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STORY:  CRITICAL  FOOD  AND  NUTRITION  SITUATION  
PERSISTS  IN  SOMALIA-­‐UN  
DURATION:  02:37  
SOURCE:  UNSOM  PUBLIC  INFORMATION  
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CREDIT  REQUIRED:  UNSOM  PUBLIC  INFORMATION    
LANGUAGE:  ENGLISH/NATURAL  SOUND  
DATELINE:  31/8/2015,  MOGADISHU,  SOMALIA  
 
 
SHOT  LIST  
1. Wide   shot,   Deputy   Special   Representative   of   the   UN   Secretary-­‐General   for  
Somalia  (DSRSG), Resident Humanitarian  Coordinator  Peter  de  Clercq  and  the  
representative   of   the   Food   and   Agriculture   Organization   (FAO)   in   Somalia  
Richard  Trenchard    arrive  for  the  press  briefing    
2. Med   shot,   DSRSG   and Resident Humanitarian   Coordinator   Peter   de   Clercq  
and   the   representative   of   the   Food   and   Agriculture   Organization   in   Somalia  
Richard  Trenchard  
3.  Wide  shot,  journalist  in  attendance    
4. Close  up,  camera  LCD  display    
5. SOUNDBITE   (English)   DSRSG, Humanitarian   Coordinator   Peter   de   Clercq:  
“The   outlook   is   also   not   giving   us   cause   for   optimism.   Malnutrition   continues  
to   be   pervasive   and   the   situation   is   currently   getting   worse.   Malnutrition  
rates   in   fact   are   going   to   increase   before   the   end   of   the   year   due   to   below  
average   cereal   production   and   poor   rainfall   in   sub-­‐pastoral   and   agro-­‐pastoral  
areas;   (and)   trade   disruption   of   course   in   most   conflict-­‐affected   areas   and  
continued  displacement  as  I  already  referred  to.”  
6. Close   up,   the   representative   of   the   Food   and   Agriculture   Organization   in  
Somalia  Richard  Trenchard  
7. SOUNDBITE   (English)   DSRSG, Humanitarian   Coordinator   Peter   de   Clercq:  
“My   most   important   message   today   will   be   that   while   saving   lives   and  
livelihoods   continues   to   be   very   important,   we   must   simultaneously   also  
address   underlying   causes.   Most   of   the   underlying   causes   of   Somalia’s  
protracted   crisis   remain   unresolved.   The   sobering   reality   is   that   any   shock  
could   plunge   Somalia   into   another   devastating   emergency.   We   therefore  
need  to  ensure  that  the  critical  vulnerability  levels  are  brought  down  and  that  
we  reduce  risk  of  having  far  too  many  people  slide  back  into  crisis”.    
8. Wide  shot/Pan  left  to  right,  Nairobi  humanitarian  briefing  via  video  call  
9. Med   shot,   OCHA   Somalia   PIO   Maurizio   Giuliano   listening   to   the   Nairobi  
briefing  
10. Wide  shot,  Nairobi  office  video  call  
11. Close  up,  Nairobi  office  video  call  
12. Med  shot,  Nairobi  office  video  call  

13. SOUNDBITE   (English)   the   representative   of   the   Food   and   Agriculture  
Organization  in  Somalia  Richard  Trenchard:  
“There   is   a   lot   of   work   starting   now   in   terms   of   preparedness.   And   let   me  
focus   particularly   on   preparedness   that   has   been   done   to   support   farmers  
and   livestock   owners.   There   are   two   major   things   we   can   do;   one   is   to  
minimize   the   extent   of   flooding.   There   is   a   lot   of   work   going   on   now  
particularly   in   the   Shabelle   area   along   the   Shabelle   River   to   reinforce   river  
banks,   et   cetera,   to   put   sandbags   along   the   river.   That   will   just   reduce   the  
amount   of   flooding   that   takes   place.   Similarly   providing   farmers   with   very  
simple  kits  will  allow  them  to  build  platforms  to  protect  their  seed  and  grain  
above  the  flood  waters.”                
14. Med  shot,  Senior  UN  officials  in  attendance    
15. Close  up,  DSRSG, Humanitarian  Coordinator  Peter  de  Clercq    
16. Wide  shot,  OCHA  Somalia  PIO  Maurizio  Giuliano  closing  the  press  briefing      

 
 
 
STORY  
 
Mogadishu,  31  August  2015:  The  United  Nations  today  released  results  of  the  latest  
Food  Security  and  Nutrition  Assessment  for  Somalia,  indicating  that  the  country’s  

humanitarian  situation  remains  highly  alarming.    Results  of  the  report  indicate  that  a  
total  of  855,000  people  in  Somalia  today  face  food  crisis  or  emergency,  and  are  
critically  in  need  of  food  and  nutrition  assistance  having  increased  from  731,000  six  
months  ago,  and  reflecting  a  17  percent  increase.      
 
The  report  also  shows  that  2.3  million  people  are  food-­‐stressed.    The  deterioration  is  
due  in  part  to  the  early  end  of  the  rainy  season  that  led  to  below-­‐average  cereal  
production,  as  well  as  continuing  insecurity  in  many  areas.    A  total  of  3.1  million  
people  now  require  humanitarian  assistance.    Among  those  facing  food  crisis  or  
emergency,  the  majority  are  internally  displaced  persons  (IDPs).    The  findings  further  
indicate  that  nearly  215,000  children  aged  under  five  are  acutely  malnourished,  of  
whom  almost  40,000  are  severely  malnourished  and  face  a  high  risk  of  disease  and  
death.  
   
Peter  de  Clercq,  the  Deputy  Special  Representative  of  the  United  Nations  Secretary-­‐
General  for  Somalia  (DSRSG),  who  is  also  the  United  Nations  Resident  and  
Humanitarian  Coordinator  for  Somalia,  described  the  humanitarian  situation  in  the  

country  as  very  fragile.    While  addressing  journalists  at  the  United  Nations  offices  in  
Mogadishu,  he  said,  “The  outlook  is  also  not  giving  us  cause  for  
optimism.    Malnutrition  continues  to  be  pervasive  and  the  situation  is  currently  
getting  worse.    Malnutrition  rates  in  fact  are  going  to  increase  before  the  end  of  the  
year  due  to  below-­‐average  cereal  production  and  poor  rainfall  in  sub-­‐pastoral  and  
agro-­‐pastoral  areas”.  
 

 Mr.  de  Clercq  added  that  despite  the  challenges,  sustained  humanitarian  action  has  
had  a  positive  impact  on  the  lives  of  millions  of  Somalis  by  improving  their  
livelihoods,  provision  of  food  assistance,  treating  acute  malnutrition  in  children  
below  five  years  of  age,  extending  basic  health  services,  provision  of  safe  drinking  
water,  as  well  as  hygiene  promotion.  
 

“My  most  important  message  today  will  be  that  while  saving  lives  and  livelihoods  
continues  to  be  very  important,  we  must  simultaneously  also  address  underlying  
causes.    Most  of  the  underlying  causes  of  Somalia’s  protracted  crisis  remain  
unresolved.    The  sobering  reality  is  that  any  shock  could  plunge  Somalia  into  another  
devastating  emergency.    We  therefore  need  to  ensure  that  the  critical  vulnerability  
levels  are  brought  down  and  that  we  reduce  the  risk  of  having  far  too  many  people  
slide  back  into  crisis,”  the  DRSG  said.  
 

Richard  Trenchard,  the  Representative  of  the  Food  and  Agriculture  Organization  
(FAO)  in  Somalia  warned  of  flooding  in  the  coming  months  due  to  the  El  Niño  
phenomenon  likely  to  severely  affect  Somalia  in  the  coming  months.    Mr.  Trenchard  
however  added  that  measures  are  underway  to  mitigate  the  risk  of  food  insecurity  
and  famine  caused  by  loss  of  livestock  and  crops  for  farmers.  
   
“There  is  a  lot  of  work  starting  now  in  terms  of  preparedness.    And  let  me  focus  
particularly  on  preparedness  that  has  been  done  to  support  farmers  and  livestock  
owners.  There  are  two  major  things  we  can  do.    One  is  to  minimize  the  extent  of  
flooding;  there  is  a  lot  of  work  going  on  now  particularly  in  the  Shabelle  area  along  
the  Shabelle  River  to  reinforce  river  banks,  et  cetera,  to  put  sandbags  along  the  

river.    That  will  just  reduce  the  amount  of  flooding  that  takes  place.    Similarly,  
providing  farmers  with  very  simple  kits  will  allow  them  to  build  platforms  to  protect  
their  seed  and  grain  above  the  flood  waters”,  Mr.  Trenchard  said.  
   
The  periodic  assessment  is  conducted  twice  a  year  by  the  Food  Security  and  
Nutrition  Analysis  Unit  (FSNAU)  and  the  Famine  Early  Warning  Systems  Network  
(FEWSNET)  for  Somalia,  managed  by  the  Food  and  Agriculture  Organization  (FAO)  in  
collaboration  with  various  technical  partners  and  governments.  
ENDS.