You are on page 1of 28

The Risk 

Management 
Series: 
A Multihazard Approach 
Milagros Kennett – FEMA 
Workshop on Condition Assessment of Critical Infrastructure 
ASCE/CCI/USACE 
July 13, 2006

Manchester Bombing

Content  Why a Multihazard Approach?  Risk Management Series  Risk Assessment – FEMA 452  Conclusion 3  .

819 people were killed  •  Stock exchanges around the  world dropped sharply  •  Gold and oil prices spiked  upwards  In New York City  •  Hotel occupancy fell below 40%  •  Over 145.000 jobs were lost  •  $105 billion in economic loss  4  .Why a Multihazard Approach?  Some Effects of 9/11 •  2.

836 estimated death toll  •  Total damage $75 billion  dollars; economic losses  exceed $150 billion dollars  •  Katrina/Rita/Wilma jointly  damaged 1.2 million housing  units out of which 90% was  due to Katrina 5  .Why a Multihazard Approach?  Some Effects of Hurricane Katrina (2005)  •  Southeast Louisiana and the  coasts of Mississippi and  Alabama were the most  affected areas  •  Affected area stretched from  100 to 120 miles from the eye  of the storm and some 150  miles inland  •  1.

Why a Multihazard Approach?  Other disasters to remember….  1995 Oklahoma City Bombing  1900 Galveston Hurricane  1906 San Francisco Earthquake  Multihazard  Design  1994 Northridge Earthquake  1993 Midwest Floods  1992 Hurricane Andrew 6  .

Why a Multihazard Approach?  •  After 9/11 it was understood that manmade disasters  cannot be predicted but their impacts are well  understood and can be managed  •  By designing against a particular hazard and  disregarding others the levels of protection and  performance are compromised  •  A multihazard approach is the most effective way to  reach building resilience  •  Security and natural hazard design needs to be part of  an overall approach and included early into the design  process 7  .

RMS Publications  Benefits and Conflicts of Using Multihazard Approach  FEMA 424 8  .

 U)  Impact­resistant glazing  EQ = undesirable conditions  Wind = undesirable conditions  Blast = undesirable conditions  Fire = no significance  Flood = no significance  EQ = no significance  Wind = desirable conditions  Blast = desirable conditions  Fire = undesirable conditions  Flood = no significance  9  .Why a Multihazard Approach?  Example of benefits and  Conflicts Large Roof overhangs  EQ = undesirable conditions  Wind = undesirable conditions  Blast = undesirable conditions  Fire = no significance  Flood = no significance  Use of non­rigid connections for  attaching interior non­load  bearing walls to structure  EQ = desirable conditions  Wind = desirable conditions  Blast = desirable conditions  Fire = undesirable conditions  Flood = no significance  Re­entrant corner (L.

RMS Publications  ■  After 9/11 FEMA role was  expanded  ■  Security became part of FEMA  building design guidance  Design Goals:  §  §  §  Risk assessments  Explosive blast  Chemical. biological  and radiological  effects (CBR) 10  .

 Safe Havens. Reference Manual to  Mitigate Potential Terrorist Attacks  Against Buildings  ■ FEMA 427. A How­To  Guide to Mitigate Potential Terrorist  Attacks Against Buildings  ■ FEMA 453. Building Design for Homeland  Security (FEMA Course) 11  . Finance. Primer for Design of  Commercial Buildings to Mitigate  Terrorist Attacks  ■ FEMA 428. Risk Assessment. Primer for Terrorist Risk  Management in Buildings  ■ FEMA 452. A Guide for  Designing Multihazard Shelters to  Mitigate Potential Terrorist Attacks (95%)  ■ E155. Primer to Design Safe  School Projects in Case of Terrorist  Attacks  ■ FEMA 429. and  Regulation. Insurance.RMS Publications  ■ FEMA 426.

 Incremental  Rehabilitation to Improve Building  Security (50%) 12  .RMS Publications  ■  FEMA 430. Primer for Incorporating  Building Security Components in  Architectural Design (85%)  ■  FEMA 455. Rapid Visual Screening  for Building Security (50%)  ■  FEMA 459.

 and Winds  ■  FEMA 454.RMS Publications  ■  FEMA 389. Communicating with  Owners and Manager of New  Buildings on Earthquake Risk  ■  FEMA 424. Design Guide for  Improving Critical Facilities from  Floods and Winds – (Hurricane  Katrina) 13  . Design Guide for  Improving School Safety in  Earthquakes. Designing for  Earthquake: A Manual for Architects  ■  FEMA 543. Floods.

RMS Publications  ■  FEMA 395. Incremental Seismic  Rehabilitation of Hospital Buildings  ■  FEMA 397. Incremental Seismic  Rehabilitation of Retail Buildings 14  . Incremental Seismic  Rehabilitation of School Buildings (K­12)  ■  FEMA 396. Incremental Seismic  Rehabilitation of Office Buildings  ■  FEMA 398. Incremental Seismic  Rehabilitation of Multifamily Apartment  Buildings  ■  FEMA 399.

Risk Assessment ­ FEMA 452  Risk assessment helps to  identify:  •  How buildings and their  systems interact  •  How reinforcement  between hazards may be  gained  •  How vulnerabilities may be  decreased  •  How building resilience  can be obtained 15  .

Risk Assessment – FEMA 452  Explosive blast  and CBR only  Currently being  updated to  include:  •  Floods  •  High Winds  •  Earthquakes 16  .

Risk Assessment – FEMA 452 Definition of Risk Risk = Threat Rating x Asset Value x Vulnerability Rating 17  .

 and vulnerability rating  •  Factors are established from 1­10. asset value. 10 being the worst case  scenario  Threat Rating  Asset Value  Vulnerability Rating  18  .Risk Assessment – FEMA 452  Methodology •  The methodology provides tables that determine and rank the  threat rating.

 or event with the potential to cause loss of  or damage to an asset  Weapons. circumstance. and tactics can  change faster than a building can be  modified modified  19  .Risk Assessment – FEMA 452  Step 1:  Threat Assessment  Any indication. tools.

Risk Assessment – FEMA 452  Step 2:  Asset  Value  Assessment  The degree of  debilitating  impact that  would be  caused by the  destruction of  an asset 20  .

)  20.  Stand­off : 15 feet  166 killed  Khobar Towers Murrah Federal Building  YIELD (»TNT Equiv.  Stand­off:   80 feet  19 killed  21  .000 lb.Risk Assessment – FEMA 452  Step 3:  Vulnerability Rating  Any weakness that can be exploited by an aggressor to make  an asset susceptible to damage  YIELD (»TNT Equiv.000 lb.)  4.

Risk Assessment – FEMA 452 Evaluated against  •  Threat Rating  •  Asset Value  •  Vulnerability Rating  22  .

Risk Assessment – FEMA 452  Building Vulnerability Checklist 23  .

Risk Assessment – FEMA 452  Automated Software to Prepare Risk Assessment Threat Matrices  Main Menu Assessors  24  .

Risk Assessment – FEMA 452  Type of Assessment and Team  Composition  Screening Phase  ­ 1 day  ­ 1 day  (1)  Site and Architectural  (1)  Security System and Operations  Full on Site Evaluation 1­  3 Days  Full on Site Evaluation 1 ­ 3 Days  (1)  Site and Architectural  (1)  Structural and Building Envelope  (1)  Mechanical. Power  Systems. Electrical. Power  Systems. and Site Utilities  IT and Telecom Modeler  (1)  Security System and  Operations  Explosive Blast Modeler  (1)  CBR Modeler  (1)  Cost Engineer Cost Engineer  25  . and Site Utilities  (1)  IT and Telecom  (1)  Security Systems and  Operations  Detailed Evaluation  (1)  Site and Architectural  Structural and Building Envelope  (1)  Mechanical. Electrical.

Risk Assessment – FEMA 452  Step 4: Risk Assessment Risk = Threat Rating x Asset Value x Vulnerability Rating  26  .

Risk Assessment ­ FEMA 452  STEP 5:  Selecting Mitigation Options 27  .

fema.gov/plan/prevent/rms/index.shtm 28  . efficiencies  and increases building resilience and performance  http://www.Conclusion  •  Large amount of technical literature endorses the concept of  multihazard and multidisciplinary approach  •  Risk assessments are a key tool to identify how buildings and  systems interact and how reinforcement between hazards may  be gained  •  A multihazard approach produces cost­savings.