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Engage Today. Improve Tomorrow.
4245 NORTH FAIRFAX DRIVE , SUITE 600 , ARLINGTON , VA 22203

FOR THREE DECADES, WE HAVE EMPOWERED PEOPLE TO TAKE INFORMED AND COMPASSIONATE ACTION TO IMPROVE THE ENVIRONMENT FOR ALL LIVING THINGS HELPING TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE FOR COUNTLESS GENERATIONS TO COME.

THE JANE GOODALL MISSION:

to increase the power of individuals to take informed and compassionate action to improve the environment for all living things.

2006

JGI ANNUAL REPORT

FOR WILDLIFE RESEARCH , EDUCATION AND CONSERVATION

“We are moving towards a sustainable future. Our Roots & Shoots members and other young people share new values. They understand that acquiring more and more money, more and more stuff, doesn’t give life meaning or create joy. They are tomorrow’s leaders. And they will lead on behalf of all — animals, people, and the environment.” — Jane Goodall

2006

JANE GOODALL INSTITUTE ANNUAL REPORT SAVED THE FOLLOWING RESOURCES BY USING NEW LEAF OPAQUE

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2,801 POUNDS OF SOLID WASTE , AND 5,463 POUNDS OF GREENHOUSE GASES .

© 2007

THE JANE GOODALL INSTITUTE

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A LETTER FROM JANE

JGI PARTNERS

PHOTO CREDITS

Dear JGI Members & Friends,
Although it doesn’t seem possible, this year was busier than last, with almost nonstop travel, which took me to five continents. While my schedule is often exhausting, I am kept going by the prospect of planting seeds of change — and hope — wherever I go. And I am continually inspired by the spirit and determination of so many people who are using their lives to make a better world. Visiting Gombe is always a highlight. During my June visit, as I was walking to Kasekela Point along the beach, I turned a corner and there was Gremlin. My favorite living Gombe chimpanzee. How amazing it was to see her carrying her 1-month-old grandson Godot. He clung to her belly, while her 3-year-old son Gimli moved through the trees and bushes or rode on her back. This trio was part of a remarkable but ultimately sad story, which you can read in the research section inside. Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Here, membership in Roots & Shoots groups has grown steadily over the past five years. One successful project is the humane raising of chickens. The hens provide eggs and meat for much-needed protein and a source of income for families. The project also teaches children about the nature of animals. (There is no history of domestication in their culture.) The Roots & Shoots youth there twice demonstrated the power of the Roots & Shoots message (“knowledge, compassion, action”) when they rescued wild animals they found in the woods instead of killing them as some other children suggested. JGI in Tanzania has really taken off. There are now more than 600 Roots & Shoots groups in the country and, thanks to Executive Director Pancras Ngalason, we have a wonderful new office near my house in Dar es Salaam. I had an unforgettable experience in January 2006, when I was awarded France’s Légion d’honneur and UNESCO’s 60th Anniversary Gold Medal Award — on the same amazing day! I had the opportunity to discuss JGI’s programs both with the Director-General of UNESCO, Mr. Koïchiro Matsuura, and with the then Prime Minister of France, Dominique de Villepin. During a visit in March to our Tchimpounga Sanctuary for orphaned chimpanzees, I saw old Gregoire and his companion LaVielle. Gregoire looks incredibly fit for an old man of 63 — especially given his hard life! And LaVielle is finally enjoying her garden. For two years after we rescued her, she refused to step off concrete. We shall never know what horrors she endured in her earlier captivity. As I sat on the ground beside her, she playfully handed me little pieces of grass, leaves, even earth. And there was one beautiful moment when I held out my hand and she reached out and touched my fingers. Sanctuary Manager Rebecca Atencia, Fernando Turmo, and I discussed our plans to enlarge the reserve and find a suitable place to reintroduce some of the chimpanzees into the wild. My North American tours were hectic as always. In Orlando, Florida, I received an award of $100,000 from the Disney Wildlife Conservation Fund for our conservation work; in Chicago, Illinois, I met with our newest regional Roots & Shoots coordinator; and in Danbury, Connecticut, I attended a truly inspirational R&S College Summit. Then there was a meeting with Google and Google Earth that was absolutely fascinating. For the first time, I was introduced to our Gombe blog, and we had a brainstorming session with Google.org, a foundation that helps environmental and social causes. At the International Primatological Society annual meeting in Uganda, I met many old friends from the primate research community. There were fascinating presentations by researchers from around the world. At the concluding banquet, I inaugurated the first “primate karaoke.” I had ended my talk with a rousing chimpanzee call, in which I was joined by other chimpanzee folk. I then persuaded those studying other primates to come to the mike and imitate the calls of their study animals. It was wonderful. There were pant-hoots, roars, grunts, and songs of orangutans, gorillas, gibbons, howler monkeys, baboons, and others! My year ended with a four-week tour in Asia during which I visited JGI and R&S projects in Japan, South Korea, China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. In South Korea, I spoke at a reception honoring Ban Ki-moon, the new Secretary-General of the United Nations, and had the opportunity to tell him about the ways in which Roots & Shoots is spreading seeds of global peace and about our efforts to support the UN International Peace Day with our Giant Peace Doves. Throughout the year, there were so many other events, meetings, lectures, interviews, and conferences — there simply isn’t space to mention more than a few. When I think back over the year, I’m amazed at how much JGI has grown around the world, how many wonderful initiatives have sprung up. Together, we truly are sowing seeds of hope, moving towards a sustainable future for our children. And none of it would be possible without your support and help. I thank you from the depths of my heart. With my love,

The involvement of key partners and supporters around the world is integral to JGI’s vision and strategy. The four organizations below have been especially important this year as we worked to preserve great apes in Africa through community-centered conservation and other means, and as we helped youth connect globally and take action through Roots & Shoots.

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The Arcus Great Apes Fund supports conservation efforts that promote the survival of the great apes in the wild and sanctuaries that offer safety and freedom from invasive research and other forms of human exploitation. In 2006, the Arcus Foundation awarded JGI a two-year grant of $450,000, which has allowed us to expand our horizons into the world of public policy. Our new Public Policy Department is working to increase US public funding for great ape conservation in Africa, Malaysia, and Indonesia, and to improve legal protection for great apes in the US.

In April 2006, the Disney Wildlife Conservation Fund honored Dr. Goodall with an award of $100,000 to advance the work of JGI. The award is presented to global organizations that promote the study and protection of the world’s wildlife and ecosystems. In addition, Disney’s commitment to youth outreach and environmental stewardship is reflected in its ongoing support of JGI’s Roots & Shoots program. In 2007, Disney will host the Roots & Shoots National Youth Leadership Retreat at Disney World in Orlando, Florida.

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“I’m amazed at how much JGI has grown around the world, how many wonderful initiatives have sprung up. Together, we truly are sowing seeds of hope.”
After leaving Gombe, I attended a ceremony with the US Ambassador to Tanzania, Michael Retzer, to launch the Greater Gombe Ecosystem Program. This program, supported by the US Agency for International Development, expands TACARE’s efforts to create sustainable livelihoods in the region, adding components such as GIS-based land-use planning with villagers. It is critical to the future of the people as well as the chimpanzees of the region. We also officially opened our beautiful JGI Education Centre in Kigoma, which will help teach children about conservation and sustainable living. Before leaving Kigoma, I visited the Lugufu Refugee Camp, home to tens of thousands of refugees from Before leaving Tanzania, I arranged a meeting with new President Jakaya Kikwete. When the day came, however, he was so busy it seemed our meeting wouldn’t happen. But, as luck would have it, the president was flying to Arusha that evening — and so was I! He offered me a lift in the presidential plane, and for over an hour I had the opportunity to talk with him about everything that JGI and Roots & Shoots are doing in Tanzania. He was very interested and told me that he planned to put environmental protection high on his agenda. (As, indeed, he has.)

GOOGLE

Jane Goodall

With the help of Google Earth, JGI launched the Gombe Chimpanzee Blog in January 2006. The blog is unique because it allows anyone to experience the wonder of Gombe through the eyes of the people who live and work there. You can “fly” through Gombe National Park and see houses, paths, oil palm plantations, cassava fields, and other agricultural activity, as well as track the paths of chimpanzees and researchers through the park. This imagery is a powerful tool to help us visualize the spatial relationships between the forest and land use by humans. Through these images, we gain a true appreciation for the threats and challenges we face in saving Gombe.

The US Agency for International Development (USAID) has supported JGI on numerous projects and has been integral to the growth of the Lake Tanganyika Catchment Reforestation and Education (TACARE) program in Kigoma region, Tanzania. In 2006, USAID provided support for community-centered conservation, environmental education, HIV/AIDS testing, and family-planning initiatives. This included a grant for increasing engagement in coastal and marine conservation among primary and madrassa school students, as well as a $1.2-million five-year Cooperative Grant Agreement that will incorporate TACARE into a broader framework of landscape-scale conservation and planning in the Greater Gombe Ecosystem in Western Tanzania.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

JGI CHIMPANZEE WORK
Gombe Stream Research Center The Sad Story of Godot Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center Annotated Map: JGI in Africa 6 8 10 12

JGI CONSERVATION AND COMMUNITIES
TACARE Microcredit Program Gombe Reserve Coffee HIV/AIDS Voluntary Counseling and Testing Environmental Education and Eco-tourism in Uganda Chimpanzee Conservation and Sensitization Program 16 18 20 22 24

JGI EDUCATION AND OUTREACH
Roots & Shoots-Tanzania Environmental Education Program Roots & Shoots Tchimpounga Youth Campaign Roots & Shoots-Nepal Vulture Conservation Project Roots & Shoots: Compassion in Action Jane News 28 30 32 33 34

FINANCIAL REPORT AND DONORS
JGI 2006 Financial Report How Can You Help? JGI’s Donor Family JGI USA 2006 Board of Directors JGI Staff and Worldwide Locations JGI Donor Spotlight 36 40 42 50 51 52

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FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN HELP …

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A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

I wish you could see from my vantage point the incredible growth of the Jane Goodall Institute in 2006. In program reach, staff capacity, and public recognition, we are on the move, working ever more effectively and in new arenas in Africa and the US. Our growing global network of partners and supporters is one sign of our momentum. On October 31, I joined Michael Retzer, the US Ambassador to Tanzania, Professor Mark Mwandosya, Tanzania’s Environment Minister, and Mufti Issa Shaaban bin Simba, Tanzania’s chief Muslim religious leader, at a ceremony to launch a major Roots & Shoots initiative. The USAID-funded program is engaging 26,000 children in coastal conservation and reaching some 440 schools in coastal districts of Tanzania, including 220 madrassas — schools that provide religious education to Muslim children. Minister Mwandosya had recently returned from visiting our TACARE projects in the Kigoma Region of Western Tanzania. In his speech he lauded our work and suggested we expand throughout the country. Mufti bin Simba was also encouraging. “I am very pleased to work with the Jane Goodall Institute,” he said. “The Koran contains many passages that encourage us to take care of our environment, and so I welcome the opportunity to emphasize these messages.” As we sat together on the dais watching the boys and girls from public schools and madrassas singing about saving the oceans, I was struck by how lucky we were to be part of an organization that could bring together so many different cultures, religions, and political leaders in a shared effort to improve our environment.

One goal of our programs in Africa is to help communities, especially those near chimpanzee habitat, support themselves without cutting down trees or hunting wildlife. JGI provides technical support to farmers in villages around Gombe to help them improve their cultivation of crops such as coffee and palm oil. Now we are helping these farmers to export their crops to the US. With our assistance, a cooperative of 2,700 farmers from Kalinzi Village near Gombe sold more than 58,000 pounds of their premium coffee to US roasters, including Green Mountain Coffee Roasters. The farmers received record prices for their beans. In the future, we hope to work with the farmers to create a leafy corridor that will give the Gombe chimpanzees access to critical habitat from which they’ve been cut off by deforestation. It is a perfect example of the ways in which we can use the connections between people, animals, and the environment to benefit all. On page 12, you’ll see a map highlighting these projects and other Roots & Shoots and communitycentered conservation projects in Africa. I hope you’ll be as excited as we are to see the significant growth in our activities and the ways in which we are partnering with individuals and other organizations to achieve Dr. Goodall’s vision of hope. Sincerely,

Bill Johnston President

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JANE GOODALL INSTITUTE

About Us
Founded in 1977, the Jane Goodall Institute continues Dr. Goodall’s pioneering research of chimpanzee behavior — research which transformed scientific perceptions of the relationship between humans and animals. Today, the Institute is a global leader in the effort to protect chimpanzees and their habitats. It also is widely recognized for establishing innovative community-centered conservation and development programs in Africa, and the Roots & Shoots education program, which has groups in more than 95 countries.

Please visit www.janegoodall.org for more information.

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J G I C H I M PA N Z E E WO R K

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JGI Chimpanzee Work
JGI’s work on behalf of chimpanzees reflects the interconnectedness of people, animals, and the environment. It incorporates field research, which not only adds to our knowledge of chimpanzees but informs conservation efforts. It also includes biodiversity education and training, and rehabilitation of chimpanzees orphaned by the commercial bushmeat trade.

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J G I C H I M PA N Z E E WO R K

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT:

Gombe Stream Research Center
Since Jane Goodall began her research 47 years ago, Gombe has become a hub for scientific study.

At the Gombe Stream Research Center in Tanzania, site of Jane Goodall’s groundbreaking and historic research, ongoing field studies inform new theories about chimpanzee biology and behavior, and also provide data vital to effective conservation strategies. JGI’s Gombe researchers continue Dr. Goodall’s long-term study of the chimpanzee communities living in the park. They further our understanding of chimpanzees with data related to diet, range use, intergroup aggression, health, and other areas of inquiry, much of which is vital to efforts to preserve chimpanzee populations in Gombe and throughout Africa. Visiting researchers conduct both basic and applied research, exploring areas such as the relationship between fathers and offspring, female foraging strategies and range use, and intergroup aggression. Last year, the Gombe Stream Research Center experienced a first when it hosted a philosophy student — York University’s Maria Botero, who was investigating the emotional bond between mothers and infants. One critical study at Gombe is that of Dr. Beatrice Hahn of the University of Alabama. Her internationally recognized research is seeking to understand the natural history of HIV by looking at factors causing transmission of the closely related simian immunodeficiency virus (chimpanzee strain – SIVcpz).
EXTENSIVE OUTPUT

ABOVE: GOMBE RESEARCH ENLIGHTENS US ABOUT CHIMPANZEE BEHAVIOR AND INFORMS CONSERVATION STRATEGIES .

OPPOSITE PAGE: GREMLIN AND HER TWINS GOLDEN AND GLITTER, WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG.

attended the conference or were listed as authors. Of the 589 oral and poster presentations, at least 26 were related to Gombe research — almost 5 percent of all presentations. The Gombe presentations covered topics such as cognition, health monitoring, parasitology, genetics, intergroup aggression, demography, social behavior, medicinal plants, and ecology. The scale of work ranged from molecular genetics to satellite imagery, and included work on five primate species — chimpanzees, olive baboons, red-tailed monkeys, blue monkeys, and humans.
GOMBE CHIMPANZEE BLOG

The breadth and significance of Gombe research was made clear in June 2006 at the 21st Congress of the International Primatological Society in Entebbe, Uganda. Dr. Goodall gave the plenary talk and 17 Gombe researchers participated. In addition, more than 20 others who had been visiting researchers at Gombe

It is the behavioral research at Gombe that most captures popular imagination and encourages individual action on behalf of chimpanzees. JGI’s efforts to capitalize on this interest for the benefit of chimpanzees made great strides in 2006 with the inauguration of our Gombe Chimpanzee Blog. JGI was the first to create a Google “geoblog,” or weblog that uses Google Earth’s gorgeous spinning globe as

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JGI IN ACTION

What we are doing: JGI field staff and visiting scientists continue Jane Goodall’s groundbreaking study of Gombe’s wild chimpanzees. Why is it important? These efforts further our understanding of chimpanzee behavior and biology, as well as ape conservation.

OPPOSITE PAGE: GREMLIN AND HER TWINS DEN AND GLITTER, WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG.

its backdrop. The blog received thousands of visits after Google Earth installed very high resolution satellite images of Gombe. This meant any of Google Earth’s 100 million users could zoom down into the lush canopy of trees in Gombe to read the daily updates about the park’s famous chimpanzees and experience resolution fine enough to see landmarks such as the few buildings in the park. Praise for the blog came from many quarters, including Google CEO Eric Schmidt in The Economist, who said, “Take a look at environmental champion Jane Goodall’s blog. She has used Google Earth to give people keener views and insights into the nature of nature.” Most important, the blog and its fascinating entries by researcher Emily Wroblewski give us unprecedented virtual access to life at Gombe, very much in the tradition of Jane herself — who first opened that window for the world in the 1960s with her book, In the Shadow of Man.

POWER OF CONNECTION

Praise for our geoblog came from many quarters. “I can’t imagine a more powerful tool for environmental nonprofits and NGOs than to ‘fly’ your supporters and potential supporters over the area of the world you are working in,” said nonprofit watchers Net Squared, which voted JGI’s blog as one of the best in nonprofit marketing in 2006. Check out www.janegoodall.org/Gombe-Chimp-Blog

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J G I C H I M PA N Z E E WO R K

GOMBE NEWS:

The Sad Story of Godot
Chimpanzee Gremlin’s unusual behavior is another demonstration of how much more there is to learn about chimpanzees.

Since 1960, when Jane Goodall first shared her observations of chimpanzees making and using tools, research at Gombe National Park in Tanzania has often revealed surprising new behaviors. Certainly, reports in the 1970s of cannibalism and organized “warfare” among the Gombe chimpanzees were disturbing and unexpected. Last year, the Gombe researchers surprised us yet again with the news that Gremlin — that wonderfully skilled mother and Jane’s favorite living chimpanzee — confiscated her infant grandson. Gremlin took the newborn Godot from her daughter Gaia within 48 hours of his birth, quickly treating him as her own, nursing, playing with, and nesting with him. Gombe researchers can only speculate about this unprecedented behavior. Gremlin may have sought to protect Godot from females who tried to seize her own ABOVE: newborns in the past, presumably to kill and GREMLIN ASSUMED CARE OF HER INFANT GRANDSON, A BEHAVIOR NEVER BEFORE OBSERVED AT GOMBE. cannibalize them. Perhaps Gremlin thought Gaia an unfit mother. Quite possibly, Gremlin wanted another set of twins. One day at about five months old, She had successfully raised he loosened his grip on his grandmother, Gombe’s famous twins, Golden closed his eyes, and simply did not awake. and Glitter, now nine. When Godot was born, Gremlin was still nursing Gimli. After “adopting” Godot, she suckled Gombe researcher Mike Wilson says that it’s both males, and this time, when traveling, possible Godot was vulnerable to disease because he it was Gimli who rode on her back while missed some or all of Gaia’s colostrum fluid. He also Godot clung underneath. pointed out one bright spot: As a young female, Unfortunately, this chapter in the life of Gaia is almost sure to conceive again. Gombe’s chimpanzees did not end happily for Tragic as the outcome was, the event points to the Godot. He was bright-eyed and alert, but also value of long-term research. The painstaking small and weak. One day at about five months accumulation of long-term data not only provides old, he loosened his grip on his grandmother, invaluable information about chimpanzee biology closed his eyes, and simply did not awake.

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ABOVE: ALTHOUGH GAIA LOST HER YOUNG SON, SHE IS ALMOST CERTAIN TO CONCEIVE AGAIN SOON. FAR LEFT: WHEN GREMLIN KEPT GODOT AS HER OWN, HE EFFECTIVELY BECAME A TWIN, REDUCING HIS CHANCES OF SURVIVAL. LEFT: JANE GOODALL DISCOVERED THAT CHIMPANZEES MAKE AND USE TOOLS , SUCH AS THIS ONE GAIA USED TO CATCH TERMITES .

and behavior, but it is the only way to consistently uncover rare or once-in-a-lifetime behaviors. “Godot’s fate is so sad,” says Dr. Goodall, “but it’s wonderful that, even after 47 years of being observed every day, the Gombe chimpanzees continue to surprise us.”

TANZANIA GOMBE NATIONAL PARK

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J G I C H I M PA N Z E E WO R K

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT:

Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center
In the heart of the illegal bushmeat trade, a traumatized chimpanzee gets a second chance.

Every year in Africa, many chimpanzees are killed for food. When a mother is shot, her infant is likely to be sold in the market or on the roadside, or kept as a pet to attract visitors to a bar. When authorities find these traumatized orphans, they turn them over to sanctuaries, including JGI’s Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center in the Republic of Congo. Situated in the heart of the Congo Basin’s illegal commercial bushmeat trade, Tchimpounga is the largest chimpanzee sanctuary in Africa, with more than 130 chimpanzees. Although each chimpanzee is unique, each sanctuary arrival has a similar story. Each has witnessed the death of his or her mother. Each is traumatized, dehydrated, often wounded,
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sometimes close to death. One recent arrival, Kauka, was no more than six months old when Lisa Pharaoh, JGI-Congo Interim Country Coordinator, received a call that a baby had been confiscated from a poacher and was at the Brazzaville Zoo. (The zoo didn’t have the resources or veterinary expertise to care for a sick infant.) He was suffering from respiratory problems, fever, diarrhea, intestinal parasites, lice, malnourishment, and dehydration. He needed immediate intervention. After Lisa rushed to retrieve him, Sanctuary Manager and veterinarian Rebecca Atencia began the difficult task of restoring Kauka to health. Because he was so sick, he refused to eat or drink. Even when he did take food in his mouth he just spat it out. But the staff was determined to save this little life. Kauka’s recovery meant several sleepless

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days and nights for staff! Thankfully, within three days of receiving antibiotics and other medicine, he began to vocalize, play, and, most important, take a bottle. “He began to act like a baby chimpanzee should,” says Lisa. Because he had been so dehydrated, the Tchimpounga caregivers decided to name him “Kauka,” which means “dry” in the local language, Monokotuba.

Even when he did take food in his mouth he just spat it out. But the staff was determined to save this little life.
Today, Kauka thrives. He much prefers the company of other chimpanzees to human caregivers, as a chimpanzee should. His group includes infants Lufino, Ulenge, Zimbanna, and an 8-year-old, Vichika, who did not fit in well with older chimpanzees but flourishes as a “mother” to the infant group. In the end, these other chimpanzees will be the most important aspect of Kauka’s recovery. Having an established social group is critical to the welfare of any chimpanzee. For the orphans at Tchimpounga, who have lost their entire families, this opportunity to bond with other chimpanzees is perhaps the greatest “gift” their loving and conscientious caretakers can offer.
OPPOSITE PAGE: OUR TCHIMPOUNGA CHIMPANZEE REHABILITATION CENTER IN THE REPUBLIC OF CONGO IS HOME TO MORE THAN 130 ORPHANS , INCLUDING KAUKA . TOP: STAFF MEMBERS NURSE TRAUMATIZED YOUNG CHIMPANZEES BACK TO HEALTH. MIDDLE: AUTHORITIES CONFISCATE ORPHANED CHIMPANZEES FROM THE BLACK MARKET AND THEN OUR STAFF MEMBERS TRANSPORT THE CHIMPANZEES TO SANCTUARY. BOTTOM: SANCTUARY CHIMPANZEES , LIKE KAUKA HAVE A SECOND CHANCE AT A HAPPY LIFE.

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JGI in Africa
JGI addresses conservation problems at their roots, working with local communities in a spirit of innovation and true partnership. Here is a summary of our community-centered conservation, chimpanzee awareness, and Roots & Shoots work throughout Africa in 2006.

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1 G O M B E N AT I O N A L P A R K , TA N Z A N I A

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› At the Gombe Stream Research Center Tanzanian field staff and visiting scientists further the chimpanzee study Dr. Goodall began in 1960.
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› JGI-Uganda staff habituates wild chimpanzees to a human presence in the Budongo Forest Reserve Eco-tourism Project.
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› Our Greater Gombe Ecosystem Program helps create sustainable livelihoods with state-of-the-art conservation tools and a participatory approach. › Kigoma youth learn about chimpanzees, habitats, and conservation at our new JGI Education Center. › TACARE staff helps Kigoma coffee farmers improve incomes and conserve chimp habitat through the Gombe Coffee Promotion Project.
3 D A R E S S A L A A M , TA N Z A N I A

› As part of our Snare Removal Project, former poachers scour the forest floor for illegal snares, which maim — and even kill — wild chimpanzees.
8 K A B A R O L E , K Y E N J O J O , B U N D I B U G YO ,
AND KAMWENGE DISTRICTS, UGANDA

› JGI trains teachers and develops curricula to support quality environmental education in primary schools in districts where chimpanzees are found.
9 T C H I M P O U N G A N AT U R A L R E S E R V E ,
REPUBLIC OF CONGO

› Roots & Shoots youth plant trees, tend nurseries, teach parents about conservation, and much more. They’re 600 groups strong in Tanzania. › Roots & Shoots youth leaders promote greater understanding of HIV/AIDS in a three-month Anti-Stigma Campaign. › Every student at the Yatima orphanage has the all-important chance to attend secondary school, thanks to the Roots & Shoots Yatima Scholarship Program.
4 A R U S H A A N D M A N YA R A R E G I O N S ,
TA N Z A N I A

› Orphaned chimpanzees build important social bonds, take forest walks, eat healthy diets, and receive loving care at JGI’s Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center. › JGI’s protected area management, including training of local eco-guards, has significantly reduced illegal hunting in the Reserve. › JGI collaborates with the Max Planck Institute and Harvard University to conduct noninvasive, behavioral and genetic chimpanzee research at our sanctuary.
10 M A I K O - TAY N A - K A H U Z I - B I E G A
L A N D S C A P E , D E M O C R AT I C R E P U B L I C OF CONGO

› Mobile video units travel to remote villages to teach school children about conservation through a Roots & Shoots partnership with Nature for Kids.
5 C O A S TA L TA N Z A N I A

› In this community-centered conservation effort, JGI promotes sustainable agriculture, family planning, and improved local infrastructure.
11 G U I N E A A N D S I E R R A L E O N E

› Students in public and Islamic schools learn about coastal conservation and take action through our R&S Environmental Education Program.

› JGI raises awareness of the plight of chimpanzees and partners with communities to develop alternatives to slash-and-burn agriculture and poaching.

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JGI Conservation and Communities
JGI’s community-centered conservation activities preserve and restore the environment while supporting sustainable livelihoods and improving health care and local capacity. They range from technical support for a new coffee line that benefits farmers and chimpanzees to HIV/AIDS mobile testing to eco-tourism and environmental education.

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TACARE Microcredit Program
In Western Tanzania, village banks boost income for women.

At one time, Gefruda Damian’s only income came from the tomatoes she sold out of a bucket in the central square of her village, Mukigo, high in the mountains of Tanzania’s Kigoma region, bordering Burundi. In 2000, the Institute’s TACARE (Lake Tanganyika Catchment Reforestation and Education) program came to Mukigo to discuss a savings-and-credit program it had begun in partnership with area villages the previous year. The TACARE staff explained that they would support residents in pooling savings to create a fund from which they would issue loans to support sustainable small businesses and agriculture. Gefruda and other Mukigo residents agreed to pool savings towards a goal of $15 USD each (or about 17,000 Tanzanian shillings), which would be matched by TACARE. The Mukigo village bank was born. With significant support from the US Agency for International Development and JGI-Canada, TACARE encourages microcredit in the region because lack of access to capital is a huge challenge for the rural families here. The creation of small businesses not only improves quality of life, but helps promote sustainability by reducing slash-and-burn farming and overreliance on already depleted natural resources. The program also provides village microcredit groups with training in accounting and administration. With her loan of 50,000TSh, Gefruda bought tomatoes wholesale. Within 12 months, she’d increased her income twofold. With subsequent loans, she expanded her inventory and now has a small shop from which she sells flour, sugar, and clothes. Each of her three children old enough for secondary school is attending, now that she can afford to pay school and uniform fees. She says she is better able to care for her family’s dietary and health needs as well. The Mukigo group started with 35 members but quickly grew to 57, mostly women. Many started businesses in food sales, sustainable timber, or vegetable and coffee farming. TACARE has supported 12 microcredit groups throughout Kigoma, with an average repayment rate of 88 percent. Mukigo’s repayment rate is even higher at 97 percent.

“The drive to improvement through microcredit is contagious, ‘Many are now coming to join the group because they have seen so many people benefit.’”

The experiences of women such as Gefruda demonstrate not only the livelihood advantages of small-scale savings and loan programs, but that women also improve their status

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when they are able to be income earners and village leaders. For example, Gefruda now serves as chairperson of the Mukigo Microcredit Group. She says that the drive to improvement

through microcredit is contagious, “The community members…realize the potential. Many are now coming to join the group because they have seen so many people benefit.”

ABOVE: WITH HELP FROM TACARE’S MICROCREDIT PROGRAM, GEFRUDA DAMIAN CAN SEND HER THREE CHILDREN TO SECONDARY SCHOOL. TODAY SHE SERVES AS CHAIR OF THE MUKIGO MICROCREDIT GROUP.

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Gombe Reserve Coffee
A new line of coffee benefits Tanzanian farmers and Jane’s famous chimpanzees.

In Jane Goodall’s In the Shadow of Man, she describes her daily routine while living and working in Gombe National Park, “My alarm clock was always set for five-thirty in the morning, and after a slice of bread and a cup of coffee I would hurry off after my chimps.” Three of Jane’s loves — coffee, chimpanzees, and Africa — are now tangibly linked in a coffee that tastes good and does good: Green Mountain Coffee Roasters’ “Gombe Reserve — In Cooperation with the Jane Goodall Institute.” Those who purchase this high-quality coffee are supporting cultivation of a sustainable, chimpanzee-friendly crop grown by farmers in the impoverished Kigoma region of western Tanzania. The coffee is shade-grown (meaning trees aren’t cut down). What’s more, because chimpanzees don’t like coffee beans, they don’t raid the fields, thus avoiding humanwildlife conflict — an increasing, life-threatening problem in areas where human and wildlife live in proximity. JGI hopes the partnership with Kigoma coffee growers, as an ongoing part of the TACARE program, will result in a new leafy corridor connecting vital habitats from which the Gombe chimpanzees have been cut off due to deforestation. The corridor will allow the chimpanzees to expand their feeding range and mingle with other chimpanzee groups, which is vital for genetic diversity and disease resistance. Traditionally, coffee from the Kigoma region was sold at auction and blended with coffees from better-known regions. By connecting the 2,700 small-scale farmers in Kigoma’s Kalinzi Cooperative with specialty coffee roasters such as Green Mountain, and introducing new qualitycontrol and production methods, JGI is helping

the farmers significantly boost their income. JGI’s assistance includes sending farmers to training in coffee husbandry, and extension services focused on better harvesting, pulping, and drying practices, and proper storage. All of this gives farmers an incentive to work with JGI in the future to set aside land for the chimpanzees. If key villages reserve 10 to 20 percent of their land, there will be a multivillage forest reserve providing additional habitat to chimpanzees and connecting Gombe National Park to forest reserves in Burundi. “Our effort to involve local citizens in restoring the forests and practicing sustainable agriculture is the most important work we can do to ensure a future for the Gombe chimpanzees and the people of Africa,” says Jane.

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ABOVE: COFFEE IS A LEADING CROP IN KIGOMA REGION NEAR GOMBE NATIONAL PARK. LEFT: ENCOURAGING SHADE-GROWN COFFEE PRODUCTION REDUCES PRESSURE ON THE FORESTS AROUND GOMBE. BOTTOM: JGI AND GREEN MOUNTAIN COFFEE ROASTERS’ GOMBE RESERVE COFFEE HELPS CHIMPANZEES , SMALLSCALE FARMERS IN WESTERN TANZANIA , AND COFFEE LOVERS ALIKE.

ORDER YOUR OWN GOMBE RESERVE COFFEE

greenmountaincoffee.com/gombe

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HIV/AIDS Voluntary Counseling and Testing
In villages around Gombe, JGI and partners bring HIV/AIDS services to the people.

In the impoverished Kigoma region of Western Tanzania, HIV/AIDS infection is of growing concern. Much of the community lacks awareness about how the disease is transmitted, and there is a relatively low reliance on condoms — the only means of prevention besides abstinence. Many fishermen travel the coast of Lake Tanganyika in pursuit of the sardine-like fish known as dagaa; they spend weeks away from home and, as a result, often put themselves and, when they return, their wives at risk. The terrifying stigma associated with the disease in villages prevents people from seeking testing and even treatment once ill. In addition, many can’t spare the resources to travel to town for testing. Explained Emmanuel Mtiti, head of JGI’s Greater Gombe Ecosystem Program (GGE), “What family can take their money and, instead of buying school uniforms, use that for testing?” So Mtiti and his staff decided to bring voluntary counseling and testing to the villages. In partnership with the Kigoma Regional Hospital and with support from the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, testing was provided to individuals close to their homes, along with counseling on critical topics such as disease transmission, prevention, and living with HIV and AIDS. Those tested receive instant results, reducing the anguish of waiting for news. If results are positive, individuals receive immediate confidential counseling and funds to travel to the local hospital for further diagnosis and treatment. Project funding also covers travel and accommodation to receive life-prolonging anti-retroviral drugs. To date, the initiative is supporting drug therapy access for 76 individuals in the Kigoma region, 51 identified through mobile testing.

Given the problem of stigma, Mtiti expected a low turnout during the first testing. Perhaps five or six of the “risk-takers” in each community would be tested. To the staff’s surprise, in many of the 24 villages served by the program, 100 or more people showed up. “The mobile units ran out of testing materials,” he said.

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“Testing was provided to individuals close to their homes, along with counseling on critical topics such as disease transmission, prevention, and living with HIV and AIDS.”

The testers are finding an average 2 percent infection rate, which indicates that they began early enough to focus on prevention with greater efficacy. “Any rate of infection that is greater than zero is too high,” said Mtiti at the end of 2006, “but 2 percent means we can make a real difference.”

ABOVE: JGI AND PARTNERS PROVIDE INDIVIDUALS IN THE KIGOMA REGION WITH VOLUNTARY HIV TESTING CLOSE TO THEIR HOMES , ALONG WITH COUNSELING AND HIV/AIDS EDUCATIONAL SERVICES .

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Environmental Education and Eco-Tourism in Uganda
Two exciting new programs use the forest as a living classroom.

To the cadence of clapping, 12 squealing students skip around hula hoops arranged on the forest floor. It’s musical chairs, with a twist: Each time the clapping stops, there’s one less hula hoop. The kids jostle, accommodating themselves to the disappearing spaces by wedging themselves, tighter and tighter, into the shrinking area. Child’s play, perhaps. But the take-home lesson — about forest destruction and habitat loss — is as clear to a 10-year-old girl who, until now, has never set foot in a forest, as it is eye-opening to a teenage boy who previously viewed trees as little more than firewood and construction material. This is the kind of game that thousands of students play at JGI’s Kalinzu and Budongo Forest Reserve environmental education programs in western Uganda. JGI built Budongo in 2006 with funding from Disney Animal Kingdom and the US Agency for International Development mission in Uganda. They are two of four JGI education centers planned within major forest habitats for chimpanzees. The education centers teach environmental lessons that are meant to complement the core curriculum in Uganda’s schools. Chimpanzees are distributed in 18 districts in Uganda. JGI’s goal is to reach all 6,000 primary schools within those districts over the next five years through new curriculum taught in the classroom and through field trips to the forestbased education centers. “I grew up in Nairobi, a city, and I didn’t go into the forest as a young person,” says Alice Macharia, Program Coordinator for JGI Africa Programs. “These students are similar. They

either don’t go into the forest or they’re going in to cut down trees or kill animals.” The education centers help correct misinformation and taboos surrounding chimpanzees and their habitats by convincing young people of the value of all living things and the need to preserve wildlife, including chimpanzees. Each forest visit — a dozen students at a time — helps to shape a generation of engaged citizens and environmental leaders. Those who understand and embrace environmental issues such as the conservation of great apes will be motivated to take direct action to improve the world around them. “One of the things they talk about is what actions they can take to help the environment,” Macharia says. “Parents report noticing a better environmental ethic in their kids after they come home from having walks in the forest.”

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JGI IN ACTION

What we are doing: Two education centers and eco-tourism projects have been established in major forest habitats for chimpanzees in Uganda. Why is it important? JGI’s successful track record in Uganda in environmental education and eco-tourism has led to expanded funding and new opportunities in both of these vital areas.

E C O -TO U R I S M P R O J E C T

ABOVE: COMMUNITIES ARE AT THE HEART OF JGI’S CONSERVATION EFFORTS . OPPOSITE PAGE: JGI PRESIDENT BILL JOHNSTON AND STUDENTS PLANT A TREE AS THEY CELEBRATE THE VALUE OF ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION.

Another way in which JGI helps to develop a larger conservation ethic is through an eco-tourism project, also in the Budongo Forest Reserve. It involves habituating wild chimpanzees to the presence of humans to ensure an optimal number of sightings when tourists pay to see the chimpanzees. JGI trains community staff members to follow the chimpanzees daily from dawn until dark, not only to habituate the chimpanzees but to get to know them as individuals. This allows them to discuss individual chimpanzees and share stories about them with visitors. Of course the program requires guides to have health checkups and always stay at least 30 feet away from the chimpanzees to reduce any risk of disease transmission. The initiative is modeled after a successful JGI effort in Kibale National Park, an extensive park that hosts a large primate population. Since it began in 1999, this project has seen significant results: The percentage of visitors who saw chimpanzees during their walks increased from 60 to 85 percent.

UGANDA BUDONGO FOREST RESERVE KABAROLE, KYENJOJO, BUNDIBUGYO, AND KAMWENGE DISTRICTS KALINZU FOREST RESERVE

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Chimpanzee Conservation and Sensitization Program
In the competition with humans for food, chimpanzees do not come out on top. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

On a hike through his rice farm in the south of Guinea, near the Sierra Leone border, Mamadou Waré Diallo points to some orange trees he bought as seedlings and planted around his home. “The chimpanzees are always robbing the fruit. If I protect the chimpanzees, will that mean my family won’t have enough to eat? Why should I protect them?” That is a common sentiment. “People don’t want to kill the chimpanzees,” says Jim Tolisano,

region because it is an area of critical biodiversity where fragmentation threatens the corridors chimpanzee groups require to intermingle. The project is funded by the US Agency for International Development. The grizzled Mr. Diallo is a colorful figure in his community, known locally to be somewhere between 60 and . . . 200 years of age. He is apt to launch into standing back-flips during conversations about chimp conservation. He has had plenty of

"It is really worth doing all we can to help the local communities figure out how to co-exist with the chimpanzees…”
JGI’s Eco-development/Conservation Specialist in Guinea and Sierra Leone. “But they have their own issues. They don’t wake up thinking: ‘What can I do to protect chimps today?’” In the competition with humans for food, chimpanzees do not come out on top. But it doesn’t have to be a win-lose game, which is why JGI works in this region to promote chimpanzee conservation and sustainable community development. Because the most viable solutions tend to come from communities, JGI trains individuals such as Mr. Diallo to serve as “para-biologists” who help develop economic alternatives to slash-and-burn agriculture and poaching, the two biggest threats to chimpanzees. The para-biologist training is one of the most significant achievements of JGI’s Chimpanzee Conservation and Sensitization Program (CCSP), a two-year initiative in Guinea and Sierra Leone that seeks to protect chimpanzees and their habitat through education, community-based eco-development, and law enforcement initiatives. JGI works in this border opportunity to learn to imitate the gymnastics of our closest cousins — his property, cut through by a river, harbors a significant population of wild chimpanzees. “We found dozens of nests and signs of chimps when we hiked his property,” recalls Tolisano, who suspects that this area may be one of the most critical strongholds of wild chimpanzee populations in all of Western Africa. “It is really worth doing all we can to help the local communities figure out how to co-exist with the chimpanzees,” he says. For chimpanzee conservation to become widely accepted in these communities, it must become a byproduct of poverty alleviation, Tolisano says. “We need to create opportunities for them to protect the chimpanzees. That’s where the eco-development approach comes in. We want the para-biologists to take on leadership roles in their rural communities.” The first step in para-biologist training is to inventory everything in nature that has value, and determine how abundant it is and where it is declining, and how it’s used and in what amount. With that information, the para-biologists begin, with the help of JGI, to put together eco-development plans.

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TOP AND MIDDLE: CHIMPANZEES LIVE THROUGHOUT THE GUINEA-SIERRA LEONE BORDER REGION. BOTTOM: JGI TRAINS “PARA-BIOLOGISTS” SUCH AS MAMADOU DIALLO.

JGI IN ACTION

Some communities are interested in developing tourism that would incorporate the chimpanzees. Others are looking into marketing specialty crops, medicinal plants, and aromatics that can be sustainably harvested from the forest. “We’re training them in small business development skills,” Tolisano adds. “They’re very excited to learn how to price and market.” “The para-biologist training is key to our efforts to enhance the villagers’ natural resource management capacities,” says Marie-Claude Gauthier, Program Director. “The villagers appreciate and value the training because it improves their understanding of their own environment while respecting the cultural and traditional value they place upon resources.” The training is just one of the ways JGI raises awareness about the plight of chimpanzees and changes attitudes in the GuineaSierra Leone border region. A larger awareness strategy hinges on public education not only about chimpanzee social behavior and chimpanzees’ relationships to humans but also about the law as it relates to the great apes.

What we are doing: In Guinea and Sierra Leone, JGI is training community members to act as “para-biologists” who help develop sustainable livelihoods. Why is it important? A biodiversity hot spot, this severely fragmented habitat is a high priority for primate conservation.

BILLBOARDS, T-SHIRTS, NEWS ARTICLES, RADIO SPOTS, AND POSTERS IN POPULATED LOCATIONS SUCH AS FREETOWN AND KABALA , SIERRA LEONE , SEEK TO COMMUNICATE SEVERAL KEY MESSAGES:

› Chimpanzees are complex, fascinating beings with intrinsic value › Chimpanzees are genetically very similar to humans › Chimpanzees support healthy forest growth through seed dispersal › Chimpanzees are endangered and need protection › It is illegal to kill, capture, trade, or keep chimpanzees as pets

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JGI Education and Outreach
The Roots & Shoots global youth program provides young people with inspiration, support, a variety of tools, and a framework for conceiving and implementing meaningful service projects. As they take action, the young Roots & Shoots members receive far more than they give.

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J G I E D U C AT I O N A N D O U T R E AC H

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT:

Roots & Shoots-Tanzania Environmental Education
In Tanzania, nurturing a generation committed to coastal conservation.

Tanzania is rich in coastal and marine resources, including coral reefs, mangrove forests, and a large variety of fish species. But pollution and commercial activities, such as blast fishing with dynamite and mining coral reefs for lime, threaten its fragile coastal and marine ecosystems. A new Roots & Shoots project supported by the US Agency for International Development aims to create greater awareness of these problems and inspire action on the part of Tanzanian youth. The Environmental Education (EE) Program is the first in Tanzania dedicated to engaging youth in coastal conservation. It is unique in another important aspect as well: It engages both public school students and those who attend madrassas (Islamic schools that offer religious instruction based on the Holy Koran) and is thereby designed to help further cultural understanding. To help nurture a new generation of future leaders committed to environmental education,

The Environmental Education (EE) Program is the first in Tanzania dedicated to engaging youth in coastal conservation.
the Roots & Shoots EE Program relies heavily on hands-on learning and encourages youth to make decisions about how to solve coastal problems. Students study coastal conservation issues in their communities and then, under the guidance of a teacher, take action through service projects of their own design. These projects might range from a beach cleanup to an awareness campaign on overfishing. Over the next two years, the Roots & Shoots Environmental Education Program will reach 12,650 primary school students and 12,650 madrassa students. Some 440 teachers — 220 primary school and 220 madrassa teachers — are being trained in coastal and marine environmental education, and techniques for sharing this information with other teachers and supporting the youth action. Madrassa training focuses on how teachings in the Holy Koran relate to environmental issues. The students are also attending leadership training and regional summits where they can meet and brainstorm with other students. A “Partnership in Understanding” component has

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JGI IN ACTION

What we are doing: Teaching Tanzanian youth in public schools and madrassas (Islamic schools) about coastal conservation and supporting their environmental actions. Why is it important? The program fills a significant need for greater awareness about threats to Tanzania’s coastal and marine ecosystems as it promotes cultural understanding among Muslim and non-Muslim youth.

ABOVE AND LEFT: THE ROOTS & SHOOTS ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION PROGRAM ENGAGES YOUTH IN BOTH PUBLIC AND RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS . OPPOSITE PAGE: MUFTI ISSA SHAABAN BIN SIMBA , TANZANIA’S CHIEF MUSLIM RELIGIOUS LEADER, ATTENDED THE LAUNCH OF THE ROOTS & SHOOTS PROGRAM.

students from madrassas and primary schools corresponding with each other and sharing thoughts, ideas, and success stories through letter writing and the creating and sharing of “culture boxes.” The program supports Tanzania’s National Environment Policy, which regards environmental education for children as a critical piece of its longterm conservation goals.

“Change can happen and is happening; to be able to share my message with my community instills in me a deep sense of hope that I can make a difference in the world.”
— Mitch Paine, R&S youth leader who developed a high school environmental curriculum, which the Lincoln (Neb.) Public School system is using to revise science standards

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Roots & Shoots Tchimpounga Youth Campaign
Give young people ideas, inspiration, and support and they will step up in amazing ways.

Like many 8-year-olds, Brandon Smith loves animals and watches a lot of the Animal Planet channel. The death of “Crocodile Hunter” Steve Irwin from a freak stingray attack in 2006 hit Brandon hard. “He was very sad,” says Brandon’s mom Jennifer. “And he decided he needed to take action to help animals now that Steve Irwin is gone.” Through the Roots & Shoots website, Brandon learned about a youth-designed fundraising campaign to help build a new dormitory for orphaned chimpanzees at JGI’s Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center in Congo, Africa’s largest ape sanctuary.

good. I wanted to help the chimpanzees so that they could have a second chance at life.” This is the kind of touching story Roots & Shoots hears many times over — a young person is empowered to act on a natural passion to help make a better world, and grows in the process. “I have Asperger’s and it makes me smart about animals and able to help them,” says Brandon. “I learned there are wonderful parts about having Asperger’s. Everyone has gifts from God and can use those gifts to help.” Brandon’s success in raising funds for Tchimpounga was repeated around the world. Through bake sales, craft fairs, raffles, and other

“I wanted to raise a hundred million dollars at first, but my mom said to try to get $100. I ended up with $329.46...”
Brandon has Asperger’s Syndrome, a form of autism. Normally, it is difficult for him to plan and organize tasks, but this time, it was no problem at all. He decided to speak to fraternity and sorority students at nearby Eastern Illinois University about the dormitory campaign and the illegal commercial bushmeat trade in Africa, which is endangering chimpanzees and creating so many orphans. The college students were happy to hear him out. “Brandon can struggle with one-on-one communication, and yet he was able to hold his own when it came to answering questions from the students,” says his mother. “I can’t offer an explanation for this, except he realized the importance of his work.” Brandon dressed in a khaki safari outfit and passed around a “Chimp Change” jar. “I wanted to raise a hundred million dollars at first,” Brandon says, “but my mom said to try to get $100. I ended up with $329.46, which is pretty creative fundraisers, Roots & Shoots groups and individual members raised $53,000, $17,000 of which was a matching gift by an anonymous donor. Today, the new dormitory at Tchimpounga is being constructed. Says Roots & Shoots Youth Leadership Fellow Chase Pickering, who spearheaded the Tchimpounga Youth Campaign with other members of the Youth Leadership Council, “Hundreds of young people stepped up to a leadership role and took action to help the orphaned chimpanzees. “Young people already have the desire for change,” says Jeanne McCarty, Vice President of Roots & Shoots. “They believe in the power of individual action; they just need tools and support.” The tools and support Roots & Shoots provides include staff members based at regional offices throughout the country and a website launched in 2006 that seeks to engage youth with each other and with the Roots & Shoots staff. (See photo at right.)

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JGI IN ACTION

What we are doing: Inspiring and supporting youth around the world through fundraising and action campaigns designed by youth. Why is it important? When young people take action and see results, the life lesson is profound.
LEFT: “MY ASPERGER’S MAKES ME SMART ABOUT ANIMALS AND ABLE TO HELP THEM,” SAYS R&S MEMBER BRANDON SMITH.

“I really don’t know why I got involved in the Tchimpounga Youth Campaign. I just was born with a love of animals. I don’t want to wait until I am grown-up to become a conservationist. I want to help now.”
— Brandon Smith, who raised more than $300 for the new chimpanzee dormitory at JGI’s Tchimpounga sanctuary

The second national Roots & Shoots youth campaign is led by R&S groups in Arizona and Nova Scotia. By early 2007 the Reusable Bag Campaign had sold out of its first-edition bags — 1,500 in all — and 1,000 more were on order. A third campaign, “Rebirth the Earth: Trees for Tomorrow,” got underway in early 2007. Its goal is to raise funds for five critically needed tree nurseries in Tanzania while planting thousands of trees in North America and around the world. In the meantime, Brandon is a nominee for the Gloria Barron Prize for Young Heroes. He also was featured by his local television station and on the Animal Planet website for R.O.A.R. - Reach Out, Act and Respond. “In a perfect world,” Brandon says on the site:, “there would be no habitat destruction, and everyone would treat animals the way they would want to be treated.” Visit rootsandshoots.org to keep abreast of the amazing work of our determined Roots & Shoots youth.

THE ROOTS & SHOOTS WEBSITE SEEKS TO INSPIRE THROUGH SHARING STORIES LIKE BRANDON’S. HERE IS A SAMPLING OF REPORTS SUBMITTED TO THE ROOTS & SHOOTS ONLINE PROJECT DATABASE:

› The California State University R&S group hosted an event, “In Our Own Backyard: Threats to Local Wildlife,” to raise money for the Los Angeles Birds of Prey Center. › The Milwaukee German Immersion School R&S group created quilt squares and sewed them into eight quilts that were delivered to an orphanage in Bolivia. › The Christ Renewing Hope Mission R&S group in the Goderich Village of Freetown, Sierra Leone, educated villagers about humane piggery practices. They advised owners on how to protect pigs from disease and treat them humanely. Raising pigs is common in Sierra Leone.

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J G I E D U C AT I O N A N D O U T R E AC H

S U C C E S S S TO RY:

Roots & Shoots-Nepal Vulture Conservation Project
A group of determined young Roots & Shoots members in Kathmandu are working to protect endangered vultures.

If a vegetarian restaurant is where vegetarians eat and a seafood restaurant is where seafood is eaten, then what exactly happens at a “vulture restaurant”? In Kathmandu, the so-called vulture restaurant is a Roots & Shoots effort to provide a safe food

Roots & Shoots Nepal group was charged with studying local problems and developing creative, compassionate solutions. Under the guidance of 20-year-old R&S coordinator Manoj Gautam, they decided to haul clean carcasses to underdeveloped areas where vultures can feed undisturbed. They work with local youth in Nawalparasi — a town not far from Kathmandu — to gather the carcasses of cows and other animals that are free of diclofenac. They are also working to see laws passed banning the use of the harmful drug and to raise awareness of the problem in local communities. Specific messages include urging people to bury tainted carcasses instead of dumping them where vultures

“In recent years the populations of white-rumped and slender-billed vultures have rapidly declined across the Indian subcontinent.”
supply to the critically endangered scavengers. In recent years the populations of white-rumped and slender-billed vultures have rapidly declined across the Indian subcontinent. One major cause is the veterinary drug diclofenac, which veterinarians use as a painkiller in buffalo and other working animals, but which causes kidney failure in vultures that eat the tainted carcasses. As members of the Jane Goodall Institute’s global youth program Roots & Shoots, the
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can find them and urging vets to find a less toxic replacement for diclofenac. “We are determined to continue with this project until the use of diclofenac is completely stopped and the safety of vultures is ensured,” says Gautam.

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J G I E D U C AT I O N A N D O U T R E AC H

S U C C E S S S TO RY:

Roots & Shoots: Compassion in Action
US students give and receive during Tanzania visit.

“With Roots & Shoots, learning is amazing! Because the kids accomplish projects they lead and/or design themselves, they really learn, not just test well. I’ve seen this program work with even the most unmotivated students. It’s a way for them to connect learning with real global issues.”
— Leah Crocker, teacher, Central Intermediate School, Wadsworth, Ohio

LEFT: ROOTS & SHOOTS HELPS ITS YOUNG MEMBERS MAKE GLOBAL CONNECTIONS .

Thousands of pencils, personally delivered, summed up the bountiful energy and spirit of a group of Roots & Shoots youth who wanted to ensure rural Tanzanian students could get the most out of a new conservation education program. When youth leaders of JGI’s global Roots & Shoots program discovered that students in Tanzania didn’t have pencils to fill out booklets connected to the new program, they took quick action, holding pencil drives all over the US. They collected a mountain of pencils — 21,000 in all. The pencils made quite a sight when they were stored in the small R&S regional office in California. The students brought the pencils to Africa as part of a life-changing cultural exchange in Tanzania. The group of nine US students met fellow Roots & Shoots members, participated in tree-planting and other service projects, and, most important, brainstormed with their Tanzanian counterparts about how to strengthen and enhance communication among Roots &

Shoots groups internationally. “We want to connect youth globally so they inspire each other, learn from each other, and are a part of something bigger,” explains Jeanne McCarty, Vice President of Roots & Shoots. The youth leaders also reinforced a new partnership between Roots & Shoots and Nature for Kids, an educational nonprofit begun in Africa in 2002. The partnership involves a four-year mobile video and discussion project designed to teach rural children about wildlife, the natural world, and particularly conservation. Three times a year the project sends educators with a mobile video unit to 76 of the most disadvantaged schools and rural communities in the Arusha and Manyara regions. The project will eventually reach nearly 18,000 students aged seven to thirteen, who now have the pencils they need to complete program lessons designed to help them assimilate what they’ve learned.

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J G I E D U C AT I O N A N D O U T R E AC H

JANE NEWS:

New Biography and “Jane Goodall’s heroes”

Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Redefined Man

Jane Goodall’s Heroes

After editing two of Dr. Goodall’s volumes of letters, science writer Dale Peterson released Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Redefined Man, the first complete authorized biography. It provides a detailed account of Jane’s childhood adventures — including her early fascination with nature and animals — discoveries at Gombe, and her tireless efforts today as an environmentalist and humanitarian. Mr. Peterson’s biography of Dr. Goodall takes readers on a journey alongside the woman who revolutionized primate studies and also provides the most revealing look at Jane’s life to date. A portrayal of courage, inner strength, and, most of all, hope, it complements Dr. Goodall’s own tireless and determined efforts to deliver her message: Every individual has a purpose and makes a difference. Lynn Hamilton of America’s Book Review said of the book, “The lessons of Goodall’s life will cheer spiritual thinkers, rally animal rights activists, affirm wilderness conservationists, and walk alongside young women incubating their own hopes and dreams.”

Five remarkable individuals whose work inspired Dr. Goodall were featured in a moving special from Animal Planet, Jane Goodall’s Heroes. Ordinary people who have dedicated themselves to making a positive impact in the lives of animals, they share a passion for conservation and an intense dedication to their work. They come from diverse backgrounds. Washo Shadowhawk is a 15-year-old whose home in Oregon is a sanctuary where he works with local vets to rehabilitate injured wildlife. Samuel Hung of Hong Kong has devoted his life to studying and helping the endangered Chinese white dolphin. George Archibal is the co-founder of the International Crane Foundation and thus can often be found in an ultralight plane. Tom Mangelsen is a renowned wildlife photographer and JGI Advisory Board member who recently founded the Cougar Fund. Juan Carlos Antezana runs Bolivia’s Inti Wara Yassi sanctuary, originally for street children but expanded to rehabilitate Amazonian wildlife such as pumas, jaguars, and monkeys. “These five individuals show that, regardless of age or what type or size of the project we take on, we can each make a difference for all living things,” says Dr. Goodall.

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“I have had so many parents thank me for starting our Roots & Shoots group and involving their children in working to help others.”
— Dianne Swanson, teacher, Los Cerritos Elementary School, Long Beach, California
ABOVE: EVERY YEAR, IN LATE SEPTEMBER, ROOTS & SHOOTS MEMBERS AROUND THE WORLD GATHER TO CELEBRATE ROOTS & SHOOTS DAY OF PEACE, IN SUPPORT OF THE UNITED NATIONS INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEACE. ROOTS & SHOOTS DAY OF PEACE 2006 WAS A GREAT SUCCESS , WITH 200 GIANT AND SMALL PEACE DOVES FLYING IN AT LEAST 50 CITIES WORLDWIDE.

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JGI 2006 FINANCIAL REPORT

JGI-USA

Financial Report — 2006
In 2006, JGI continued to grow rapidly, with total unrestricted revenue reaching $15.9 million, the highest in the Institute’s history. Driven by bequest income, growth in private and government grants, and record individual contributions, JGI recorded total revenue of $17.7 million, including restricted grants.

In 2006, JGI continued to grow rapidly, with total unrestricted revenue reaching $15.9 million, the highest in the Institute’s history. Driven by bequest income, growth in private and government grants, and record individual contributions, JGI recorded total revenue of $17.7 million, including restricted grants. Investment income, including interest and dividends, totaled $628,000 in 2006. Total expenses reached nearly $10 million, leaving an unrestricted surplus of $6.2 million. This surplus allowed the Institute to build its cash and invested reserves to $12.5 million at year end, a $5.6 million increase from the previous year. Grants from government agencies and private foundations increased substantially. Grant commitments for the year totaled over $3 million, including $2 million in government grants and $991,000 in private foundation grants. Since many of these are multi-year grants, the Institute’s restricted net assets grew by nearly $2 million, from $723,000 in 2005 to $2.5 million in December 2006. The Institute’s balance sheet continued to grow stronger. In addition to the $12.5 million in cash and investments, grants-receivable increased from $756,000 in 2005 to $1.9 million in 2006. Total liabilities decreased from $1.6 million in 2005 to $586,000 in 2006. Together, these changes led to total net assets equaling $15.3 million, up from $7.3 million in the previous year. Roots & Shoots began its strategic expansion in the United States with two generous multiyear grants. The Allene & Jerome Lapides

Foundation awarded JGI a three-year grant to establish a Roots & Shoots program in the “Four Corners” region of United States. A Roots & Shoots office in Sante Fe, New Mexico will oversee the expansion of the program in New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado and Utah. Separately, the Regenstein Foundation funded a three-year grant. Based in Chicago, the Foundation enabled the Institute to establish an office in Illinois, which has the primary task of expanding Roots & Shoots in Chicago and the Great Lakes region. Thanks to a multi-year grant from US Agency for International Development (USAID), Roots & Shoots in Tanzania expanded into six regions along the country’s east coast. There Roots & Shoots is overseeing an Environmental Education Program reaching both public school and Islamic madrassa students. USAID also continues to support our Greater Gombe Ecosystem Program, which helps create sustainable livelihoods with state-of-the-art conservation tools and a participatory approach. A USAID grant is also funding ecotourism and environmental education in Uganda. Funding through Germany’s Max Planck Institute supports JGI’s collaboration with Harvard University to conduct non-invasive, behavioral and genetic chimpanzee research at our Tchimpounga sanctuary. The Institute established a new public policy program enabled by a grant from the Arcus Foundation. The program is strengthening the Institute’s impact on issues affecting the welfare of great apes, including conservation in the wild and treatment in captivity. Our administrative and fundraising costs declined in 2006. Together they account for

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RIGHT: DR. GOODALL TRAVELS THE WORLD 300 DAYS PER YEAR MEETING WITH SCHOOL GROUPS AND OTHERS TO PROMOTE ROOTS & SHOOTS AND JGI’S AFRICA PROGRAMS BELOW: ROOTS & SHOOTS HELPS YOUNG PEOPLE BECOME GOOD ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDS .

20 percent of our total expense base. Fundraising expenses as a percentage of revenue dropped to slightly above 8 percent, despite the continuing need to add administrative and fundraising functions to increase revenues and meet the reporting requirements of donors and government agencies. The revenue growth of 2006 and continued expansion of multi-year funding signals a new level of fiscal strength, and a higher level of impact for JGI in the years to come. We anticipate continued growth and stronger long-term partnerships with key funders of our programs in coming years. Following are the combined financial statements of JGI-USA, including JGI-Tanzania, JGI-Republic of Congo, JGI-Uganda, and JGI-Illinois — the primary organizations managed by JGI-USA.

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JGI 2006 FINANCIAL REPORT

2006 Sources of Unrestricted Operating Funds
82% Contributions 12% Grants 2% Lecture Tour and Honorariums 2% Interest and Dividends 2% Other Income
TOTAL

13,051,877 1,921,933 289,121 367,159 240,217 $15,870,308

2006 Uses of Unrestricted Funds
7.3% Wildlife Research 23.6% Education 8.7% Communication 40.2% Animal Welfare and Conservation
TOTAL PROGRAMS

730,797 2,353,613 865,395 4,014,578 $ 7,964,383 1,437,329 575,006 $ 9,976,718 5,893,590 288,295 6,391,024 $12,572,909

14.4% Fundraising 5.8% Management and General
TOTAL

Change in net assets Other items Unrestricted net assets, beginning of year NET ASSETS, END OF YEAR

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Combined Statement of
TOTAL REVENUE TOTAL EXPENSES

ACTIVITIES AND CHANGES IN NET ASSETS FOR THE YEAR ENDED AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2006

UNRESTRICTED

TEMPORARILY RESTRICTED

PERMANENTLY RESTRICTED

TOTAL

Change in net assets from operating activities before other items
GAINS ON INVESTMENTS

15,870,308 9,976,718 5,893,590

1,792,834 0 1,792,834 — 1,792,834 722,971 2,515,805

0 0 0 — 0 217,728 217,728

17,663,142 9,976,718 7,686,424 288,295 7,974,719 7,331,723 15,306,442

288,295 Change in net assets 6,181,885 Net assets, beginning of year 6,391,024 Net assets, end of year 12,572,909

Combined Schedule of Financial Position
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2006

ASSETS

Cash and cash equivalents Investments Accounts receivable Grants and bequests receivable Advance to field Prepaid expenses and other assets Merchandise inventory Furniture and equipment, net accumulated depreciation
TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES

948,289 11,557,391 506,634 1,885,546 78,851 95,960 187,730 632,508 $15,892,909 33,045 541,755 — — 11,667 $586,467

Refundable advance Accounts payable and accrued expenses Capital lease obligation Line of credit Notes payable
TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS

Unrestricted: Undesignated Board designated
TOTAL UNRESTRICTED

Temporarily restricted Permanently restricted
TOTAL NET ASSETS TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

7,107,681 5,465,228 $12,572,909 2,515,805 217,728 $15,306,442 $15,892,909

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JOIN JANE !

How can you help?
Your financial support has been integral in allowing us to accomplish many goals in 2006. As we move forward with our ambitious 2007 plan, your continued dedication to our programs is critical. We can’t do it without you!
Together, we are working to save the chimpanzees who are struggling to survive in the remote forests of equatorial Africa. We are working hand-in-hand with rural communities in Africa to find alternative livelihoods that help preserve their natural resources and improve their standard of living. We are fighting to end the tragic and unsustainable commercial bushmeat trade as we care for its victims, orphaned chimpanzees, at our sanctuary in Congo. We are empowering youth around the globe with knowledge, compassion, and confidence to enact solutions to the problems they see in their communities and beyond. And, of course, we continue the vital primate research that Dr. Goodall started so many years ago at Gombe. Each and every day we are making a positive difference. Our goal: To achieve balance and harmony among animals, people, and the critical ecosystems upon which we all depend. There are many ways to invest in the work of the Jane Goodall Institute.
BECOME A MEMBER

With a gift of $35 or more, you join a group of people — 50,000 strong and growing — who care deeply about the natural world and are committed to doing their part.
JOIN JANE’S PEAK SOCIETY

Please Join Us
WITH AN INVESTMENT IN THE JANE GOODALL INSTITUTE , YOU JOIN A GROWING CADRE OF CARING AND COMPASSIONATE INDIVIDUALS PROMOTING RESPONSIBLE STEWARDSHIP OF OUR PLANET.

This unique giving option starts with an investment of $1,000 or more and includes extraordinary opportunities to participate in: • JGI safaris to East Africa • Dr. Goodall’s lectures and events • Annual JPS reception and dinner In addition, you’ll receive JGI’s newsletters, annual report, and personal communications from Jane and JGI President Bill Johnston, allowing you deeper insight into Jane’s own journey and the Institute’s initiatives. All of these events and communications are our way of keeping you up-to-date on JGI

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program activities, connecting you with other committed individuals, and involving you in the important work you help make possible. Please visit https://contribute.janegoodall.org to learn more.
PLEDGE AS A SUSTAINER

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Please visit www.janegoodall.org/you to learn more about the many ways you can support the work of the Jane Goodall Institute. If you would like to learn more about Jane’s Peak Society, please email jps@janegoodall.org For more information about Jane Goodall’s Circle of Hope, please contact Jessica Lindenfelser, Director, Gift Planning, at 703-682-9292 or jlindenfelser@janegoodall.org To learn more about other giving opportunities, please email give@janegoodall.org For phone inquiries, please call 1-800-592-JANE (5263).

By committing to a monthly gift of $10 or more, you become a vital JGI team member. This gift option helps JGI staff plan ahead and use your donations in the most strategic way possible. Please visit https://contribute.janegoodall.org to learn more.
ASK YOUR EMPLOYER TO MATCH YOUR GIFT

Many employers offer to match their employees’ charitable donations, multiplying the impact of employee gifts. Contact your human resources office for more information.
INCLUDE JGI IN YOUR WILL OR ESTATE PLAN AND JOIN JANE GOODALL’S CIRCLE OF HOPE

Thank you for caring about and investing in our work. You are making a difference!

One of the simplest ways to make a significant and lasting gift to JGI is through a bequest in your will or trust. Whether your gift is a specific amount, a percentage, or the residue of your estate after all other provisions are made for your family and friends, your bequest will provide a vital source of revenue to further JGI’s work in Africa and around the world. JGI would also benefit greatly by being made a beneficiary of your life insurance, retirement account, or Charitable Remainder Trust. In 2007, we are establishing a Charitable Gift Annuity Program, a wonderful way for JGI’s friends and supporters to make a generous future gift to the Institute while enjoying the security of investment income payments for life.

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JGI ’ S DONOR FAMILY

JANE’S PEAK SOCIETY IS A LEADERSHIP GROUP OF THE JANE GOODALL INSTITUTE’S STRONGEST STEWARDS. MEMBERS PLAY A CRITICAL ROLE IN SUSTAINING JGI’S QUALITY OF PROGRAMMING IN CHIMPANZEE CARE AND PROTECTION, COMMUNITY-CENTERED CONSERVATION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL AND HUMANITARIAN EDUCATION.

Jane’s Fellowship $100,000+
Alcoa Foundation The Arcus Foundation Addison Fischer Discovery Communications, Inc. Disney Wildlife Conservation Fund Estate of George Cornell Estate of Juliana Kickert JGI-Canada Allene & Jerome Lapides Foundation, Inc. Maine Community Foundation David J. Miller Susan Regenstein Frank, Regenstein Foundation Schultz Family Foundation USAID

David Greybeard’s Fifi’s Flo’s Fellowship Fellowship Fellowship $50,000 - $99,999 $25,000 - $49,999 $10,000 - $24,999
Anonymous The Glaser Progress Foundation JGI-France Alissa & Henry Klein Cynthia & George Mitchell Foundation Park Foundation John E. Peckham (posthumously) Lekha Singh Miranda E. Stern Revocable Trust Taronga Foundation Connie & Craig Weatherup Anonymous (2) Abbott Family Foundation Valerie Anton The Wanda Bobowski Fund Keely & Pierce Brosnan The Howard G. Buffett Foundation Harriet Bullitt ConocoPhillips Sharon & Chris Davis Estate of Magery Turner Harvard University Nina Lesavoy Macricostas Family Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Bruce Richards Susan & Kirk Sakmar Sheri & Howard Schultz The Justin Timberlake Foundation Tina & Byron Trott Elizabeth Van Vleck David Williams Anonymous (3) Jeanne M. Anderson Sue AnschutzRodgers The Apple Lane Foundation Patrice & Kevin Auld The Barkley Fund Candice Bergen & Marshall Rose Elisabeth Brehmer Build-A-Bear Workshop Doris Gabbe Cadoux & Harold Schwartz Christine & Bill Campbell Chrysalis Foundation Debra Allison & Stephen Cohn Peter Danzig Anita Donofrio Barbara & Joseph H. Ellis Estate of Judith Homstad Estate of Vivion LeBow Bobbie & Lew Frankfort Giant Steps Foundation Amy & John Griffin Maureen Hackett and Roman Oliynyk Eva & Yoel Haller Michelle Hanes & Dan Duffus Lowry Hill Melody Hobson Stacy & Peter Hochfelder Houston Zoo, Inc. Jonathan Jaffrey Jingle & William Johnston Angelina Jolie Sheila & Bryant Keil Diane & Donald Kendall, Jr. Constance Lane & David Cameron Bokara Legendre Stacey & Dan Levitan Leo S. Guthman Fund Betty White Ludden Beth & George Macricostas Edward H. Meyer Jerry Murdock Mary Onstead Connie & Rusty Pace Pamela Pantzer Milbry Polk RagingWire Telecommunications, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. William P. Rayner Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Riggio Corrie & Jonathan Sandelman Judy & Stephen Schwartz Emily & Tom Scott Lyn & David Silfen Connie Steensma & Richard Prins Susan Stroman Lucy Waletzky Wallis Foundation Billy E. Weisman Anna WianckoChasman Mollie Williford Mike Wood Zimmer Family Foundation

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A MESSAGE

Gremlin’s Fellowship $5,000 - $9,999
Anonymous Caitlin Alegre Patricia & Richard Austin-Puccio Caroline Barrett Sarah & Richard Barton Edward Bass Frederick Bear Lisa & Zohar Ben-Dov Jill & Darius Bikoff Elizabeth Holland & Gene Brandt John W. Carson Foundation Cher Malinda & Yvon Chouinard Circuit City Commonwealth Zoological Corporation Creative Artists Agency Pogo Davis & George Kutzschbach Lesley & Matt Day Sherry deBoer Patty DeDominic & Gene Sinser The Banky Larocque Foundation Genevieve Di San Faustino Nick & Anita Donofrio Estate of B. Irigarry Billy Etkin Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Franklin Philanthropic Foundation Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation Google Patricia S. Gordon Cathy & Warren Gorrell Great Ape Trust of Iowa Alan C. Greenberg Mr. & Mrs. Theodore Hartley Hohn Hennessy The Humane Society of the United States JGI-Brussels Kaylin Koch & Kimala Lynn Chevron Phillips Chemical Company Public Welfare Foundation Stacey & Jonathan Levine Thomas D. Mangelsen, Inc. Jill & Tom Marino Martha’s Vineyard Camp-Meeting Association Jennifer & Jow McManamey Microsoft Mr. & Mrs. Sergio Millerman Jerry Montgomery Kiersten Nieuwejaar Patagonia, Inc. Lynn Picard Marylin L. Prince Jeri & Greg Rice Jean R. Romoser Charitable Trust Steve Roth Lowell M. Schulman Rosalind & Mark Schurgin Sean Scully Barbara & David Shear Mr. & Mrs. George Skouras Janice and Richard Skow, Wildlife Concern International Donna & Barry Slotnick William F. Sweetnam Marta Weeks Peter Wege Danielle Wilson Susan and David Young

From Our Supporters

The Roots & Shoots program reaches young people worldwide, helping them discover connections among all living things. And by doing so, they also discover their own amazing power to make a difference. To help our fellow creatures. To change the world. What better cause to support than the Jane Goodall Institute? Through its work, we join hands — with each other and with our chimpanzee cousins — to brighten the future for us all.”
— T.A. Barron, children’s book author and JPS Member, Merlin Foundation

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JGI ’ S DONOR FAMILY

Golden & Glitter’s Fellowship $1,000 - $4,999
A MESSAGE

From Our Supporters

“I introduced my son, John Eric Peckham, to animals when he was very young. I taught him that all members of the animal kingdom are sentient beings and that they should be treated as such. John had the utmost respect for animals of all kinds. When he was tragically killed in September 2006, I knew that I wanted to honor his memory in a meaningful way, and that my first check would be written to the Jane Goodall Institute. I have always adored Jane Goodall. She understands the interconnectedness of all creatures that share the earth; her focus is very broad and encompassing. If it were not for people like Dr. Goodall and organizations like the Jane Goodall Institute, the world would be a much poorer place.”
— Mary Ann Parker, Jane’s Peak Society Member

Anonymous (8) Andrew Abrams Melissa Adde Viraj Alankar Penelope Alexitch David B. Allegoren Julie Allison Aloha Fund AMD American Bar Association Jeanne & Thomas P. Archibald Holly Ardinger Sarah Armentrout Art Branch of the Ojai Art Center Dillu Ashby John J. Atherton Veronica Atkins Avrum Katz Foundation Sharon Bailey & Jay Gede Lyndall & John Bailye Ellen Balaguer and Mark Chase Marjorie Balazs Jonathan Balcombe Bank of America The Baobab Fund Carol & Larry Barbour Phyllis Barlow Gale Bartle Charles Bascom Liz Bauer Patricia Beck Rebecca Bell Thomas Bell Laurie & Bill Benenson Judy Benvenuti Katherine M. I. Berger Robert Bergstein Jeanne Berwind Tammara Bettinger & Joe Beilitzki Friedereke & Jeremy Biggs Seana Blake Anne Bowman

Sandra & Richard Boyatzis Wendy & Titus Brenninkmeijer Kim Brizzolara Lois & Julian Brodsky Ellen G. Brodsky Lewis D. Brounell Charitable Trust Keith & Susan Brown Amanda Burden Elisabeth Cain Isabel L. Campbell Martha Campbell & Malcolm Potts Carolina Day School Helga Felsch Caruthers Georgia Carver Mr. & Mrs. Victor Cavdek Kimberly Christensen & David Sielaff Jo Clessler Cleveland Metroparks Zoo Cherida Collins Smith Community Foundation of Santa Cruz County Virginia & William Cowie Alison Darroch Jennifer DeGolia Terry D. Diamond Suzanne & Steve Diamond Katharine Dickson Joanne Diefenbach Maureen Dieter Peg & Peter DiGiammarino Christine & Gerald DiPego Nickie Ducommun Julia & Patrick Dunster Susan & Charles Durham Lucie Easley Patricia & Joseph Elliott

Patsy Ellsworth Eugene Elten Gene Elter L ErlenmeyerKimling Estate of Helen Sheridan Pamela Farkas Janice Farrell Catherine Faver Gail & Prentiss E. Feagles Robert Foster The Foundation for Comparative and Conservation Biology Lara Frank Heimann E. Beebe Frazer Cindy Frey Deborah Frieden Deborah K. Fulbright Tori & Jim Gagne Nona Gandelman Sam Gandy & Michelle Ehrlich Garden Homes Fund Gloria Garrett Carol Gates Yvette Gerrans Bob & Eileen Gilman Family Foundation Nancy Glassman Adelaide Gomer Lynn & Gary Goodman Ann Goodman The Goodnow Fund Kelly Graham & John Barman Alison Graham & Richard Messina Gloria Gray Karen Gupta Bette Ann & Charles Gwathmey Michael Hacker Mrs. John Haddow Julie A. Hall Allison Fund Hallmark Corporate

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Foundation William Hamm III Robert Hardison George Harmon Georgia & Jerry Harris Barb & John Hartz Haskell Fund Shirleyann Haveson Hawksglen Foundation Francis S. Hayward Deborah Hebblewhite Jeanette & Grant Heidrich The Hershey Foundation Anne G. Hess John Higgins Michelle Hobby Hogan & Hartson, LLP Denise Hogan & James Roach Cynthia Hoi Pamela Hokanson Holland Hall Middle School Gloria & George Holloway Ruth S. Holmberg Donna & Daniel Hone Amanda Hopkins Image Technology, Inc. Jean-Pierre Jacot Melinda & Stanely R. Jaffe Joseph Jester Virginia Johnson Faith Johnson Suzanne Jones and Robert Elia Jerry G. Jones Michele Jones Cathy Kangas Mariellen Keefe Rosalind & Michael Keiser Suzanne Keith Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Kennedy Eleanore Kennedy

Jan Kerr Eckbo The Kinkaid School Kite Family Foundation Knox Family Foundation Julia R. KnoxHudson The Kodiak Foundation Marjorie & Ralph Koldinger Karen Kress Leonard Kurz Laurie Kydon Ann & Jerry Lafferty Mary Lafler John Lamb Alicia Lancashire Nancy & John Landon Jennifer Leeds Cathi Lerch Kimberly Levesque Linda Levine Judith & Melvyn Levy Kara Liederman Richard Lightman Kai & Doron Linz Meilani Loker Ricki & Mitchell Lubart Lucasfilm Foundation Peter Luck Carol Lushear Luster Family Foundation, Inc. Corbin Lyday Susan & Peter MacGill Peter Magoun Amy & Timothy Maher Wendie Malick Bonnie Martin Martin Pierce Hardware, Inc. Philip Mathias Kathleen May Patricia Mc Coy Jeanne McCarty & Jason Hewitt

Nancy April & Douglas McGilvray Gwen Meitchik Merlin Foundation Virginia Metcalf & Mary Yeakel Mr. & Mrs. William Michaelcheck Miller-Worley Foundation Minotaur Amusements Dorothy Moller Elizabeth L. Morgan Marjorie Morris Rosemary Moukad Thomas Muchisky Constance Murray Lois Musoke New Society Fund Norling Family Fund Barbara Nussa Erik Oberholtzer Alisa O’Leary Ben Olewine Elizabeth Orr Curt Overway Lavonne Painter Ulla & Kevin Parker Michelle Parrish Cathie & David Partridge Anna L. Patterson Patricia Patterson Sherin Peace Norman Pearl Pamela Pearson Dee Ann Pederson Jamel & Thomas Perkins Tom Perkins Rodd Perry Linda & John Petersen Betty Peyton Judy & Tom Phares Lucie & Dan Phillips Edward & Lesley Phillips Family Foundation Margo PhippsAlden Chase Pickering

Philip D. Porter General Colin Powell Jerilyn Prescott Barbara Pyle Quail Roost Foundation R&S Tanzania Volunteer Program Roots & Shoots Furuvik-Zoo, Sweden Jennifer Randall Susan W. Reichelt The Renman Group Nicole Ricci Linda & William Richter Richard G. Robb Ralph F. Robertson Marius Robinson Sondra Robinson Lori Robinson Ray Rodney Sheila Roebuck & John Catts Barbara & David Roplh Daniel Romanow & Andrew Zelermyer Claire Rosenzweig Ava & James Rouse Dorothy Rowan Lillian & Paul Sakmar Mary Ann & Allen Sanborn Nimish Sanghrajka Steven Sarnoff Edward Satell Deb Sawyer & Wayne Martinson Michael Scharff Schooner Foundation Patricia Schreter Sandra Seidenfeld John A. Sellon Charitable Trust Arthur Serio Mary Shamrock Muriel E. Shaw Gilbert Shelton Elizabeth Simon Diane Meyer Simon

Ann & Paul Simonds Shelley Skinner Barbara Smith & Daniel Sullivan Anne K. Smith Holmes Catherine Smolich Marion Soloway Elissa Sommer Jill St. John & Robert Wagner Nancy Stegens Robert Stilin Strategic Partnership, L.L.C. Mr. & Mrs. Melville Straus Elie & Frank Sullivan Weona Sutton Suzan R. Mackler Fund Margaretta Taylor Richard K. Taylor Marvin Tenberg Les Thiele Cheri Thompson Donna & Fred Thompson Peter Thum Marguerite Totka Karen & Harry Trueheart Phyllis Turner Karen A. Vagts Heather & Paul Van Munching Annette Varady Donna Wainwright Carolyn & Charles Walker Arline Warwick Amy Wechsler Peter Wege Linda & Alex Weiss W. Pete Welch Western Connecticut University WestWind Foundation Whalesback Foundation Valerie White

Tavor White SAVY Jennifer Wilkins Edmund S. Wilkinson, Jr. Catherine Williams Kathryn Williams Ann & Chris Willms Wings WorldQuest, Inc. JW & Ethel I Woodruff Foundation The James H. Woods Foundation Peggy & Edgar Woolard Laurie Young Shirley & Dan Zemsky Suzanne & Hans Zimmer Susan Zimny & Sheldon Sussman

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JGI ’ S DONOR FAMILY

JGI Members $500 - $999
Anonymous Shabnam Alibhai Page Allen & Nathaniel Owings Susan Allison American Association of Zookeepers Russellene & B. Ross Angel Deborah Ashford Aspegren Charitable Foundation Paul Atlas Jean & Ray Auel Chris Babu Helen Baker Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Barsema Gale Bartie Bonnie Bartnick Jennifer Bartram Ted Bayer Jim Bayne Barbara Beyer Linda Bickham Big Screen Music, Inc. Janny Biltoft Richard Bird Elspeth Bobbs Laurie Boccia Virginia Bound Robin Boyer Kristen Breck Terry Brennan Lance W. Bridges Patricia A. Brown Otto Budig Odette CadartRicard Camp Lenny Foundation, Inc. Elizabeth Campbell George Carneal Christine Cattell & Bruce Hendrick Nancy Chamberlin Judy Chen Sally Chisholm Ooi Chin Choo Amanda Christie Rhoda Christopher Lawrence Coffman Earl Coggin Ann & Don Connell Kathryn Conway Patricia Cooper Joshua-Michael Corrente Karen Corrick Jamie Coulson Rose Crofutt Celine J. & James M. Crowson Anne Curtis Denise Cuthbertson Cynthia Davidson Jill Dean Louise Devine Liz Doria Agnes & Jack Dover Diana Drever Mr. & Mrs. Woodson Duncan Sondra Eddings Donna Edwards Judy & Rob Egenolf Jennifer Ehlers Alan Eidsness Betty & Sam Emmanuel Estate of Geraldine Jones Karl G. Estes Foundation Facill Corporation Evan R. Farber Charlotte Farquhar Frederick Farrand Mrs. Joann Fechner Mary & James Fico Howard I Flack Jennifer Fleck Kakert Floatron, Inc. Sarah Ford Pride Forney Diane Fox Lorien French Michael Froy Jean Fujisaki & Robert Nelson Maria Galison & Saxton Freymann Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell Geffen Jo Ghrist Emily Gibson Nancy Gilbert Gardner F. Gillespie Valerie Gillies Sara Graybill Janice & Barrett Green Samuel Greenberg Gail Griffith Jane & James Griswold Katharine Gross Mr. & Mrs. Allen Grubman Margrit Hall Amanda Hamilton Mr. & Mrs. Michael Hammer Nora Hanke David Harder Mr. & Mrs. George Harmon Harraseeket Inn Judith C. Harris Joseph M. Hassett Elinor Head Susan Heineman Mr. & Mrs. Jon Henricks Margaret N. Hensler & David Joseph Hensler Claudette Christian & Donald Hertzmark Amy & John Higgins Bill Hilbrandt Dorothy Hines Mr. & Mrs. Howard Hoffen Gerhart Hoffmeister James Holcomb Melanie Holmes Julie Grohovsky & Craig Hoover Michelle Horan Katie Horan W. M. House Shirley Hudson Jennifer Hughes IBM International Foundation Susan & Stephen J. Immelt Robert Ing Elizabeth Irwin Steven Jacobson Barbara Jaynes Geraldine & William Jones Michele Jones Nancy & Albin Jubitz Judy Judd June & Howard Kambach Rita J. & Stanley H. Kaplan Family Foundation, Inc. Jean S. & Robert H. Kapp Judy Kent Joan Kerr Henry Klein Amanda & Donald Koepke Harold Kramer Cynthia G.& Daniel R. Kronemyer Deborah & Raymond Kurz Jill Kusba Gary Jay Kushner Lisa Kyle Morgan Lance Cindy Landon Joan E. Lane Mr. & Mrs. Richard LeFrak David Lickerman Walter G. Lohr, Jr. Estate of Muriel Lotsman Gina Mallory Jane Mann The Margolis Foundation Dortha Marquis Toni Marshall & Suzanne Wood Alison Martyn & James T. Banks Mary Anne Mason George Mayo Doris McClure & Jim Roberts Janet McDavid Susan McGreevy Sonnet & D. Ian McKinnon Elizabeth B. & Dale R. Meers Martin Michaelson Catherine Michaud Mary & Dale Missimer Christine Moore Jan Wilson Morris Marjorie Morris Kimberly Murphy Peter Negri Network for Good Andrea Newman Sheila Nicklas Deborah Niehaus The Norfolk Academy Athena Novak Tamara Oberholtzer Claire Obrien & Tim Brosnan Leslie Otis Sharon PageMedrich Nieba Paige Steven Park Jocile Parsons Terri Hansen Payne Robert B. Pender Amy & Gary Perlin Mary Elizabeth Peters Keith Petersen Steve Phillips Amy Maureen Poole John Edward Porter Lisa Potts Shelley Powsner Patrick M. Raher Betsy & Jack Randall Marion & Marshall Rawson The Raynie Foundation Dianne Rhodes Judith Ricci Leonard C. Roberts Lemise & Donald Rory Carolyn Rosenberg Vivian & James J. Rosenhauer Linda & Jay Sandrich Wendy Schayes Chris Schoeneman Sony Schotland Ann Schroeder Gene Schroeder Joan & David Schulman Schwab Fund For Charitable Giving George Liston Seay Anna Selver-Kassell Francie & Robert P. Sheehan Brady Gloria Shilling James E. Showen Marjorie F. & Howard S. Silver Julie Simons Patricia Simpson Edwin Sisson Soundhound Incorporated Anne Stern Cindy TaylorLisenby Conrad Thalmayer Ann Thayer Catherine B. Thoburn

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JGI Members $250 - $499
Byron Thompson Christopher Thompson Imenda Tiongson Robert Traut Frederick Treyz Helen R. Trilling Robin Turk United Way Southeastern Pennsylvania Ann Morgan & Raymond E. Vickery Jr. Betsy Von Furstenberg Katherine Wade Robin S. & Robert J. Waldman Arlene & Matthew Wasserman Peter Weiss Ginne & Jeffrey Westfall Mark Whalen Valarie & David Whiting Catrina Whitley Whole Foods Market Florence Wigley L. Cathy Wining Rachel Winnik Lily Yen Gisela ZelenkaDrysdale & Douglas Drysdale Michael Douglas & Catherine ZetaJones Dawn Zuber & Gil Pomeranz Anonymous Fatima Abdulhussein John Abeles Action for Nature, Inc. Karen Adam Camilla Adler Mary Aegerter Ahimsa II Fund Elizabeth Aldrich Beverly Alexandre Harvey Alpert Jeremy Al-Quatami Gwen Appleyard Satoru Araki Gary Armstrong Janet Asimov Rick Asselta Mr. & Mrs. Russel E. Atha, Jr. Blythe Austin Janet Axelrod Betty Azar Jason Bailey Carla Ball Barbara Ballinger Emma Barnsley Robert C. Baron Debbie & Louis Beacham Margaret Beals Margie BeckerLewin Joseph C. Bell Mandell Berman Jeanne Bernard Joy L. Biedermann Joan Blatt Jim Blechman Ronald Blond Mark Bowcock Lowell Boyers Joel Boylan Terri Brittingham Thomas Brown Priscilla Browning Shane Bryant Sara Brydges Lydia Burd MikeBurik Elliot Burk Louis Buron Megan Bushnell Catherine Cahill & William Bernhard Amy & Thomas Callister Bonnie Campbell Mr. & Mrs. Carlucci Susan Casey Erica Chang Gloria Cheung Anne Childs Betty Churchill Mr. & Mrs. Charles Cicero Clara Cist Beth Climo Barbara Close Candice Clough Stephanie Coakley Kelly Collier Flora Collins Frances Cook Carolyn Cooley Linda Cooper Kate Coursey Susan & Alexander Coxe Patsy Cravens Adele Crawford Creekside Roots & Shoots Matthew Crema John Crocker Linda Cunningham Beverly Dann Nimish Desai Lisa Desantis Amy Dickinson Mary Dillon Joan Dobbs Cynthia Dostal Kay Drey Carol Dudzik Charlene & J. Orin Edson Christine Ellersick Susan Erb Evangelical Good Samaritan Center Melvyn J. Falis Julie Falis Olivia Feeney Rachel Fettig Michelle Filby
A MESSAGE

From Our Supporters

“My partner, Linda Korn, always felt a deep connection to animals and often said that Africa was her heart’s true home. Linda grew up reading Jane’s books and supported the Institute even before I first met her in 1984. Linda and I believed in JGI’s unique, holistic approach to conservation, with its focus not only on the chimpanzees but also on the people and the environment. This approach reflects the interconnection of all living things. When Linda passed away unexpectedly in 2004, I wanted to honor her life by supporting what she cared about the most — Africa and chimpanzee conservation.”
— Pat Beck, Jane’s Peak Society Member

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JGI ’ S DONOR FAMILY

A MESSAGE

From Our Supporters
“I first became aware of Roots & Shoots at a gathering with Dr. Goodall at the Santa Fe Animal Shelter. I knew immediately that this was a program that my foundation should become involved with. Now there is a Four Corners States Regional Office established in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and children throughout the Southwest will be able to carry on Dr. Goodall’s vision of Roots & Shoots — breaking through brick walls to help solve the problems we have created.”
— Allene Lapides, JPS Member, Allene and Jerome Lapides Foundation

Barbara Fitzgerald Bill Fitzhugh Barbara Foss Eileen Foster Jane Foster Kimberly Frangella Andrea Frankel Allen Carole Fritz Claudia Gall Matt Garfunkle Lisa Gillis Michael Girardi Mr. & Mrs. Todd A. Goergen Charles Goldsmith, Jr. Katie Goodpasture Roberta Gould Janet Grane Benjamin S. Gray Mary Jo Greenberg Agnes Gregson Shana & Hugh Griffiths Marcie Guidry Angela & Bill Halamandaris Mrs. Jean Hall Emily Halpern Tammy Halstead Melinda & Kirby Hamilton Elizabeth Hamilton Jennifer Hand Sharon HandaFlipse Eva Hanks Daniel C. Hanni Brian Hanson Kimberly K. Harbin Helene Harding Christopher Harman Lynn & Robert Hawkey Bradley Hawkins Maddie Hayes Evelin Hegyesi Noreen & William Hetzneker

Harry Hilp Mr. & Mrs. Martin Hochsteinaltschul Jordan Hofer Dr. & Mrs. Gary Hoffman Grace Holden Jill Horner-Jencks Margatet Hough Molly Houston Dr. & Mrs. Richard Hovda Vanessa Hull Patsy Humphrey Jeffrey M. Hurlburt Injoy Videos Julie Irwin Genichi Itani Alexander Izmailoff Isabel Jessen Jewish Communal Fund Lynn Johanna Todd A. Kahan Wendy Kalil Kerul Kassel Mrs. Gayle K. Keefer Sara Kelly John Kern Lisa Kessel Richard Kessler Betty Killa Kori Kinard Lo Cheuk King Donna King George Kinkle, III Ridlon J. Kiphart Jonathan Kligler Cynthia Klinksiek Laura Koch Charlotte Kramer Lauren Lake Florence Lambert L. R. G. Lawrence Jonathon Lazear Sarah Leahy Ernest S. Levine Myra Levine Harris Hans Liepmann

The Lifshutz Foundation James Lillibridge Peter Limburg Rita Linder Victor Lindner Lion Country Safari, Inc. Loma Vista 4H Club Joan Lonergan Kelly Long Armando Lopez Jessica Lopez Teresa Luchsinger & Bill Unger Mia Macdonald Althea May Martell Mr. & Mrs. John McFadden Mark McGarigal Irene McGinnis Bruce Mckinney Susan Merideth Jennifer & George Miers Jeanne Milbrath Mike Mills Betsy Mitchell Constance K. Mohrman Mrs. Rebecca Moise Susan Moldow Wendelin Montciel Jan Montgomery Rise Moody Deborah Moran Elizabeth Morgan Vicki Morgan Virginia Mudd Lynn & George Mulholland Salvatore Murdocca Marci Mylan Ronald Nason Yousuf Nejati James Nelson Thea Nelson New York University Faculty of Arts and Science Susan Nicholas Leslie Nixon

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OUR WARMEST THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT

In Kind Donations
Melinda & Jonathan North Susan Noyes Caroline Nunan Joann NurdjajaAcuna Sally Obre Ernest Osborne Nathan Ottosen Deborah S. OwenWilhelm Michael Parish James Parks Robin Patton & Alice Cahn Michelle A. Peacock Mrs. Ann Pemble Nancy & John Penson Marianne Perlak Geoffrey Peters Cynthia Pett-Dante Raymond Picciano Nuri Pierce Flora Piterak Michael Poder Bonnie Porta & Robert C.S. Monks Anne Powell Prairie Mountain School Patricia Price Mary Pritchard Quadra Foundation, Inc. Anne Radice Allison Rahs Elodie Joy Ramjheetun Susan Ravenscroft Dale Reddy Patricia Rennicke Robert Rhue Jim Ritchie Helene Roberts Angeli Robinson Diane & David Rochester Martha & Bradley Rock Lauren Rollheiser Maria Romo Jean Ross Janice B. Rubel Bruce Rubin Joan Rusthon Tedd Saunders Judith Schultz Julie Scott Laura Shillam Silicon Valley Community Foundation Jennifer Simons Lucinda Smith Daniel Snyder Neil Sood Mary Souza Elaine & Vincent Spoto Merrin & Charlie Stein Margot Steinberg James Stolz Brenda & Daniel Stone Pam Straley Catharine Strauss A. Stringer Mary Stuart Patrick Sullivan Laura Sutherland Dianne Swanson Jane Swotes Talking Evolution Productions Neelam Talreja Robert Taylor Donna Taylor Sanath Thearam Leanne Thomassen Sally Thorpe Gina Tito Tom McCall Upper Elementary Jessica Tovrov Mary Trachsel The Trombly Elementary Fifth Grade Science Class United Way King County United Way New York City United Way Silicon Valley Dona Upson Alan Van Norman Gloria Van Santen Sarita Van Vleck Joanna Vestey Ella Viola Linda Wade Judith Wagner Brandee Wagner Wald Foundation Marjory Walters Jean Warren Christopher Weaver Carol & Charles Weaver Charles Weber William Weeks Noelle Weidman Paul White Doug Whiteman Judy Wicks Jeanne Wiebenga Elizabeth Williams Michael C. Williams Nancy Willis Jan Wilson Morris Jeremy Wintersteen Margaret Wittenberg Mr. & Mrs. Irving Wladawsky Sylvia & Lawrence Wong Mary Woodward Jim Wright Diane Yeager Katherine A. Yutzey Susan & Barry Zirko Nora Zurcher Adina Juice Michael Aisner Honorary Mayor of Griffith Park Louis Alvarado Amarula Cream Liqueur American Tents Animal Planet Annie’s Home Grown Val & John Armstrong Rick & Nelly Asselta Barbara’s Bakery Lynn Bartsch BCD Marc Bekoff Bentley Motors Katherine Berger Julie Bitnoff Mary Bowen Henry Breed The British Council Buca Di Beppo Judy Burroughs Dr. James Caillouette Kristina CasperDenman Catholic University’s School of Library & Information Science CCA Safaris Chuck Chaapel Charter Communications Children’s Museum of Maine Chimpanzee Sanctuary & Wildlife Conservation Trust Michael Cinque Jason Cleanthes John Conaghan Annie Cook Cornelia Day Resort Creative Education Foundation Jane de Forest Jim DePompei Jeannie Dewan Digital Globe Discovery Communications Inc. Disney Volunt-ears Jolene Dodson Joseph Drabinski Banafsheh Ehtemam Eos Airlines Kate Espisito ESRI Ethos Water Kat Favoccia Monica Ferreira Heather Burch & Addison Fischer FM Allen Luggage & Clothing Four Seasons Hotels Nicole French Michael Fritzen Janet Glazier Global Explorers Patti Glover Google, Inc. GoSMILE Jonathan Granoff Greater Los Angeles Zoo Association Green Mountain Coffee Roasters Greg Schaler Photography Amy & John Griffin Chelsea Gross Patricia Hammond Barbara Hargenrater Jeri Hawkins Jennifer Hernandez Julia Butterfly Hill Home Depot Joy Hotchkiss Gail Hudson Humane Society International Images of Nature Charlene Janice Joan Joffa Dr. Laura Johnson Maureen Marshall & Paul Kase Deborah Keaton & Associates Dave Keliher Dr. Jim King Laura King Angela Kirwin James Knowles LA City LA Dodgers LAUSD Nina Lesavoy Liberty Science Center Alana Libow Mark Maglio Bill Mandel Sheri Mandel Thomas D. Mangelsen Becky Mathis Eric Matthews Bill McCarthy Melbourne Zoo Dina Merrill & Ted Hartley Mary Paris and Bill Woolam

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JGI - USA 2006 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

JGI-USA 2006 BOARD OF DIRECTORS DR. JANE GOODALL , DBE

U.N. Messenger of Peace Founder
GENEVIEVE DI SAN FAUSTINO

Founding President
THE JANE GOODALL INSTITUTE USA DAVID SHEAR

4245 North Fairfax Drive Suite 600 Arlington, VA 22203 Tel 800.592.JANE www.janegoodall.org JGIinformation@janegoodall.org

Chairman and Executive Committee Chair DAVID J. MILLER Vice-Chairman
POGO DAVIS

Treasurer
KATHERINE M .I. BERGER

Secretary
WILLIAM JOHNSTON

President, JGI-USA

SUE ANSCHUTZ-RODGERS HELEN CLAIRE PATTY DEDOMINIC LUCIA DE GARCIA LISA GANSKY DR. WILLIAM HALAMANDARIS EVA HALLER DR. DONALD JACOBS DONALD KENDALL GEORGE MACRICOSTAS MARY LYNN OLIVER DR. LUCIE PHILLIPS DR. JAMES ROACH SUSAN SAKMAR HAROLD SCHWARTZ JANICE SKOW CONNIE STEENSMA LEKHA SINGH BILLY WEISMAN

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JGI SENIOR STAFF

JGI WORLDWIDE LOCATIONS

President Executive Vice President and CFO KEITH BROWN , Executive Vice President, Africa Programs NONA GANDELMAN, Vice President, Communications LINDSAY HANCE KOSNIK , Vice President, Development VIRGINIA LANDAU, PHD, Vice President, ChimpanZoo MARY LEWIS, Vice President Outreach/ Assistant to Dr. Jane Goodall, DBE JEANNE MCCARTY, Vice President Roots & Shoots GEORGE STRUNDEN, Vice President Africa Programs ALEXANDRA THORNTON, Vice President Public Policy
WILLIAM JOHNSTON, ROBERT MENZI,

JGI AUSTRIA

www.janegoodall.at
JGI BELGIUM

www.janegoodall.be
JGI CANADA

www.janegoodall.ca
JGI CHINA-BEIJING

www.jgichina.org
JGI CHINA-CHENGDU

www.jgichina.org
JGI CHINA-SHANGHAI

www.jgi-shanghai.org
JGI CONGO

jgicongo@yahoo.com
JGI FRANCE

www.janegoodall.fr
JGI GERMANY

www.janegoodall.de
JGI HONG KONG

www.janegoodall.org.hk
JGI HUNGARY

janegoodall.dunamuzeum.org.hu
2006 ADVISORY BOARD
CANDICE BERGEN KEELY SHAYE BROSNAN PIERCE BROSNAN JOAN BROWN CAMPBELL YVON CHOUINARD WHOOPI GOLDBERG JONATHAN GRANOFF ANGELINA JOLIE RICHARD LEAKEY THOMAS MANGELSEN STEVEN ROCKEFELLER JOHN SIMPSON JEFF WALD E .O. WILSON PAUL WINTER RICHARD WRANGHAM MOHAMMED YUNUS JGI UGANDA JGI SWITZERLAND JGI JAPAN JGI ITALY

www.janegoodall-italia.org www.jgi-japan.org
JGI NETHERLANDS

www.janegoodall.nl
JGI SOUTH AFRICA

www.janegoodall.org.co.za www.janegoodall.ch
JGI TAIWAN

www.goodall.org.tw
JGI TANZANIA

jgi-tanzania@africaonline.co.tz info@jgiuganda.org
JGI UK

www.janegoodall.org.uk

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JGI DONOR SPOTLIGHT

JOHNATHAN AND STACY LEVINE, SHERI AND HOWARD SCHULTZ, BRUCE AND AVIS RICHARDS

the schultz family
After meeting Dr. Goodall at a fundraising dinner in Seattle, Sheri Schultz was inspired by Jane’s vision of a better world for people, animals, and the environment. She jumped in with both feet, joined JGI’s leadership giving circle, Jane’s Peak Society, and signed up to go on the inaugural JPS trip to Kenya and Tanzania. The journey was life-changing. In Tanzania, Sheri met the children at Yatima, an orphanage in Dar es Salaam, participating in the Roots & Shoots program. She was bowled over by the poverty, and conversely, by the exuberant, hopeful smiles. She looked into many pairs of beautiful eyes that day and saw awe-inspiring potential. So she acted. Together with the Bobo Foundation, the Schultz Family Foundation is funding the Yatima Roots & Shoots Scholarship Pilot Program. To date, this program has allowed 25 children at the orphanage to attend secondary school, while covering medical expenses, career counseling, and more. The program also involves the children in local Roots & Shoots groups where they work on service learning projects that benefit the orphanage and community. The Roots & Shoots scholarships are giving the Yatima students a chance at a better life. Sheri’s travels in Africa were so profound that she knew she had to get her family (Howard, husband and founder of Starbucks, and their kids, Jordan and Addy) there as soon as possible, this time with a stop in Uganda to meet the chimpanzees at the Ngamba Island Sanctuary. For Jordan, the highlight of that trip came when the family met and fed the chimpanzees. “Robbie,” a bit of a brute, arrived in splendid alpha style. Jordan called out to him repeatedly, and in response, Robbie picked up a large rock and chucked it at Jordan — who caught it! He (Jordan) was totally blown away! The Schultz family is doing all they can to help JGI save the endangered chimpanzee. Last fall, Sheri and Howard hosted a fundraiser in East Hampton that netted over $620,000 for JGI’s programs. Sheri’s welcoming remarks that beautiful August night were so heartfelt. She explained that supporting the Institute’s mission is about more than writing checks. It’s also about helping people see the best in themselves, and recognizing that each of us can make a difference in our communities and our world. It’s that shared ideal that has made JGI’s partnership with the Schultz family so rewarding. We are so grateful for everything they are making possible.

JGI DONOR EVENTS

2006 reason for hope gala

CO-HOSTS MARSHALL ROSE AND CANDICE BERGEN WITH JB BOARD CHAIR DAVID SHEAR

JANE WITH SARAH MCLACHLAN

JILL BIKOFF, SUSAN SAKMAR, DARIUS BIKOFF

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