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TLIA207C  

Maintain  container/cargo  records  

Curriculum  
  Armstrong’s  Driver  Education    
 
 
Learner  Guide  
 
TLIA207C Maintain container/cargo records

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Contents
What this Learner’s Guide is about ........................................ 5
Plan your learning .................................................................. 6
How you will be assessed? .................................................... 8

Section 1............................................................................................. 9
Preparing to record container/cargo locations ....................... 9

Section 2........................................................................................... 25
Monitoring units.................................................................... 25

Additional resources ....................................................................... 35

Feedback on activities .................................................................... 37

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What this Learner’s Guide is about

This learning guide is about the skills and knowledge required to


maintain container/cargo records in accordance with workplace
requirements including processing container and/or cargo
documentation, maintaining records of container/cargo movements,
monitoring refer units and completing required reefer records.

The Elements of Competency from the unit TLIA207C Maintain


container/cargo records covered in this Learner’s Guide are listed
below.
Process container/cargo documentation
Maintain records of container/cargo movements
Monitor container/cargo and maintain records

This unit of competency is from the Transport and Logistics


Training Package (TLI07).

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Plan your learning

It  is  important  to  plan  your  learning  before  you  start  because  you  may  
already  have  some  of  the  knowledge  and  skills  that  are  covered  in  this  
Learner’s  Guide.  This  might  be  because:  
• you  have  been  working  in  the  industry  for  some  time,  
and/or  
• you  have  already  completed  training  in  this  area.  

Together  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer  use  the  checklists  on  the  
following  pages  to  help  you  plan  your  study  program.  Your  answers  to  
the  questions  in  the  checklist  will  help  you  work  out  which  sections  of  
this  Learner’s  Guide  you  need  to  complete.  

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  written  with  the  idea  that  learning  is  made  more  
relevant  when  you,  the  learner,  are  actually  working  in  the  industry.  
This  means  that  you  will  have  people  within  the  enterprise  who  can  
show  you  things,  discuss  how  things  are  done  and  answer  any  
questions  you  have.  Also  you  can  practise  what  you  learn  and  see  how  
what  you  learn  is  applied  in  the  enterprise.  

If  you  are  working  through  this  Learner’s  Guide  and  have  not  yet  found  
a  job  in  the  industry,  you  will  need  to  talk  to  your  trainer  about  doing  
work  experience  or  working  and  learning  in  some  sort  of  simulated  
workplace.    

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Section 1: Process container/cargo


documentation
Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  

1. process  container/cargo  documentation  in  


accordance  with  workplace  procedures  and  
statutory  authority  requirements?        

2. record  movements  of  containers/cargo  in  


accordance  with  workplace  procedures  and  
statutory  authority  requirements?        

Section 2: Maintain records of container/cargo


movements
Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  

1. up-­‐date  container/cargo  records  each  time  


containers/cargo  are  moved  within  the  yard?        

2. check  containers/cargo  using  markings  to  


ensure  correct  identification  when  updating  
records?        

Section 3: Monitor container/cargo and maintain


records
Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  

1. monitor  containers/cargo  on  a  daily  basis  and  


record  the  specified  information?        

2. report  problems  with  controlled  systems  on  


containers/cargo  on  the  appropriate  forms  and  
forward  to  the  maintenance  area  for  action?        

3. check  log  cards  on  containers/cargo  with  


controlled  systems  on  completion  of  
monitoring  and  log  all  unit  or  system  
breakdowns  and/or  faults  in  the  breakdown  log  
diary  in  accordance  with  workplace  
procedures?        

4. monitor  movement  of  containers/cargo  on  a  


daily  basis  and  record  the  information?        

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How you will be assessed?

Assessment  of  this  Unit  of  Competency  will  include  observation  of  real  
or  simulated  work  processes  using  workplace  procedures  and  
questioning  on  underpinning  knowledge  and  skills.  It  must  be  
demonstrated  in  an  actual  or  simulated  work  situation  under  
supervision.  

You  will  be  required  to  demonstrate  that  you  can:  


• use  workplace  systems  to  track  container  and  cargo  
movement  from  arrivals  through  to  despatch  
• solve  problems  related  to  container  locations  
• process  container  and  cargo  documentation  including  for  
dangerous  goods  and  other  special  types  and  conditions  
for  cargo  (particularly  exported  and  imported  goods)  
• monitor  reefer  units  and  report  any  faults  in  these  units.

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Section 1

Preparing to record
container/cargo locations

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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Preparing  to  record  container/cargo  locations  including:  


 ‘state-­‐of-­‐the-­‐art’  systems  for  tracking  containers  and  cargo  
 processing  container/cargo  documentation  
 monitoring  container/cargo  movements  
 up-­‐dating  container/cargo  movements  
 using  workplace  systems  and  procedures  for  recording  
container/cargo  movements  and  locations  received  
 

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How do you prepare to record container/cargo


locations?

What is ‘state-of-the-art’ for container tracking


systems?

At  the  October  2002  meeting  of  the  Sea  Freight  Council  of  NSW,  a  
report  was  made  of  theft  of  containers  in  and  around  Sydney.    Some  
70  containers  with  a  value  between  $40  and  $200  million  had  been  
stolen  in  the  preceding  3  months.      

Official  estimates  of  figures  for  indirect  costs  such  as  those  associated  
with  investigation  and  insurance  payments  related  to  cargo  theft  (in  
general)  are  between  US$20  billion  –  60  billion.    The  breakdown  into  
sectors  is  as  follows:  
• road  transport  –  87%  of  cargo  losses  
• maritime  –  8%  of  all  cargo  losses  
• rail  –  4%  of  all  cargo  losses  
• air  –  less  than  1%  of  all  cargo  losses.    

The  problem  of  container  and  cargo  theft  is  therefore  quite  significant  
and  stakeholders  in  the  transport  and  distribution  industry  are  looking  
at  ways  of  reducing  the  theft  and  associated  costs.  

Technology  is  re-­‐shaping  our  lives  and  the  way  that  we  work.    Fridges  
are  available  with  Internet  access  and  a  TV  screen  and  cars  have  Global  
Positioning  Systems  installed  for  navigation.  

Smart  technology  is  being  investigated  and  beginning  to  be  used  for  
container  tracking.    This  change  is  being  driven  by  industry  estimates  
for  error  rates  in  tracking  with  conventional  systems  of  greater  than  
10%.    The  cost  of  technology  based  systems  can  be  offset  by  the  cost  of  
time  delays,  late  deliveries  and  added  labour  costs  through  ‘lost’  
containers.      

Perhaps  the  most  sophisticated  and  accurate  of  these  systems  uses  
the  Global  Positioning  System  (GPS)  similar  to  that  found  in  luxury  
cars.    With  this  system,  containers  and  container  moving  equipment  
(Rubber  Tyre  Gantry  and  Straddle  Carrier)  can  be  located  by  reference  
to  the  computer  storing  this  information  and  movements  of  containers  
and  cargo  managed  quickly  and  efficiently.    With  sites  like  East  
Swanston  Dock  and  Port  Botany  covering  40ha  and  44.2ha  each,  the  

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advantages  of  accurate  information  on  locations  of  equipment  and  


containers  are  apparent.  

Patrick  the  Australian  stevedore  company  has  invested  in  such  


technology  and  uses  it  to  allow  for  scatter  stacking.    The  gains  are  in  
yard  efficiency  and  removing  congestion.    Container  movements  are  
optimised  through  this  system.    As  part  of  the  system  movements  of  
containers  can  be  monitored  through  activation  of  twist  locks.  The  
company  has  reported  savings  of  10%  through  using  this  technology.  

P&O  Ports  mounted  a  security  drive  to  eliminate  theft  and  believes  
that  it  has  ‘just  about  won  the  battle’.    Their  system  included  
introducing  changes  such  as:  
• use  of  container  seals  
• accurate  receipt  and  storage  of  cargo  
• use  of  Closed  Circuit  Television  monitors  to  record  packing  
of  containers  for  later  inspection  
• I  Button  technology  to  locate  employees  within  terminals  
• storage  of  empty  containers  away  from  laden  containers  
• installing  automated  tracking,  detection  and  security  
technology  for  containers  (that  allows  for  tracking  from  
the  time  they  enter  foreign  ports  to  being  picked  up  at  US  
depots)  

Other  companies  have  reported  large  savings  from  using  electronic  


transmission  of  data  through  broadband  cable  to  ensure  that  required  
documentation  for  cargo  and  containers  can  be  moved  quickly  to  a  
required  location  in  a  paperless  environment.    

Orica  chemicals  has  introduced  a  bar  coding  system  on  chlorine  


cylinders  that  allows  for  tracking  of  these  cylinders  to  customers.    As  a  
cylinder  leaves  the  depot,  it  is  scanned  and  matched  to  customer  
details.    Using  this  system,  invoices  can  then  be  generated  and  
reinspection  dates  for  cylinders  monitored.    Customers  holding  on  to  
cylinders  for  longer  than  12  months  can  also  be  identified  and  
contacted,  as  Orica  prefers  these  containers  not  to  remain  with  
customers  beyond  that  point.  

Radio  Frequency  Identification  (RFID)  is  also  available  for  container  


and  cargo  tracking.    This  system  is  advertised  as  being  particularly  
suited  where  bar  codes  would  be  inappropriate  (e.g.  where  these  
might  be  scratched  off  or  worn  off).    The  system  works  on  tags  being  
attached  to  containers  and  a  message  being  transmitted  and  picked  up  
at  a  central  monitoring  point.    ‘Unscheduled’  movements  can  be  
detected  and  action  taken  via  security  or  other  relevant  personnel.    A  
side  benefit  is  in  reductions  of  time  and  cost  to  count  stock.  

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In  summary,  container  tracking  can  be  made  more  effective  


and  efficient  via  the  use  of  technology  and  accurate  record  
keeping  systems.  

In  Activity  1,  you  are  asked  to  compare  the  systems  that  your  company  
uses  to  record  and  track  container/cargo  locations  with  what  is  seen  as  
the  potential  in  this  area.  

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Activity 1: Comparison between your company’s system and


ultra-modern systems

Discuss with your supervisor, trainer and colleagues, how your


workplace tracks containers and cargo and their locations and
movement. Use the questions to guide your research and use the
space below to answer these questions and summarise the system
in place.

How do you record the movement of a container into your


terminal/depot or workplace?

How is the location of this container determined – is it a case of


“where does it fit?” or is placement systematic?

How do you find a specific container?

What if you can’t find the container you are looking for?

How do you know if a container is moved from its original location?

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Summary of tracking system:


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There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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What’s involved in container and cargo


tracking?

In Activity 1, you were asked to look at the overall picture of


tracking of containers and cargo.

Typically, a container (or cargo) has a simplified ‘life cycle’ within


your terminal or depot as shown below:

‘LIFE  CYCLE’  OF  A  CONTAINER  

  Container Container and


arrives at documentation
  depot with are recorded
documentation and assigned
  a location

  Container is Container is
relocated due despatched
  to required
movements
 
 

A  container  that  is  stored  without  any  reference  to  its  due  date  for  
despatch  from  the  depot  may  become  ‘buried’  under  other  containers  
and  moved  many  times  before  finally  leaving  the  premises.  

In  order  to  minimise  movement,  the  system  to  manage  container  


tracking  must  have  built  into  it:  
• smart  placement  
• accurate  information  (or  intelligence)  on  location  of  
containers  

A  logical  system  for  container  placement  will  allow  for  a  variety  of  
factors:  
• stacking  heights  for  containers  (if  only  placed  in  singles,  
access  will  be  much  easier  but  this  is  rarely  done)  
• date  of  despatch  (later  despatched  containers  can  be  
placed  at  the  bottom  of  stacks  that  will  be  moved  prior  to  
the  movement  of  the  bottom  container)  

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• groupings  according  to  means  of  despatch  and  destination  


(containers  being  loaded  on  a  specific  ship  for  a  specific  
trip  can  be  placed  together)  
• available  space  in  depot  or  terminal  

Accurate  records  means  that  the  location  of  a  container  can  be  
determined  (quickly)  at  any  point  in  time.    Computerised  systems  can  
record  locations  but  these  will  only  be  accurate  where  accurate  and  
current  information  is  entered.  

The  information  required  to  track  a  container  while  within  your  


company’s  responsibility  might  include:  
• contents  of  container  
• source  of  container  (consigner’s  details)  
• identification  of  container  by  numbers  –  4  letters  and  7  
digits  
As  a  container  enters  your  premises,  you  will  need  to  ensure  
that:  
• the  container  is  fit  for  use  and  has  a  Safety  Plate  attached  
with  required  information  (see  box  below)  

  Marine Orders (Part 44) detail the regulations on containers. The main
elements of this legislation that have an impact on your role include that
  containers for transporting goods or cargo must:
• be approved
  • have a Safety Approval Plate permanently affixed to the
  container in a visible location
• be in good/safe condition
 
• have a date stamp indicating its original examination and
  next re-examination date or marked ‘ACEP’ (Approved
Continuous Examination Program)
 
• comply with colour code given in these orders (9.3.6) and in
  English language or Arabic figures (the style used in
Australia for numbers such as 23578)
 
• be labelled with maximum operating gross (weight that can
  be loaded in container).
Note that under these Orders, it is a penal provision (offence that can
  result in a jail sentence) to load or unload containers that do not meet
  these requirements unless a Marine Surveyor permits the
loading/unloading under given conditions.
 
 
• documentation  accompanies  the  container  giving  the  
information  on  contents,  source  of  container  

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• any  dangerous  goods  within  container  load  are  listed  on  a  


dangerous  goods  declaration  (M041)  
• the  documentation  gives  information  on  despatch  
including:  
- when  it  is  to  be  despatched  
- where  it  is  to  be  despatched  to  
- who  is  to  receive  the  container  
- clearance  information  related  to  Customs  and  AQIS  
(Australian  Quarantine  Inspection  Service)  such  as  a  
Fumigation  Certificate  

If  you  are  the  person  checking  the  container  against  its  container  and  
seal  number  and  the  documentation  does  not  match,  you  should  
report  this  according  to  workplace  procedures.    Failure  to  identify  such  
problems  and  report  them  may  cause  two  problems  where  an  error  
has  been  made  and  two  containers  are  swapped:  
• a  problem  of  your  company  having  a  container  which  is  
not  the  required  container  
• another  company  having  the  container  you  are  supposed  
to  have  and  which  is  not  the  container  that  company  is  
suppose  to  have  

In  the  next  activity,  you  are  asked  to  do  a  find  out  what  types  of  
documents  accompany  containers  and  cargo  and  to  list  these  and  to  
check  workplace  procedures  for  containers  without  proper  Safety  
Plates.    

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Activity 2: Documentation for containers

As you are learning your job and over a few weeks, make notes of the sorts of documents that you receive with
containers and cargo. List the source of the document, what is done with the document (filed, attached to a record that
follows the cargo, etc) and reason for the document being required. One example has been done to guide you.

Document Source What is done with Reason for document


document

Certificate of Fumigation AQIS Accompanies cargo Cargo contains wooden


items and comes from
overseas

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 15


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Document Source What is done with Reason for document


document

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s Guide.

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Activity 3: Safety plate and container fitness procedures

The Learner’s Guide describes the requirements for containers as


regards fitness for use and Safety Plates. Talk to your supervisor
and trainer and any other relevant persons in the workplace and
find out what you are required to do if these requirements are not
met. Summarise this information in the space below.
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There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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What can happen to containers while in your


premises?

Looking  back  at  the  ‘life  cycle’  of  a  container,  there  is  a  possibility  that  
the  container  is  moved  within  the  depot  or  terminal  before  it  is  
despatched.  

Any  such  movements  need  to  be  recorded  so  that  exact  location  of  the  
container  is  known  at  all  times.    Locations  will  need  to  be  described  in  
some  way  that  ensures  that  everyone  using  the  system  can  find  that  
location.  

An  aerial  drawing  is  shown  below  of  a  container  depot  to  illustrate  a  
typical  identification  system  for  container  locations  (containers  are  
shaded  and  stacked  3  high).  

NA  
*

  Loading
apron for
trucks
NB  

  Access
road
NC  
Entry
  and
exit
gates
SD  

SE  
Gate
  house

SF  

    W     C     E  

The  locations  are  given  according  to:  


• row  (West,  Central  and  East,  abbreviated  as  W/C/E  
• area  (N  for  Northern  stacks  at  top  of  diagram  or  S  for  
Southern  stacks  at  bottom  of  diagram)  

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• position  in  stack  (1  at  base,  2  in  middle  and  3  on  top  of  
stack)  
• position  along  individual  stack  (A,  B,  C,  D,  E,  and  F  from  
North  to  South)  

According  to  this  system,  a  container  placed  on  the  top  of  the  stack  in  
the  upper  left  hand  corner  (*  on  diagram)  would  have  a  coded  location  
of  NAW3  (Northern  end,  first  stack  in  that  row,  Western  side  of  depot  
and  top  of  stack).    Similarly,  a  container  in  the  exact  opposite  location  
at  the  bottom  of  the  stack  would  be  located  at  SFE1.  

This  is  only  one  possible  model  for  identifying  locations.    Your  
workplace  may  use  an  entirely  different  system.    Hopefully  the  system  
does  allow  your  company  to  keep  a  track  of  containers  and  cargo  and  
to  minimise  unnecessary  and  time  wasting  movements.  

If  movements  are  required,  these  should  be  recorded  and  entered  into  
the  records  so  that  containers  don’t  get  ‘lost’.    As  containers  are  
moved,  a  check  should  be  made  to  ensure  that  container  markings,  
records  and  documentation  still  match  up  and  that  the  container  is  
correctly  identified.  

In  the  next  activities  you  will  be  asked  to  indicate  where  containers  are  
placed  using  the  model  given  above  and  to  summarise  how  your  
container  locations  are  identified.  

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Activity 4: Container locations 1

The model given in this Learner’s Guide for container locations has
been repeated below without the explanation of the layout but with
the numbering system still indicated. Mark on this diagram below
the location of the following locations for containers:

NCC2

SEW1

NBC1

SDE3

Also indicate if stacked at top, middle or bottom of stack.

NA

NB

NC

SD

SE

SF

W C E

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Activity 5: Container locations 2

Draw a sketch map and use this to show the system for identifying
container locations in your workplace. Show your trainer that you
can use this to locate container locations (or if you have a
photocopied diagram from your workplace of container locations,
use this to show your trainer that you can identify locations).

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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What workplace systems and procedures are in


place for container and cargo records?

In  this  Learner’s  Guide  you  have  been  introduced  to  the  requirements  
for  a  container  and  cargo  tracking  system.    Most  likely  your  system  in  
your  workplace  is  computer  based  and  may  even  be  ‘state-­‐of-­‐the-­‐art’,  
as  described  in  the  first  section  

You  should  practice  making  entries  into  the  records  system  with  
support  from  your  trainer,  supervisor  or  colleagues  in  your  workplace.  

The  next  activity  asks  you  to  record  your  practice  at  doing  this  using  a  
checklist.  

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Activity 6: Practice makes perfect!

Arrange with your trainer to have support as you learn to use the
workplace system for recording container locations. Make notes as
you learn of how you enter information into the system. Your notes
should cover:
• entering records
• changing records
• deleting or archiving* records when despatch is effected
• making reports
• printing off reports

(Note: archiving refers to moving records to a different location


when not in use. This may be same computer different folder,
different filing cabinet, etc.)

Space is provided for you to do this.

SUMMARY OF HOW TO ENTER RECORDS INTO WORKPLACE


SYSTEM:
________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 23


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Page 24 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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Section 2

Monitoring units

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 25


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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  


Recording  container/cargo  locations  and  monitoring  units  
including:  
 monitoring  reefer  units  
 workplace  procedures  

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How do you monitor units?

What types of units require monitoring?

In  the  transport  and  distribution  industry,  a  refrigerated  unit  is  


referred  to  as  a  ‘reefer’.    These  units  are  used  for  transporting  
perishable  goods,  usually  food,  and  require  a  power  supply  to  maintain  
the  required  temperature  inside  the  container.  

Similar  to  a  refrigerator,  low  temperature  environments  cause  


condensation  to  form  and  ice  may  build  up.    Condensation  can  cause  
problems  with  rotting  and  a  decline  in  quality  of  the  temperature  
regulated  cargo.  

Reefer  units  require  monitoring  both  for  temperature  and  


condensation.    Some  reefer  units  allow  for  this  information  to  be  
reported  via  computer  on  a  continuous  basis  so  that  any  problems  
with  the  unit’s  operation  can  be  quickly  identified  and  addressed.    
Automatic  defrosting  can  also  be  programmed  into  these  units,  similar  
to  frost-­‐free  fridges.    Alarms  may  also  be  fitted  to  provide  a  warning  
that  the  unit  has  malfunctioned  in  some  way.  

As  part  of  the  monitoring  of  reefer  units,  a  log  card  will  be  attached  
(unless  linked  to  computerised  monitoring)  that  is  used  to  record  
variables  such  as  temperature  and  humidity  (level  of  water  vapour  or  
moisture  in  the  air  inside  the  container).  

Reefer  units  generally  operate  within  a  prescribed  temperature  range.    


For  pork  exported  from  Australia  to  Asian  markets  by  the  
Confederation  of  Pork  Exporters  (CAPE),  this  range  is  specified  as  
‘around  the  0°C  to  4°C  and  never  warmer  than  5°C’.    This  temperature  
range  must  be  maintained  at  all  times  including  when  containers  are  
opened  to  repackage  or  despatch  loads.    Specialised  facilities  referred  
to  as  temperature  controlled  loading  docks  are  used  at  airports,  
transport  depots  and  terminals  to  break  open  containers  while  
maintaining  the  required  conditions.      

HACCP  Guidelines  are  increasingly  being  applied  to  food  handling  and  
transportation  and  companies  transporting  foodstuffs  in  reefer  units  
should  be  aware  of  these  guidelines  (see  under  Additional  Resources).  

The  transportation  of  foodstuffs  requiring  temperature  controlled  


environments  is  referred  to  as  the  ‘cold  supply  chain’  and  this  refers  to  
the  need  for  temperature  controls  from  point  of  production  (capture,  
slaughter  or  picking)  through  to  retail  environment.      

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Your  role  in  the  cold  supply  chain  is  to  ensure  that  reefer  units  are  
working  correctly  to  maintain  prescribed  temperature  limits  on  goods  
requiring  this  treatment  at  all  times  when  the  cargo  is  under  your  
company’s  control.  

All  reefer  units  must  be  checked  every  day  and  log  cards  completed.    
Faults  in  these  units  should  be  reported  on  discovery,  when  any  fitted  
alarms  are  sounded  or  when  computerised  monitoring  equipment  
detects  a  fault.  

As  with  other  containers  and  cargo,  the  location  of  the  individual  units  
should  be  monitored  and  recorded  whenever  movements  of  
containers  are  made.  

The  activities  that  follow  are  designed  to  familiarise  yourself  with  
reefer  units  and  monitoring  of  these  units.  

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Activity 7: Temperature controlled cargo

As you work with reefer units, record the types of temperature


controlled cargo that you handle and the conditions that apply to
retain quality and food safety standards. Use the table below to
record this information. Seek assistance from your trainer,
supervisor or colleagues to complete this activity, if required. One
example has been completed to guide you.

Type of Min temp Max temp Other conditions


cargo

Pork 0°C 4°C but Use of controlled temp


never loading docks if
warmer container opened
than 5°C

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 29


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Activity 8: Monitoring

Discuss with your trainer, supervisor and colleagues the process


for monitoring reefer units. Summarise this process using the
questions below to guide you.

How reefer units are monitored (computerised, visual inspection,


alarm system, gauges permanently or temporarily fitted to reefers
etc)?

If visual inspection is required, how often are units inspected?

Typically, what variables are monitored (temperature, humidity,


oxygen levels, etc)?

What other requirements are involved with monitoring reefers


(besides reporting problems & completing log cards – see Activity 9
&10)?

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Activity 9: Log cards

Arrange with your trainer, supervisor or colleagues to practice


completing log cards for reefer units. Summarise what is involved
in this process in the space below. Include details of how often
cards are filled out, what records are required to be made, what
time of day/night records are made, etc).

SUMMARY OF PROCESS OF FILLING OUT LOG CARDS


________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 31


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Activity 10: Reporting faults

Discuss with your trainer, supervisor and colleagues, the sorts of


problems that can occur with reefer units and how these are
detected and rectified. Summarise what you have learnt in the
table below. Do this activity over a few weeks and use actual
examples where possible. One example has been completed to
guide you.

Problem Cause Action required to


rectify

Electrical supply to Faulty plug on power Change lead and


reefer unit came inlet report fault in lead to
unplugged maintenance for
repair

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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What workplace procedures apply to container


and cargo records?

Throughout  this  Learner’s  Guide,  you  have  been  referred  to  workplace  
procedures  and  it  is  recommended  that  you  check  with  your  trainer  to  
see  what  has  already  been  provided  as  guidance  for  you.  

Where  you  are  unsure  of  what  you  are  supposed  to  do,  you  should:  

1. Check  any  existing  workplace  procedures.  

2. Check  with  your  trainer.  

3. Check  again  with  your  trainer  if  still  unsure.  

As  well  as  having  the  required  information,  you  need  to  understand  
the  information  and  how  to  apply  it  to  making  required  records  of  
containers  and  cargo  including  temperature  controlled  containers  and  
cargo.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 33


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Additional
resources

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 35


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Web sites:
• Software  programs:  
 CMS  Transport  Systems      
http://www.cmstransport.com.au  
 Fenwick  Software      
http://www.fenwicksoftware.com.au  
• Organisations:  
 Australian  Maritime  Safety  Authority    
http://www.amsa.gov.au    
 Australian  Customs  Service    
http://www.customs.gov.au  
 Australian  Quarantine  and  Inspection  Service  
http://www.daffa.gov.au/aqis  
 Australian  Institute  of  Export  (NSW)  Ltd  
http://www.aiex.com.au  
 Customs  Brokers  and  Forwarders  Council  of  Australia  Inc  
(CBFCA)    
http://www.cbfca.com.au    
 Department  of  Infrastructure,  Transport,  Regional  Development  
and  Local  Government  
http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/  
• Other  information:  
 Reefer  units  (‘Thermo-­‐king’)        
http://www.thermo-­‐king.com.au  
• Container  tracking  systems    
 Absoft            
www.absoft.com.au  
 Orica  (chlorine  containers)        
www.orica.com.au  
 NSW  Food  Industry  Training  Council  
http://www.nswfitc.com.au/a/11.html  

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Feedback on
activities
The responses provided in this section are suggested responses.
Because every workplace is different, your responses may vary
according to your specific workplace procedures, the equipment
available and the nature of the business.

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Activity 1: Comparison between your company’s system and


ultra-modern systems

Your company’s system for recording container and cargo


movement may be via a software based system of use paper
based records. Whichever system is used, it needs to accurately
record where containers and cargo are located at any time while
under your company’s control.

The system should include a method of assigning locations to


containers and cargo such as shown in the Learner’s Guide in a
later section.

Assigning unique locations and tracking these locations will allow


you to find a specific container or item of cargo.

When a container ‘cannot be found’, it may be that the container


has been despatched, the container may have been moved, or the
container may not have arrived at your workplace. Your options
will vary and may include a visual inspection or chasing other
records for arrivals and despatches.

Seek feedback on your responses from your trainer or supervisor.

Activity 2: Documentation for containers

Documentation that might accompany containers and cargo


includes: permits from regulatory authorities such as ECNs (Export
Clearance Numbers), Certificates of Fumigation, Export License
documentation; cartnotes (cartage notes); packing slips; financial
information (invoices, payment details); etc.

Seek feedback on your responses from your trainer or supervisor.

Activity 3: Safety plate and container fitness procedures

Containers that are unfit for use (rusted, damaged, not cleaned)
should be repaired, reported and replaced as appropriate. Safety
plates must be in place and have current information including that
related to required inspections.

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Activity 4: Container locations 1

SDE3 does not exist – it is an empty space used for truck loading.

Other examples are shown with positions.

NA

NBC1
(bottom)
NB

NCC2
(middle)
NC

SD

SEW1
SE (bottom)

SF

W C E

Activity 5: Container locations 2

Your workplace system for assigning locations may vary from the
example shown. The system requires a unique identification
mechanism for each and every possible location in your work area
and that this system is understood and applied by everyone in the
workplace. Ensure that you understand and can use this system to
allocate a location to a container. Your trainer will check your
understanding of this system.

Activity 6: Practice makes perfect!

The systems used by workplaces will vary. Your notes should


allow anyone else to pick these up and use them as a guide to how
to use the system. Your trainer will give you feedback on your
competence at using the system. If in doubt, check with others
until you feel confident that you have ‘got it right’.

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Activity 7: Temperature controlled cargo

Temperature controlled cargo could include foodstuffs, flowers,


pharmaceuticals, etc. HACCP regulations may apply to handling
these types of cargo. Generally, temperature needs to be
controlled within a narrow range and unloading or repacking must
be done in a temperature controlled environment. The handling of
pork (see additional resources) is a good example of food that is
maintained in a temperature controlled environment.

Activity 8: Monitoring

Monitoring processes may be by visual inspection or be supported


by computer based systems. This activity and the next activity are
related and may be done together.

Activity 9: Log cards

The process that you have summarised should include information


about what entries you make on the cards (temperature, humidity,
etc), how often cards are filled out and what to do if you identify
problems (see also next activity).

Get feedback on your progress from your trainer or supervisor.

Activity 10: Reporting faults

Faults in reefer units need to be reported quickly as the contents of


the container or cargo may spoil very quickly with consequent loss
of income and reputation for reliability. Possible problems include:
power failures, running out of fuel if reefer unit is powered by diesel
or gas, electrical fault (fuse blown, etc), over heating or cooling, etc.

Alarms and continuous monitoring via computer systems may be in


place within your workplace.

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