Konstantin Sakaev

The Petroff:
an Expert Repertoire
for Black

Chess Stars

If White is an experienced player with a good grasp of theory. You can see this illustrated in the Complete Games section. named after its inventor and also know as the Russian Game. In general. thus slightly simplifying the position and quickly defining the future pawn-structure. in my view. proposing to the opponent the immediate exchange of a pair of pawns.. Some variations which have amassed considerable tournament practice. Still. but which. because in contemporary chess it is tremendously difficult to win with Black unless White makes a serious mistake. and a hard nut to crack. has for many years been the main opening weapon of Vladimir Kramnik and Boris Gelfand and has also been played regularly by Vishy Anand and Alexey Shirov. there is a great advantage to consider: you will not obtain bad positions from the opening.PREFACE The Petroff Defence is an exceptionally reliable and almost indestructible opening. then he should be able to share the point without too much problem. Anatoly Karpov and Artur Yusupov have been using it as a part of their opening armoury throughout their chess careers. On the other hand. quiet contest you can easily win the game if the opponent takes too many risks.. the same can also be said about almost every other opening. are 7 . I have endeavoured to present and explain to you all the finer points of this opening.. as I understand them. The Petroff Defence is characterised by the fact that on his second move Black does not protect his e5-pawn. It is no accident that the Petroff Defence. but instead counter attacks with 2. such as Wesley So and Anish Giri. such as we are recommending in this book? I think I can see only one drawback. the critical positions have been treated thoroughly and I have also suggested and analyzed a great many new ideas in this book. Nowadays there are also several very young and talented grandmasters who play it. The Petroff Defence is particularly suitable for players with a positional style. even for the strongest and most meticulously prepared grandmasters theoretically. The list could go on and on. since in a calm.. What are the pluses and minuses of an opening repertoire based on the Petroff Defence.Nf6. and he is in the mood to draw.

and I wish you wonderful tournament results with this opening! Konstantin Sakaev. Otherwise. Saint Petersburg 2011 8 . have been covered only briefly. they offer no original analysis and often quote outdated games. Unfortunately. some of which are very weakly played and almost useless. too many authors write chess books in that way. the reader. I hope that you. the book would have become too big. losing its essential purpose. will enjoy studying this book.less principled.

. . .Bd3 d5 5.Bd3 . . . .Qh5 Qf6 . . . 81 4. . . . . Scotch Four Knights. . . . . . . .Nc3 Nc6 4. . . . . . . . . .dxe5 d5 . . . . . . . . . . All White Replies w/o 3.Nxe5 1. . . All White Replies w/o 2. . . . .Nf3 Nf6 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bc4 Nf6 . . . . .Bd3 d5 5. .Nc3 Nxc3 . . . . . . . . .d4 Nxe4 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 4. . . . . .e4 e5 2. . . . . . . 3. . . . . . 52 6 Belgrade Gambit. . . . . . . . . .Bd3 d5 5. . . . .d4 1. . . 3. . . . . . . 105 4. . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . 101 4. Petroff Defence 3. . . .Bb5 Nd4 . 58 8 Four Knights Game. . . 116 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Vienna Game. . . . . . . 2. . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . .g3 .Nc3 Nf6 . . . .Nc3 Bb4 . . . . . . . . . 56 7 Glek Variation. .Nxe5 Nd7 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nxe5 d6 16 17 18 4. .Nxe5 Nd7 6. . . . . .dxe5 Be7 . . . . . .Nxd7 Bxd7 7. . . . . . .Nxe5 Nd7 6. . . . . . . . . . 3.Qe2. . . . . . . . . .0-0 Nxe5 . . .Nxd7 Bxd7 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nf3 Nf6 3. . 96 4.Nxe5 Nd7 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nf3 Nf6 5 Three Knights Game. . . . . . . . .Nf3 Nxe4 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Petroff Defence 3.f4 exf4 . . . . 2. . 92 4. . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Bd6 8. . .c4 c6 . . . . . . . . . .d4 and 3. . . 62 Part 3.Nc4 Nxe4 . .0-0 Bd6 8. . . 7 Part 1.Nf3 1 2 3 4 Seldom Played Moves . . . . . . . . .c4.e4 e5 2. . . . . . . . . . .Nc3 Nc6 4. .e4 e5 2. . . . . . . .Contents Preface . . . . . . 26 Bishop’s Opening. . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Part 2. . . . . . . . . . . . .Nc3 Nc6 4. . . . 5. . . . . . . . .Nc3 . . . . . . . .Nxe5 Nd7 6. . .0-0 Bd6 8. .Bd3 d5 5. 74 4. . . . . 120 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .d4 ed . 18 King’s Gambit. . . . . . . . . . .Nxf7 Kxf7 . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Part 4. . . . . . . . .Bd3 d5 5. 129 5 . .Nxd7 Bxd7 7.Bd3 d5 5.Nxe5 1. .

h3 h6 . 16. . . .Re1 Re8 14. . . . . . .Nf3 Nxe4 5. . . .c4 Nb4 9. . . .0-0 Be7 8.d4 d5 6. . .Nc3 Bf5 11. .d4 d5 6.c4 Nb4 9. 168 4. .d4 d5 6.Bd3 Nc6 7. . .Nf3 Nxe4 5. . . 246 6 . . . . .c4 Nb4 9. . . . .cxd5. . . .Bd3 .0-0 Be7 8. . . . . . 136 4. . . .Re1 . . 216 4. . . . .Nf3 Nxe4 5. . . . . . . . . 185 4. . .c4 Nb4 9.Nf3 Nxe4 5. . .a3 Nc6 .Nc3 Bf5 11. . . . . 145 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5. . .d4 d5 6. .Bf4 Rac8 16. .c3 f5 . . .h3 Be4 .Nc3 Bf5 11. . 9.a3 Nxc3 12. .Be2 0-0 10.Be3 . . . .0-0 Be7 8. . 176 4. . . . . . .Bd3 Nc6 7.d4 d5 6. 198 4. . . . . . . . . .dxc3 Be7 7. . . .Be2 0-0 10. . . . . . . 180 4. . . . . . 229 Complete Games . .g3. . . . .cxd Qxd5 15. . . . . .Nc3 Nxc3 6.Re1 Re8 14. . . . . .Re1 Re8 14. . 206 4. .c4 Nb4 9.dxc3 Be7 7.0-0 Be7 8.a3 Nxc3 12. .Nf3 Nxe4 5. . .Re1 Bg4 9. .19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 4. . . . .Nf3 Nxe4 5.Bf4 Rac8 16. .Nf3 Nxe4 5. . . .bxc3 Nc6 13. .a3 Nxc3 12.c4 Nf6 . . .cxd Qxd5 15. . .Bf4 dc.0-0 Be7 8.a3 Nxc3 12. . . .Nf3 Nxe4 5.Re1 Bg4 9. .d4 d5 6. . .Nc3 Bf5 11. . . .bxc3 Nc6 13. .Nc3 Nxc3 . . . . 157 4. . . .bxc3 Nc6 13. .Be2 0-0 10. 16.Nf3 Nxe4 5.cxd Qxd5 15. . . .Bd3 Nc6 7. . . . .Bd3 Nc6 7.0-0 Be7 8. . . .Bd3 Nc6 7. .Be2 0-0 10. .bxc3 Nc6 13. . . . . . . .d4 d5 6. . .c4 Nb4 9. . . . . .Bf4 Rac8 16. .Nc3 Nxc3 6. .Bd3 Nc6 7. . . . .Nf3 Nxe4 5.0-0 Be7 8. . .d4 d5 6. . . . . .Re1 Re8 14. . .Bf4 .d4 d5 6.Qa4. . .Bd3 Nc6 7. . . . .0-0 Be7 8. . .Be2 0-0 10. .0-0 Be7 8. . . .Bd3 Nc6 7. .Bd3 Nc6 7. . .