Digital Train Radio System

Bankstown - Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) Site
Review of Environmental Factors
June 2012

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Table of Contents
Executive Summary .................................................................................................................... 4 

Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 6 
1.1  Background to the Project ......................................................................................... 6 
1.2  Background to Bankstown - Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) Site ........................................... 7 
1.3  Location and Land Use.............................................................................................. 8 
1.4  Consultation ............................................................................................................. 11 

Statutory Position and Requirements........................................................................... 14 
2.1  Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979................................................ 14 
2.2  State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007..................................... 15 
2.3  Confirmation of Statutory Position ........................................................................... 15 
2.4  Other Relevant Environmental Planning Instruments ............................................. 16 
2.5  Other NSW Legislation ............................................................................................ 17 
2.6  Commonwealth Legislation...................................................................................... 19 
2.7  Ecological Sustainable Development ...................................................................... 20 
2.8  Other Guidelines...................................................................................................... 21 
2.9  Licences and Approvals........................................................................................... 21 

Description of the Proposed Work................................................................................ 22 
3.1  Scope of Proposed Works ....................................................................................... 22 
3.2  Construction Methodology ....................................................................................... 24 
3.3  Timing and Costing.................................................................................................. 25 
3.4  Alternatives to DTRS ............................................................................................... 26 
3.5  Alternatives to the Bankstown - Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) Site ................................... 28 
3.6  Justification of the Preferred Option ........................................................................ 30 

Environmental Impact & Risks ...................................................................................... 31 
4.1  Landforms, Geology and Soils ................................................................................ 31 
4.2  Water Quality and Hydrology................................................................................... 32 
4.3  Air Quality ................................................................................................................ 33 
4.4  Biodiversity............................................................................................................... 34 
4.5  Noise and Vibration ................................................................................................. 36 
4.6  Heritage ................................................................................................................... 38 
4.7  Waste....................................................................................................................... 39 
4.8  Contaminated Land ................................................................................................. 40 
4.9  Hazardous Materials................................................................................................ 42 
4.10  Visual Aesthetics and Urban Design ....................................................................... 43 
4.11  Land Use.................................................................................................................. 46 

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4.12  Socio-Economic Effects........................................................................................... 46 
4.13  Electromagnetic Energy (EME) ............................................................................... 47 
4.14  Traffic and Access ................................................................................................... 48 
4.15  Utilities and Services ............................................................................................... 49 
4.16  Light spill .................................................................................................................. 49 
4.17  Demand on Resources ............................................................................................ 49 
4.18  Cumulative Environmental Effects........................................................................... 49 
4.19  Consideration of Clause 228 of EP&A Regulations and EPBC Act ........................ 50 
4.20  Summary of Control Measures ................................................................................ 54 
4.21  Implementation Process .......................................................................................... 59 

References....................................................................................................................... 60 

Appendix 1: Principles from the Telecommunication Facilities Guideline ......................... 61 
Appendix 2: Design Plans ........................................................................................................ 66 
Appendix 3: Database searches .............................................................................................. 67 
Extracts from the NSW Wildlife Atlas................................................................................ 67 
Flora………….................................................................................................................... 67 
Fauna ................................................................................................................................ 67 
Aboriginal Heritage Information Management System Report ......................................... 67 
Section 170: RailCorp Heritage Register .......................................................................... 67 
NSW Heritage Register..................................................................................................... 67 
Australian Heritage Database ........................................................................................... 67 
EPBC Act 1999 Protected Matters Report........................................................................ 67 
Appendix 4: Electro-Magnetic Energy (EME) Reports........................................................... 68 

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• A 10 metre tall steel monopole with a bored pile foundation. Proposal Description The Bankstown . It will provide communications coverage along a 3. The DTRS will provide 100% radio coverage for approximately 1. Page 4 of 68 . Construction will take about six weeks. The New South Wales Government and RailCorp have begun work on the implementation of a Digital Train Radio System (DTRS) which will replace this analogue system and address a number of recommendations from the Waterfall Special Commission of Inquiry (WSCOI). power supply equipment and fibre interfaces which will be installed on a concrete base slab.Executive Summary Need for the Proposal RailCorp currently operates an analogue train radio system known as MetroNet for operational communications between signallers and train drivers.1400 millimetres from the base to assist in the erection of the pole.Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) base transceiver station (BTS) will be installed in the rail corridor adjacent to Punchbowl railway station as part of the DTRS project. • New isolating transformer (approximately 1200 millimetres wide. 2000 millimetres long and 1500 millimetres tall) for power requirements installed near the existing power supply pole (approximately 38 metres northeast of the monopole and cabinets). Once erect. 1000 millimetres long and 1700 millimetres tall) which contains the DBS baseband control unit.2 metres away from the monopole. UGL has been contracted to design and construct the DTRS. • Installation of an underground earth grid that comprises a series of copper stakes and earth wires that form a circuit attached to the earth rod.455 kilometres of the RailCorp electrified network as well as 66 tunnels covering approximately 70 kilometres and has an expected design life of at least 15 years. This system has reached the end of its serviceable life and requires replacement.42 kilometre section of track for trains travelling between Lakemba and Bankstown on the Bankstown Line. The proposal will involve the following. the antennas will be situated at a height of 9 metres. The DTRS will be a secure digital train radio system designed to provide reliable voice and data communications on a Global Systems Mobile – Railway (GSM-R) platform. • An aboveground DBS cabinet (approximately 880 millimetres wide. The pole will be hinged approximately 1200 . approximately 4. • Two Yagi antennas mounted onto the monopole whilst the pole is on the ground. but once in place the hinge will be bolted in order to fix the monopole in place.

However. Part 5 requires RailCorp to consider the environmental impacts of the proposal. • Other associated and necessary activities to ensure the proper functioning of RailCorp’s radio communications facility including safe access. potential environmental impacts can be controlled and reduced to acceptable levels and. air quality and noise issues for nearby receivers. subject to the implementation of mitigation measures. This Review of Environmental Factors (REF) has been prepared to address the requirements of the EP&A Act. a new monopole will be introduced into the visual landscape. signage and bollards for vehicle protection. will not compromise the health. The main environmental issues relate to construction impacts such as erosion and sedimentation risks as well as short-term traffic.• Conduit feeder cables to connect to the new isolating transformer and fibre supply. In the long term. It assesses the potential environmental impacts of the proposal within the context of Clause 228 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 and the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (TSC Act). Environmental Management The proposed control measures described at the end of each environmental impact section in this REF will be incorporated into a Construction Environmental Management Plan (CEMP). Such impacts will be managed through the implementation of a traffic management plan. therefore. the top of the monopole may be visible to residents along and near Urunga Parade. Proposed works will have minor traffic impacts to Urunga Parade. Electromagnetic energy (EME) impacts have also been considered and the EME levels for the proposal will be well within the limits set by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). diversity and productivity of the environment for the benefit of future generations. This REF concludes that. The requirements of the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) are also considered. Approval Process The proposal is being assessed under Part 5 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (EP&A Act). Page 5 of 68 . Environmental Impact Assessment The benefits of the proposal cannot be achieved without some degree of environmental impact. installed at a depth of at least 1000 millimetres. The impacts resulting from construction and operation of the radio facility have been assessed in this REF. The monopole and its antennas will not be bulky and will be partially screened by vegetation along the rail corridor.

 approximately 255 base transceiver stations (BTS) as well as other base stations in tunnels. train drivers. The DTRS will include:  a main switching centre in the Sydney CBD.  replace and improve on the current RailCorp MetroNet communications system.1 Introduction 1.g.455 kilometres of the RailCorp electric network as well as 66 tunnels covering approximately 70 kilometres and has an expected design life of at least 15 years. This system has reached the end of its serviceable life and requires replacement.  on-train equipment in approximately 675 train cabs. The system is designed to allow for growth in both the size of the network and the number of services using it. The New South Wales Government and RailCorp have begun work on the implementation of a Digital Train Radio System (DTRS) which will replace this analogue system and address a number of recommendations from the Waterfall Special Commission of Inquiry (WSCOI).  a geographically separated back-up switching centre at Homebush. Page 6 of 68 .  provide a technology platform for the introduction of an automatic train protection system (ATP). and  adopt best management and administrative practices while complying with the principles of ecologically sustainable development.1 Background to the Project RailCorp currently operates an analogue train radio system known as MetroNet for operational communications between signallers and train drivers. freight operators. train guards and signallers. The DTRS will provide secure and reliable voice and data communications via a Global Systems Mobile – Railway (GSM-R) platform. It will be compatible with communications systems used by other users of the network. and  capability to provide staff with handheld terminals. e. The DTRS will provide 100% radio coverage along approximately 1.  approximately 65 dispatcher terminal units. It will be used by train controllers. The DTRS will provide continuous coverage along the entire RailCorp network for on-train radios and permit at least 14 simultaneous voice calls from each base station. The primary objectives of the DTRS project are to:  provide continuous radio coverage 100% radio of RailCorp’s electric network.

Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) is part of the DTRS that is being developed along the RailCorp’s electrified train lines. This REF describes a proposal to construct a BTS at Bankstown . GSM-R is being installed on the Melbourne train network by the Victorian government.Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) Site The proposed base transceiver station (BTS) at Bankstown .Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) is to build a new installation.2 Background to Bankstown .42 kilometre section of track between Lakemba and Bankstown on the Bankstown Line. Page 7 of 68 . The proposal for Bankstown .Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) BTS is one of 255 radio facilities which will provide enhanced. which aims to provide coverage along a 3. In Australia.Mt Lewis (Punchbowl). documents the likely impacts on the environment and details the environmental safeguards required to address those impacts.DTRS systems are now widely used as a standard by major rail operators in Europe and Asia. The Bankstown . efficient and reliable communication. 1.

Access to the site is off Urunga Parade through existing access gates. The site is in a cleared area with a buffer zone of at least four metres in all Page 8 of 68 . Punchbowl Station and a commuter car park then retail and residential properties. 9. • There are seven schools/child care centres within a 370m radius of the site. The gates are 25 metres from the site. Punchbowl NSW 2196 Property Description Bankstown Line Railway Line Bankstown Line Chainage B16+389 Site co-ordinates Latitude: -33. off Urunga Parade.2 metres from the railway track. • To the west are Punchbowl Road and commercial/retail properties. The site is within the Canterbury Local Government Area (LGA) and the proposed works will be undertaken on land in Zone 3(c) Neighbourhood Business. Land around the site is for the purposes listed below.3 Location and Land Use Site Name Bankstown (Mt Lewis) Street address In the rail corridor.05647 Local Government Area Canterbury City Council NSW State electorate Lakemba Catchment Salt Pan Creek Nearest Railway Station Punchbowl The proposed BTS site is situated on the northern side of the rail corridor adjacent to Punchbowl railway station (refer Figure 1). • To the north is Warren Reserve. then retail and residential properties.1. • Punchbowl Boys’ High School and oval are 230 metres to the north west. • The nearest residential property is around 60 metres to the north east on Urunga Parade. The site comprises an undeveloped area of the rail corridor.925250 Longitude: 151. the closest a child care centre 75 metres to the north east. • To the south and east are the Bankstown railway line. The new monopole and cabinet will be located southwest of the access gates off Urunga Parade. There is a fence which separates the construction site from the track.

Warren Reserve is 15 metres north of the site. however there are few trees offering little habitat to wildlife.3 degrees and a mean annual minimum of 12. The area experiences extremes of climate. The climate in the area is similar to other parts of the Sydney Basin. There are no waterways on or in close proximity of the site. The majority of the annual rainfall occurs in the summer and early autumn months.0 degrees. having a peak monthly precipitation of 106. The area has a mean annual maximum temperature of 21. There are mature trees at the corridor boundary.6 millimetres.4 millimetres in February and the least rainfall in July with an average rainfall of 44. The Bankstown Airport weather station is the closest station.directions between the site and vegetation within the rail corridor. bushland or heritage sites. There are no nearby national parks or other natural heritage reserves. N Figure 1 Proposed site and surrounds © 2011 Google – Image © 2011 Sinclair Knight Merz © 2011 Whereis® Sensis Pty Ltd Page 9 of 68 . The proposed works will take place on land that has a slight slope.

Figure 2 Site location map Map Section reproduced with permission of UBD. Page 10 of 68 . Copyright Universal Publishers PTY LTD DD 06/11.

1) Communication with local councils and regulatory authorities Consultation with the local council and other regulatory authorities is required under the SEPP (Infrastructure) 2007.Figure 3 1.4 Photo of proposed site looking west along northern side of the rail corridor Consultation The consultation activities for the proposed work are outlined below. nearby schools and other nearby community facilities is required. Three main consultation activities will take place. This will include notification of and liaison with Canterbury City Council/other government agencies/utilities is required with regard to temporary work impacts may have on nearby community (traffic. parks. Page 11 of 68 . stormwater etc). 2) Communication with impacted residents and businesses within a 500 metre radius of the site Consultation with directly impacted residents. Consultation activities and work practices will be undertaken in accordance with community relation protocols and requirements as per RailCorp’s Communications Management Plan. A number of consultation activities will be undertaken and are outlined below. These measures will help ensure stakeholders are informed of the proposal and that RailCorp meets its obligations under the State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007 (ISEPP).

Dudley. traffic control measures and compound/assembly location. Communication with the community will take place before and during construction.info before work begins. Owen. Rickard. • residents on Rossmore Avenue between Punchbowl Road and Hillcrest Street. Page 12 of 68 . child care centres and community facilities close to the site. Hillcrest. notifications. This information will include specific detail regarding activities. • “Face to face” consultation: direct consultation will be undertaken with nearby residents and they will be given opportunities to discuss the DTRS works. Activities will include “face to face” communications with directly affected community members.railcorp. Turner. detailing the DTRS project and the scope of works that will be undertaken for the Bankstown .Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) BTS site. contact phone line and fact sheets. works hours. • residents and businesses on The Boulevard between Punchbowl Road and Robinson Street South. and • schools. Heggie and Quine lanes and Clarke and Breust places. Community relations will be specifically be targeted at: • residents on Urunga Parade. Council will also be given a copy and a link to the DTRS section of the RailCorp website. Matthews. Turner. • residents on The Broadway between The Boulevard and Hillcrest Street. Henry and Kelly streets.• Letter: a letter will be sent to all properties within a 500 metre radius. Arthur. Rosemont Street North. Campbell. • Display of REF: the final REF will be made available at www. 3) Notification and community relations during construction and commissioning works with Council and nearby community Additional information about the upcoming work will be provided to the nearby community and Canterbury City Council five business days before work begins. • residents and businesses on Punchbowl Road between Waratah and Myall Streets. Waratah. • Contact hotline: a telephone line will be established for the community to obtain further information.

It will then be used.4) Summary Report Feedback received during pre-construction consultation will be compiled into a summary report and taken into consideration. along with the REF. to determine whether the development should proceed and what. if any. changes need to be made. Page 13 of 68 .

Page 14 of 68 . to the fullest extent possible. The legislative framework relevant to the proposed works and associated approvals is set out in the following sections. • Part 4 generally provides for the control of local ‘development that requires development consent from the local Council’.1 Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 The Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (EP&A Act) establishes the statutory framework for planning and environmental assessment in NSW. • Part 5 provides for the control of ‘activities’ that do not require development consent and are undertaken or approved by a determining authority. and the (Commonwealth) Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). • Part 3A provides for control of ‘major infrastructure and other projects’ that require approval from the Minister for Planning and Infrastructure.2 Statutory Position and Requirements The description of the proposed works and the associated environmental impacts has been undertaken in the context of Clause 228 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000. Implementation of the EP&A Act is the responsibility of the Minister for Planning and Infrastructure. that RailCorp must examine and take into account. These include Local Environmental Plans (LEPs) and State Environmental Planning Policies (SEPPs). statutory authorities and local councils. all matters affecting or likely to affect the environment by reason of the activity. the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (TSC Act). The EP&A Act contains three parts which impose requirements for planning approval. As RailCorp is the determining authority and this site falls under the definition of activities that do not require consent. this REF helps fulfil the requirements of Section 111 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (EP&A Act). 2. Pursuant to Section 36 of the EP&A Act there is a general presumption that a SEPP prevails over a LEP in the event of an inconsistency. In doing so. The applicable approval process is generally determined by reference to the relevant environmental planning instruments and other controls. the approval of this site will be sought under Part 5 of the EP&A Act.

RailCorp is a state-owned operating entity in the transport portfolio. It is classified as a public authority under Section 4 of the EP&A Act. antennas and power and BTS cabinets). which includes “signalling. Section 76 of the EP&A Act states that “if an environmental planning instrument provides that specified development may be carried out without the need for development consent. a person may carry the development out. on land to which the provision applies. this proposal (construction of a new BTS at Bankstown (Mt Lewis)) is being assessed under Part 5 of the EP&A Act.” The proposal is for the installation of a new base transceiver station (new monopole. RailCorp is the proponent and determining authority as per the provisions of Section 110 of the EP&A Act. Accordingly.2. and on what land the activity is permissible. 2. train control. in accordance with the instrument. communication and security systems”. The ISEPP provides for the development of certain activities for a range of infrastructure types. Page 15 of 68 .3 Confirmation of Statutory Position Clause 79(1) of the State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007 (ISEPP) provides: “Development for the purpose of a railway or rail infrastructure facilities may be carried out by or on behalf of a public authority without consent on any land. In addition Clause 114(1) provides: “Development for the purposes of telecommunications facilities (including radio facilities) may be carried out by a public authority without consent on any land.” The proposal also meets the definition of a telecommunication facility under Clause 113 of the ISEPP. The ISEPP indicates whether an activity is permissible with or without consent.” However environmental assessment of the development may nevertheless be required under Part 5. along with providing for consultation with relevant public authorities during the assessment process. which is consistent with the definition of a rail infrastructure facility under Clause 78.2 State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007 The State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007 (ISEPP) provides a consistent planning regime for infrastructure and the provision of services across NSW.

therefore.2. remediation must take place before the land is developed.4 Other Relevant Environmental Planning Instruments State Environmental Planning Policy No. 26 Littoral Rainforests This policy applies to local government areas outside the Sydney metropolitan area that front the Pacific Ocean (the same area which SEPP 14 applies to) and is. if required. 55 – Remediation of Land SEPP 55 provides for a consistent state-wide planning approach to the remediation of contaminated land. therefore the proposal is not subject to the provisions of SEPP 44. and therefore does not apply. State Environmental Planning Policy (Major Development) 2005 This SEPP identifies certain developments which are deemed major projects under Part 3A of the EP&A Act and which are then determined by the Minister for Planning and Infrastructure. so no further consideration of this SEPP is required. State Environmental Planning Policy No. not applicable. The policy states that land must not be developed if it is unsuitable for a proposed use because it is contaminated. 14 Coastal Wetlands This policy applies to local government areas outside the Sydney metropolitan area that fronts the Pacific Ocean and is. nor does the proposal meet any of the other requirements listed in Schedules 2. not applicable. The proposal does not meet the criteria listed in Schedule 1 Section 23 (Rail and related transport facilities). 44 – Koala Habitat Protection The proposed site is not located in an area nominated or classified by this SEPP as habitat for koalas. State Environmental Planning Policy No. 71 – Coastal Protection The proposed site falls outside the coastal protection zone designated in the Coastal Protection SEPP. educational and scientific purposes. the proposed work will not require the removal of vegetation. State Environmental Planning Policy No. State Environmental Planning Policy No. as part of the natural heritage or for recreational. State Environmental Planning Policy (Sydney Drinking Water Catchment) 2011 Page 16 of 68 . 4 Development Without Consent and Miscellaneous Complying Development The proposal is not classified as “exempt development” or “complying development” under the provisions of SEPP 4. 3 or 5. State Environmental Planning Policy No. This SEPP does not apply to the proposal. therefore. 19 Bushland in Urban Areas This SEPP protects and preserves bushland within certain urban areas. The presence of contamination will be determined during excavation works. However. and a suitable remediation plan will be developed. Canterbury LGA is listed in Schedule 1 as an area where bushland needs to be preserved. State Environmental Planning Policy No. If the land is unsuitable.

The State Environmental Planning Policy Infrastructure 2007 (ISEPP) also allows for the proposal to proceed without development consent (refer section 2. and (c) allowed a reasonable period for the requested information to be provided. which is located in Zone 3(c) – Neighbourhood Business. Clause 104B of the Electricity Supply (General) Regulation 2001 provides: (1) Work of the following kind. that is carried out within the distribution district of a distribution network service provider.2 and section 2. or authorise such excavation work to be commenced. Canterbury Local Environmental Plan 1994 The proposed site is located within the Canterbury LGA and is subject to the Canterbury Local Environment Plan – 138. or is carried out in connection with. unless the person has first: (a) contacted the designated information provider and requested information as to the location and type of any underground electricity power lines in the vicinity of the proposed work. The proposed works will be undertaken in the rail corridor. Development for the purposes of utility installations is permissible in Zone 3(c) – Neighbourhood Business with consent under the Canterbury LEP. is excavation work to which section 63Z of the Act applies… (b) excavation that is. 2. Page 17 of 68 .5 Other NSW Legislation Crown Lands Act 1989 The proposal will not be undertaken on crown land and the provisions of this act are not applicable. Section 63Z provides: (1) A person must not commence to carry out excavation work to which this section applies.The proposal is located in the Salt Pan Creek catchment and is not part of a drinking water catchment. This SEPP does not apply to the proposal. Electricity Supply Act 1995 The Electricity Supply Act 1995 and Electricity Supply (General) Regulation 2001 sets out certain notification and procedural requirements in relation to excavation. 1994 (Canterbury LEP). an activity within the meaning of Part 5 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.3 for more detail). and (b) complied with any reasonable procedures of the designated information provider as to the manner of contacting the designated information provider and the information to be provided by the person in connection with the person’s request for information.

The EPL applies to the NSW rail network as defined in the Transport Administration Act 1988 for the purposes of ‘railway systems’. Safeguards have been proposed to address circumstances where an unexpected find occurs. There are no Aboriginal objects or places known to occur in the immediate vicinity of the proposed site and no known items or places will be affected by the proposal. An application for an exemption can also be made under some circumstances. As such. the proposed works can be undertaken without requiring a variation to the EPL. an Aboriginal heritage impact permit may be issued in relation to a specified Aboriginal object. Aboriginal places. except the dingo.6. hence. All native birds. the proposed works are not listed as a scheduled activity under the POEO Act and.Consultation with the relevant service provider will occur in accordance with these provisions. activities or persons. RailCorp is not required to seek a modification to its licence under the POEO Act. Further. Potential impacts to fauna are considered in Section 4.4. the existing licence requires that the licensee must comply with Section 120 of the POEO Act with regard to the pollution of waters and must manage dust-generating activities. More information about heritage is included in Section 4. Under Section 90. However. RailCorp is required to seek a modification to the licence for certain ‘scheduled’ activities. moving or exhibiting of Aboriginal objects requires a permit under Section 87 of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 (NPW Act). Notwithstanding. are protected in NSW under the NPW Act. RailCorp holds an Environment Protection Licence (EPL). land. National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 The excavating. but an exemption applies in relation to things that are essential to the carrying out of an activity to which Part 5 of the EP&A Act applies and where the determining authority has complied with the provisions of that part. Page 18 of 68 . Also.6). The harming of protected fauna is prohibited under the NPW Act. land. the likelihood of uncovering Aboriginal heritage items is considered low (refer Section 4. Aboriginal place. number 12208. which is a scheduled activity under the POEO Act. reptiles. amphibians and mammals. activity or person or specified types or classes of Aboriginal objects. Under the provisions of the licence. The proposal is to be undertaken in an area where no State heritage items are located and approval under the Heritage Act is not required. Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997 In accordance with Section 55 of the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997 (POEO Act). the works associated with the proposal will be confined to land on which the rail undertaking is currently being carried out. Heritage Act 1977 Section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 lists the types of activities/works that require approval from the Heritage Office when working on/in an item/place listed on the State Heritage Register. The harming or desecration of Aboriginal objects or places is an offence under Section 86 of the NPW Act.

2. Threatened species. Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 The Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (TSC Act) is directed at conserving threatened species. however the monopole is lower than the airport Obstacle Limitation Surface. Civil Aviation (Building Control) Regulation 1988 The proposed site is within the height restriction zone of Bankstown Airport.” otherwise than with the consent of the appropriate roads authority. A summary of EPBC factors is included in Table 4. matters of NES are defined as: • world heritage properties. endangered ecological communities are not likely to occur at the site and further consideration under the Act is not required. or will have. • migratory species. Therefore CASA approval is not required.6 Commonwealth Legislation Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 The primary legislation at the Commonwealth level is the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). and • nuclear actions. Part 3 of the EPBC Act requires approval from the Commonwealth Minister for Sustainability. a person must not “erect a structure or carry out a work in. a significant effect on a matter of National Environmental Significance (NES). as a result of this proposal. No Commonwealth land will be affected. • Ramsar wetlands. Population and Communities if a development is likely to have. • national heritage places. • nationally threatened species and ecological communities. or dig up or disturb the surface of a public road. populations. Page 19 of 68 .. No works are proposed on public roads as part of these works therefore consent under the Roads Act is not required..Roads Act 1993 Under Section 138 of the Roads Act 1993. on or over a public road. For the purposes of the EPBC Act. There are no matters of national environmental significance that will be affected as a result of this proposal. Environment. populations and ecological communities of animals and plants. either directly or indirectly. • commonwealth marine areas. Water.

The site selected is within a previously disturbed area in the rail corridor. Conservation of biological diversity and ecological integrity The proposed site is on disturbed land that has been previously cleared. Page 20 of 68 .2.7 Ecologically Sustainable Development Ecologically sustainable development (ESD) entails using. some of the potential impacts are reversible as the monopole and cabinets can be removed. RailCorp is committed to ensuring its projects are consistent with the principles of ESD and these have been considered for this proposal (refer Table 1). The basis for achieving ecologically sustainable development involves the application of four principles: • the precautionary principle. Intergenerational equity This proposal and the overarching DTRS project will contribute towards RailCorp’s strategic benefits for current and future generations. • intra. Table 1 Consideration of ESD for the proposal ESD Principle Application to the proposal Precautionary principle The site selection and design process aims to avoid areas where there will be a significant environmental impact or impacts that are irreversible. There is no major clearing or other disturbance to the biodiversity or ecological significance of the area. • conservation of biological diversity and ecological integrity. In addition. hence. The proposed activity is not expected to result in any loss of biodiversity or ecological integrity. the quality of life. social and safety considerations of the DTRS have been integrated with the consideration and assessment of potential environmental impacts regarding the development and operation of the DTRS.and inter-generational equity. for present and future generations. and • improved valuation and pricing of environmental resources. if no longer required. The economic. providing coverage and reliable communications services to all parts of the electrified rail corridor and acting as the basis for the introduction of an Automatic Train Protection System. conserving and enhancing the community’s environmental resources in a manner that sustains and improves ecological processes and. including safer public transport by improving on the current communications system. Any adverse impacts associated with the site and construction will be minor and measures to reduce impacts as far as practicable identified within this REF will be implemented during construction.

ESD Principle Application to the proposal Improved valuation and pricing of environmental resources RailCorp recognises the value of environmental sustainability and will minimise the impacts of its activities by ensuring that appropriate mitigation measures are implemented for all aspects of the DTRS project.8 Other Guidelines Consideration of the NSW Telecommunication Facilities Guideline including Broadband NSW (DoP 2010) is a requirement when Clause 114 or Clause 115 (development of a telecommunications facility) of the ISEPP is applied.9 Licences and Approvals Responsible Authority Approval/Licence/Permit RailCorp Determination under Part 5 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 Page 21 of 68 . 2. The requirements of the guidelines have been considered and are included in Appendix 1. The potential environmental costs of the proposal have been considered in conjunction with the costs of design. construction and operation 2.

2 BTS Site DBS Cabinet The DBS cabinet will be placed on a concrete slab.1. Page 22 of 68 .  two Yagi antennas mounted on the monopole.  DC distribution (including EMI filter and surge protection).  a 1. and  fibre optic cable connection into the existing RailCorp Network Access Point (NAP) 2ATJ0030 (B14+345) located 33m from the site. approximately 1700 millimetres high by 1000 millimetres long by 880 millimetres wide. Plan drawings of the proposal are provided in Appendix 2.  a DBS cabinet located on a slab 4. These components of the proposal are described in the sections below.1. Internal DC distribution is provided via miniature circuit breakers. Refer to Huawei DBS3900 GSM-R Product Description documentation for further details of the DBS equipment. The DBS cabinet will include the following equipment:  DBS equipment (BBU3900). The cabinet will contain the internal DBS equipment which will be connected to an internal -48V supply.Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) will consist of the following components:  a 10 metre high monopole.1 Summary The outdoor BTS site at Bankstown .1 Scope of Proposed Works 3. 3.  a new low voltage underground power supply cable from the existing metering panel pole to the new distribution board and BTS location. DC supplies at this point will be surge protected and protected by Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) filter. All aspects of the proposal will be earthed in line with all relevant standards.3 Description of the Proposed Work 3.2 metres from the monopole. The cabinet will be painted stainless steel.5 metre high lightning rod at the apex of the monopole.  power supply cable from a new 25kVA isolating transformer/distribution supply main switch board (DSMSB) to the northeast of the site fed from the Ausgrid network. and will be placed on a stainless steel plinth which will have a minimum height of 200 millimetres to allow for the management of cables entering the cabinet.

but will be able to be remotely adjusted to different degrees of tilt. The DSMSB is within the new isolating transformer cover. Monopole A 10 metre monopole will be erected approximately four metres to the east of the DBS cabinet in the rail corridor 9. The requirement for a field monitoring device at this site has yet to be finalised.Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) power cabinet will be via a new 25kVA isolation transformer/distribution supply main switch board (DSMSB). bollards are to be provided around the facility to minimise the risk of collisions. This requires a 12V DC input so is installed with a 48V to 12V DC power converter. Page 23 of 68 .  monitoring and reporting capability of power cabinet conditions.  fibre optic distribution frame. The DSMSB will be supplied via an underground cable from an existing Ausgrid metering panel located adjacent to Urunga Parade. transmission interface (Huawei PTN 910). shown in the design drawings in Appendix 2. This 1-sector site configuration requires one 2:2 hybrid combiner and will support up to 4 TRXs (including the redundant TRX) as each RRU supports 2 TRXs. Due to the position of the proposal adjacent to the railway in an area frequently used for access to the rail corridor. Remote Radio Unit (RRU) Two DC RRU3004 radio remote units will be mounted externally on the monopole approximately 14m from ground level. Two Yagi antennas will be mounted nine metres above the ground with azimuths of 85° and 280°.1. A -48V DC supply will be reticulated to the two RRUs from the DBS cabinet by individual cables. The antennas will be installed to have a zero degree tilt. and  field monitoring device for radio frequency coverage. 3. without the need to climb the monopole for such adjustments.2 metres from the track.3 Power Supply The supply to the Bankstown . An underground LV cable will run from the isolating transformer to the power cabinet. Base Band Unit (BBU) The base station to be used at this site will be a Huawei DBS3900 GSM-R in the S3 configuration (2+1) that comprises of a BBU3900 baseband control unit connected via fibre optic patch leads to two externally located RRUs mounted on the monopole.

drills or auger.1. Two new fibre optic cables will then be routed from the DBS. one in each new duct.  Excavation of trenches for power and fibre optic cables. to the NAP and left ready for splicing into the bearer network.  Installation of earth grid using drills. The area of ground disturbance at the BTS site is likely to be in the vicinity of five square metres. (to be undertaken by RailCorp). The grid will be nominally four by two metres. However. 3. placing the six earth stakes two metres apart. The initial extent of the trenching for earthing grid will be around 20 metres. Once these earth stakes have been installed. A new two duct buried cable route will be provided to the NAP from the DBS site. This area will allow for the erection of the monopole and the slab containing the DBS cabinet.  Installation of concrete slab brought to site for BTS and power cabinets. This will result in approximately four cubic metres of excavated material which may include rock.2 Construction Methodology The construction of the BTS site will require the use of approximately 10 square metres of land within the northern side of the rail corridor. shovels or excavator and connection of the radio facility to the electrical supply and optical fibre communications cable. Page 24 of 68 .  Connection of power and fibre optic cables to the transformer and communications pit.  Assembly of monopole and attachment of antenna mounts and cables before erection of pole using the built in hinge joint.  Delivery and pouring of concrete on site for the monopole foundation.  Installation of conduit within trenches. 3.4 Fibre Optics The OCDN fibre network is north of the track and the nearest NAP is 2ATJ0030 (B14+345). Installation of the power and fibre optic cables will require excavation of trenches approximately 1000mm and 500mm wide.  Excavation of the foundation for the monopole using excavator. The monopole foundation will require an excavation approximately five metres deep with a diameter of approximately one metre.3.  Transport and installation of monopole sections using trucks. The indicative construction methodology of the proposal will include elements outlined below.1. cranes and riggers.5 Earthing The earthing installation will comprise six earth stakes at a pre-determined distance apart. respectively. a distance of 33 metres. the system will be tested and modified if needed. followed by installation of cables within conduits. it can be extended if the results show that the earthing arrangement is insufficient.

5 tonne come-a-long  Hand digging tools (shovels etc) The skip bin and the site compound area will be within the rail corridor near the site. Installation and commissioning of radio equipment. The batteries to be used are sealed. Any excess concrete will be removed. cables and radio equipment. All excavated material not required for backfilling will be stockpiled. steel mounts. limiting the risk of leaking battery acid. gravel. batteries. Proposed construction timing: Page 25 of 68 . removed from site and disposed of at a licensed facility or used elsewhere on the site. antennas. batteries. It is not envisaged that any chemicals or hazardous materials will be used during construction. The following equipment will potentially be used during construction. 3.3 Timing and Costing Construction work for the proposal is planned to begin in the third quarter of 2012 and scheduled to run for a period of six weeks. The construction process will require an average of four to six vehicle movements and a team of three to six people on site per day.  Pile borer  17 metre sling  Hi-Abb truck 10T  Assorted slings and shackles  Trencher (chain digger)  Assorted large spanners and hand tools  Excavators  Hydraulic pack and ram  Bobcat  Portable generator (with RCD)  Vacuum excavator (Sucker Truck)  Cable striping tools  Wacker packer  Hydraulic hole punch (sized to suit  Earth rod drill  Concrete delivery truck  Delivery truck VLC (semi trailer)  Crane where required (sized to suit the  cable gland)  Crimpers ratchet type  Battery drill  Multimeter application)  Electrical hand tools 1. antennas. cables and other equipment. Materials used for construction and installation include concrete. steel plinth. Any excess material will be removed and disposed of. The majority of material brought to the site will remain there once installed. reused or recycled.

• It uses out dated technology and cannot be expanded due to its limited capacity. RailCorp investigated a number of alternatives already used by the state government or available commercially. • It cannot facilitate a communications platform that can be used by all necessary RailCorp personnel.00pm Saturday 8. The existing MetroNet communication system was not deemed a feasible solution for the reasons listed below. The DTRS project has an overarching value of $225 million. • The network is both inside and outside the rail corridor. The government alternatives were the existing MetroNet system or the Government Radio Network (GRN). • Priority is given to emergency services which could result in a failure of 100% rail network coverage. • GRN would require a substantial upgrade.4 Alternatives to DTRS As discussed earlier. The Department of Commerce’s Government Radio Network (GRN) was not deemed a feasible solution for the reasons listed below.00am to 6. means the cost of using and maintaining the MetroNet system is increasing at a substantial rate. including new base stations.Standard working hours Monday to Friday 7. The NSW Government then committed to a state-wide strategy for all rail communications. 3. the Waterfall Special Commission of Inquiry precipitated the recommendations regarding communications in NSW rail operations and within RailCorp. • It could not meet interoperability requirements.00pm Evening/weekends/out of hours: No out of hours work is expected. Note: separate approval will be required if works are to take place outside standard hours. This includes the design. combined with obsolete technology. looking for a system that met its own safety and reliability requirements as well as the recommendations of the Waterfall inquiry. and installation of the DTRS on the RailCorp electrified network plus a five-year life support component. • It has to be shared with other NSW Government agencies. • It only has one main supplier and this.00am to 1. supply. to ensure 100% network coverage of the rail corridor. Page 26 of 68 . • It does not have the ability to support the requirements of Automatic Train Protection.

some with networks comparable in size and complexity to RailCorp’s network. GSM-R was deemed the platform most suitable for RailCorp’s train network and system requirements for the reasons listed below. • It does not support a functional addressing system that maps train run numbers to mobile subscribers’ numbers. Page 27 of 68 . • It operates on a spectrum of 1800 MHz which was available for purchase by RailCorp. TETRA is also a proven emergency services communications system and is deployed in a number metropolitan rail networks. • It relies on a dispatch terminal for functionality. TETRA and GSM-R. The other options would have required the leasing of a radio spectrum from a telecommunications licence holder. However. • It is an open standard with a large number of equipment suppliers. • This application is confined primarily to underground metro networks that are not comparable to RailCorp’s network. • It is deployed by major rail operators in Europe and Asia. which does not meet the RailCorp reliability requirements. it was rejected for the reasons listed below. • It does not meet the interoperability requirements. • It relies on a dispatch terminal for functionality. The radio communications marketplace responded with three systems: APCO-25. • It has no proven history of usage in a rail environment. which does not meet RailCorp’s reliability requirements. • It does not meet the interoperability requirements. which is a key requirement. • It is not scalable in regards to the future growth of the rail network. • It is the only rail-specific communications standard and has the highest levels of safety and reliability in its design. • It achieved a higher level of compliance with the RailCorp functional requirements when compared to the other systems. • There is no commercialised Automatic Train Protection (ATP) solution available. APCO-25 is a proven standard for emergency services but was rejected for the reasons listed below.• The cost of this upgrade is comparable to the development of an entire new network. • It is a scalable network that can grow in step with RailCorp operations and network.

Possible locations to the east and west were rejected for the reasons listed below. resulting in a significant safety issue in the event of an emergency call or a train incident. including a Level 2 Automatic Train Protection (ATP) System. which removes the need for large cranes.Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) proposal.5 It will deliver the best value for money solution with the least risk. Other infrastructure options were considered. increase the risk of environmental impacts of the proposal. Page 28 of 68 . • Install the proposed site further up or down the track. is thinner at the top and less obtrusive than a lattice tower. helping to minimise visual impacts. • A ‘black spot’ in the DTRS network. The do nothing option was rejected for the reasons listed below. This would incur additional costs and. Alternatives to the Bankstown . potentially.Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) Site The following options were considered for the development of the Bankstown . • It provides a platform for future enhancements and increased operational safety. as per the recommendations of the Waterfall inquiry.• It is compatible with the Australian Rail Track Corporation’s communication system. • A monopole uses a foundation design that is better suited for the spatial limitations within the rail corridor. • The proposed monopole is less obtrusive. requires less space and is cheaper to maintain than a lattice tower or guyed mast. • An additional DTRS site would be required to ensure 100% network coverage. • To do nothing. but were not feasible for the proposed facility due to the reasons listed below. • The increasing maintenance costs of the MetroNet facility and its limited ability to adequate operate adequately for the next 10 to 15 years. • The radio frequency modelling indicated that a DTRS site in an alternative location will not provide coverage to 100% of the rail corridor. • A monopole can be installed using a hinge mechanism. • The inability to meet the requirement of 100% network coverage. • 3.

Page 29 of 68 . Outdoor cabinets are the most suitable solution.• The installation of a walk-in equipment hut would use more space and is more expensive. limited space and minimisation of environmental impacts. given the cost.

reliability and emergency responsiveness.Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) because this site will be consistent with the whole RailCorp DTRS network. Consistent technology choice will enable RailCorp to improve its existing quality of service.3.  The site is close to existing fibre and power supply and has good construction and maintenance access.  It will cover the 3.42 kilometre section of track between Lakemba and Bankstown.  The site also has a number of trees and other vegetation along the edge of the rail corridor and this will limit the visual impact of the site on the local community.6 Justification of the Preferred Option It was decided to construct a BTS at this location in Bankstown . It also meets the requirement to minimise the number of base transceiver stations along the network.Mt Lewis (Punchbowl) site was selected for the reasons listed below.  The site will not impact on existing RailCorp infrastructure such as overhead and underground services and will not impact on train drivers line of sight or signalling equipment. Page 30 of 68 . The location of this site is necessary for satisfactory handover between adjacent BTS sites due to the curvature of the rail corridor and any movement may necessitate an additional BTS with associated costs.  Developing the site will not require the removal of vegetation.  The proposed antenna height (approximately 10 metres) is the minimum height required to provide optimum radio frequency coverage across this section of track. The Bankstown . The reasons for selecting the technology are discussed above.  The RF modelling performed identified the selected site as the most suitable location for this section of track.

it is anticipated that erosion risks will be managed using the standard measures outlined in the Landcom/Department of Housing Managing Urban Stormwater. Soils and Construction Guidelines (the Blue Book) (Landcom 2004). Ashfield Shale. the installation of underground communication cables and the maintenance of the track. The proposal area is mapped as having a low probability of Acid Sulfate Soil occurrence. low soil fertility. This plan will detail appropriate erosion and sedimentation control measures which will be implemented during the construction phase. The site is in a cleared area with bitumen.  All spoil will be transferred directly to skip bins or stockpiled appropriately. Potential Impacts Less than 10 square metres of ground will be disturbed during the proposed works. Page 31 of 68 .1 Landforms. The measures will include. Geology and Soils Existing Situation The site is within the existing railway corridor approximately nine metres north of the track. given the relatively small level of disturbance. Limitations of this soil include moderately reactive highly plastic subsoil. The site is on a slight slope and there is a drainage line along the edge of the ballast. waterways and drains. adjacent to Punchbowl Station. but not be limited to. poor soil drainage. There has been significant disturbance in the area resulting from the establishment of the railway line. However. The site is within the Blacktown soil landscape.  Appropriate stockpiling of materials will take place away from drainage lines. gravel and grass surface cover and an underlying geology comprising Wianamatta Group. Soil and rock from the excavation will that is not to be used for backfilling will be placed into skip bins and removed from the site.4 Environmental Impact & Risks 4. Excavation could result in some erosion if appropriate mitigation measures are not in place. those outlined below. Possible Control Measures A site specific erosion and sediment control plan will be prepared as part of CEMP. The foundation for the monopole will result in approximately five cubic metres of spoil will be placed into a skip bin and removed from site at the completion of construction works. No operational impacts are expected. which is where surface water may accumulate.

8 kilometres southwest of the proposed site. it is unlikely that groundwater will be encountered.2 Water Quality and Hydrology Existing Situation The nearest water body is Salt Pan Creek. The suburban stormwater system is situated along the main roads and some stormwater drains may be present around the construction footprint in Urunga Parade. 1. any spills will be attended to and treated in an appropriate and timely fashion in accordance with normal RailCorp procedures.  Soil will be removed from public roads and other paved areas using dry street sweepers or other measures. given the distance between the construction and drains and creeks. If inappropriately managed. It is part of the Salt Pan Creek catchment which feeds into Georges River. No operational impacts expected. Excavation for the monopole foundations is approximately five metres and the water table is more than 10 metres below the surface. pollutants (e. The groundwater is estimated to be more than 10 metres below the surface Potential Impacts Without appropriate safeguards.  During maintenance activities. As a result. the risk of such an occurrence is low. this sedimentladen water could be discharged into local water bodies and/or the nearby stormwater system. However. 4. Any soil that may be contaminated or weed infested will be stockpiled separately before being removed from the site. if required. fuel/chemicals from accidental spills and sediment from excavations and stockpiles) may reach nearby drains and discharge into local waterways. Fuel/chemicals and increased sedimentation have the potential to harm aquatic life and affect the quality of water downstream.g. Rain or groundwater may enter the excavations.  Sediment fences and bunds will be installed and inspected regularly. The proposal will not affect the landform or the flow of water in the area.  The tracking of soils on public roads will be prevented by using appropriate shaker grids/ballast pads. A drainage line for rainfall is along the ballast of the railway line. Page 32 of 68 .  Disturbed areas will be replanted.

delivery and staff vehicles) and construction plant. but will not be limited to those outlined below. Potential Impacts Local and regional air quality can be affected during construction by dust.  Plant and equipment will not be refuelled on site. The following options have been identified:  disposal at an appropriate waste facility. and  reuse for vehicle cleaning and wash down.  Ensure construction materials are not left in the vicinity of storm water drains. Dust may be generated from the disturbance of soils or poorly maintained stockpile areas. The works will require energy to power vehicles (e. Major sources of air pollution in the Canterbury LGA are motor vehicles. wood fire heaters and industrial and commercial activities. Poorly maintained vehicles could produce excess emissions.1. construction.  land disposal.  discharge to the public sewer.3 Air Quality Existing Situation Canterbury City Council’s State of the Environment Report 2009-2010 reported that the regional air quality in greater metropolitan Sydney area was generally ‘good’. Groundwater/rainwater in trenches and/or the pit will be disposed of appropriately.  discharge to the existing storm water system. construction vehicle emissions and odour.  Plant and equipment will be checked regularly for oil leaks.Possible Control Measures During construction water quality impacts will be minimised through a range of control measures in addition to the erosion and sedimentation controls included in Section 4. The water quality measures may include.g. A water management plan will be prepared before construction begins to determine the most appropriate method for water disposal.  Wash down areas will be off site  Liquid waste generated during non-destructive excavation will be removed from the-site for treatment and disposal. 4. which can affect human health or property. The energy requirements will primarily be in the form of fuel (petrol and Page 33 of 68 .  Trenches and excavations will be covered to prevent rain water entering.

Biodiversity Existing Situation At a national level there are two ecological communities.  Minimal work will be undertaken during high wind periods.  Plant and equipment will be maintained in accordance with manufacturers’ specifications. Weed control is enforceable by Canterbury City Council.  Plant or machinery will not be left idling. as the local control authority under the Noxious Weeds Act 1993. which may include.diesel). 20 species of fauna. At a state level there are records of six threatened fauna species and two threatened flora species listed under the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (TSC Act) within the search area (refer Appendix 3).  Trucks and train carriages transporting spoil and other waste materials from site will be covered appropriately. which could include covering or regular watering to minimise dust. but the energy use will form only a small contribution to RailCorp’s overall greenhouse gas emissions. indirect and third party emissions will be generated as a result of energy used to produce materials (for example steel and concrete) – which is known as ‘embodied energy’. Possible Control Measures Air quality impacts throughout construction will be minimised through a range of control measures. electricity will be required to power the facility. Potential Impacts Page 34 of 68 .  4. The immediate area around the proposed monopole and cabinets has been cleared previously. These species or their habitat may occur in the search area (refer Appendix 3).3 to 2.  Regular inspection of plant and equipment will be undertaken to ascertain that fitted emission controls are operating efficiently. seven species of flora and 19 migratory species that may occur in the Canterbury LGA listed as threatened under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act 1999 (EPBC Act).7 kilograms of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e) emitted per litre of fuel consumed (DEWHA 2008).  Stockpiles will be maintained and contained appropriately. Fuel use will emit greenhouse gases with about 2.4 Disturbed areas will be rehabilitated after construction. During operation. In addition. There are a few mature trees both within the rail corridor and in Warren Reserve immediately north of the site. but will not be limited to those outlined below. There are 83 species that are declared noxious weeds in the Canterbury LGA.

the preparation of a Species Impact Statement under NSW legislation to further consider the impacts of the proposal on any threatened plants or animals is not considered necessary. As such. Animals could potentially fall into an open trench and become trapped or injured. it is unlikely that any threatened fauna species will be present in the area. • No trees will be removed. Excavation works have the potential to affect nearby trees if roots are damaged during excavation or equipment collides with trees.While there are several threatened species known to be present in the Canterbury LGA. the proposed works will not affect. which should be a sufficient distance to avoid adverse impacts. but will not be limited to those outlined below. threaten or have a significant impact on any ecological communities. an area where there is no bushland or dense vegetation. will be undertaken in consultation with Canterbury City Council. With regards to fauna. • Care will be taken to minimise the spread of weeds. Appropriate management and disposal of any noxious weeds. Given the absence of suitable habitat. The nearest trees are approximately five metres from some excavation sites. • The work site will be inspected for any trapped or injured fauna at the start of each day. plants or animals listed under the EPBC Act and/or TSC Act. Referral to the Commonwealth Minister for Sustainability. • Trenches/excavations will be covered at the end of each day and inspected before they are backfilled. and inspected before they are backfilled to ensure that no fauna species are harmed. Page 35 of 68 . the site is in a disturbed area adjacent to the rail corridor. Similarly. which may include. the works will not remove vegetation or any other features considered as potential habitat for fauna (threatened or otherwise). Noxious weeds are known to occur in the Canterbury area. Possible Control Measures Impacts to flora and fauna throughout construction will be minimised through a range of control measures. The works are not expected to impact on any listed threatened species or endangered ecological communities (EECs). Trenches/excavations will be covered at the end of each day. No operational impacts are expected. Population and Communities for further consideration or approval in relation to potential flora and fauna impacts associated with the works is not considered necessary. Water. • Care will be taken not to damage the existing trees and tree roots. Environment. Once soil has been disturbed there is the potential for the spread of weeds.

• that the proponent should also inform all potentially affected residents of the nature of works to be carried out. Punchbowl Road.4. Given this. and contact details. Construction Noise The Interim Construction Noise Guideline (ICNG) (DECC 2009) defines noise management levels (measured in decibels) for residential receivers and other types of receivers including commercial. The ICNG states: • that where the predicted or measured noise level is greater than the noise management level. Noise is likely to be created by construction trucks. The closest receivers to the site are residences around 60 metres away on Urunga Parade. the proponent should apply all feasible and reasonable work practices to meet the noise affected level. A range of standard construction noise mitigation measures is proposed to minimise noise (refer Table 2). and • that for works above the highly affected noise criteria respite periods may be required. commercial premises or schools will experience a noise level above the highly affected level of 75 dBA LAeq. Construction is expected to take between four and six weeks and all works will be undertaken during standard working hours. 15min. the expected noise levels and duration. however. 15min during the noisiest works. These activities will be of a short duration. which is the point where there may be strong community reaction to noise. Page 36 of 68 . it is unlikely that dwellings. machinery and. background noise monitoring and the establishment of noise management levels for residential receivers is not proposed. in particular. retail and schools.5 Noise and Vibration Existing Situation The adjacent railway line. and for works outside standard hours there needs to be a strong justification and negotiation with the community (DECC 2009). boring activities required to establish the foundations for the monopole. The Boulevard and local traffic are the major sources of noise in the area. The ICNG does. Given the offset distance and the natural vegetation barrier. and the community will be notified and provided with details of the works before construction begins. prescribe a highly noise affected criteria of 75 dBA LAeq.

Discomfort effects are not expected given the types of machinery required for construction works. No No Not applicable as night works are not proposed.00pm Monday to Friday and 8. No Construction works will take place during standard working hours. Similarly. Possible Control Measures Construction works will adopt Best Management Practice (BMP) and Best Available Technology Economically Achievable (BATEA) practices as addressed in the ICNG (DECC 2009). The proposed work will not require the use of vibration causing heavy machinery. structural damage to buildings is not expected as the nearest buildings are adjacent to the railway and already experience vibration from trains on a regular basis. In addition to the control measures listed in Table 2. where this is not possible. Operational Noise and Vibration No operational impacts are expected.00pm Saturday) or. Any noise complaints received will be addressed by the Project Manager as soon as possible. No Avoid the simultaneous operation of two or more noisy plant items in close vicinity and adjacent to residential receivers Yes Schedule the noisiest activities during normal business hours (7. Table 2 Possible Construction Noise Control Measures Possible Construction Noise Control Measures Maximising the offset distance between noisy plant items and nearby residential receivers Construction Noise Control Measures to be implemented during construction. Yes They will be approximately 60 metres from the nearest residential receiver. to less sensitive times of day Yes Provide periods of quiet if activities occur for extended periods during the night Yes Minimise consecutive night Yes Efforts will be made to minimise the unnecessary simultaneous operation of noisy plant and equipment.00am and 6.00am and 1.Construction Vibration Vibration effects from the operation of heavy machinery. such as vibratory rollers or large earth moving equipment have the potential to cause structural disturbance or discomfort. the community will be notified of the works. duration and provided with contact details before work begins. Page 37 of 68 .

No Carry out loading and unloading away from residential receivers Yes The unloading of materials for the proposed site will be done in the rail corridor. plant and equipment will be orientated from the nearest receivers. State Heritage Register. No Use structures to shield residential receivers from noise Yes Vegetation along the rail corridor boundary will act as a natural barrier. No Plan for and conducting night time activities in ways that eliminate or minimise the need for audible warning alarms Yes Notify residents of any proposed activities which are to be conducted outside normal business hours and which are likely to create offensive noise Yes 4. No Position site access points and roads as far as possible away from residential receivers Yes The site will be accessed via Urunga Parade approximately 50 metres from the nearest residential receiver. (including Commonwealth Register of the National Estate). Heritage Existing Situation A search for non-Aboriginal heritage items was undertaken on 26 May 2011 consulting the following databases: Canterbury Local Environmental Plan (LEP). Trucks and the site will be laid out to act as a barrier during the boring construction activities.6 No No Not applicable as night works are not proposed. Page 38 of 68 .Possible Construction Noise Control Measures Construction Noise Control Measures to be implemented during construction. time activities in the same locality No Not applicable as night works are not proposed. Not applicable as out of hours works are not proposed. Orient equipment away from residential receivers Yes Where possible. The RailCorp Section 170 Heritage and Conservation Register identifies Punchbowl Railway Station Group as having local historical significance. therefore limiting the impacts on the adjacent residential area. World Heritage Sites and RailCorp’s Section 170 Heritage and Conservation Register. Australian Heritage Database. State Heritage Inventory.

 Should Aboriginal heritage items be uncovered. No current waste has been identified on site.7 Waste Existing Situation RailCorp is required to manage waste in accordance with the Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Act 2001 (WARR Act). Environment Protection and Regulation Division. However. The Local Aboriginal Land Council will be notified and an assessment by an archaeologist will be arranged to determine the significance of the objects and any other requirements before work resumes. The potential to uncover unidentified Aboriginal heritage items is low. Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) will be notified in accordance with Section 89A of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974. Recycle. but will not be limited to those outlined below. all work in the vicinity will cease and the Project Manager and RailCorp heritage staff will be notified immediately. Energy Recovery and Disposal) should be followed for all projects. all work likely to affect it will cease and the Project Manager will be contacted. No Aboriginal sites or places were found at the proposal location or in the surrounds (refer Appendix 3). Reuse. The construction works will not impact any known items of Aboriginal heritage significance. which may include. there is some potential for previously unidentified items to be uncovered during construction. Potential Impact The main waste streams that may be generated during construction include: Page 39 of 68 . The Manager of the Planning and Aboriginal Heritage Section. before work resumes. RailCorp heritage staff and the NSW Heritage Branch (formerly Heritage Office) in the Office of Environment and Heritage will be notified as required. An investigation will be undertaken by a suitably qualified archaeologist to identify suitable measures to reduce the impact on the relic discovered.  If a non-Aboriginal historical relic is discovered. No permits or approvals will be required. 4. Potential Impacts The works are unlikely to impact on any known items or places of non-Aboriginal heritage value. Metropolitan Branch. All works will be undertaken away from known items.A search for known items of Aboriginal heritage value was undertaken for the proposal site. (with a 50 metre buffer) on 26 May 2011 using the Office of Environment and Heritage’s Aboriginal Heritage Information Management System (AHIMS). The site is in an area that has been disturbed previously. Possible Control Measures Impacts to heritage throughout construction will be minimised through a range of control measures. The waste hierarchy (Avoid.

metal and paper waste. and  groundwater (if encountered during excavation) No operational impacts are expected.  Any spoil or waste material tracked onto roads will be swept up immediately.  wiring. handling. plastic.  Packaging will be minimised. where possible and where the safety and delivery of services is not compromised.  All waste will be removed from the site when work is completed. but not be limited to.  asphalt. Page 40 of 68 . Contaminated Land 4.  general litter including glass. Furthermore. spoil from excavation.8 Existing Situation The site has been investigated for potential land contamination. The site manager will ensure bins are not overflowing and are appropriately covered. those outlined below.  Any material that may be classified as a hazardous waste will be dealt appropriately and in accordance with RailCorp procedures.  vegetation. waste impacts will be minimised through a range of control measures. storing and disposal.  Waste water generated by non-destructive excavation will be taken off site for treatment and disposal.  Adequate numbers of bins and waste containers will be placed at the site.  All waste will be classified in accordance with the Waste Classification Guidelines (DECCW 2009) and transported to a place that can lawfully accept the waste. Possible Control Measures A waste management plan will be prepared as part of CEMP to detail waste types and quantities as well as methods for segregation. (consistent with the WARR Act) which may include. The investigation included:  a visual inspection for signs of potential land contamination. suitable excavated spoil will be reused on site for backfilling.  packaging.  Wherever possible. landscaping and other purposes.

and  a review of all materials to be used at the site to establish their potential for land contamination.  a search of RailCorp records.  If any contamination is encountered or suspected. contaminants may pose a risk to the health of workers and the environment in general. therefore. the Environmental Management Plan for DTRS project and land contamination legislation. There is a risk that contaminants could be encountered during the proposed work. The initial investigation did not find any signs of potential land contamination. soil discoloration.  A remedial action plan (RAP) will be prepared before clean up operations begin. No waste dumping. If encountered. There are no visible and/or obvious signs of contamination in the vicinity of the site. RailCorp does not have any record or evidence that the site can be contaminated. the limited investigation cannot exclude potential contamination as the result of unknown past activities.  During excavation.  The site will be validated before work begins. soil colouring. those outlined below. However. the proposed work will not result in any new site contamination. odours and/or similar were noticed. The impact of potential contaminants will be minimised through a range of control measures including. Risk Management and Possible Controls The risk of encountering unknown contaminants during excavation will be managed in accordance with RailCorp procedures (see References). Hazardous materials will not be used during construction and operation and. either on the site or in the vicinity. site workers will look for signs of potential contamination such as the presence of waste and/or other imported materials. but not limited to. The closest site subject to an EPA notice is approximately 2. a search of OEH register of contaminated sites.2km north-northeast of the site and it is considered highly unlikely that it will impact the subject site. other than those typically associated with rail corridors. work will stop immediately and the site will be fenced off. floating layers in groundwater etc. odours. Potential Impact It is highly unlikely that the site can be contaminated by known activities or by contaminants migrating from the known contaminated site. Page 41 of 68 .  Any potential contamination will be investigated and work resumed only after approval from HSE Manager is obtained.

 Hazardous materials will be transported. Possible Control Measures The impact of any hazardous materials will be minimised through a range of control measures including. operation and maintenance of the proposed facility will not require the use of any chemicals and/or hazardous materials.g. if required for any unforeseen reason. The plan will detail terms applying to the purchase.  Adequate spill prevention. Hazardous Materials 4. a hazardous waste management plan will have to be prepared. stored and used in accordance with the corresponding material safety data sheets which will be available on the site. drip trays) will be provided on site if needed.  An evaluation of alternative materials will be undertaken before any use of chemicals is approved. Any refuelling will be undertaken at off-site facilities.  Construction personnel will be trained in spill containment and response procedures. including a need for a dangerous goods licence. should they be required. The site CEMP will further detail these measures. but not limited to. chemicals may present a risk to the safety of workers and the environment in general. However. Page 42 of 68 .  All storage and handling equipment on site will be maintained properly. use. storage. containment and response measures (e. incompatible chemicals will not be stored together. Contaminated soil will be segregated in a special container before classification and disposal.  No fuels will be stored on site.9 Existing Situation Construction. The CEMP will further detail the proposed control measures. Safe use of chemicals is regulated and subject to numerous standards. handling and disposal of such materials. those outlined below.  Hazardous materials will be stored in a locked and bunded area at the site. Potential Impact If not properly used.  Hazardous materials will be properly classified and managed in accordance with requirements for their particular class.

For example. Page 43 of 68 . Various combinations of visual sensitivity and visual magnitude produce low. relatively few of whom will have direct views of the monopole. such as the overhead cables and other communications poles in the area and around the railway line. When the site is operational. Bankstown railway line and associated overtrack power lines. such as cranes and trucks. For this proposal the sensitivity of the area is moderate given the presence of residential receivers. The overall impact is considered to be low-moderate. only the top section of the pole will be visible. however the magnitude of the impact area will be low given the existing visual environment and presence of vegetation screening. The new monopole will not be a dominant part of the visual landscape.4. The visual magnitude is derived from the scale and level of visual contrast between the proposed facility and existing visual environment.7 metre high cabinets and isolating transformer will be screened from Urunga Parade. The site is in an area of moderate sensitivity given the close proximity to residential receivers. The 1. It is not a bulky structure and is consistent with elements of the existing visual environment. There is vegetation lining the fence of the rail corridor. The new steel monopole will be approximately 10 metres high. There are dwellings north east of the proposal site along Urunga Parade. Both the visual sensitivity and magnitude of the monopole have been considered.10 Visual Aesthetics and Urban Design Existing Situation The visual landscape surrounding the proposed site includes Punchbowl Station. A commuter car park is south of the station and Warren Reserve is north of the site. moderate and high levels of impact. Most of these receivers are shielded by vegetation and. depending on the viewing angle. Potential Impacts During construction the visual environment will be altered temporarily through the presence of work buildings. their views of the railway are screened by existing vegetation. plant and equipment. Visual impact is then generally determined by reference to both visual sensitivity and visual magnitude. Visual sensitivity relates to the number of people who are likely to see the facility and their possible expectations of visual quality. commercial properties are generally considered less sensitive than private residences. a new 10 metre high monopole will be partially visible from Urunga Parade and Warren Reserve. Figure 4 and Figure 5 show how the monopole will look. However.

Figure 4 Photomontage of proposed site – view looking west Page 44 of 68 .

Figure 5 Photomontage of proposed site – view looking east Page 45 of 68 .

materials and refuse relating to the works will be removed. Potential Impacts Social and economic considerations typically focus on the effect on the local community as a whole.11 Land Use Existing Situation The proposed site is on land owned by RailCorp within the rail corridor adjacent to Punchbowl railway station.Possible Control Measures Visual impact will be minimised through a range of control measures. Residential dwellings are approximately 90 metres away along Urunga Parade and other surrounding streets. Page 46 of 68 .14. all vehicles.3% of the population born overseas. Amenity issues such as noise. A reserve is immediately north of the site and the surrounding area generally consists of residential and commercial/retail properties. Warren Reserve is immediately north of the site and a childcare centre is 75 metres away adjacent to the reserve. 4. had a population of around 135. which may include.10 and 4. in the 2006 census.000 with 51. Punchbowl Boys High School and playing fields are 230 metres north west of the site. and on any local businesses.12 Socio-Economic Effects Existing Situation The proposed site is in the Canterbury LGA which. The proposal will not have any effects on the use of the neighbouring properties. Possible Control Measures No specific control measures are required. visual impacts and traffic are some of the key areas that can affect the community and are discussed in detail in Sections 4. 4. but will not be limited to those outlined below. The closest residential receiver is 65 metres away from the proposed site.  The construction site will be kept tidy and rubbish free. Potential Impacts The proposal will not affect or alter the current use of the site or the immediate surrounding area as a rail corridor.  The site will be rehabilitated as soon as possible. The suburb of Punchbowl is mostly a residential suburb with some commercial and retail properties along major roads.  On completion of work.

As works will occur during normal construction hours. no additional track possessions are required. When operational. transport. traffic and visual sections. Radio frequency EME refers to the EME generated by radio waves. mobile phone base stations and radio communication facilities. 4. The Australian Radiation Protections and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has established a radiation protection standard specifying limits for continuous exposure of the general public and occupational workers to radio frequency emissions.  If any out of hours works is required. food. services and accommodation.  Nearby residents and businesses will be informed about the nature and timing of works. baby monitors. the facility will behind an existing fencing and will not pose a risk to public safety. There will be some minor traffic impacts due to trucks accessing the site. access to driveways for dwellings on Urunga Parade will be maintained. The work will not affect any other known community services. e.The nearest residential receivers are 65 metres from the proposed site and may be temporarily affected by noise.13 Electromagnetic Energy (EME) Existing Situation Electromagnetic energy (EME) is the energy stored in an electromagnetic field. Possible Control Measures In addition to the control measures proposed in the noise. The site will be appropriately fenced off during construction. Page 47 of 68 .g.  Appropriate fencing around the site will help maintain public safety during construction. TV and radio broadcasts. There will be positive long-term effects resulting from the proposal. including Warren Reserve. model planes. however. so there will be no additional interruptions to train services as a result of the work. other control measures are outlined below. surrounding receivers will be notified at least five days in advance. as the new DTRS will provide a more effective communication service and improve the safety of the rail network. There may be minor short-term positive impacts for the surrounding area as a result of the need for materials. EME is a factor of everyday life and is emitted by natural sources such as the sun and earth and by man-made sources operating on radio waves.  Signage will notify the public about the works. The DTRS project has a capital value of approximately $225 million and will generate over 100 jobs over the life of the project.

This will be via the access gate off Urunga Parade. It should be noted that the actual EME levels will be significantly less than predicted due to path losses and that the BTS automatically minimises transmitter power to serve only established phone calls. the volume of traffic will be very small and will not adversely impact the surrounding road network.0066% of the ARPANSA exposure limits. or a ladder and dual lanyard system. However. Potential Impacts During construction. but will not be limited to those outlined below. However. EME impacts are unlikely when the facility is operational. • Appropriate signage is placed around the site to warn people of the potential hazards. • UGL will notify Canterbury City Council of works within or adjacent to roadways and comply with any traffic control requirements. 4. It is expected that the monopole and antennas will be accessed via an elevated work platform. However.5 metres above the ground is estimated to be 0. • All people required to work around occupationally hazardous radio frequencies will undergo RadHaz training. The ARPANSA report is included at Appendix 4.14 Traffic and Access Existing Situation Access to the proposed site will be through an existing RailCorp gate. The maximum cumulative EME level at 1. The 2002 annual average daily traffic volume for Punchbowl Road at the intersection Bankstown railway line (which is close to the proposal) was around 25. Urunga Parade is a local residential cul-de-sac with one lane of traffic flowing in each direction.Potential Impacts EME levels emitted by the new BTS have been estimated at 1.5 metres above ground level at various distances from the proposed antennas. off Urunga Parade. which may include. there will be an increased number of vehicles using local streets. the following control measures are also recommended to minimise and health and safety risks. the anticipated volume of traffic is relatively small (approximately four to six truck movements per day) when compared to the existing volumes of traffic. There will be some traffic movement associated with maintenance vehicles that will need access to the facility when it is operational. Possible Control Measures The BTS will be in RailCorp land in an area which is not accessible by the public and has been designed so that it cannot be climbed. Page 48 of 68 .461 vehicles per day (RTA 2003). Possible Control Measures Impacts associated with traffic and access will be minimised through a range of control measures.

there is no new permanent lighting proposed. 4.18 Cumulative Environmental Effects Cumulative impacts can result when several different construction projects are scheduled for similar times and locations. 4. Depending on the service. No further consideration of light spill is considered necessary.17 Demand on Resources Construction materials are readily available and will be sourced from local contractors where possible. Page 49 of 68 . A number of public utilities are close to the site and there is potential for some known or unknown services to be impacted during excavation or relocation/connections. No overhead wires will need to be relocated. The facility will not require connections to water or gas.15 Utilities and Services Existing Situation There are high voltage overhead power lines that run adjacent to the site and across the site access track. outages or interruptions could affect nearby properties or the rail network. 4. Potential Impacts The facility will be connected to the existing fibre supply and to the Ausgrid electricity supply.  Public utility providers will be consulted to minimise impacts during any utility relocations or readjustments.• All pavement and road surfaces damaged during construction will be restored when work is finished.32002 Manual of uniform traffic control devices – traffic control devices on roads. RailCorp has an existing metered power supply and will continue to use this existing supply. • The Traffic Management Plan will ensure compliance with Australian Standard AS1742. In addition. Possible Control Measures  Ensure that a Dial Before You Dig call and RailCorp services search are undertaken to identify services. 4.16 Light spill Existing Situation Light spill impacts for the proposal will not occur as night works are not proposed.

as part of the DTRS project. There is also a risk of cumulative impacts if unscheduled work. Even if both facilities were constructed simultaneously. Proposed Control Measures  Any other major development or works planned in the vicinity of the proposal will be investigated before work begins. In terms of localised cumulative construction impacts.A search of the Department of Planning’s Major Projects register was undertaken and no major projects were identified in the vicinity of the proposed site. 4. is required. the nearest construction work for the DTRS project is the Bankstown Station site. the DTRS will provide a more effective communications system that will assist in the safe and efficient operation of RailCorp’s electrified rail network. The Bankstown (Mt Lewis) BTS site is one of a large number of radio communications facilities being installed across the RailCorp network as part of the DTRS project. will result in significant benefits by providing a more effective communications systems for the RailCorp network. it is not likely cumulative noise or local traffic impacts will result. emergency work by other utilities or developers. Overall this work.5 kilometres northwest of the Bankstown (Mt Lewis) site. the capacity to make simultaneous calls and greatly improved emergency calling capabilities. which is approximately 1. Once active. Such situations will be monitored and addressed by the Project Manager.19 Consideration of Clause 228 of EP&A Regulations and EPBC Act Clause 228 Factors Clause 228(2) of the EP&A Regulation 2000 details factors that must be taken into account when considering the likely impact of an activity on the environment. Table 3 below provides a summary of how each of these factors has been considered. The GSM-R system is in use around the world and allows for continuous communications coverage.  Canterbury City Council and any other relevant stakeholders will be consulted regarding other developments will be undertaken on an ongoing basis. Page 50 of 68 . A search of major development applications around the area currently on exhibition and recently determined was undertaken and did not identify any large projects nearby that might be constructed at a similar time. e.g.

anthropological. Page 51 of 68 . visual impacts will be minor. air quality. recreational. (f) Any impact on the habitat of any protected fauna (within the meaning of the National Parks and Wildlife Act. cultural. whether living on land. (d) Any reduction of the aesthetic. (c) Any environmental impact on the ecosystems of the locality? nil With the proposed mitigation measures in place the works will not impact on the ecosystem of the locality. in water or in the air? nil No protected or endangered species will be impacted. place or building having aesthetic. (e) Any effect on a locality. traffic and visual impacts resulting during construction. (g) Any endangering of any species of animal. historical. -ve long-term In the long term. -ve long-term In the long term. traffic and visual impacts for nearby residents.Table 3 Consideration of Clause 228 Factors Clause 228 Factor Impacts Comments (a) Any environmental impact on a community? -ve short-term There will be a short-term minor negative impact during the construction phase as there may be noise. However. scientific or social significance or other special value for present or future generations? nil No such significant places will be affected during construction or operation. there will be the addition of new infrastructure to the visual landscape (monopole and power pole). plant or other form of life. (h) Any long-term effects on the environment? nil The proposal will not pose any environmental risks in the long-term. 1974)? nil No habitat on which protected or endangered species will be reliant will be impacted. visual impacts have been assessed as minor. There will be minor changes to traffic flow on Urunga Parade. architectural. air quality. (b) Any transformation of a locality? -ve short-term Minor short-term changes during construction phase given the presence of machinery and noise. there will be the addition of new infrastructure to the visual landscape. scientific or other environmental quality or value of a locality? -ve short-term There will be a minor reduction in the aesthetic values of the neighbourhood due to the anticipated noise. However. archaeological.

the new DTRS will provide a safer and more efficient rail network. (j)Any risk to the safety of the environment? -ve short-term During construction there is a risk to the environment due to accidental spills and sedimentation but these risks will be minimised through the implementation of the proposed control measures. (k) Any reduction in the range of beneficial uses of the environment? -ve short-term Works will take place on RailCorp land but may affect traffic on Urunga Parade. (l)Any pollution of the environment? -ve short-term During construction there is a risk of noise and air pollution. air quality and traffic impacts are not expected. or are likely to become in short supply? nil Construction materials are readily available and will be sourced from local contractors where possible. will have significant benefits in providing a more effective communications systems for the RailCorp network. (p) Any impact on coastal processes and coastal hazards. including those under projected climate change conditions? nil The proposed works are not located on the coastline and have not been identified as within an area that will be subject to increased sea level rise. Nil = No Impact . natural or otherwise which are.Clause 228 Factor Impacts Comments (i)Any degradation of the quality of the environment? nil The works will not involve the removal of large areas of vegetation or adversely impact waterways. (o) Any cumulative environmental effect with other existing or likely future activities? nil short-term The distance between the different DTRS sites is such that cumulative noise. as part of the DTRS project. These risks will be minimised through the implementation of the proposed control measures. +ve = Positive Impact Page 52 of 68 . Alternate traffic arrangements will be detailed in an approved Traffic Management Plan. Once active. it is possible that spoil may be contaminated and an appropriate remediation plan and/or waste disposal method will be required. (n) Any increased demands on resources. +ve long-term Overall this proposal. Key: -ve = Negative Impact . (m) Any environmental problems associated with the disposal of waste? -ve short term During construction.

scale and location of the works are such that impacts on any RAMSAR wetland are not expected. (h) Any direct or indirect effect on Commonwealth land? No The proposal is not located within or in close proximity to any Commonwealth land. Table 4 Consideration of EPBC Factors Factor (Commonwealth Legislation) Impacts Comments (a) Any environmental impact on a World Heritage property? No There are no World Heritage properties in the vicinity of the works. Table 4 provides a summary of how these factors have been considered. Indirect impacts are also not expected. (g) Any environmental impact on a Commonwealth marine area? No The proposal is not located within the vicinity of any Commonwealth marine areas.EPBC Act 1999 Factors Matters of national environmental significance must also be considered as a requirement of the EPBC Act. (e) Any environmental impact on Commonwealth listed migratory species? No The nature. (c) Any environmental impact on wetlands of international importance? No The nature. scale and location of the works are such that impacts on any Commonwealth listed threatened species or ecological communities or their habitats are not expected. scale and location of the works are such that impacts on any Commonwealth listed threatened species or ecological communities or their habitats are not expected. (d) Any environmental impact on Commonwealth listed threatened species or ecological communities? No The nature. (f) Does any part of the proposal involve a nuclear action? No The proposal does not involve any nuclear actions. Indirect impacts are also not expected. Indirect impacts are also not expected. (b) Any impact on the National Heritage values of a National Heritage Place? No There are no National Heritage Places in the vicinity of the works. Page 53 of 68 .

 Sediment fences and bunds will be installed and inspected regularly.  Any soil that may be contaminated or weed infested will be stockpiled separately before being removed from the site.  Wash down areas will be off site  Liquid waste generated during non-destructive excavation will be removed from thesite for treatment and disposal. Geology and Soils  All spoil will be transferred directly to skip bins or stockpiled appropriately. if required. Air Quality  Plant and equipment will be maintained in accordance with manufacturers’ specifications. Page 54 of 68 .  Disturbed areas will be replanted.  Regular inspection of plant and equipment will be undertaken to ascertain that fitted emission controls are operating efficiently.  Plant and equipment will be checked regularly for oil leaks.  Plant and equipment will not be refuelled on site.  Appropriate stockpiling of materials will take place away from drainage lines.  During maintenance activities.20 Summary of Control Measures Landforms.  The tracking of soils on public roads will be prevented by using appropriate shaker grids/ballast pads.4.  Soil will be removed from public roads and other paved areas using dry street sweepers or other measures. waterways and drains. Water Quality and Hydrology  Ensure construction materials are not left in the vicinity of storm water drains.  Trenches and excavations will be covered to prevent rain water entering. any spills will be attended to and treated in an appropriate and timely fashion in accordance with normal RailCorp procedures.

Appropriate management and disposal of any noxious weeds. Page 55 of 68 . Noise and Vibration Please refer to Table 2 Possible Construction Noise Control Measures.  Stockpiles will be maintained and contained appropriately.  Trucks and train carriages transporting spoil and other waste materials from site will be covered appropriately.  The work site will be inspected for any trapped or injured fauna at the start of each day.  Minimal work will be undertaken during high wind periods.  Disturbed areas will be rehabilitated after construction.  Trenches/excavations will be covered at the end of each day and inspected before they are backfilled. which could include covering or regular watering to minimise dust. Biodiversity  No trees will be removed. will be undertaken in consultation with Canterbury City Council.  Care will be taken to minimise the spread of weeds.  Care will be taken not to damage the existing trees and tree roots. Plant or machinery will not be left idling.

all work likely to affect it will cease and the Project Manager will be contacted.  Adequate numbers of bins and waste containers will be placed at the site. Metropolitan Branch. Waste  All waste will be classified in accordance with the Waste Classification Guidelines (DECCW 2009) and transported to a place that can lawfully accept the waste.  Any material that may be classified as a hazardous waste will be dealt appropriately and in accordance with RailCorp procedures. where possible and where the safety and delivery of services is not compromised.Heritage  If a non-Aboriginal historical relic is discovered. all work in the vicinity will cease and the Project Manager and RailCorp heritage staff will be notified immediately.  Wherever possible.  Waste water generated by non-destructive excavation will be taken off site for treatment and disposal. The site manager will ensure bins are not overflowing and are appropriately covered.  All waste will be removed from the site when work is completed.  Any spoil or waste material tracked onto roads will be swept up immediately. The Local Aboriginal Land Council will be notified and an assessment by an archaeologist will be arranged to determine the significance of the objects and any other requirements before work resumes. suitable excavated spoil will be reused on site for backfilling. landscaping and other purposes.  Packaging will be minimised. Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) will be notified in accordance with Section 89A of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974. The RailCorp heritage staff and the NSW Heritage Branch in the Department of Planning and Infrastructure will be notified as required. Environment Protection and Regulation Division. Contaminated Land Page 56 of 68 . An investigation will be undertaken by a suitably qualified archaeologist to identify suitable measures to reduce the impact on the relic discovered before work resumes. The Manager of the Planning and Aboriginal Heritage Section.  Should Aboriginal heritage items be uncovered.

 The site will be validated before work begins.  A remedial action plan (RAP) will be prepared before clean up operations begin.g. Hazardous Materials  Hazardous materials will be properly classified and managed in accordance with requirements for their particular class. During excavation.  Hazardous materials will be stored in a locked and bunded area at the site.  No fuels will be stored on site. odours.  Contaminated soil will be segregated in a special container before classification and disposal. Any refuelling will be undertaken at off-site facilities. all vehicles. stored and used in accordance with the corresponding material safety data sheets which will be available on the site.  Any potential contamination will be investigated and work resumed only after approval from HSE Manager is obtained.  Construction personnel will be trained in spill containment and response procedures.  Adequate spill prevention.  The site will be rehabilitated as soon as possible.  Hazardous materials will be transported. materials and refuse relating to the works will be Page 57 of 68 . site workers will look for signs of potential contamination such as the presence of waste and/or other imported materials. work will stop immediately and the site will be fenced off.  An evaluation of alternative materials will be undertaken before any use of chemicals is approved.  On completion of the work. soil colouring. incompatible chemicals will not be stored together. drip trays) will be provided on site if needed.  If any contamination is encountered or suspected.  All storage and handling equipment on site will be maintained properly. containment and response measures (e. floating layers in groundwater etc. Visual Aesthetics and Urban Design  The construction site will be kept tidy and rubbish free.

 Signage will notify the public about the works.  Appropriate fencing around the site will help maintain public safety during construction. Page 58 of 68 . Socio-Economic Effects  Nearby residents and businesses will be informed about the nature and timing of works. Land Use No specific control measures are required. • Public utility providers will be consulted to minimise impacts during any utility relocations or readjustments. Electromagnetic Energy (EME)  Appropriate signage will be placed around the site to warn people of the potential hazards.32002 Manual of uniform traffic control devices – traffic control devices on roads.  If any out of hours works is required. • The Traffic Management Plan will ensure compliance with Australian Standard AS1742. surrounding receivers will be notified at least five days in advance.removed. Utilities and Services • Ensure that a Dial Before You Dig call and RailCorp services search are undertaken to identify services. • All pavement and road surfaces damaged during construction will be restored when work is finished. Traffic and Access • UGL will notify Canterbury City Council of works within or adjacent to roadways and comply with any traffic control requirements.  All persons required to work around occupationally hazardous radio frequencies will undergo RadHaz training.

The construction contractor will prepare the CEMP incorporating environmental mitigation measures for construction works including the control measures specified in this REF.Light spill No specific control measures are required. The CEMP will be prepared in accordance with the Guideline for the Preparation for Environmental Management Plans (DIPNR 2004). and  corrective action requirements and their verification. • Canterbury City Council and any other relevant stakeholders will be consulted regarding other developments will be undertaken on an ongoing basis. Cumulative Environmental Effects • Any other major development or works planned in the vicinity of the proposal will be investigated before work begins. The CEMP is the key environmental management document that the Project Manager will follow during construction and commissioning to ensure appropriate environmental management practices are followed. Page 59 of 68 .  assignment of responsibility for implementation and monitoring of environmental controls.  reporting and emergency procedures.21 Implementation Process The proposed control measures described at the end of each environmental impact section in this REF will be incorporated into a Construction Environmental Management Plan (CEMP).  details of statutory requirements including those of any approvals and licences. 4. Demand on Resources No specific control measures are required.  contact details for all site personnel and agency contacts. The CEMP will include:  details of environmental controls to be implemented including location and timing. A copy of this REF and the CEMP will be retained on site and produced upon request.

• DECCW (2009) Waste Classification Guidelines. Soils and Construction Guidelines (the Blue Book).5 • References DECC (2009) Interim Construction Noise Guideline.html • Canterbury City Council (2010) State of the Environment Report 2009/2010.environment.gov. Sydney.au/settlements/transport/fuelguide/environment. • Landcom (2004) Managing Urban Stormwater. Accessed on 11 August 2011 at: http://www. Prepared by the Department of Environment and Climate Change. • RTA (2003) Traffic Volume Data for Sydney Region 2002.rta. Climate Change and Water. Planning and Natural Resources.au/trafficinformation/downloads/aadtdata_dl1. • DoP (2010) NSW Telecommunication Facilities Guideline including Broadband. Prepared by the Department of Infrastructure. Page 60 of 68 . Prepared by Department of Planning. Sydney. Sydney. Sydney. Prepared by Landcom/Department of Housing.nsw. Prepared by the Department of Environment.gov. Prepared by Canterbury City Council.html • DIPNR (2004) Guideline for the Preparation of Environmental Management Plans. • DEWHA (2010) Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Accessed on 9 June 2011 at: http://www. Sydney. Sydney.

The cabinet is less than two metres high and will not be visible from public access points. The telecommunications facility is similar in design to other infrastructure within the rail corridor. using the same colour as the prevailing background to reduce its visibility. (e) A telecommunications facility should be located and designed to respond appropriately to its rural landscape setting. The proposed site and design is sympathetic to the nearby listed heritage items within the Punchbowl Railway Station Group. and their physical dimensions (including support mounts) should be sympathetic to the scale and height of the building to which it is to be attached. a telecommunications facility that is to be mounted on an existing building or structure should be integrated with the design and appearance of the building or structure. It is located in the rail corridor adjacent to a residential area. The selection of a monopole and antenna mounting system that is unobtrusive with minimal visual bulk has also minimised the visual impact. the presence of vertical structures as well as trees along the edge of the rail corridor. and sympathetic to adjacent buildings. a State or local heritage item or within a heritage conservation area. The outdoor cabinet will be located adjacent to the base of the monopole. visual clutter is to be reduced particularly on tops of buildings. (b) The visual impact of telecommunications facilities should be minimised. Principal Proposal (a) As far as practical. finishes and scale sympathetic to those of the heritage item or conservation area. the facility and their support mounts should be either the same as the prevailing colour of the host building or structure. This has been achieved by selecting a location inside the rail corridor where there is already a level of disturbance. including the use of existing vegetation where available. The proposed facility does not involve mounting antennas on a building or structure. The design and site selection has aimed to minimise the visual impact of the proposal. The proposal is not located in a rural area. (d) Ancillary facilities associated with the telecommunications facility should be screened or housed. or new landscaping where possible and practical. The proposal does not involve mounting antennas on a building or structure. (c) Where telecommunications facilities protrude from a building or structure and are predominantly backgrounded against the sky. or a neutral colour such as grey should be used. Page 61 of 68 . should be sited and designed with external colours. or adjacent to.Appendix 1: Principles from the Telecommunication Facilities Guideline Principle 1: A telecommunications facility is to be designed and sited to minimise visual impact. (f) A telecommunications facility located on.

any trees that may need removal will be located on RailCorp land and are not subject to tree preservation orders. It is unlikely any trees will need to be removed. The proposed facility will not block or significantly obstruct any views of heritage items or other landmarks of state significance. The proposed monopole is less than 500 millimetres wide at the top and there is no headframe supporting the antennas.Principal Proposal (g) A telecommunications facility should be located so as to minimise or avoid the obstruction of a significant view of a heritage item or place. The optical fibre for the DTRS network will be located in new underground conduits. vista or a panorama. Should the facility ever become redundant. The co-location of the proposal on other communications towers has been considered. Tree replanting will be investigated. EME and construction procedures. public utility structures. However. be co-located or attached to existing structures such as buildings. a landmark. As such a new monopole is proposed. as far as practical. The proposed facility is close to residential areas. The proposed design has been completed using “best industry practice” and complies with the relevant standards regarding structural engineering. to a condition that is similar to its condition before the facility was constructed. lopping. where practical. whether viewed from public or private land. a streetscape. the land will be restored as close as practicable to its condition before work began. views are partially screened by vegetation along the border of the rail corridor. (h) The relevant local government authority must be consulted where the pruning. No other towers were deemed appropriate or in a location to provide sufficient network coverage. should tree removal be required. However. towers or other radio communications equipment to minimise the proliferation of telecommunication facilities and unnecessary clutter. The monopole and new power pole will not represent a dominant structure in the view lines of people occupying the residential properties in the surrounding area. (j) The siting and design of telecommunications facilities should be in accordance with any relevant Industry Design Guides. (i) A telecommunications facility that is no longer required is to be removed and the site restored. or removal of any tree or other vegetation would contravene a Tree Preservation Order applying to the land or where a permit or development consent is required. antennas and ancillary telecommunications facilities should. Principal Proposal (a) Telecommunications lines are to be located. Page 62 of 68 . Principle 2: Telecommunications facilities should be co-located wherever practical. RailCorp will decommissioned and remove the applicable components and following the removal. (b) Overhead lines. poles. underground or within an existing underground conduit or duct.

Principle 3: Health standards for exposure to radio emissions will be met. The facility will comply with the ARPANSA standard in relation to human exposure to EME. siting of facilities and notifications. The proposal is not for a mobile phone network and is not subject to the Code for the Development of Mobile Phone Network Infrastructure commonly known as the ACIF Code. and demonstrate compliance with the Mobile Phone Networks Code. installed and operated so that the resultant cumulative levels of radio frequency emissions of the colocated telecommunications facilities are within the maximum human exposure levels set out in the Radiation Protection Standard. It is to show the predicted levels of electromagnetic energy surrounding the development comply with the safety limits imposed by the Australian Communications and Media Authority and the Electromagnetic Radiation Standard. (e) If a facility is proposed not to be colocated the proponent must demonstrate that co-location is not practicable. (b) An EME Environmental Report shall be produced by the proponent of development to which the Mobile Phone Network Code applies in terms of design. The proposal does not involve the use of an existing tower. The proposal does not involve the use of an existing tower. the extension of existing towers in the area was considered and deemed unsuitable. (f) If the development is for a co-location purpose. This report demonstrates compliance with the ARPANSA standard for the operation of a radio communications facility in Australia. An EME report has been completed and is found at Appendix 4. Principal Proposal (a) A telecommunications facility must be designed. (d) The extension of an existing tower must be considered as a practical co-location solution prior to building new towers. There are no suitable communications towers in the target coverage area that will satisfy the coverage objectives as well as the network requirements of the DTRS project. The Report is to be in the format required by the Australian Radiation Protection Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). installed and operated so that the maximum human exposure levels to radiofrequency emissions comply with Radiation Protection Standard.Principal Proposal (c) Towers may be extended for the purposes of co-location. and deemed unsuitable. Page 63 of 68 . The extension of existing towers in the area was considered. An EME report has been completed and is found at Appendix 4. The proposal is not a co-location. However. then any new telecommunications facility must be designed.

Riverina. The proposal will be located within the rail corridor that is owned and used by RailCorp. (d) The telecommunications facility is not to affect the structural integrity of any building on which it is erected. including the Morundah Communication Facility. and maximise compliance Principal Proposal (a) The siting and height of any telecommunications facility must comply with any relevant site and height requirements specified by the Civil Aviation Regulations 1988 and the Airports (Protection of Airspace) Regulations 1996 of the Commonwealth. The proposal is not connected to an existing building. (e) The telecommunications facility is to be erected wholly within the boundaries of a property where the landowner has agreed to the facility being located on the land.1). The installation and operation of the radio equipment and antennas will be carried out in accordance with the manufacturers’ specifications. RailCorp will operate the radio facility with its own spectrum and the facility will not cause any interference with other networks. It must not penetrate any obstacle limitation surface shown on any relevant Obstacle Limitation Surface Plan that has been prepared by the operator of an aerodrome or airport operating within 30 kilometres of the proposed development and reported to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority Australia. (b) The telecommunications facility is not to cause adverse radio frequency interference with any airport.Principle 4: Minimise disturbance and risk. The provisions of the Civil Aviation Regulations 1988 and the Airports (Protection of Airspace) Regulations 1996 have been considered during design and siting. Page 64 of 68 . (c) The telecommunications facility and ancillary facilities are to be carried out in accordance with the applicable specifications (if any) of the manufacturers for the installation of such equipment. erosion controls. (f) The carrying out of construction of the telecommunications facilities must be in accordance with all relevant regulations of the Blue Book – ‘Managing Urban Storm water: Soils and Construction’ (Landcom 2004). All radio transmitters will use the frequency assigned to RailCorp for the exclusive use of RailCorp. or its replacement. The activities associated with construction and installation will be done in accordance with sediment controls. RailCorp is the proponent of the network and agrees to the use of the land for the proposed radio equipment. port or Commonwealth Defence navigational or communications equipment. There is no need for the installation of a warning light or aircraft navigation light. as the proposal does not penetrate the Obstacle Limitation Surface. stormwater controls and other controls outlined in the Blue Book (refer Section 4.

suitable replanting will be undertaken (refer Section 4. Construction activities will take place in the rail corridor.00am to 1.00pm. paving or other existing facilities removed or damaged during construction should be reinstated (at the telecommunications carrier’s expense) to at least the same condition as that which existed prior to the telecommunications facility being installed. Mondays to Saturdays. Where possible.Principal Proposal (g) Obstruction or risks to pedestrians or vehicles caused by the location of the facility. work will cease immediately and the OEH will be consulted and works will not resume until OEH has granted its consent. construction activity or materials used in construction are to be mitigated.00pm. A search of the AHIMS has been completed and there are no known items or places of archaeological significance on the site or in the immediate surrounding area (refer Appendix 3).00am and 6. Tree removal is not proposed as part of the works. (m) The likelihood of harming an Aboriginal Place and / or Aboriginal object should be identified. If there are any suspicious items or objects found during any excavation works.3-2002 Manual of uniform traffic control devices – traffic control devices on roads (refer Section 4. Page 65 of 68 . A Traffic Management Plan will be developed and implemented during construction and installation activities. The proposed activities will not require the removal of significant amounts of vegetation. A search of threatened species has been completed (refer Appendix 3) and there is not expected to be any significance impacts on any threatened species. (h) Where practical.14).4). should the works require the removal of any trees. all work associated with the development and installation will take place between 7. traffic flow on Urunga Parade may be impacted.00pm Saturdays. (j) Open trenching should be guarded in accordance with Australian Standard Section 93. with no work on Sundays and public holidays. (l) The likelihood of impacting on threatened species and communities should be identified in consultation with relevant state or local government authorities and disturbance to identified species and communities avoided wherever possible. or Aboriginal objects are found. Any street furniture or paving and walkways that are damaged during construction will be reinstated at the end of construction to at least the same condition as they were in before work began. Any traffic changes will be implemented in accordance with an approved Traffic Management Plan There will be no risks to traffic or pedestrians when the facility is operational. (i) Traffic control measures are to be taken during construction in accordance with Australian Standard AS1742. The procedures and mitigation measures in the plan will ensure compliance with Australian Standard AS1742. All works are to occur in the rail corridor. However. (n) Street furniture. work is to be carried out during times that cause minimum disruption to adjoining properties and public access. Hours of work are to be restricted to between 7. Approvals from the Office of Environment & Heritage (OEH) must be obtained where impact is likely. However.3-2002 Manual of uniform traffic control devices – Traffic control devices on roads. Mondays to Fridays and 8.00am and 6. All trenches will be covered or filled so that they are not open over night. (k) Disturbance to flora and fauna should be minimised and the land is to be restored to a condition that is similar to its condition before the work was carried out. with no work on Sundays and public holidays.080 – Road Engineering AS1165 – 1982 – Traffic hazard warning lamps.

Appendix 2: Design Plans Refer attached documents:  DTRS-D-078-BS-0003: Bankstown (Mt Lewis) Outdoor Design – Rail Corridor Site Layout Plan  DTRS-D-078-BS-0004: Bankstown (Mt Lewis) Outdoor Design – Rail Corridor BTS Set out Design  DTRS-D-078-BS-0005: Bankstown (Mt Lewis) Outdoor Design – Rail Corridor BTS Elevation and Antenna Table  DTRS-D-078-TR-0001: Bankstown (Mt Lewis) Transmission Diagram  DTRS-D-078-BS-0031: Bankstown (Mt Lewis) Electrical Site Layout Plan Page 66 of 68 .

Flora Extracts from the NSW Wildlife Atlas .Fauna Aboriginal Heritage Information Management System Report Section 170: RailCorp Heritage Register NSW Heritage Register Australian Heritage Database EPBC Act 1999 Protected Matters Report Page 67 of 68 .Appendix 3: Database searches Extracts from the NSW Wildlife Atlas .

Appendix 4: Electro-Magnetic Energy (EME) Reports Refer attached document:  DTRS-R-078-EM-0001: Bankstown (Mt Lewis) Electro-Magnetic Energy Report (ARPANSA Report) Page 68 of 68 .

Released
Subject to Comments
By: Robert Mahood
UGL Infrastructure
Date: 05/05/2011
Reviewers: PD,PH

Released
By: Robert Mahood
UGL Infrastructure
Date: 05/05/2011
Reviewers: PD,PH

Released
By: Robert Mahood
UGL Infrastructure
Date: 05/05/2011
Reviewers: PD,PH

EM.AH .Released By: Robert Mahood UGL Infrastructure Date: 05/05/2011 Reviewers: BB.PH.

Released
By: Robert Mahood
UGL Infrastructure
Date: 13/05/2011
Reviewers: DB

Summary of Estimated RF EME Levels around the
Rail Corp DTRS Site 78, Bankstown (Mt Lewis) NSW-2196.
Introduction:

Date 29/04/2011

DTRS-R-078-EM-0001_A

Released
This report summarises the estimated maximum cumulative radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic energy (EME) levels at

ground level emitted from the RailCorp DTRS Site 78, Bankstown (Mt Lewis) NSW-2196. Maximum EME levels are estimated
By: Robert Mahood
in 360 circular bands out to 500m from the base station. The procedures for making the estimates have been developed by
UGL
Infrastructure
the Australian
Radiation
Protection And Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA)1. These are documented in the ARPANSA
Date:
06/05/2011
Reviewers:
PD,LB
Technical Report; “Radio Frequency EME
Exposure Levels
- Prediction Methodologies” which is available at
http://www.arpansa.gov.au

EME Health Standard
ARPANSA, an Australian Government agency in the Health and Ageing portfolio has established a Radiation Protection
Standard2 specifying limits for continuous exposure of the general public to RF transmissions at frequencies used by mobile
phone base stations. Further information can be gained from the ARPANSA web site.
The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA)3 mandates exposure limits for continuous exposure of the
general public to RF EME from mobile phone base stations. Further information can be found at the ACMA website
http://emr.acma.gov.au

Proposed Site Radio Systems
Antenna No

Model

Height (m)

Bearing (°)

Power (dBm)

A1

YOLYCOM YLDY-17/23-12

9.03 m

85

35.8 dBm

A2

YOLYCOM YLDY-17/23-12

9.03 m

280

35.8 dBm

Table of Predicted EME Levels –Proposed
Distance from the antennas at Bankstown (Mt Lewis)
in 360 circular bands

Maximum Cumulative EME Level – All carriers at this site
(% of ARPANSA exposure limits2)
Public exposure limit = 100%

0m to 50m
50m to 100m
100m to 200m
200m to 300m
300m to 400m
400m to 500m

0.0066%
0.0066%
0.0038%
0.0012%
0.00057%
0.00032%

Maximum EME level
51.52 m, from the antennas at Bankstown

0.0066%

Table_A: Estimation for the maximum level of RF EME at 1.5m above the ground from the proposed antennas assuming level ground. The

estimated levels have been calculated on the maximum mobile phone call capacity anticipated for this site. This estimation does not include
possible radio signal attenuation due to buildings and the general environment. The actual EME levels will generally be significantly less than
predicted due to path losses and the base station automatically minimising transmitter power to only serve established phone calls 5. Where
applicable, particular locations of interest in the area surrounding the base station, including topographical variations, are assessed in Appendix
A “ Other areas of Interest” table on the last page.

Summary –Proposed Radio Systems
RF EME levels have been estimated from the proposed antennas at Bankstown (Mt Lewis) Site. The maximum cumulative
EME level at 1.5 m above ground level is estimated to be 0.0066 % of the ARPANSA public exposure limits.

Environmental EME report
Page 1 of 3

(2007 ARPANSA Format)

M110460
EMC Technologies Pty Ltd

Existing Site Radio Systems
There are currently no existing radio systems for this site.

Reference Notes:
1.

The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) is a Federal Government agency incorporated under
the Health and Ageing portfolio. ARPANSA is charged with responsibility for protecting the health and safety of people, and the
environment, from the harmful effects of radiation (ionising and non-ionising).

2.

Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), 2002, ‘Radiation Protection Standard: Maximum Exposure
Levels to Radiofrequency Fields — 3 kHz to 300 GHz’, Radiation Protection Series Publication No. 3, ARPANSA, Yallambie Australia.
[Printed version: ISBN 0-642-79400-6 ISSN 1445-9760]
[Web version: ISBN 0-642-79402-2 ISSN 1445-9760]

3.

The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) is responsible for the regulation of broadcasting,
radiocommunications, telecommunications and online content. Information on EME is available at http://emr.acma.gov.au/

4.

The EME predictions in this report assume a near worst-case scenario including:
- base station transmitters operating at maximum power (no automatic power reduction)
- simultaneous telephone calls on all channels
- an unobstructed line of sight view to the antennas.
In practice a worst-case scenario is rarely the case. There are often trees and buildings in the immediate vicinity, and cellular
networks automatically adjust transmit power to suit the actual telephone traffic. The level of EME may also be affected where
significant landscape features are present and predicted EME levels might not be the absolute maximum at all locations.

5.

Further explanation of this report may be found in “Understanding the ARPANSA Environmental EME Report” and other documents
on the ARPANSA web site, http://www.arpansa.gov.au

Issued by: EMC Technologies Pty Ltd, Data reference file – Bankstown_M110460

Environmental EME report
Page 2 of 3

(2007 ARPANSA Format)

M110460
EMC Technologies Pty Ltd

Estimation Notes / Assumptions – Other Areas of Interest Variable ground topography has been included in the assessment of the “Other Areas of Interest” as per ARPANSA methodology Environmental EME report Page 3 of 3 (2007 ARPANSA Format) M110460 EMC Technologies Pty Ltd . This table includes any existing and proposed radio systems.00016% 0.000011% 0.00022% 0m to 2m 0m to 2m 0.00094% 0.00000000051% 0.0000011% 0.Appendix A Table of Other Areas of Interest Height / Scan Additional Locations relative to location ground level Maximum Cumulative EME Level All Carriers at this site (% of ARPANSA exposure limits2) Public exposure limit = 100% Urunga Parade Children’s Centre (~206m away) Jenday Kindergarten (~194m away) Andy Pandy On Broadway Child Care (~269m away) Cuddles 4 Kids Child Care (~367m away) Playtime Pre-School Long Day care Centre (~304m away) Wiley Park Girl's High School (~176m away) Punchbowl Boys High School (~352m away)l 0m to 2m 0m to 2m 0m to 2m 0m to 2m 0m to 2m 0.00026% Table: Estimation for the maximum EME levels at selected areas of interest over a height range relative to the specific ground level at the area of interest.

05646 . 0 Aboriginal places have been declared in or near the above location. * If your search shows Aboriginal sites or places what should you do? You must do an extensive search if AHIMS has shown that there are Aboriginal sites or places recorded in the search area.au/gazette) website. PO BOX 1967 Hurstville NSW 2220 43 BridgeStreet HURSTVILLE NSW 2220 Tel: (02)9585 6094. Long To : -33. You can get further information about Aboriginal places by looking at the gazettal notice that declared it. Information recorded on AHIMS may vary in its accuracy and may not be up to date .92524. Long From : -33. Some parts of New South Wales have not been investigated in detail and there may be fewer records of Aboriginal sites in those areas.nsw.Location details are recorded as grid references and it is important to note that there may be errors or omissions in these recordings.AHIMS Web Services (AWS) Cover Letter Your Ref Number : Noel Arnold & Associates Level 2 11 Khartoum Road North Ryde New South Wales 2113 Date: 26 May 2011 Attention: Hayley Given Dear Sir or Madam: AHIMS Web Service search for the following area at Lat. refer to the next steps of the Due Diligence Code of practice.gov. 151. Fax: (02)9585 6094 ABN 30 841 387 271 Email: ahims@environment.05648 with a Buffer of 50 meters. Aboriginal places gazetted after 2001 are available on the NSW Government Gazette (http://www.92526.gov. Gazettal notices published prior to 2001 can be obtained from DECCW's Aboriginal Heritage Information Unit upon request Important information about your AHIMS search AHIMS records information about Aboriginal sites that have been provided to DECCW and Aboriginal places that have been declared by the Minister. These areas may contain Aboriginal sites which are not recorded on AHIMS.nsw. 151.au .Lat.gov. Aboriginal objects are protected under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 even if they are not recorded as a site on AHIMS. If you are checking AHIMS as a part of your due diligence.environment. Additional Info : conducted by Hayley Given on 26 May 2011 A search of the DECCW AHIMS Web Services (Aboriginal Heritage Information Management System) has shown that: 0 Aboriginal sites are recorded in or near the above location.au Web: www. This search can form part of your due diligence and remains valid for 12 months.nsw.

NSW. Australia (Registered) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Removed from Register or IL) Register of the National Estate Ashbury. NSW. Australia Belmore Urban Conservation Area Campsie Fire Station Beamish St Campsie. NSW. Australia Lakemba. NSW. NSW. Australia Earlwood.Australian Heritage Database Page 1 of 2 Search Results 26 results found. Australia (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Registered) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate 26/05/2011 . NSW. NSW. Australia Canarys Road Urban Conservation Area Canterbury Post Office 193 Canterbury Rd Clemton Park Urban Conservation Area Cooks River Sewer Aqueduct Homer St Thornley St Defoe Street Urban Conservation Area Defor St Dennis Street Urban Conservation Area Earlwood North Urban Conservation Area Earlwood Urban Conservation Area http://www.au/cgi-bin/ahdb/search.pl Canterbury. Australia Marrickville. NSW. Australia Clemton Park.environment. Australia Roselands. Australia Ashbury. Australia Andrews Avenue Urban Conservation Area Ashbury Brickworks Kiln and Chimney Stack Trevenar St Ashbury. Australia Belfield Urban Conservation Area Belmore.gov. NSW. NSW. NSW. Australia Wiley Park. Australia Earlwood. NSW. NSW. ASC Sugar Mill (former) Church St Canterbury. NSW. NSW. Australia Ashbury Urban Conservation Area Belfield.

Australia (Registered) Register of the National Estate Report Produced: Thu May 26 16:45:59 2011 Accessibility | Disclaimer | Privacy | © Commonwealth of Australia http://www. Australia Undercliffe Urban Conservation Area (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate Beverly Hills. NSW. Australia Belmore.au/cgi-bin/ahdb/search. Australia Campsie.gov. NSW.12 Jackson Pl Undercliffe. Australia Lawn Avenue Urban Conservation Area Moorfields Methodist Cemetery 98-100 Moorefields Rd Kingsgrove. Australia Punchbowl Urban Conservation Area Belmore. NSW. NSW. Australia Robert Street Urban Conservation Area Undercliffe. Australia Hillview Street Urban Conservation Area Jackson Place Cottages 2 . NSW. Australia Paxton Avenue Urban Conservation Area Punchbowl. NSW. NSW. Australia Redman Parade Urban Conservation Area Belmore. NSW.environment. NSW.pl 26/05/2011 .Australian Heritage Database Page 2 of 2 Roselands. NSW. NSW. (Indicative Place) Australia Register of the National Estate Welfare Avenue Urban Conservation Area Wolli Creek Sewer Aqueduct (Indicative Place) Register of the National Estate Unwin St Undercliffe.

EPBC Act Protected Matters Report This report provides general guidance on matters of national environmental significance and other matters protected by the EPBC Act in the area you have selected. NSW Report created: 26/05/11 17:50:55 Summary Details Matters of NES Other matters protected by the EPBC Act Extra Information Caveat Acknowledgements This map may contain data which are ©Commonwealth of Australia (Geoscience Australia).html LGA CANTERBURY.au/epbc/assessmentsapprovals/index.gov. forms and application process details can be found at http://www. Information on the coverage of this report and qualifications on data supporting this report are contained in the caveat at the end of the report. Information about the EPBC Act including significance guidelines. ©PSMA 2010 .environment.

Further information is available in the detail part of the report. Approval may also be required for the Commonwealth or Commonwealth agencies proposing to take an action that is likely to have a significant impact on the environment anywhere. World Heritage Properties: None National Heritage Places: None Wetlands of International Significance (Ramsar Wetlands): Great Barrier Reef Marine Park: 1 Commonwealth Marine Areas: None Threatened Ecological Communitites: Threatened Species: 2 Migratory Species: 19 None 27 Other Matters Protected by the EPBC Act This part of the report summarises other matters protected under the Act that may relate to the area you nominated. the environment from the actions taken on Commonwealth land. or the environment anywhere when the action is taken on Commonwealth land. or may relate to. or a member of a listed marine species.au/epbc/permits/index.Summary Matters of National Environmental Significance This part of the report summarises the matters of national environmental significance that may occur in. Approval may be required for a proposed activity that significantly affects the environment on Commonwealth land. Information on the new heritage laws can be found at http://www. the area you nominated.html Please note that the current dataset on Commonwealth land is not complete.gov. Commonwealth Lands: 5 Commonwealth Heritage Places: None Listed Marine Species: 17 Whales and Other Cetaceans: None Critical Habitats: None . whales and other cetaceans.environment.gov.see http://www. Further information on Commonwealth land would need to be obtained from relevant sources including Commonwealth agencies. As heritage values of a place are part of the 'environment'.environment. A permit may be required for activities in or on a Commonwealth area that may affect a member of a listed threatened species or ecological community. local agencies. If you are proposing to undertake an activity that may have a significant impact on one or more matters of national environmental significance then you should consider the Administrative Guidelines on Significance . which can be accessed by scrolling or following the links below. a member of a listed migratory species.html. Information on EPBC Act permit requirements and application forms can be found at http://www. these aspects of the EPBC Act protect the Commonwealth Heritage values of a Commonwealth Heritage place and the heritage values of a place on the Register of the National Estate. The EPBC Act protects the environment on Commonwealth land.au/epbc/assessmentsapprovals/guidelines/index.au/heritage/index.gov. when the action is outside the Commonwealth land. and the environment from actions taken by Commonwealth agencies.environment.html. and land tenure maps.

Commonwealth Reserves: None Report Summary for Extra Information This part of the report provides information that may also be relevant to the area you have nominated. Name Status Type of Presence Turpentine-Ironbark Forest in the Critically Community likely to occur within area Sydney Basin Bioregion Endangered Shale/Sandstone Transition Forest Endangered Community likely to occur within area Threatened Species Name BIRDS Anthochaera phrygia Regent Honeyeater [82338] Lathamus discolor Swift Parrot [744] Neophema chrysogaster Orange-bellied Parrot [747] Rostratula australis Australian Painted Snipe [77037] FROGS Heleioporus australiacus Giant Burrowing Frog [1973] [ Resource Information ] Status Type of Presence Endangered Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Endangered Species or species habitat may occur within area Critically Species or species habitat may occur within area Endangered Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area Vulnerable Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Litoria aurea Green and Golden Bell Frog [1870] Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area Litoria raniformis Growling Grass Frog. Warty . remote sensing imagery and other sources. Where threatened ecological community distributions are less well known. maps are derived from recovery plans. Place on the RNE: 28 State and Territory Reserves: 1 Regional Forest Agreements: None Invasive Species: 17 Nationally Important Wetlands: None Details Matters of National Environmental Significance Wetlands of International Significance (RAMSAR Sites) Name Towra point nature reserve [ Resource Information ] Proximity Within 10km of Ramsar site Threatened Ecological Communities [ Resource Information ] For threatened ecological communities where the distribution is well known. existing vegetation maps and point location data are used to produce indicative distribution maps. State vegetation maps. Southern Bell Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area Frog. Green and Golden Frog.

curviflora [4182] Pterostylis saxicola Sydney Plains Greenhood [64537] Thesium australe Austral Toadflax. Hairy Stemmed Wattle Vulnerable Species or species habitat likely to occur within area [18800] Caladenia tessellata Thick-lipped Spider-orchid. Endangered Species or species habitat may occur within area Tiger Quoll (southeastern mainland population) [75184] Isoodon obesulus obesulus Southern Brown Bandicoot [68050] Endangered Species or species habitat may occur within area Petrogale penicillata Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby [225] Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area Potorous tridactylus tridactylus Long-nosed Potoroo (SE mainland) Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area [66645] Pseudomys novaehollandiae New Holland Mouse [96] Vulnerable Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Pteropus poliocephalus Grey-headed Flying-fox [186] Vulnerable Foraging. Spotted-tail Quoll. Vulnerable Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Endangered Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area Endangered Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Vulnerable Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Endangered Species or species habitat may occur within area Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area Endangered Species or species habitat may occur within area . Toadflax [15202] REPTILES Caretta caretta Loggerhead Turtle [1763] Chelonia mydas Green Turtle [1765] Dermochelys coriacea Leatherback Turtle. Daddy Long-legs [2119] Deyeuxia appressa [7438] Melaleuca biconvexa Biconvex Paperbark [5583] Pimelea curviflora var. feeding or related behaviour known to occur within area PLANTS Acacia pubescens Downy Wattle. Leathery Turtle. Large Pied Bat Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area [183] Dasyurus maculatus maculatus (SE mainland population) Spot-tailed Quoll.Swamp Frog [1828] Mixophyes balbus Stuttering Frog. Southern Barred Frog Vulnerable Species or species habitat likely to occur within area (in Victoria) [1942] MAMMALS Chalinolobus dwyeri Large-eared Pied Bat.

White Egret [59541] Ardea ibis Cattle Egret [59542] Migratory Marine Species Caretta caretta Loggerhead Turtle [1763] Chelonia mydas Green Turtle [1765] Dermochelys coriacea Leatherback Turtle. Leathery Turtle. Luth [1768] Eretmochelys imbricata Hawksbill Turtle [1766] Migratory Terrestrial Species Haliaeetus leucogaster White-bellied Sea-Eagle [943] Hirundapus caudacutus White-throated Needletail [682] Merops ornatus Rainbow Bee-eater [670] Monarcha melanopsis Black-faced Monarch [609] Myiagra cyanoleuca Satin Flycatcher [612] Neophema chrysogaster Orange-bellied Parrot [747] Rhipidura rufifrons Rufous Fantail [592] Xanthomyza phrygia Regent Honeyeater [430] Migratory Wetlands Species Ardea alba Great Egret. White Egret [59541] Ardea ibis Cattle Egret [59542] Gallinago hardwickii [ Resource Information ] Status Type of Presence Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Endangered Species or species habitat may occur within area Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area Endangered Species or species habitat may occur within area Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Breeding may occur within area Breeding likely to occur within area Critically Species or species habitat may occur within area Endangered Breeding may occur within area Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area .Luth [1768] Eretmochelys imbricata Hawksbill Turtle [1766] Hoplocephalus bungaroides Broad-headed Snake [1182] Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area Vulnerable Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Migratory Species Name Migratory Marine Birds Apus pacificus Fork-tailed Swift [678] Ardea alba Great Egret.

Australian Postal Corporation Commonwealth Land . lat. Japanese Snipe [863] Haliaeetus leucogaster White-bellied Sea-Eagle [943] Hirundapus caudacutus White-throated Needletail [682] Lathamus discolor Swift Parrot [744] Merops ornatus Rainbow Bee-eater [670] Monarcha melanopsis Black-faced Monarch [609] Myiagra cyanoleuca Satin Flycatcher [612] Neophema chrysogaster Orange-bellied Parrot [747] Rhipidura rufifrons Rufous Fantail [592] Rostratula benghalensis s. all proposals should be checked as to whether it impacts on a Commonwealth area. lat. Due to the unreliability of the data source.Australia Post Commonwealth Land . White Egret [59541] Ardea ibis Cattle Egret [59542] Gallinago hardwickii Latham's Snipe. before making a definitive decision.Australian Telecommunications Commission Listed Marine Species [ Resource Information ] Name Status Birds Apus pacificus Fork-tailed Swift [678] Ardea alba Great Egret. Contact the State or Territory government land department for further information.Latham's Snipe.Defence Housing Authority Commonwealth Land Commonwealth Land . Painted Snipe [889] Reptiles Caretta caretta Loggerhead Turtle [1763] Chelonia mydas Type of Presence Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Endangered Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Breeding may occur within area Breeding likely to occur within area Critically Species or species habitat may occur within area Endangered Breeding may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Endangered Species or species habitat may occur within area . Commonwealth Land . Painted Snipe [889] Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Other Matters Protected by the EPBC Act Commonwealth Lands [ Resource Information ] The Commonwealth area listed below may indicate the presence of Commonwealth land in this vicinity. Japanese Snipe [863] Rostratula benghalensis s.

Name Status Type of Presence Mammals . The following feral animals are reported: Goat. National Land and Water Resouces Audit. Leathery Turtle.Green Turtle [1765] Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area Dermochelys coriacea Leatherback Turtle.Endangered Species or species habitat may occur within area Luth [1768] Eretmochelys imbricata Hawksbill Turtle [1766] Vulnerable Species or species habitat may occur within area Extra Information Places on the RNE [ Resource Information ] Note that not all Indigenous sites may be listed. Water Buffalo and Cane Toad. Red Fox. Cat. Name Historic Andrews Avenue Urban Conservation Area NSW Ashbury Urban Conservation Area NSW Bardwell Park Urban Conservation Area NSW Belfield Urban Conservation Area NSW Belmore Urban Conservation Area NSW Campsie Fire Station NSW Canarys Road Urban Conservation Area NSW Canterbury Post Office NSW Clemton Park Urban Conservation Area NSW Defoe Street Urban Conservation Area NSW Dennis Street Urban Conservation Area NSW Earlwood North Urban Conservation Area NSW Earlwood Urban Conservation Area NSW Hillview Street Urban Conservation Area NSW Jackson Place Cottages NSW Lawn Avenue Urban Conservation Area NSW Moorfields Methodist Cemetery NSW Pallamanna Parade Urban Conservation Area NSW Paxton Avenue Urban Conservation Area NSW Punchbowl Urban Conservation Area NSW Punchbowl Urban Conservation Area NSW Redman Parade Urban Conservation Area NSW Robert Street Urban Conservation Area NSW Undercliffe Urban Conservation Area NSW Welfare Avenue Urban Conservation Area NSW ASC Sugar Mill (former) NSW Cooks River Sewer Aqueduct NSW Wolli Creek Sewer Aqueduct NSW State and Territory Reserves Status Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Indicative Place Registered Registered Registered [ Resource Information ] Wolli Creek. NSW Invasive Species [ Resource Information ] Weeds reported here are the 20 species of national significance (WoNS). Maps from Landscape Health Project. Rabbit. along with other introduced plants that are considered by the States and Territories to pose a particularly significant threat to biodiversity. Pig. 2001.

Smilax Asparagus [22473] Chrysanthemoides monilifera Bitou Bush. Boneseed [18983] Genista sp. Florist's Smilax. Bridal Veil Creeper. Yass River Tussock. European Rabbit [128] Sus scrofa Pig [6] Vulpes vulpes Red Fox. Pink Flowered Lantana. Species or species habitat may occur within area Pussy Willow and Sterile Pussy Willow [68497] Salvinia molesta Salvinia. Smilax.x reichardtiji Willows except Weeping Willow. Wilding Pine [20780] Rubus fruticosus aggregate Blackberry. Yass Tussock. Common Lantana. Wild Sage [10892] Lycium ferocissimum African Boxthorn.babylonica. European Blackberry [68406] Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat may occur within area Species or species habitat likely to occur within area Salix spp. Large-leaf Lantana. Boxthorn [19235] Nassella trichotoma Serrated Tussock. Red Flowered Lantana. Insignis Pine. Kariba Weed [13665] Ulex europaeus Gorse.x calodendron & S. except S. Fox [18] Alternanthera philoxeroides Alligator Weed [11620] Asparagus asparagoides Bridal Creeper. White Sage. S. House Cat. Aquarium Species or species habitat may occur within area Watermoss.Capra hircus Goat [2] Felis catus Cat. Red-Flowered Sage. X Genista monspessulana Broom [67538] Lantana camara Lantana. Giant Salvinia. Kamara Lantana. Nassella Tussock (NZ) [18884] Pinus radiata Radiata Pine Monterey Pine. Domestic Cat [19] Oryctolagus cuniculus Rabbit. Furze [7693] Species or species habitat may occur within area Caveat .

Where threatened ecological community distributions are less well known. Such breeding sites may be important for the protection of the Commonwealth Marine environment. NT Dept of Natural Resources.non-threatened seabirds which have only been mapped for recorded breeding sites. The department acknowledges the following custodians who have contributed valuable data and advice: -Department of Environment. the distribution maps are based solely on expert knowledge.marine The following species and ecological communities have not been mapped and do not appear in reports produced from this database: .migratory species that are very widespread.some terrestrial species that overfly the Commonwealth marine area . In some cases. Tasmania -Department of Environment and Natural Resources. museums. It holds mapped locations of World Heritage and Register of National Estate properties. point locations are collated from government wildlife authorities. maps are digitised from sources such as recovery plans and detailed habitat studies. People using this information in making a referral may need to consider the qualifications below and may need to seek and consider other information sources.migratory and . Parks. vagrant. maps are derived from recovery plans. New South Wales -Department of Sustainability and Environment. Where appropriate. Where available data supports mapping. migratory and marine species and listed threatened ecological communities. Only selected species covered by the following provisions of the EPBC Act have been mapped: . For threatened ecological communities where the distribution is well known. Climate Change. Energy and Water . Maps have been collated from a range of sources at various resolutions. The following groups have been mapped. foraging and roosting areas are indicated under 'type of presence'. existing vegetation maps and point location data are used to produce indicative distribution maps. but may not cover the complete distribution of the species: . South Australia -Parks and Wildlife Service NT. Commonwealth and State/Territory reserves. Climate Change and Water.seals which have only been mapped for breeding sites near the Australian continent. . Western Australia -Department of the Environment. Acknowledgements This database has been compiled from a range of data sources.threatened species listed as extinct or considered as vagrants . Wetlands of International Importance.The information presented in this report has been provided by a range of data sources as acknowledged at the end of the report. and non-government organisations. Environment and the Arts -Environmental and Resource Management. Queensland -Department of Environment and Conservation. This report is designed to assist in identifying the locations of places which may be relevant in determining obligations under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Mapping of Commonwealth land is not complete at this stage. For species whose distributions are less well known. Victoria -Department of Primary Industries. the type of presence that can be determined from the data is indicated in general terms. listed threatened. Water and Environment. core breeding. State vegetation maps. bioclimatic distribution models are generated and these validated by experts. For species where the distributions are well known. or only occur in small numbers.some species and ecological communities that have only recently been listed . remote sensing imagery and other sources. Not all species listed under the EPBC Act have been mapped (see below) and therefore a report is a general guide only.

Population and Communities GPO Box 787 Canberra ACT 2601 Australia +61 2 6274 1111 ABN | Australian Government | . Water. Atherton and Canberra -University of New England -Ocean Biogeographic Information System -Australian Government. 16-Sep-2010 09:13:25 EST Department of Sustainability. Please feel free to provide feedback via the Contact Us page. Department of Defence -State Forests of NSW -Other groups and individuals The Department is extremely grateful to the many organisations and individuals who provided expert advice and information on numerous draft distributions.-Birds Australia -Australian Bird and Bat Banding Scheme -Australian National Wildlife Collection -Natural history museums of Australia -Museum Victoria -Australian Museum -SA Museum -Queensland Museum -Online Zoological Collections of Australian Museums -Queensland Herbarium -National Herbarium of NSW -Royal Botanic Gardens and National Herbarium of Victoria -Tasmanian Herbarium -State Herbarium of South Australia -Northern Territory Herbarium -Western Australian Herbarium -Australian National Herbarium. Accessibility | Disclaimer | Privacy | © Commonwealth of Australia | Help Last updated: Thursday. Environment.

nsw. reflect the development of suburbs in the area during the Interwar period. The overhead booking office has local aesthetic and technical significance as an example of the design by NSW Railways of these timber overhead structures built between 1910 and the 1950s.Online Database Page 1 of 6 About Us Home Listings Development Heritage Council Publications & Forms Conservation & Technical About Heritage Research Funding Listings Heritage Databases Heritage Database Search Heritage Item Click on the BACK button of your browser to return to the previous page.Rail Category: Railway Platform/ Station Primary Address: Punchbowl Road. http://www.heritage.cfm?itemid=4802009 26/05/2011 . NSW 2196 Local Govt. Punchbowl Railway Station Group Item Name of Item: Punchbowl Railway Station Group Type of Item: Built Group/Collection: Transport . The station reflects the extension of the line to Bankstown in 1909 and the overhead booking office. Punchbowl. The overhead booking office is also significant as it is a fine example of its type. Date Significance Updated: 25 Jun 09 Note: There are incomplete details for a number of items listed in NSW. and because it is relatively intact with an unaltered lamp room.Heritage Branch Website . footbridge and stairs.au/07_subnav_04_2.gov. Area: Canterbury Property Description: Lot/Volume Code Lot/Volume Number Section Number Plan/Folio Code Plan/Folio Number Boundary: North: Property boundary along Warren Reserve South: Property boundary to rear of private properties along The Boulevard East: 5 metres from eastern end of island platform West: 5 metres from end of western end of island platform (excluding overbridge on Punchbowl Road) All Addresses Street Address Suburb/Town LGA Parish Punchbowl Road Punchbowl Canterbury County Type Primary Owner/s Organisation Name Owner Category RailCorp State Government RailCorp State Government Statement of Significance Date Ownership Updated Punchbowl Railway Station has local historical significance as it was one of the stations to be located on the Sydenham to Bankstown Line which was built to take pressure off the traffic on the Main South Line as well as promote agriculture and suburban development in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The roof spans between both buildings.cfm?itemid=4802009 26/05/2011 .Online Database Page 2 of 6 The Heritage Branch intends to develop or upgrade statements of significance and other information for these items as resources become available. while the windows are aluminium framed. Immediately to the west of the overhead booking office the Punchbowl Road overbridge crosses the rail line. The windows are timber double hung and the doors are flush. (1909) Footbridge. The station can be accessed by steps either from the south by The Boulevard. which is a major shopping street. the booking hall and the eastern and western footbridges. with external walls of face brick.au/07_subnav_04_2. (1930) Canopies and extensions to Overhead Booking Office. the toilet is a simple rectangular building.1929 Physical Description: BUILDINGS Platform building. Description Designer/Maker: NSW Government Railways Builder/Maker: George Leggo Construction Years: 1909 . Like the main building. PLATFORM BUILDING (1980s) External: Simple rectangular face brick building with a flat metal deck roof and high profiled metal fascia which extends as a cantilever awning on both sides. TOILET BLOCK (1970s) The male and female toilets originally had a hipped roof which was replaced with a flat roof matching the adjacent main platform building. The later lamp room addition extended the western side of the building to the north to make the building L shaped. PLATFORMS (1909) One island platform with asphalt surface and original brick face and http://www.nsw. Platform 1/2 (1970s) Overhead Booking Office (1929) STRUCTURES Platforms 1/2. sign-on room a store and waiting room.gov.Heritage Branch Website . (c.2000s) CONTEXT Punchbowl Railway Station consists of a single island platform with two later built station buildings. or from the north via Warren Reserve and Punchbowl Road. Inside the waiting room the walls are face brick with a concrete floor. Internal: The building consists of a Station Master's office.heritage. The ticket collection cabin connected to the main booking office has been removed. OVERHEAD BOOKING OFFICE (1929) The overhead booking office is a timber framed. The platforms are accessed by a central set of stairs which lead down from the footbridge associated with the original timber framed and weatherboard overhead booking office. while the other rooms have their internal walls rendered. The metal clad soffit of the awning continues through as the internal ceiling to all rooms. A bookstall was added which added a further northern but smaller extension with an awning roof. The original 1929 roof configuration consisted of a simple hipped roof with Dutch gables on the eastern and western ends and which covered the booking office. Platform 1/2 (early 1980s) Toilet block. weatherboard clad building with a hipped corrugated steel clad roof. the parcels office.

Online Database Page 3 of 6 edge. 1926: Railway electrified. PLATFORM Generally good condition. particularly during the interwar period when many War Service homes were built west of Canterbury. CANOPIES (c2000s) A modern steel framed and steel roofed canopy has been erected over the platform access stairs and extends from the end of the main station building up to the overhead booking office. Date Condition Updated: 09 Sep 08 Modifications and Dates: 1917: Covering erected over platform signal levers. 1980s: Parcels office within the overhead booking office closed Further Information: PUNCBOWL ROAD OVERBRIDGE (1979) Modern concrete girder overbridge. FOOTBRIDGE (1930) Standard concrete platform supported on steel beams bearing on steel platform trestles and steel trestles on each side of the tracks. The contract for construction of station buildings was awarded to G Leggo http://www. The line was extended to Bankstown in 1909 (and then to Regents Park in 1928. The footbridge structure and stairs have been modified. Current Use: Railway Station Former Use: Nil History Historical Notes: The Sydenham to Bankstown Railway was opened with the initial terminus station at Belmore on 1 February 1895. its justification by then being the servicing of suburban development. suburban development followed in the early twentieth century. 1929: Overhead booking office erected. A contemporaneous canopy with glazed walling also extends across the southern footbridge. Punchbowl Station was opened along with the line extension on 14 April 1909. Stairs give access from the north and south with a single stair leading down to the island platform. The most important stations on the line. Canterbury and Marrickville.cfm?itemid=4802009 26/05/2011 . were built with impressive near-identical brick buildings. 1924: Station building awning erected. However. Lobbying by local interests and land speculators achieved Parliamentary approval by 1890 and construction commenced in 1892.gov. FOOTBRIDGE Good condition. making it part of a loop line through Lidcombe). possibly reflecting economies of the depression of the 1890s. Excluded from listing. the other intermediate stations (Campsie. 1941: Erection of new lamp room 1947: New parcels office opened. Dulwich Hill and Hurlstone Park) receiving more modest timber buildings (later replaced). Physical Condition and/or Archaeological Potential: PLATFORM BUILDINGS Good condition. The line had its origins in Railway Commissioner Goodchap’s 1882 recommendation that an additional line was needed between Newtown and Liverpool to relieve traffic on the Southern Line and to encourage agriculture and suburban settlement. Belmore. platforms lengthened. 1930: Steel beam footbridge erected. The depression suppressed the profitability of the line and the extension to Liverpool did not proceed.nsw. at the same time as Bankstown and Lakemba. CANOPIES Good condition. ARCHAEOLOGICAL POTENTIAL Based on the surviving documentation and the evidence on site it is unlikely there would be any potential archaeological remains at Punchbowl Railway Station.au/07_subnav_04_2.Heritage Branch Website .heritage. 1919: Goods shed opened.

Assessment of Significance SHR Criteria a) [Historical Significance] Punchbowl Railway Station has local historical significance as it is one of the railway stations on the Sydenham to Bankstown Line built to relieve the crowding on the Main Southern Line and encourage agriculture and suburban growth in the late 1800s and early 20th century.gov.heritage. In 1929 following electrification that occurred in 1926. the semienclosed booking hall and the connections to the footbridge and stairs down to the island platform. Block signalling was introduced in 1916.cfm?itemid=4802009 26/05/2011 . The footbridge and stairs have been modified by the addition of a new balustrade. A goods siding was opened in 1919 (removed 1981) and a station building awning added in 1924. being relatively intact and possessing an unaltered lamp room. Assessment Criteria Items are assessed against the State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. and the removal of the stairway to the overbridge. The overhead booking office however retains its original configuration. SHR Criteria e) [Research Potential] The timber overhead booking office.au/07_subnav_04_2. The ticket windows have been replaced as has the parcels office enclosure and the original fitout within the booking office. while the original timber wall panelling remains. with the construction of a new lamp room and a new parcels office. Internally. the ceiling is new plasterboard. SHR Criteria d) [Social Significance] The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place. there were further modifications with an overhead booking office erected. new concrete treads and risers. but the overhead booking office and associated spaces have local aesthetic and technical significance in deonstrating the particular design and style of timber overhead booking structures erected by the NSW Railways between 1910 and the 1950s. and a covering erected over the platform signal levers the next year.nsw. as well as the associated footbridge and stairs is a good example of this type of structure built by NSW Railways in the Sydney Metropolitan area between 1910 and the 1950s. The depot closed in 1995. SHR Criteria g) [Representativeness] While the platform buildings at Punchbowl do not qualify. A notable railway development in proximity of the station was the opening of an electric train depot in 1926. the glass enclosure as well as the roofing canopies.Online Database Page 4 of 6 of Paddington. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection. There were further developments in the 1940s. being the enclosed booking office. http://www. New ripple iron has replaced the original glazing at the western and eastern ends overlooking the railway lines. platforms lengthened.Heritage Branch Website . because of its relative intactness. Integrity/Intactness: Overall the station has lost integrity due to the replacement of the station buildings. the timber overhead booking office. The station represents the extension of the line to Bankstown in 1909 and the overhead booking office and associated footbridge and stairs the suburban development after the First World War when many War Services Homes were built in the area. and can provide a connection to the local community's past. and the presence of the early lamp room does give some ability for further understanding of the design of these building types constructed by the railways in the first half of the 20th century. The early addition of the lamp room and the bookstall also remain. SHR Criteria c) [Aesthetic Significance] The platform station buildings have no aesthetic significance as they are later additions. as well as most of the original weatherboard and cement sheet wall and ceiling linings.

au/07_subnav_04_2. Internet links & Images Type Author Year Title Written Tony Prescott 2009 Historical Research for RailCorp's S170 Update Project Written John Forsyth 2007 New South Wales Railway Stations: an alphabetical arrangement of railway station and place names Written K.Online Database Page 5 of 6 Recommendations Management Category Description Date Updated Statutory Instrument List on a Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 18 May 09 Listings Listing Title Heritage Listing Listing Number Heritage Act .Heritage Branch Website .cfm?itemid=4802009 26/05/2011 .170 NSW State agency heritage register Gazette Date Gazette Number Gazette Page 18 Mar 10 Study Details Title Year Number S170 Heritage & Conservation Register Update 2009 Author Inspected by Guidelines Used OCP Architects Yes References.nsw. (Click on Thumbnail for Full Size Image and Image Details) Data Source The information for this entry comes from the following source: Name: State Government Database Number: 4802009 Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct.s. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.heritage. http://www. Edwards 1982 Beginning the Bankstown Line: a history of the Marrickville to Burwood Road Railway Internet Links Note: Internet links may be to web pages.gov. documents or images.

gov.Heritage Branch Website .cfm?itemid=4802009 | Disclaimer | Privacy 26/05/2011 . NSW Government | Site Map | Contact Us | Copyright http://www.Online Database Page 6 of 6 All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Branch or respective copyright owners.nsw.au/07_subnav_04_2.heritage.

925km Concrete Bridge 1.1 SHR SHI # 4801834 4804407 4804408 Y 4801032 4801117 .Version 1.ITEM NAME LOCATION SUBURB LGA Oatley (Georges River) Underbridge Illawarra Line 19.5Km Before Station Como Sutherland Oatley Railway Station Group Mulga Road Oatley Kogarah Y 4801116 Orange Railway Precinct Peisley Street Orange Orange Y 4806345 Otford Railway Tunnel (former) Chellow Dene Ave Stanwell Park Wollongong City Y 4801152 Ourimbah Railway Station Group and Residence Pacific Highway Ourimbah Wyong 4801030 Padstow Railway Station Group Cahors Road Padstow Bankstown 4801925 Panania Railway Station Group Anderson Street Panania Bankstown 4801926 Parkes Railway Precinct May Street Parkes Parkes Y 4801352 Parramatta Railway Station Group Argyle St reet Parramatta Parramatta Y 4801031 Parramatta Station to Parramatta Road Railway Line (Archaeological Site) Station Street East Harris Park Parramatta Parramatta Station to Pitt Street Railway Line (Archaeological Site) Argyle Street Parramatta Parramatta Paterson Railway Precinct Railway Street Paterson Dungog 4806211 Pendle Hill Railway Station Group Joyce St Pendle Hill Holroyd 4800257 Penrith Railway Station Group and Residence Station St Penrith Penrith Penshurst Railway Station Group The Strand Penshurst Hurstville Petersham Railway Station Group Terminus St Petersham Marrickville Y 4801094 Picton Railway Precinct Station Street Picton Wollondilly Y 4806271 Punchbowl Railway Station Group Punchbowl Road Punchbowl Canterbury 4802009 Pymble Railway Station Group Grandview Street Pymble Ku-Ring-Gai 4801068 Pyrmont Railway Cuttings and Tunnel Quarry Master Drive/Harris Street Pyrmont Sydney Y 4801122 Queanbeyan Railway Precinct Henderson Road Queanbeyan Queanbeyan Y 4806293 Quirindi Railway Station Station St Quirindi Liverpool Plains Y 4801174 Redfern Railway Station Group Lawson Street Redfern Sydney Y 4801095 Regents Park Railway Station Group Park Rd Regents Park Auburn 4802060 Revesby Railway Station Group Blamey Street Revesby Bankstown 4801929 RAILCORP S170 HERITAGE AND CONSERVATION REGISTER Page 13 of 26 .

This means that there may be several entries for the same heritage item in the database. This section may also contain additional information on some of the items listed in the first section. Section 2. the search results have been divided into two sections. Section 1. contains items listed by Local Councils & Shires and State Government Agencies. contains items listed by the Heritage Council under the NSW Heritage Act. Section 2.   Section 1.gov.Heritage Branch Website .au/07_subnav_01_1. an Interim Heritage Order or protected under section 136 of the NSW Heritage Act.Online Database About Us Home Page 1 of 6 Listings Development Heritage Council Publications & Forms Conservation & Technical About Heritage Research Funding Listings Heritage Databases Heritage Database Search Search Results Click on the BACK button of your browser to return to the search. This includes listing on the State Heritage Register. This information is provided by the Heritage Branch. Items listed by Local Government and State agencies. The search results can be re-sorted by clicking on the (sort) option at the top of each column. Statutory Listed Items Information and items listed in the State Heritage Inventory come from a number of sources.cfm LGA (sort) Information Source (sort) 26/05/2011 . Click on an item name to view the full details. For clarity. Items listed under the NSW Heritage Act. Item Name (sort) Address (sort) Suburb (sort) LGA (sort) Listed Under Heritage Act Ashfield Reservoir (Elevated) (WS 0003) Holden Street Ashbury Canterbury Yes Belmore Railway Station Group Bankstown railway Belmore Canterbury Yes Bethungra 9 Fore Street Canterbury Canterbury Yes Campsie Railway Station group Bankstown railway Campsie Canterbury Yes Canterbury Railway Station group Bankstown railway Canterbury Canterbury Yes Cooks River Sewage Aqueduct Pine Street Undercliffe Canterbury Yes Earlwood Canterbury Yes Canterbury Canterbury Yes Potts Hill Bankstown Yes Undercliffe Canterbury Yes Earlwood Aboriginal Art Site Old Sugarmill Sugar House Road Pressure Tunnel and Shafts Wolli Creek Aqueduct Unwin Street There were 10 records in this section matching your search criteria.heritage. Item Name (sort) Address (sort) Suburb (sort) http://www.nsw.

Online Database Ashfield Reservoir (Elevated) (WS 0003) Holden Street Belmore Railway Station Group Page 2 of 6 Ashbury Canterbury SGOV Belmore Canterbury LGOV Belmore Railway Station Group Burwood Road Belmore Canterbury SGOV Bethungra 9 Fore Street Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Beulah Vista Church Street Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Brick Paving Church Street Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Brick Post Office Building 54 (Part) The Boulevarde Lakemba Canterbury LGOV Brighton Avenue Palm Trees Brighton Avenue Croydon Park Canterbury LGOV Broadway and War Memorial The Broadway Punchbowl Canterbury LGOV Bushland and Park Girrahween Park Earlwood Canterbury LGOV But-har-gra 106-114 Georges River Road Croydon Park Canterbury LGOV Campsie Court House Building 56 Campsie Street Campsie Canterbury LGOV Campsie Fire Station Beamish and Claremont Streets Campsie Canterbury SGOV Campsie Park Estate Subdivision Carrington Square Campsie Canterbury LGOV Campsie Railway Station Group Beamish Street Campsie Canterbury SGOV Charles Street.nsw. Brick Canterbury (Cooks River) Arches Past Station For Underbridge The Goods Lines Canterbury Canterbury SGOV Canterbury Hospital (Buildings Facing Canterbury Rd) 575 Canterbury Road Campsie Canterbury LGOV Canterbury Park Racecourse King Street Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Canterbury Post Office 193 Canterbury Road Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Canterbury Public School Church Street Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Canterbury Railway Station Group Canterbury Rd and Broughton St Canterbury Canterbury SGOV Canterbury Sugar Works Hutton Street Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Community Facilities Redman Parade Belmore Canterbury LGOV Cooks River Sewage Aqueduct Pine Street Undercliffe Canterbury SGOV Cul De Sac and Plantings Lovat Avenue Earlwood Canterbury LGOV Cup and Saucer Creek Culvert Bexley Road Campsie Canterbury SGOV Dan's Corner Canterbury Road Campsie Canterbury LGOV http://www.heritage.Heritage Branch Website .au/07_subnav_01_1.cfm 26/05/2011 .gov.

9.gov. 16. 2 Close Street 273 Canterbury Canterbury SGOV Electricity Substation No. 7. 2A Remly Street 279 Roselands Canterbury SGOV Electricity Substation No.Heritage Branch Website .cfm 26/05/2011 . 14. South Parade 271 Campsie Canterbury SGOV Electricity Substation No.nsw. 18 Garnet Street Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Highway Patrol Office Church Street Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Hillview 24 Willeroo Street Lakemba Canterbury LGOV Hopetoun Street Group 19. 13. 543 Burwood Road 274 Belmore Canterbury SGOV Electricity Substation No. 15 & 21 Canterbury Euston Road Canterbury LGOV Fire Station Beamish Street Campsie Canterbury LGOV Garnet Street Group 12. 3. 23 Railway Parade 143 Lakemba Canterbury SGOV Electricity Substation No. 11.au/07_subnav_01_1. 94 Church Street 275 Canterbury Canterbury SGOV Electricity Substation No. 23. 92 William Street 266 Earlwood Canterbury SGOV Electricity Substation No.heritage. 12 Floss Street 57 Hurlstone Park Canterbury SGOV Euston House 67 Floss Street Hurlstone Park Canterbury LGOV Euston Road Group 1.Online Database Doctor's Surgery 481 Burwood Road Page 3 of 6 Belmore Canterbury LGOV Electricity Substation No. 1A Fourth Avenue 311 Campsie Canterbury SGOV Electricity Substation No. 1A Shackel Avenue 304 Kingsgrove Canterbury SGOV Electricity Substation No. 5 Knox Street 276 Belmore Canterbury SGOV Electricity Substation No. 25 & 27 Hopetoun Street Hurlstone Park Canterbury LGOV Hotel Canterbury 208 Canterbury road Canterbury Canterbury LGOV House 59 Minter Street Canterbury Canterbury LGOV House 51 Amy Street Campsie Canterbury LGOV House 97 Eighth Avenue Campsie Canterbury LGOV House 99 Eighth Avenue Campsie Canterbury LGOV House 65 Gould Street Campsie Canterbury LGOV House 52 Albert Street Belmore Canterbury LGOV House 12 Oxford Street Belmore Canterbury LGOV House 43 Gould Street Campsie Canterbury LGOV House 23 McCourt Street Lakemba Canterbury LGOV http://www.

16. Bankstown Line 9. 10. 4.cfm 26/05/2011 . 12.084km Foord Avenue Hurlstone Park Canterbury SGOV Hurlstone Park Railway Station Group Floss Street Hurlstone Park Canterbury SGOV Iserbrook 10 Fore Street Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Jessamine 20 Garnet Street Hurlstone Park Canterbury LGOV Lakemba Fire Station 208 Haldon Street Lakemba Canterbury SGOV Lakemba Canterbury SGOV Lakemba Railway Station The Boulevarde Group http://www.nsw.Online Database Page 4 of 6 House 78 Kingsgrove Road Belmore Canterbury LGOV House 37 Wilson Avenue Belmore Canterbury LGOV House 43 Wilson Avenue Belmore Canterbury LGOV House 116 Homer Street Earlwood Canterbury LGOV House 173 Riverview Road Earlwood Canterbury LGOV House 66 Undercliffe Road Earlwood Canterbury LGOV House 78 Quigg Street Lakemba Canterbury LGOV House 12 The Boulevarde Lakemba Canterbury LGOV House 123 Yangoora Road Lakemba Canterbury LGOV House 66 Remly Street Roselands Canterbury LGOV House 99 Eighth Avenue Campsie Canterbury LGOV House 43 Wilson Avenue Belmore Canterbury LGOV House 23 McCourt Street Lakemba Canterbury LGOV Houses 53-55 Windsor Avenue Croydon Park Canterbury LGOV Houses 60-62 Windsor Avenue Croydon Park Canterbury LGOV Houses 24 & 30 Garnet Street Hurlstone Park Canterbury LGOV Houses 58-60 Garnet Street Hurlstone Park Canterbury LGOV Houses 61-65 Eighth Avenue Campsie Canterbury LGOV Houses 126. 132 & 134 Ninth Campsie Avenue Canterbury LGOV Houses 40 & 44 South Parade Campsie Canterbury LGOV Houses 35. 37 & 39 Isabel Street Belmore Canterbury LGOV Houses 2. 14. 30 and 32 Yerrick Road Lakemba Canterbury LGOV Hurlstone Park (Foord Ave . 18 Lakemba Street Belmore Canterbury LGOV Houses 15 & 19 High Street Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Houses 7-17 Hocking Avenue Earlwood Canterbury LGOV Houses 2-12 Jackson Place Earlwood Canterbury LGOV Houses 28. 128. 6.Heritage Branch Website . 8.M24+M25) Underbridge Railway location.au/07_subnav_01_1.gov.heritage.

heritage.nsw.Online Database Page 5 of 6 Lakemba Water Pumping Station (WP0003) Hillcrest Street Wiley Park Canterbury SGOV Lynwood 25 Baltimore Street Belfield Canterbury LGOV Methodist Church 301 & 301A Canterbury Road Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Montrose House 128 Croydon Avenue Croydon Park Canterbury LGOV Moorefields Cemetery 98-100 Moorefields Road (rear of) Kingsgrove Canterbury LGOV Narwee Railway Station Group Hannans Road Narwee Canterbury SGOV Orion Centre 153-155 Beamish Street Campsie Canterbury LGOV Palm Trees Eighth Avenue Campsie Canterbury LGOV Palm Trees Fifth Avenue Campsie Canterbury LGOV Park Dennis Street Lakemba Canterbury LGOV Park Simpson Reserve Canterbury Road Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Post Office Building (Former) 370 Burwood Road Belmore Canterbury LGOV Prouts Bridge Over Cooks Canterbury Road River Canterbury Canterbury SGOV Punchbowl Baby Health Care Centre Punchbowl Road Punchbowl Canterbury LGOV Punchbowl Pumping Station Hillcrest Street Punchbowl Canterbury LGOV Punchbowl Railway Station Group Punchbowl Road Punchbowl Canterbury SGOV Quarry Face Karool Avenue Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Riverwood Railway Station Group Phillip Street Riverwood Canterbury SGOV S.au/07_subnav_01_1.e.c Plating Pty Ltd 103-105 Lakemba Street Belmore Canterbury LGOV Scout Hall (Since Demolished) 47-49 Canterbury Road Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Second Street Group 5-15 Second Street Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Service Station 184 Canterbury Road Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Sewerage Aqueduct Wanstead Avenue Earlwood Canterbury LGOV Shop 63 Balmoral Avenue Croydon Park Canterbury LGOV Shop 146 William Street Earlwood Canterbury LGOV Shop and Dwelling 37 & 39 Undercliffe Road Earlwood Canterbury LGOV Shop and Residence 60 Balmoral Avenue Croydon Park Canterbury LGOV Shops 2-16 Anglo Road Campsie Canterbury LGOV Shops 158-160 Beamish Street Campsie Canterbury LGOV Shops 191-197 Beamish Street Campsie Canterbury LGOV http://www.cfm 26/05/2011 .gov.Heritage Branch Website .

LGOV = Local Government.au/07_subnav_01_1.Online Database Page 6 of 6 Shops 196-200 Beamish Street Campsie Canterbury LGOV Shops 293-295 Canterbury Road Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Shops and Dwellings 118 Wardell Road Earlwood Canterbury LGOV St.gov.Heritage Branch Website . however the latest listings in Local and Regional Environmental Plans (LEPs and REPs) may not yet be included. Mels Catholic Church and Buildings Evaline Street Campsie Canterbury LGOV St. Paul's Church and Churchyard Church Street Canterbury Canterbury LGOV St. There was a total of 150 records matching your search criteria. Key: LGA = Local Government Area GAZ= NSW Government Gazette (statutory listings prior to 1997). SGOV = State Government Agency. Saviour Cemetery 1353 (rear of) Canterbury Road Punchbowl Canterbury LGOV Station House 201-203 Beamish Street Campsie Canterbury LGOV Timothy Daniel's House 5-7-9 Canterbury Road Canterbury Canterbury LGOV Towers (The) Inc. HGA = Heritage Grant Application. House and Meat 31 Forsyth Street House Belmore Canterbury LGOV Unwins Bridge Over Cooks River Bayview Avenue Tempe Canterbury SGOV Vacant Land On Wolli Creek Jackson Place Turella Canterbury SGOV Waratah 15 Albert Street Campsie Canterbury LGOV Water Tower Canary's Road (off) Roselands Canterbury LGOV Western Outfall Main Sewer (part of SWSOOS) Valda Avenue to Homebush Rockdale To Homebush Canterbury SGOV Western Outfall Main Sewer (part of SWSOOS) Valda Avenue to Homebush Rockdale To Homebush Rockdale SGOV White House Bakery 2 Wilson Avenue Belmore Canterbury LGOV Wiley Park Railway Station Group King Georges Road Wiley Park Canterbury SGOV Wiley Park Reservoir (WS Canary's Road 0174) Wiley Park Canterbury SGOV Wolli Creek Conservation Area Earlwood Canterbury LGOV Wolli Creek Culvert Bexley Road Earlwood Canterbury SGOV Wolli Creek Sewage Aqueduct Unwin Street Undercliffe Canterbury SGOV World War 1 Memorial Clock Tower Beamish Street Campsie Canterbury LGOV There were 140 records in this section matching your search criteria. Note: The Heritage Branch seeks to keep the State Heritage Inventory (SHI) up to date. Always check with the relevant Local Council or Shire for the most recent listings. NSW Government | Site Map | Contact Us http://www.heritage.cfm | Copyright | Disclaimer | Privacy 26/05/2011 . Grounds.nsw. HS = Heritage Study.

Find out more about the Atlas.NPWS .au/wildlifeatlas/watlasSpecies.wildlifeatlas. * Exotic (non-native) species Aves Map Scientific Name Common Name Legal Count Info Status Accipitridae Hieraaetus morphnoides Little Eagle V 1 Lathamus discolor Swift Parrot E1 1 Neophema pulchella Turquoise Parrot V 1 Ninox strenua Powerful Owl V 1 Tyto novaehollandiae Masked Owl V 1 Psittacidae Strigidae Tytonidae Mammalia Map Scientific Name Common Name Legal Count Info Status Pteropodidae Pteropus poliocephalus Grey-headed Flying-fox V 5 * Exotic (non-native) species Choose up to 3 species to map. threatened species. recorded since 1980. These data are only indicative and cannot be considered a comprehensive inventory. and may contain errors and omissions.CANTERBURY returned a total of 10 records of 6 species.gov.jsp 26/05/2011 . non-government organisations and private individuals.nationalparks. DISCLAIMER: The Atlas of New South Wales Wildlife contains data from a number of sources including government agencies. Climate Change and Water http://www. Report generated on 26/05/2011 . NSW Department of Environment.nsw. LGA .Atlas of NSW Wildlife Page 1 of 1 DECCW home | help | about the atlas Search Results Your selection: Fauna. [ Atlas of NSW Wildlife Home ] [ DECCW Home | Feedback | Copyright | Disclaimer | Privacy ] © Copyright.16:53 (Data valid to 25/04/2010) Choose up to 3 species to map.

jsp 26/05/2011 . non-government organisations and private individuals. and may contain errors and omissions.gov.au/wildlifeatlas/watlasSpecies. recorded since 1980. * Exotic (non-native) species Plants Map Scientific Name Common Name Legal Count Info Status Fabaceae (Mimosoideae) Acacia pubescens Downy Wattle V 4 Syzygium paniculatum Magenta Lilly Pilly E1 2 Myrtaceae * Exotic (non-native) species Choose up to 3 species to map.nationalparks.wildlifeatlas. These data are only indicative and cannot be considered a comprehensive inventory.nsw. threatened species. Find out more about the Atlas. Report generated on 26/05/2011 . [ Atlas of NSW Wildlife Home ] [ DECCW Home | Feedback | Copyright | Disclaimer | Privacy ] © Copyright.Atlas of NSW Wildlife Page 1 of 1 DECCW home | help | about the atlas Search Results Your selection: Flora. NSW Department of Environment. DISCLAIMER: The Atlas of New South Wales Wildlife contains data from a number of sources including government agencies. LGA .NPWS .CANTERBURY returned a total of 6 records of 2 species.16:53 (Data valid to 25/04/2010) Choose up to 3 species to map. Climate Change and Water http://www.