: CAP members are well-versed in the skills necessary to conduct successful search and rescue missions. They know how to read maps, establish search grids, use technical direction finding and communications equipment and administer first aid.

The under-wing of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna frames an approaching National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcon. In regular training exercises across the country, CAP pilots in “low-and-slow” aircraft — just the kind that are apt to fly illegally into U.S. airspace — help fighter pilots learn how to track and intercept intruders.

With 129 glass cockpit Cessna 182 Skylanes now in CAPʼs versatile fleet of 550 aircraft, more CAP aircrews are benefiting from Cessnaʼs state-ofthe-art Garmin G1000 flight equipment. The allglass, jet-like cockpit provides more situational awareness for CAP pilots as well as a collision avoidance system, which helps ensure their safety.

Civil Air Patrol:

Going “above and beyond” to serve America’s communities
Civil Air Patrol’s 59,000 citizen volunteers truly go “above and beyond” the call of duty, giving freely of their time, talents and expertise. While their accomplishments in emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs are exemplary, the cost of these Missions for America is minimal — only about $130 per flying hour as compared with other Air Force assets, which cost $1,700 to $6,800 per flying hour. This adds up to an economic impact in volunteer man-hours of well over $120 million, even though CAP’s budget is a fraction of that.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
CAPʼs Aerospace Education programs and initiatives remain a vital component of the cadet and adult programs, as well as an exciting outreach enrichment program for schools and youth organizations nationwide. The AE program ignites interest in aerospace exploration and careers through a variety of initiatives. Special emphasis is placed on enhancement of STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — to ensure America remains a global leader in these areas of critical importance. Through the efforts of 1,600 CAP Aerospace Education (teacher) Members (AEMs), more than 96,000 students across the country are provided AE experiences. AEMs are supported in the classroom with more than 20 free educational tools that are

...
Aerospace Education Excellence Award Program, which focuses on the dynamics of aerospace. These initiatives are enhanced by teacher professional development programs, including Teacher Orientation Program Flights. Last year, this program provided some 300 educators with firsthand knowledge about aviation and the thrill of flying to share with more than 18,000 students. Partnership initiatives with likeminded aerospace organizations provide value-added opportunities for members and boost CAPʼs aerospace education outreach potential. The Air Force Association annually provides $22,500 in grants to CAP squadrons and teacher members to promote aerospace curricula to more than 10,000 young people.

To pass the torch about the vital role of flight, count on CAP
aligned with national academic standards. CAP adults and cadets, as well as K-college classrooms, use “Aerospace: The Journey of Flight,” a comprehensive 675-page, 27-chapter, full-color text; six “Aerospace Dimensions” modules; the CAP Model Rocketry Program; and the Satellite Tool Kit, which exposes students to realworld applications through software used for land, sea and space analysis. The Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) Program for K-6 students is a cross-curricular, gradelevel-specific program that is being implemented at 62 sites in 23 states across the nation, impacting almost 7,000 students. Also, more than 35,000 K-12 students and CAP adult and cadet members at 672 schools and 435 squadrons participated in the 2009

For its aerospace education program, CAP publishes several books that are used in schools across the country. A series of biographies of important figures in aviation history are geared to younger students, while a recently revamped comprehensive history of aerospace is written for middle and high school students.

Nothing excites students and cadets more than Americaʼs astronaut program. They learn the “right stuff” in programs like CAPʼs Aerospace Connections in Education program, designed for elementary students.

Cadets learn from senior members about aerodynamic principles that they put into play by building rubber-band-powered model airplanes. From there, many progress into building model rockets.

CADET PROGRAMS . . .

To mentor America’s future leaders, count on CAP
An introduction to advanced leadership concepts and aerospace-related careers continues to draw cadets to national summer cadet special activities and wing-level encampments. Depending on the activity chosen, cadets learn hands-on search and rescue techniques, military history and ceremonies, problemsolving, leadership skills, business planning and more and, along the way, are exposed to top national and military leaders. With CAP now partnering with Air Force Junior ROTC, more activities are available to youth in both organizations. CAPʼs cadet programs continue to manage more than $300,000 in college and flight scholarships for its members. And with a newly launched cadet blog, the CAP cadet Web site was visited 198,000 times in 2009, a 120 percent increase from the previous year. For CAP cadets — with thanks to our senior member volunteers who donated their time and talents — 2009 was a very good year.

As a testament to its relevance and appeal, Civil Air Patrolʼs cadet programs added nearly 2,000 young people to its rolls in 2009. Membership currently stands at 23,800 youth ages 12-20. Whether belonging to school- or community-based squadrons, cadets benefit from a complete curriculum that teaches respect, leadership, community service and aerospace education. The opportunity to fly is a major attraction for cadets, and 8,184 took advantage of orientation flights in 2009, whether in powered aircraft or gliders; that represents nearly a 10 percent increase over 2008. Notably, the number of glider sorties has risen by 46 percent over the past two years. Meanwhile, CyberPatriot, a global program of the Air Force Association, skyrocketed in popularity with CAP cadets. Fiftyfive CAP teams participated in 2009, with four of them advancing to the final round of competition, which pits eight teams against one another — and the clock — working at computers to clean up problems in the frontier of cyberspace.

Cadets play an important role in CAPʼs foremost public service project, Wreaths Across America, which places holiday wreaths on the graves of veterans throughout the country and abroad. In 2009, cadets helped place some 161,000 wreaths on individual graves and performed in color guard and honor guard units.

The opportunity to fly is a big draw for CAP cadets and, for some, a stepping stone to becoming pilots. CAP orientation flights take them aloft in small aircraft or gliders, while various military branches sometimes arrange to take them aboard larger planes.

CAPʼs cadets can choose from an outstanding array of activities, whether a state encampment or a national program, such as CAPʼs Civic Leadership Academy, which takes selected cadets to Washington, D.C., where they explore careers in public service and increase their understanding of American heritage and modern-day civics.

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