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TLIA407C

Process  receipt  and  delivery  of  


containers/cargo    

MC  
W.M.I.T.  
[Pick  the  date]  

Armstrong’s  Driver  Education  


 
Learner  Guide  
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Page 2 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Contents
What this Learner’s Guide is about ........................................ 5  
Planning your learning ........................................................... 6  
How you will be assessed ...................................................... 9  

Section 1........................................................................................... 11  
Stacking and discharging efficiently ..................................... 11  

Section 2........................................................................................... 27  
Checking containers and cargo............................................ 27  

Additional resources ....................................................................... 36  

Feedback on activities .................................................................... 38  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 3


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1069
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

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ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

What this Learner’s Guide is about

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  about  the  skills  and  knowledge  required  to  
process  the  receipt  and  delivery  of  containers  and  cargo  in  accordance  
with  workplace  requirements  including  checking  the  
stacking/discharge  list  at  commencement  of  a  shift,  assessing  and  
planning  container/cargo  consolidation,  allocating  stack  positions,  
identifying  and  checking  containers/cargo,  and  checking  and  
completing  required  documentation.  

The  Elements  of  Competency  from  the  unit  TLIA407C  Process  receipt  
and  delivery  of  containers  and  cargo  covered  in  this  Learner’s  Guide  
are  listed  below.  

Check  stacking/discharge  list  at  commencement  of  shift  

Assess  and  plan  container/cargo  consolidation  

Allocate  stack  positions  

Identify  and  check  containers/cargo  

Check  and  complete  documentation  

This  unit  of  competency  is  from  the  Transport  and  Logistics  Training  
Package  (TLI07).  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 5


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1069
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Planning your learning

It  is  important  to  plan  your  learning  before  you  start  because  you  may  
already  have  some  of  the  knowledge  and  skills  that  are  covered  in  this  
Learner’s  Guide.  This  might  be  because:  
• you  have  been  working  in  the  industry  for  some  time,  
and/or  
• you  have  already  completed  training  in  this  area.  

Together  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer  use  the  checklists  on  the  
following  pages  to  help  you  plan  your  study  program.  Your  answers  to  
the  questions  in  the  checklist  will  help  you  work  out  which  sections  of  
this  Learner’s  Guide  you  need  to  complete.  

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  written  with  the  idea  that  learning  is  made  
more  relevant  when  you,  the  learner,  are  actually  working  in  the  
industry.  This  means  that  you  will  have  people  within  the  enterprise  
who  can  show  you  things,  discuss  how  things  are  done  and  answer  any  
questions  you  have.  Also  you  can  practise  what  you  learn  and  see  how  
what  you  learn  is  applied  in  the  enterprise.  

If  you  are  working  through  this  Learner’s  Guide  and  have  not  yet  found  
a  job  in  the  industry,  you  will  need  to  talk  to  your  trainer  about  doing  
work  experience  or  working  and  learning  in  some  sort  of  simulated  
workplace.    

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ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Section 1: Check stacking/discharge list at


commencement of shift

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. check  stacking/discharge  lists  against  
container/cargo  documentation  and  
operational  order  of  work,  taking  into  
account  both  ship  and  shore  operations?        
2. update  stacking  discharge  lists  continually  
to  reflect  the  correct  location  of  containers  
and  cargo?        

Section 2: Assess and plan container/cargo


consolidation

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. assess  yard  or  terminal  plans  and  where  
appropriate  plan  to  consolidate  
container/cargo  within  the  yard  or  
terminal?        
2. prepare  consolidation  plans  to  ensure  
efficiency  of  operations  and  efficient  use  of  
available  yard/terminal  space?        
3. determine  and  record  final  yard/terminal  
positions  from  consolidation  plans?        

Section 3: Allocate stack positions

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. allocate  stack  positions  based  on  the  
nature  of  the  container/cargo  concerned  
and  the  requirements  of  yard/terminal  
operations?        
2. communicate  stacking  plan  to  the  relevant  
personnel  in  accordance  with  workplace  
procedures?        

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 7


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1069
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Section 4: Identify and check containers/cargo

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. identify  and  check  containers/cargo  at  the  
point  of  entry  to  the  yard  and  prior  to  
stacking?        
2. confirm  that  there  is  agreement  between  
numbers  and  marks  on  container/cargo  and  
shipping  documentation?        
3. inspect  cargo/containers  and  take  
appropriate  action  to  report  identified  
damage  or  defects  in  accordance  with  
workplace  procedures?        
4. ensure  stacking  follows  stacking  plans  and  
facilitates  efficient  movement  within  the  
yard?        

Section 5: Check and complete documentation

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. check  relevant  documents  prior  to  
performing  completion  procedures  
ensuring  compliance  with  workplace  
procedures  and  regulatory  requirements?        

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ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

How you will be assessed

Assessment  of  this  Unit  of  Competency  will  include  observation  of  real  
or  simulated  work  processes  using  workplace  procedures  and  
questioning  on  underpinning  knowledge  and  skills.  It  must  be  
demonstrated  in  an  actual  or  simulated  work  situation  under  
supervision.  

You  will  be  required  to:  


• plan  for  stacking  and  discharge  of  containers  and  cargo  in  
an  efficient  manner  
• identify  container  damage  and  incorrectly  labelled  
containers/cargo  by  visual  inspection  and  report  these  
according  to  your  workplace  procedures  
• complete  all  required  documents  including  reports  of  
damaged  containers/cargo,  incorrectly  labelled  
cargo/containers,  stacking  plans.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 9


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1069
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

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ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Section 1

Stacking and discharging


efficiently

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 11


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1069
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  


Stacking  and  discharging  containers  and  cargo  including:  
− planning  for  stacking  and  discharging  
− reading  stack  position  plans  
− completing  required  documents  such  as  stacking  and  consolidation  
plans  
− communicating  stack  positions  to  others  in  the  workplace  

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ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

How do you plan for stacking and discharging?


Handling  containers  and  cargo  requires  planning  and  a  
generous  dose  of  problem  solving.    The  aim  of  this  process  is  
to  make  sure  that  containers  and  cargo  are  stacked  so  that  
they  do  not  have  to  be  moved  repeatedly.    Regulations  apply  
to  this  area  and  these  must  be  complied  with.      
Communicating  (in  writing)  where  cargo  is  being  held  or  
stored  is  vital  to  save  hours  spent  searching  for  particular  
containers  or  cargo.    The  majority  of  yards  and  terminals  are  
large  and  can  hold  upwards  of  500  containers.  
A  number  of  variables  can  apply  to  the  cargo  and  containers  
that  you  are  moving.    These  might  include:  
• the  cargo  contains  dangerous  or  hazardous  goods  
• the  container  is  temperature  controlled  (reefer  unit)  
• how  long  cargo  or  container  will  remain  in  yard  or  depot  
before  being  discharged    
• the  size  of  the  container  
• requirements  for  workplace,  Customs,  AQIS  or  other  
government  authorities’  clearance  
• final  destination  of  cargo/container.  
Cargo/container  movement  is  critical  and  should  be  traceable  
at  all  stages  of  its  movement.    The  condition  of  the  container  
and  the  cargo  is  also  monitored  and  recorded  so  that  if  
damage  or  pilfering  does  occur,  the  source  or  step  in  the  
supply  chain  where  this  occurred  can  be  identified.    The  
checking  and  monitoring  that  you  are  required  to  carry  out  
will  ensure  that  your  company  (or  you)  are  not  blamed  for  
damage  or  loss  that  you  did  not  cause.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 13


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1069
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

What are the regulations on stacking containers


and cargo?

A  number  of  pieces  of  legislation  apply  to  how  containers  and  cargo  
are  stacked.      

These  include:    
• Marine  Orders.  
• Dangerous  Goods  Act.  
• Customs  Act,  CMR,  legislation  related  to  restricted  or  
quarantine  controlled  goods.  
• Legislation  related  to  air  cargo  and  implemented  by  
Department  of  Transport  and  Regional  Services.  
• Occupational  Health  and  Safety  legislation.  

Marine  Orders  (Part  44)  detail  the  regulations  on  containers.    The  main  
elements  of  this  legislation  that  have  an  impact  on  your  role  include  
that  containers  for  transporting  goods  or  cargo  must:  
• be  approved  
• have  a  Safety  Approval  Plate  permanently  affixed  to  the  
container  in  a  visible  location  
• be  in  good/safe  condition  
• have  a  date  stamp  indicating  its  original  examination  and  
next  re-­‐examination  date  or  marked  ‘ACEP’  (Approved  
Continuous  Examination  Program)  
• comply  with  colour  code  given  in  these  orders  (9.3.6)  and  
in  English  language  or  Arabic  figures  (the  style  used  in  
Australia  for  numbers  such  as  23578)  
• be  labelled  with  maximum  operating  gross  (weight  that  
can  be  loaded  in  container).  
It  is  a  penal  provision  (offence  that  can  result  in  a  jail  
sentence)  to  load  or  unload  containers  that  do  not  meet  these  
requirements  unless  a  Marine  Surveyor  permits  the  
loading/unloading  under  given  conditions.  (Picture  of  Safety  
Approval  Plate)  
A  container  on  a  ship  must  not  be  loaded  with  a  mass  
exceeding  the  allowable  stacking  mass  for  1.8g  indicated  on  
the  Safety  Approval  Plate  of  the  container.  

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ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Further  details  of  these  regulations  can  be  found  by  accessing  
the  following  site:  
http://www.amsa.gov.au/SD/MO/MO_main/MO44.pdf  
Dangerous  goods  legislation  provides  for  yards  and  terminals  
to  be  licensed  storage  areas  unless  the  holding  time  for  the  
goods  is  less  than  three  days  (Source:  Dept  of  Minerals  and  
Petroleum  resources  (WA)  Dangerous  Goods  Safety  at:  
http://www.dme.wa.gov.au/prodserv/pub/pdfs/gns314rev6.pd
f)  
Other  state/territory  legislation  should  be  checked  to  ensure  
compliance  with  relevant  legislation.  
Conditions  of  storage  in  transit  (for  WA)  include,  as  a  guide  
ONLY:  
• storage  areas  to  be  exclusive  to  dangerous  goods  and  
marked  as  a  ‘Transit  Storage’  area  with  appropriate  
HAZCHEM  signage  
• containers  stacked  two  high  and  two  deep  as  a  maximum  
• no  more  than  25  tonnes  stored  in  one  stack  and  200  
tonnes  in  total  
• segregated  from  next  stack  by  at  least  5  metres  
• stacks  to  be  accessible  from  all  sides  
• transit  area  to  be  more  than  15  metres  from  other  storage  
areas  and  at  least  3  metres  from  boundaries  
• each  class  of  dangerous  goods  to  be  stacked  in  its  own  
stacks  according  to  ADG  Code  
• make  signage  of  contents  visible  
• allow  for  collection  of  any  leaked  material  
• provide  bunding  to  110%  of  largest  container  
• removed  from  sources  of  ignition  
• secure  from  unauthorised  entry  
• have  prescribed  fire  protection  
• have  documented  manifest  available.  
 
While  you  may  not  have  to  know  every  detail  of  these  pieces  of  
legislation,  you  should  be  aware  of  the  requirements  for  safe  storage  
of  containers  and  apply  this  to  your  work.    If  in  doubt,  seek  help  and  
ask  your  trainer,  OHS  representatives  or  your  trainer.    
 
The  first  activity  asks  you  to  look  at  relevant  legislation  and  regulation  
and  how  these  apply  to  your  work.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 15


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1069
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Activity 1: Impact of legislation and regulations

Ask your trainer or supervisor to take you on a tour of the yard or


terminal. Make a sketch map of the area or if one already exists,
use this, and mark on the map:
• specialised storage areas such as for dangerous goods, open or
unsealed containers, valuable cargo, etc
• access lanes
• areas where you are required to be authorised to enter and work
• parking areas and areas where non-specialised transport
(ordinary vehicles) cannot enter
• safety equipment such as fire hoses, alarms, etc
• non-smoking and smoking areas
• any other specialised area or equipment required under
legislation or regulations.

Where specialised facilities, equipment or storage areas are


located ask why these are located and set up as they are.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 16 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

What’s the logical way to stack containers?

Stacking  of  containers  is  an  exercise  in  logic,  problem  solving  and  
‘juggling’.    Your  aim  is  to:  
• comply  with  any  regulations  about  stacking  containers  and  
cargo  (e.g.  information  on  dangerous  goods  in  previous  
section)  
• minimise  having  to  move  containers  repeatedly  
• make  best  use  of  the  space  available.  

One  factor  in  this  is  that  containers  can  be  different  sizes  –  20  feet,  24  
feet,  30  feet,  40  feet,  45  feet,  48  feet,  53  feet  and  60  feet.  

Containers  have  a  safe  working  limit  that  varies  according  to  size.    
Sample  pictures  of  containers  can  be  found  at  National  Rail’s  web  site  
at:  www.nationalrail.com.au/doing_business/containers.html  -­‐  thanks  
to  Pacific  National  for  use  of  these  images.  

A  useful  place  to  start  thinking  is  to  consider  a  car  park.    Cars  are  not  
stacked  in  the  same  way  as  containers.    They  are  in  ‘one  layer’.    Spaces  
can  be  allocated  according  to  given  criteria,  some  of  which  will  be  
similar  to  container  stacking,  such  as:  
• ease  of  entry  and  exit  
• fees  paid  
• preferences  for  regular  customers  
• available  spaces  
• security  issues.  

For  instance,  in  a  car  park,  for  a  fee  your  car  can  be  parked  where  
attendants  can  monitor  the  vehicle  at  all  times  to  prevent  theft  or  
damage  from  other  vehicles.    Occasional  or  short-­‐term  parking  could  
be  at  the  highest  level  of  the  car  park,  leaving  lower  levels  for  reserved  
or  regular  customers.    In  this  way,  valued  customers  can  get  into  and  
out  of  the  car  park  more  quickly.    Or,  short-­‐term  parkers  can  use  the  
lower  levels  so  that  in  a  busy  car  park,  an  accurate  count  can  be  made  
of  available  spaces.  

The  next  activity  uses  the  example  of  a  car  park  as  a  learning  tool  for  
practising  logical  stacking.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 17


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1069
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Activity 2: Car park design

Design a car park using the information given on fee structures,


available spaces and known information about customers using the
car park.
• the car park has six floors
• each floor can hold 100 cars
• the car park is open 24 hours a day, every day
• regular customers pay $300 per month for unlimited parking
(can come in and out to/from a reserved spot any time)
• occasional or short term parking is charged at $5 per hour
• daily rate (if arrive before 8.30 am and leave after 5.00 pm) is
$20 per day
• the car park owner would rather build up regular customers than
attract short term or daily parking (if all regulars, less staff
needed to staff the car park)
• there are 200 regular customers, an average of 200 daily
parkers and about 300 short term parkers per day (not all stay
for the whole day)
• the car park usually fills up to capacity by 10.00 am and stays
full or has very little available space until 5.30 pm.
• car park attendants are located on the first floor (exit and entry
also here)
• the car park attendants monitor the reserved or regular parking
spots by doing on foot patrols
• a lift provides access to each floor.

Decide which floor you will put each of the main types of car
parkers and justify your answer.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

The  complexity  involved  in  stacking  of  containers  increases  where  a  


second  layer  can  be  added.    For  instance,  dangerous  goods  can  be  
stacked  ‘two  containers  high  and  two  containers  deep’.    The  usual  
practice  is  to  stack  containers  three  high.    Containers  at  the  bottom  of  
such  stacks  are  difficult  to  move  as  this  involves  moving  the  two  above  
that  container.  

Careful  planing  is  therefore  needed  to  stack  containers  even  two  high.  

Consideration  needs  to  be  given  to:  


• when  the  bottom  containers  are  required  
• stacking  the  ‘soon  to  be  moved’  containers  at  the  top  of  
the  stack.  
Sometimes  it  will  be  impossible  to  determine  exactly  when  a  
container  will  be  discharged  from  the  yard  or  terminal  and  this  
must  be  allowed  for  in  planning  the  stacking.  
In  the  next  activity,  you  are  asked  to  practice  simple  stacking  
operations.  
 

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 19


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Activity 3: ‘Two high’ stacking

The list below provides information on when containers are


required for discharge. Assume for this exercise that there are no
containers in the yard and that this load is from one ship. No other
containers will be required to be stacked during the time that these
containers are in the yard. Your task is to organise these into a
logical stacking arrangement for ease of removal.

Container Discharge Container Discharge


number date/time number date/time

A 25/4 at 3.00 pm F 27/4 at 11.00 am

B 26/4 at 8.00 am G 24/4 at 10.00 pm

C 26/4 at 8.00 pm H 24/4 at 9.00 am

D 24/4 at 7.00 pm I 25/4 at 1.00 pm

E 25/4 at 11.00 am J 26/4 at 10.00 am

The containers are to be stacked as follows (to allow container


forklift to pick up from side):

TOP LAYER

BOTOM LAYER

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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The  reality  of  stacking  operations  is  much  more  complex  than  the  
example  given  in  the  activity.    As  containers  are  being  discharged,  
other  containers  are  being  brought  in  from  another  load  and  some  
containers  may  be  delayed  for  a  variety  of  reasons  including:  
• container  is  damaged  and  an  inspection  and  report  is  
required  
• clearance  has  not  been  gained  because  of:  
− problem  with  Customs  or  AQIS  or  other  relevant  authority  
− incorrect  documentation  
− some  other  human  error.  
In  the  next  activity  you  are  required  to  generate  a  movement  
schedule  for  containers  to  match  the  scenario  given.  
 

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 21


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TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Activity 4: Movement schedules for containers

The list below provides information on when containers are


required or due at a dock to be unloaded into the yard and details
of discharge. Assume for this exercise that there are no containers
in the yard at the start of the exercise. Your task is to list
movements that will be required for each day (assuming a 6.00 am
start) and a stacking order. Try to minimise movements of
containers. The challenge is to come up with a better schedule
than the suggested answer given in the section ‘feedback on
activities’.

Container Arrival date/time Discharge date/time


number

A 23/4 at 3.00 pm 23/4 at 6.00 pm

B 23/4 at 3.00 pm 23/4 at 6.00 pm

C 23/4 at 3.00 pm 26/4 at 8.00 pm

D 23/4 at 3.00 pm 24/4 at 7.00 pm

E 23/4 at 3.00 pm 25/4 at 11.00 am

F 25/4 at 8.00 am 25/4 at 7.00 pm

G 25/4 at 8.00 am 25/4 at 11.00 am

H 25/4 at 8.00 am 25/4 at 11.00 am

I 25/4 at 8.00 am 26/4 at 8.00 pm

J 25/4 at 8.00 am 26/4 at 8.00 pm

K 26/4 at 1.00 pm 26/4 at 8.00 pm

L 26/4 at 1.00 pm 26/4 at 8.00 pm

M 26/4 at 1.00 pm 26/4 at 3.00 pm

N 26/4 at 1.00 pm 26/4 at 3.00 pm

O 26/4 at 1.00 pm 26/4 at 3.00 pm

Space is provided for your suggested answers below.

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The containers are to be stacked three high and in a row of three


as follows (to allow container forklift to pick up from side).
Numbers have been assigned to positions to complete the last
column of the table:

1 4 7

2 5 8

3 6 9

Your suggested movement sheet and positions (the first two


movements are done for you with two positions allocated):

Date Time Containers requiring Positions


movement

23/4 3.00 pm A, B, C, D, E arrive in A at 3, B at 2


yard

23/4 6.00 pm A, B discharged

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 23


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TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

The  activities  provide  practice  at  the  ‘theory’  of  stacking  efficiently  and  
effectively.    Nothing  can  replace  actual  practice  at  the  ‘real  thing’.      

When  planning  the  stacking,  remember  that  you  are  trying  to  make  
everyone’s  job  easier  by:  
• making  a  logical  allocation  for  each  container  
• using  available  space  
• complying  with  any  regulations  
• recording  where  containers  are  located.  

The  last  point  is  very  important.    You  may  have  a  great  way  to  stack  
containers  but  if  no  one  else  can  follow  where  you  have  put  a  specific  
container,  then  the  result  can  be  chaos,  lost  time,  lost  containers.  
The  next  activity  gets  you  working  with  real  containers  in  your  
workplace.  

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Activity 5: Practicing stacking

Arrange with your trainer and supervisor to work with the person
who is currently responsible for stacking operations. As you work
with this person, try to answer the following questions:
• when is the stacking plan revised?
• what strategies, processes are used to get the stacking plan as
efficient as possible?
• what documents are used to develop the stacking plan?
• how is the stacking plan recorded?
• how is the stacking plan communicated to others in the
workplace?
• what problems can arise in stacking, how are these caused,
what can be done to prevent these problems?

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 25


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Page 26 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Section 2

Checking containers and cargo

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 27


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TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  


Checking  containers  and  cargo  including:  
− checking  for  damaged  containers  
− checking  seals  
− checking  markings  
Completing  required  documents  

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How do you make sure that the container is ‘as


it should be’?

What needs to be checked on a container?

When  you  are  receiving  containers  or  cargo  off  a  ship  or  a  plane,  there  
are  a  number  of  things  you  have  to  check:  
• is  the  container/cargo  damaged  in  any  way?  
• do  the  containers/cargo  match  the  manifest  or  documents  
relating  to  the  identity  of  the  container/cargo?  
• have  the  contents  been  tampered  with  or  seals  broken?  
• does  the  container  have  a  (current  and  correct)  Safety  
Approval  Plate?  

The  container  and  your  role  are  part  of  a  supply  chain.    The  diagram  on  
the  next  page  shows  the  steps  in  a  typical  supply  chain  for  goods  
imported  from  an  overseas  supplier.    The  shaded  box  indicates  your  
role  in  this  supply  chain.  

At  you  can  see  from  the  number  of  steps  in  the  supply  chain  between  
the  supplier  and  the  eventual  end  user  or  customer,  many  people  
handle  the  goods  or  the  container  in  which  they  are  being  transported.  

At  any  stage  of  the  supply  chain,  the  container  could  be:  
• opened  and  goods  removed  (pilfering,  theft)  
• damaged  and  cause  damage  or  spoilage  to  contents  of  
container  
• seals  removed  and  articles  added  to  the  container  
(including  contraband  such  as  drugs,  other  prohibited  
imports).  

In  each  case,  you  will  need  to  report  and  document  anything  that  is  
out  of  the  ordinary  or  not  right  about  the  container.    Activity  6  that  
follows  the  diagram,  asks  you  to  identify  how  you  report  such  
situations  and  what  documents  you  would  have  to  fill  out.    These  
might  include:  
• workplace  documents  
• Customs  or  AQIS  forms  
• police  report  
• insurance  report  or  claim.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 29


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TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

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ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Careful  checking  and  reporting  is  important  so  that  your  company  or  
you  are  not  held  responsible  for  damage  or  tampering  that  occurred  
elsewhere.    In  some  companies,  a  Polaroid  camera  is  made  available  to  
record  damage  or  broken  seals.  

YOUR  ROLE  IN  THE  SUPPLY  CHAIN  

  Manufacturer Goods Goods


makes goods ordered by packaged by
  wholesalers manufacturer
for shipment
  (air/sea)

  Goods Goods Goods


unpacked and received at transported to
  sorted into wharf or air destination
destinations terminal country/state
within area
 

 
Goods Goods Goods
 
repackaged transported to received and
for distribution wholesalers unpacked by
  to wholesalers wholesaler

 
Goods bought Goods received Goods
  by end at retail outlet, distributed to
customer unpacked and retail outlets
put into stock or
  storage

Shaded  and  bold  framed  box  indicates  your  probable  role.    You  may  
also  be  involved  in  other  parts  of  the  supply  chain,  depending  on  your  
workplace  and  its  operations.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 31


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1069
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Activity 6: Reporting requirements

Talk to your trainer, supervisor and others in your workplace and


discuss reporting requirements including:
• What is reported (broken seals, damaged containers, spoilt
cargo, etc)?
• What forms are used to make required reports?
• Where these forms are passed on to and filing requirements?
• Whether a photograph is required as part of reporting process?
• When police report is required?
• How soon report is made after identifying problem with
containers?
• Any other requirements for reporting?

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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A  variety  of  systems  are  used  to  identify  containers.    Whatever  system  
is  in  place,  you  will  receive  a  document(s)  that  identifies  the  containers  
that  are  being  received.    The  documents  will  detail:    
• what  is  in  the  container  
• any  dangerous  goods  loaded  in  the  container  (with  
HAZCHEM  sticker  clearly  displayed  on  outside  and/or  
dangerous  Goods  label)  
• origin  of  container  and  cargo  
• identity  markings  on  each  container  received.  

If  the  container’s  markings  and  the  document  do  not  match,  you  
should  also  report  this  according  to  workplace  procedures.    Failure  to  
identify  such  problems  and  report  them  may  cause  two  problems  
where  an  error  has  been  made  and  two  containers  are  swapped:  
• a  problem  of  your  company  having  a  container  which  is  
not  the  required  container  
• another  company  having  the  container  you  are  supposed  
to  have  and  which  is  not  the  container  that  company  is  
supposed  to  have.  
 

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 33


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TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Activity 7: Wrong container or wrong place?

Talk to your trainer, supervisor and others in your workplace and


discuss reporting requirements where the container’s markings do
not match the documents that identify the container. Find out:
• What the process is for reporting this type of problem?
• What forms are used to make required reports?
• Where these forms are passed on to and filing requirements?
• Whether a photograph is required as part of reporting process?
• How soon report is made after identifying problem with
containers?

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 34 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 35


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1069
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Additional
resources

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Web  sites:  
• Workcover  Authority  of  NSW  
 
http://www.workcover.nsw.gov.au/  
• Victorian  WorkCover  Authority    
http://www.workcover.vic.gov.au/  
• WorkCover  Queensland    
http://www.workcover.qld.gov.au/  
• WorkCover  WA      
http://www.workcover.wa.gov.au/  
• WorkCover  Corporation  of  SA    
http://www.workcover.wa.gov.au/  
• ACT  WorkCover      
http://www.workcover.act.gov.au/  
• Workplace  Standards  Tasmania  
http://www.wst.tas.gov.au/node/WST.htm  
• Work  Health  Authority  NT    
http://www.deet.nt.gov.au/wha/index.html  
• Notes  on  storage  of  dangerous  goods  in  transit:  
http://www.dme.wa.gov.au/prodserv/pub/pdfs/gns314rev6.pdf  
• Marine  Orders  Index  (Marine  Order  Part  44  gives  detail  of  
requirements  for  Safety  Plates  on  containers  and  safe  containers):  
http://www.amsa.gov.au/sd/mo/mo_index.htm  

Paper-­‐based  resources:  
• Australian  Dangerous  Goods  Code,  Federal  Office  of  Road  Safety  &  
National  Road  Transport  Commission,  Commonwealth  of  Australia,  
Volume  1  &  2,  6th  edition,  1998.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 37


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TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Feedback on
activities
The responses provided in this section are suggested responses.
Because every workplace is different, your responses may vary
according to your specific workplace procedures, the equipment
available and the nature of the business.

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TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Activity 1: Impact of legislation and regulations

This activity is designed to make you aware of any regulations that


have an impact on your role and to find out why these areas are set
up as they are.

Activity 2: Car park design

The activity gets you to think about how to plan use of space where
the use is in one dimension (cards cannot be layered on top of
each other).

A suggested answer that is based on best access for most valued


customers is to:
• allocate the regular spots on the first and second floors
• arrange for patrols of first and second floors on a regular basis
and other floors at less frequent intervals
• place daily users on third and fourth floors
• place occasional users on top two floors.

Another possibility based on staff not having to move around as


much is to:
• allocate the regular spots on the third and fourth floors
• arrange for patrols of the third and fourth floors on a regular
basis and other floors at less frequent intervals. Staff on first
floor can monitor space available in short term spots allocated
here
• place daily users on fifth and sixth floors.

Note that there are many possible answers depending on how


important certain criteria are in allocating space. Similarly, stacking
configurations will vary. The best solution is still to minimise
movements.

Activity 3: ‘Two high’ stacking

This activity increases the complexity of stacking operations by


providing a second layer. Discuss your answers with your trainer.
The suggested answer attempts to minimise moving containers
twice.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 39


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1069
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

TOP LAYER
B or C D H G E

BOTTOM LAYER
C or B F J I A

Note that multiple answers are possible. B and C are


interchangeable in this arrangement as they are required at the
same time. D is required before F, H before J, G before I and E
before A. This arrangement was developed by putting the last to
be moved containers at the bottom and then making sure that the
container on the top layer was required before the container
directly below it.

Activity 4: Movement schedules for containers

A suggested answer is as follows:

Date Time Containers requiring Positions


movement

23/4 3.00 pm A, B, C, D, E arrive in A at 3, B at 2, C at 6,


yard D at 4, E at 5

23/4 6.00 pm A, B discharged from -


2 and 3

24/4 7.00 pm D discharged from 4 -

25/4 8.00 am F, G, H, I, J arrive in F at 3, G at 2, H at 1,


yard I at 9, J at 8

25/4 11.00 G, H, E discharged -


am

25/4 7.00 pm F discharged -

26/4 1.00 pm K, L, M, N, O arrive at K at 3, L at 2, M at 1,


yard N at 5, O at 4

26/4 3.00 pm M, N, O discharged -

26/4 8.00 pm I, J, K, L discharged -

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ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

This solution allows for only two movements per container – at


arrival and when discharged. Making diagrams of each step
assists in this process as below:

23/4 at 3 pm 23/4 at 6 pm

D D

B E E

A C C

24/4 at 7 pm 25/4 at 8 am

E G E J

C F C I

25/4 at 11 am 25/4 at 7 pm

I I

F C J C J

26/4 at 3 pm 26/4 at 3 pm

M O

L N I L I

K C J K J

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 41


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1069
TLIA407C Process receipt and delivery of containers/cargo

Activity 5: Practising stacking

Discuss your responses with your trainer and supervisor and the
person currently performing this role.

Activity 6: Reporting requirements

Your trainer and supervisor will be able to check that you have
correctly identified the reporting requirements in your workplace
and what you are specifically required to check.

Activity 7: Wrong container or wrong place?

Your trainer and supervisor will be able to check that you have
correctly identified the reporting requirements in your workplace
and what you are specifically required to check.

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ADELG1069 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009