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TLIA1107C

Package goods
Learner Guide
Contents
What this Learner’s Guide is about ........................................ 1
Planning your learning ........................................................... 2
How you will be assessed ...................................................... 4

Section 1............................................................................................. 5
Packing goods........................................................................ 5

Section 2........................................................................................... 17
Factors to consider when packing goods............................. 17

Section 3........................................................................................... 32
Labelling of packaged products ........................................... 32

Additional resources ....................................................................... 40

Feedback on activities .................................................................... 55


TLIA1107C Package goods

What this Learner’s Guide is about

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  about  the  knowledge  and  skills  you  require  to  
package  goods  in  accordance  with  regulatory  and  workplace  
requirement  including  selecting  materials,  packing  and  unwrapping  
procedures  and  labelling  packaged  products/loads  to  the  required  
labelling  standards.  The  activities  are  designed  to  give  an  opportunity  
to  practise  and  demonstrate  your  skills  and  knowledge.    

The  Elements  of  Competency  from  the  unit  TLIA1107C  Package  goods  
covered  in  this  Learner’s  Guide  are  listed  below.  
Select  materials  and  pack  and  unwrap  products  
Label  packaged  products/loads  
This  unit  of  competency  is  from  the  Transport  and  Logistics  
Training  Package  (TLI07).  

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Planning your learning

It  is  important  to  plan  your  learning  before  you  start  because  you  may  
already  have  some  of  the  knowledge  and  skills  that  are  covered  in  this  
Learner’s  Guide.  This  might  be  because:  
• you  have  been  working  in  the  industry  for  some  time,  
and/or  
• you  have  already  completed  training  in  this  area.  

Together  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer  use  the  checklists  on  the  
following  pages  to  help  you  plan  your  study  program.  Your  answers  to  
the  questions  in  the  checklist  will  help  you  work  out  which  sections  of  
this  Learner’s  Guide  you  need  to  complete.  

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  written  with  the  idea  that  learning  is  made  more  
relevant  when  you,  the  learner,  are  actually  working  in  the  industry.  
This  means  that  you  will  have  people  within  the  enterprise  who  can  
show  you  things,  discuss  how  things  are  done  and  answer  any  
questions  you  have.  Also  you  can  practise  what  you  learn  and  see  how  
what  you  learn  is  applied  in  the  enterprise.  

If  you  are  working  through  this  Learner’s  Guide  and  have  not  yet  found  
a  job  in  the  industry,  you  will  need  to  talk  to  your  trainer  about  doing  
work  experience  or  working  and  learning  in  some  sort  of  simulated  
workplace.    

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Section 1: Packing goods

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. identify  and  explain  the  use  of  standard  
packaging  materials  for  a  range  of  goods?        
2. identify  and  explain  the  use  of  different  
types  
of  containers?        
3. prepare  the  packing  area  to  meet  
workplace  and  OHS  requirements?        

Section 2: Factors to consider when packing


goods

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. assemble  and  consolidate  an  order?        
2. understand  packaging  specifications  and  
documents?        
3. use  packaging  technology  and  equipment?        
4. package  an  order  correctly?        
5. stack  goods  on  pallets  correctly?        

Section 3: Labelling of packaged products

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. explain  the  reason  for  labelling  packages?        
2. identify  symbols  used  in  packing  goods?        
3. explain  the  use  of  bar  coding?        
4. show  how  to  label  goods  for  
storage/dispatch?        

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How you will be assessed

Assessment  of  this  Unit  of  Competency  will  include  observation  of  real  
or  simulated  work  processes  using  workplace  procedures  and  
questioning  on  underpinning  knowledge  and  skills.  It  must  be  
demonstrated  in  an  actual  or  simulated  work  situation  under  
supervision.  

You  will  be  required  to:  


• demonstrate  that  you  can  pack  goods  ready  for  dispatch  in  
accordance  with  workplace  procedures  and  standards    
• prepare  a  customer  order  for  dispatch.    

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Section 1

Packing goods

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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

The  reason  goods  need  to  be  packed  

The  types  of  materials  that  are  used  for  packaging  goods  

The  types  of  containers  that  are  used  for  packing  goods  

The  work  area  OHS  requirements  for  packing  goods  

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Why do goods need to be packed?

Goods  arrive  in  a  warehouse  in  some  form  of  package.  When  a  
customer  orders  those  goods,  they  must  be  picked  by  the  storeperson.  
The  load  must  then  be  packed  ready  for  the  move  to  the  customer.  
This  is  known  as  assembling  or  consolidating  a  load.  

There  are  many  reasons  why  goods  need  to  be  packed.  Packaging  has  
four  key  functions,  these  are:  
• to  provide  protection  from  damage  caused  by:  
− shock  and  vibration  during  transport  
− compression  in  stacks,  causing  crushed  goods  
− temperature  extremes  (heat  and  cold)  
− moisture  
− infestation  by  vermin  such  as  rats  and  cockroaches  
• to  provide  containment  against  spilling  or  leaking  that  may  
cause:  
− a  loss  of  product  value  
− damage  to  other  goods  
− a  safety  problem  to  people  or  the  environment  
• to  provide  information,  for  example:  
− what  the  package  contains  
− handling  instructions  
− advertising  
− delivery  detail  
• to  provide  utility,  for  example:  
− the  ease  with  which  the  package  can  be  handled  
− the  ease  of  opening  and  closing  the  package  

Poor  packaging  can  result  in:  


• increased  operating  costs  
• unhappy  customers  
• loss  of  business  
• the  possibility  of  theft  
• damage  to  the  goods.  

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Certain  types  of  goods  have  special  packing  needs.  It  is  important  that  
you  find  out  how  such  goods  should  be  handled  and  packed.  The  
following  types  of  goods  are  examples  that  will  need  special  attention:  
• glass  and  breakable  items  
• perishable  or  frozen  items  for  example  food  
• dangerous  or  hazardous  goods  such  as  poisons  
• odd  shaped  or  sized  items.  a  good  example  would  be  
household  goods  such  as  paintings  and  furniture,  packed  
by  a  removalist.  

What types of materials are used for packaging


goods?

There  are  many  types  of  materials  available  for  use  in  packing  goods.  
In  choosing  the  right  one  for  a  particular  job  you  need  to  consider  the  
following:  
• where  the  goods  have  to  go  (for  example,  what  distance  
will  they  travel)  
• how  the  goods  are  going  to  move  (for  example  by  road,  
rail,  air  or  sea)  
• how  many  times  the  package  will  be  handled  before  
reaching  the  end  user  
• any  special  packaging  requirements  (for  example,  frozen  
products  or  dangerous  goods  such  as  explosives).  

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Activity 1: Packing materials

In the space below, list the types of material you think would be
used for packing goods. This should be easy if you think about
goods you have purchased. Talk to your trainer if you need help in
making up this list.

Example

cardboard __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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What types of containers are used for packing


goods?

The  main  function  of  containers  is  to  enable  the  grouping  together  of  
goods  into  a  single  load  (consolidation).  

Another  term  commonly  used  in  the  warehouse  for  containers  is  ‘load  
carriers’.  

Using  the  correct  container  to  suit  the  goods  being  handled  is  just  as  
important  as  picking  the  right  packing  materials.  When  you  are  doing  a  
packing  job  always  think  about  the  functions  of  packaging.  

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Activity 2: Packing containers

In the space below, list the types of containers used to pack goods
in your workplace or at a warehouse you have visited. This activity
can also be conducted as a group discussion.

Talk to your trainer if you need help in making up this list.

Example

wooden crates __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

_____________________ __________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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What are the work area OHS requirements for


packing goods?

Health  and  safety  is  an  important  requirement  of  anything  you  do  in  
the  workplace.  When  packing  goods  you  will  be  working  with  different  
types  of  equipment  and  materials,  each  with  its  own  handling  
requirements.  

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Activity 3: Packing area health and safety

Can you think of three things that you must do to meet OHS
standards in a packing area? Look at the packing area function in
your own workplace or at a warehouse you have visited before
answering this question.
1. ___________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

3. ___________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Activity 4: Packing operations

This activity requires you to choose the correct answer to five


questions on packing operations. All questions are covered in
section one, which you have just finished.

The questions are all multiple choice. This requires you to read the
question and each response, then indicate with a tick in the box
beside the response that you believe to be correct.

The four functions of packaging are:


• protection, containment, information, utility 
• protection, health, safety, utility 
• contain, inform, manage, advertise 

Answer true or false. “Damage to goods can be caused by shock


or vibration during transport.”

True  False 

One of the things you should consider when choosing packing


materials is:
• the time it takes to move the goods 
• how the goods are to be moved 
• the cheapest solution 

Answer true or false. ”The function of a container is to keep


different products apart.”

True  False 

Answer true or false. ”Health and safety issues are an


important part of packing operations.”

True  False 

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Activity 5: Identify packing materials

The aim of this activity is to get you to identify the packing materials
that can be used for different goods.

Your trainer is to provide you with a list of three ‘different’ types of


goods.

You are required to:


• identify how each of the individual goods is packaged. In other
words the packaging materials used (for example, paper wrap,
plastic bags, cardboard boxes and so on)
• identify how the goods are packed for bulk movement (for
example the goods may be put into cartons or onto a pallet
which is then packaged with shrinkwrap or banded with straps).

Use the table on the next page to enter your response:

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Goods Packaging materials

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Section 2

Factors to consider when packing


goods

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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Preparing  orders  for  packing  (commonly  called  ‘assemble  and  


consolidate’)  

Packaging  specifications  

The  types  of  documents  used  in  packing  goods  

The  technology  and  equipment  used  for  packing  goods  

Stacking  goods  on  pallets  

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How are orders prepared and packed?

To  do  your  job  in  the  packing  area  you  must  know  what  you  are  
required  to  do.  For  example:  
• in  a  small  warehouse  you  may  be  told  to  ‘assemble’    a  
customer  order.  This  may  involve  picking  the  order  from  
store,  moving  the  order  to  the  dispatch  area,  packing  the  
order  and  then  sending  the  order  
• in  a  large  warehouse  you  may  work  in  the  packing  section.  
In  this  case  the  order  may  be  picked  and  ‘assembled’  by  
picking  staff.  It  would  then  be  delivered  to  your  location  to  
be  packed  for  delivery.  You  would  then  send  the  
‘assembled’  order  to  the  dispatch  area  
• in  any  type  of  warehouse  you  may  be  told  to  ‘consolidate’  a  
load  for  dispatch.  This  will  require  the  ‘assembling’  of  a  
number  of  customer  orders  and  then  bringing  them  
together  for  packing  into  a  single  load  for  ease  of  delivery.  

Information  on  how  goods  are  prepared  and  packed  is  included  in  the  
‘Additional  resources’  section  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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Activity 6: Assemble and consolidate orders

You should now discuss with your trainer the meaning of the terms
‘assemble’ and ‘consolidate’, as they apply in your workplace. Write
your response below:
Assemble
_____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

Consolidate
_____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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What are packaging specifications?

When  packing  goods,  it  is  important  that  the  goods  are  handled  
properly.  To  carry  out  correct  packing  of  goods,  you  must  know  how  
to  use  packaging  specifications  for  the  goods  you  will  handle.  

The  type  of  information  that  you  can  expect  to  find  in  a  packaging  
specification  will  include:  
• the  dimensions  of  the  outer  package  (height,  width  and  
length)  
• the  weight  of  the  packaged  goods  
• internal  packaging  requirements.  For  example,  fitted  
moulds  or  foam  inserts  
• protective  requirements.  For  example,  against  
temperature,  dust  or  moisture  
• special  handling.  For  example,  certain  chemicals  should  
not  be  packed  together  
• outer  packaging  requirements.  For  example,  if  thin  outer  
cartons  are  used  this  will  limit  stacking  due  to  the  danger  
of  crushing  goods  within  the  cartons  
• the  preferred  load  carrier  or  container.  This  will  normally  
be  based  on  experience  with  handling  the  goods  
• the  shape  of  the  goods.  Not  all  goods  pack  neatly  into  a  
cube  dimension.  For  example,  lengths  of  steel  may  be  
banded  and  moved  using  a  specially  designed  cradle  
• the  labelling  required.  For  example,  information  about  
dimensions  and  weight,  or  handling  instructions  such  as  
symbols  or  written  guides  that  must  appear  on  the  outer  
pack.  

Packaging  specification  information  can  be  gained  from  a  number  of  


places.  These  include:  
• from  written  specifications  for  goods.  An  example  of  this  
is  the  ‘Material  Safety  Data  Sheet’  (MSDS),  which  must  be  
kept  for  each  type  of  hazardous  or  dangerous  goods  held  
in  the  workplace  
• from  the  actual  goods.  Some  goods  have  a  specification  
plate  fixed  to  them.  For  example,  electrical  goods  
• from  the  outer  package.  Most  cartons  carry  handling  
requirements,  weights  and  dimensions  

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• from  warehouse  operating  procedures.  This  is  normally  


available  for  goods  that  are  frequently  handled  in  the  
store.  

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An  example  of  a  packaging  specification  is  included  in  the  ‘Additional  


resources’  section  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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Activity 7: Packaging specifications

Use the information you have just covered to list four packaging
specifications. You should also note where the information can be
found. An example is provided below.

You should discuss this with your trainer or in a group with other
learners.

Example
package weight on the outer package

Complete this activity in the space below:

1 ______________________ ________________________

2 ______________________ ________________________

3 ______________________ ________________________

4 ______________________ ________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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What type of documentation is used in packing


areas?

Documentation  is  used  in  the  packing  function  to  record  and  control  
the  orders  as  they  are  assembled  and/or  consolidated.  Examples  of  the  
types  of  documentation  used  in  packing  goods  is  included  in  the  
‘Additional  resources’  section  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

Many  of  the  documents  used  in  the  packing  area  are  multi-­‐user  in  
design.  This  means  they  could  be  raised  in  another  part  of  the  
warehouse  and  travel  with  the  order  into  the  packing  area.  Action  is  
then  taken  and  the  document  notated  or  signed  off.    

The  type  of  documentation  you  could  be  required  to  use  includes:  
• package  labels  
• order  picking  slips  
• packing  slips  
• advice  notes  
• delivery  notes  
• pre-­‐printed  stick  on  labels  
• packaging  specifications  
• bar  codes.  

What type of technology and equipment is used


for packing goods?

To  carry  out  packing  tasks  you  must  be  able  to  use  a  number  of  
different  types  of  technology  and  equipment.  A  description  of  the  
various  technology  and  equipment  is  included  in  the  ‘Additional  
resources’  section  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  The  type  of  technology  and  
equipment  you  may  be  required  to  use  in  the  workplace  is:  
• glue  and  sealing  equipment  
• banding,  strapping  
• netting  
• palletisers  
• bin  stackers  
• pallet  inverters  

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• conveyors  and  rollers  


• shrink  wrap  equipment  
• stretch  wrap  equipment  
• scanning  devices  
• hand  held  or  bench  top  computer  systems.  

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Activity 8: Packaging technology and equipment

Discuss with your trainer the types of technology and equipment


used in your workplace. This can be the actual warehouse you
work in, or a simulated warehouse where training is being
undertaken by you.

From your discussion, identify five items of technology or


equipment that you will be required to use when packing goods.
You must also state the main purpose for each item selected.

Example
staple gun to close and seal cartons

Complete the activity in the space below.

1 ______________________ ________________________

2 ______________________ ________________________

3 ______________________ ________________________

4 ______________________ ________________________

5 ______________________ ________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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How are goods stacked on pallets?

Pallets  are  the  most  common  load  carrier  that  you  will  work  with.  The  
standard  pallet  you  will  deal  with  is  the  one  tonne  re-­‐useable  wooden  
pallet.  As  a  storeperson  it  will  be  your  job  to  correctly  pack  pallets  with  
customer  orders.  To  do  this,  an  understanding  of  the  different  ways  
that  goods  can  be  stacked  onto  pallets  is  necessary.  

The  information  that  follows  covers  pallet  stacking  for  standard  loads.  
For  example,  cartons  and  boxes  with  the  same  dimensions.  The  main  
considerations  when  stacking  pallets  are:  
• the  loaded  pallet  should  fit  into  the  storage  racks  within  
the  warehouse  
• the  loaded  pallet  must  be  within  the  safe  lifting  limits  of  
the  material  handling  equipment  used  in  the  warehouse  
• the  loaded  pallet  must  be  able  to  fit  external  transport  
• pallet  space  should  be  fully  used  

This example shows a poorly This example shows a balanced,


stacked pallet, where space is not evenly spread stack.
used and is not evenly spread.
• goods  should  not  overhang  pallets.  

This example shows goods overhang which leads to poor use of space
when loading pallets. This could also cause damage to the goods.

There  are  a  number  of  different  patterns  that  can  be  used  when  
stacking  cartons  and  boxes  onto  a  pallet.  Some  of  the  more  common  
ones  include:  
• block  pattern  
• row  pattern  
• brick  pattern  
• pinwheel  pattern.  

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A  description  of  the  above  patterns  is  included  in  the  ‘Additional  
resources’  section  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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Activity 9: Using packing technology and equipment

In this activity you will be required to practice using technology and


equipment to pack goods. The activity will be conducted in your
workplace or in a simulated warehouse. Your trainer will control this
activity and arrange for you to be shown the use of each type of
technology and equipment available.

You should practice the use of at least three kinds of technology or


equipment to cover the requirement for:
• wrapping orders
• strapping orders
• packing orders.

This activity is aimed at teaching you how to use a selection of


technology and equipment in your workplace. Feedback for this
activity will be given on-the-spot by your trainer.

Feedback for this activity should occur on-the-spot as training


occurs.

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Activity 10: Stacking a pallet

In this activity you will be required to stack a pallet with a customer


order, consisting of enough standard sized cartons to make up
three layers on the pallet. You will be required to use one of the
patterns covered in this Learner’s Guide. When you have
completed stacking the pallet, you must then secure the order for
dispatch. This must be done by using packing materials that are
normally used for securing pallet loads.

This activity is to be completed in your current workplace or in a


simulated warehouse. Your trainer will control the activity and
provide advice if you need it.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Section 3

Labelling of packaged products

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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

The  reasons  why  packages  need  to  be  labelled  

Identification  of  symbols  and  handling  instructions  used  in  packing  


goods  

Bar  coding  systems  

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Why do goods need to be labelled?

To  do  your  job  in  a  warehouse  you  must  be  able  to  read  information  on  
labels  and  take  the  action  indicated  on  the  label.  In  your  job,  you  will  
also  have  to  select  and  put  the  correct  labels  on  packaged  goods.      For  
example,  you  will  have  to:  
• label  goods  for  storage  
• label  goods  for  dispatch  
• label  damaged  goods  
• read  label  information  to  work  out  where  goods  need  to  
be  moved  in  the  warehouse  
• read  labels  to  find  the  goods  you  are  looking  for.  This  may  
be  as  part  of  picking  an  order  for  a  customer,  or  it  could  be  
during  a  stocktake  in  the  warehouse.  

The  aim  of  labelling  packages  is  therefore  to:  


• provide  identification  on  what  the  package  contains  
• give  direction  on  where  the  package  is  to  be  sent  
• advertise  the  goods  contained  in  the  package  
• provide  information  on  how  the  package  should  be  
handled.  

A  good  package  labelling  system  is  one  that:  


• gives  accurate  and  reliable  information  
• is  user  friendly  to  the  warehouse  staff  
• is  visible  to  the  user.  For  example,  place  labels  on  more  
than  one  side  of  the  package  
• is  part  of  a  total  system.  This  will  include  suppliers,  
customers  and  other  departments  of  your  organisation.  

Labelling  within  the  warehouse  can  be  done  by:  


• a  manual  system.  This  requires  information  to  be  written  
on  labels  by  the  warehouse  staff.  Labels  are  normally  pre-­‐
printed.  The  label  may  be  self-­‐sticking  or  may  require  
gluing  to  packages  
• an  automatic  system.  This  involves  the  print-­‐out  of  labels  
from  a  computer.  Labels  are  self-­‐sticking.  In  a  fully  
automatic  system,  information  will  be  entered  
electronically,  thus  requiring  little  or  no  input  by  the  
storeperson  on  the  warehouse  floor.    

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  This  type  of  labelling  will  be  covered  in  greater  detail  when  
you  look  at  bar  coding.  

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Activity 11: Packaging symbols and labels

In the next part of this section you will look at identification symbols
and special handling labels. Before you do this you should consider
the types of symbols or special handling labels you may have seen.
For this activity it may be a good idea to visit a large department
store like Myers. When you do this, have a look at the packaged
goods and see what types of symbols and labels are fixed to the
package. This can also be achieved in your workplace.

Once you have conducted your visit, in your own words give a brief
description, of two symbols or labels you have seen.

Example
An open umbrella with rain drops falling is the symbol
to keep a package dry.
Now provide your two examples:

1 ______________________ __________________________

2 ______________________ __________________________

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What symbols and special handling labels are


used on packages?

It  is  your  job  to  handle  other  peoples  property.  To  do  this  you  must  be  
aware  of  what  the  symbols  on  packages  mean.  You  must  also  follow  
any  special  handling  label  instructions.  Failure  to  do  so  could  lead  to:  
• goods  being  damaged  
• goods  being  lost  
• risk  to  health  and  safety  of  yourself  or  someone  else  
• accidents  leading  to  injury,  death,  or  property  damage.  

Examples  of  the  most  common  symbols  have  been  included  in  the  
‘Additional  resources’  section  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

Why is bar coding important in packing goods?

Studies  have  shown  that  using  bar  code  systems  will  improve  
efficiency  by  up  to  75%,  and  accuracy  by  as  much  as  90%.  It  is  no  
wonder,  then,  that  technology  of  this  type  is  becoming  a  normal  part  
of  the  warehouse.  

When  packing  goods,  bar  coding  can  have  a  number  of  benefits.  These  
include:  
• a  greater  accuracy  in  checking  orders  
• a  reduced  manual  labour  bill  that  allows  for  time  to  be  
used  in  other  processes  
• an  automatic  record  for  tracking  goods  through  the  
packing  area  and  on  to  dispatch.  

A  bar  code  is  a  pattern  of  different  width  bars  and  spaces.  The  code  is  
read  by  a  scanning  device  which  then  feeds  the  information  into  a  
computer.  At  this  point,  information  can  be  down-­‐loaded  to  those  who  
need  to  know  within  that  system.  

The  type  of  information  that  can  be  gained  from  a  bar  code  system  
may  include:  
• stock  locations  
• stock  keeping  units  (SKU).  This  covers  the  way  goods  are  
packaged  (for  example,  a  product  may  be  packed  100  
items  loose  in  a  sealed  cardboard  box  which  is  one  metre  
cubed  and  weighs  100  kilograms)  

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• personnel  identifier,  or  the  person  who  prepared  the  order  


• number  and  type  of  containers  needed  to  pack  an  order  
• picking  paths  for  raising  the  order  
• packing  options  and  specifications.  

To  operate  a  bar  code  system  you  will  use  a  scanning  device  to  send  
information  as  you  complete  a  task  and  to  receive  information  that  
helps  you  do  your  job.  There  are  different  types  of  scanning  equipment  
and  the  most  common  is:  
• hand  held  portable  scanners,  similar  to  those  used  in  
supermarkets  to  check  stock  on  the  shelves  
• laser  scanning  guns,  a  good  example  being  the  police  
speed  guns  
• fixed  beam  fixed  scanners,  like  those  used  at  your  local  
supermarket  checkout  
• moving  beam  fixed  scanners,  a  similar  idea  as  the  security  
camera  in  a  store.  It  allows  a  wide  cover  of  the  work  area  
to  capture  the  information.  

An  example  of  a  barcode  has  been  included  in  the  ‘Additional  


resources’  section  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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Activity 12: Packing goods for dispatch

In this activity you will be required to pack a customer order ready


for dispatch. The activity is to be under the supervision of your
trainer and may be conducted in your workplace or in a simulated
training warehouse.

Your trainer will select an appropriate order to enable you to


practice most of the knowledge you have gained from working
through this Learner’s Guide.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Additional
resources

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Publications:  
• Ackerman  K.B.  Practical  Handbook  of  Warehousing,  Van  
Nostrand  Reinhold,  New  York  
• Lindkvist  R.G.T  Handbook  of  Materials  Handling,  Ellis  
Horwood  Ltd,  Chichester,  UK  1985  
• Tomkins  &  Smith  The  Warehouse  Management  Handbook,  
Megraw  Hill  Book  Company,  USA  
• Occupational  Health,  Safety  &  Welfare  Regulations,  1995.  

Other  sources  of  information  include:  


• workplace  packaging  procedures  
• packing  equipment  user  manuals  
• packaging  information  brochures  and  magazines.  

Videos:  
• Manual  Handling  -­‐  Safetycare  Series  
• An  easy  guide  to  manual  handling  -­‐  Avoiding  back  strains  
&  pains  -­‐  Workplace  Video  Productions  

Example  for  preparing  and  packing  goods:  

When  preparing  goods  for  packing  there  are  many  things  you  must  
consider.  This  may  include:  
• the  type  of  goods  being  handled.  For  example,  food  would  
require  different  packing  to  say  electrical  goods  
• the  type  of  container  the  goods  are  assembled  on.  In  this  
case  you  would  use  certain  packing  materials  to  secure  a  
pallet,  compared  to  goods  that  have  been  assembled  in  
plastic  bins,  that  can  be  stacked  and  require  no  packing  
material    
• the  way  that  goods  are  packaged  will  effect  the  choice  of  
container  for  assembly  and  the  material  for  packing.  For  
example,  an  order  consisting  of  the  same  type  of  goods  
and  with  standard  packaging  makes  for  ease  in  stacking  
pallets.  However,  an  order  made  up  of  many  different  
goods  with  no  standard  packaging  may  not  suit  a  pallet.  

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The  method  of  packing  customer  orders  ready  for  dispatch  could  go  
something  like  this:  
• receive  the  orders  from  the  picker  
• check  the  orders,  making  sure  the  quantity  received  
matches  the  tally  on  the  picking  slip  
• check  that  all  outer  packages  are  correctly  labelled,  for  
example  customer  address  and  special  handling  required  
• identify  the  correct  load  carrier  for  the  order.  Order  
assembly  can  often  occur  as  part  of  the  picking  function  
• assemble  the  order  using  the  correct  load  carrier  
• advise  any  discrepancy  found  before  proceeding  any  
further  
• select  the  correct  packing  material  to  suit  the  goods  and  
the  load  carrier  
• pack  the  order  using  the  selected  packing  material.  
Remember  to  consider  the  type  of  goods  being  packed.  
For  example,  heavy  goods  to  the  bottom  and  fragile  goods  
protected  from  direct  strapping  which  may  cause  damage  
• consolidate  orders  into  a  single  load  if  required.  This  
includes  selecting  the  right  container  for  the  load  and  any  
additional  packing  materials  needed  to  secure  the  load  
• weigh  and  final  tally  orders,  making  sure  this  information  is  
placed  on  the  picking  slip  and/or  delivery  advice  note  
• label  all  assembled  orders  to  meet  handling  requirements.  
For  example,  the  correct  symbols  for  chemical  goods  and  
the  information  label  covering  customer  delivery  details  
• send  the  assembled  or  consolidated  orders  to  dispatch,  
along  with  support  documentation.  

Sample  product  specification  sheet:  

Product:                                                                          500ml  soft  drink    

Pack  size:                                                                      24    X    500ml  bottles  

Item  No:                                                                          566  

A.P.N.:                                                                                17  000123  00478  0  

T.U.N.:                                                                                1  17  000123  00478  0  

Unit  Dimensions:                                              70.5mm  (Dia)  X  187mm  (h)  

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External  carton  size:                                  429(l)  x  288(w)  x  199(h)mm  

Carton  weight:                                                      13kg  

Stack  Height:                                                            3  pallets  high  

Pallet  pattern:                                                          cases/row    9  

                                                                                                           rows/pallet  6  

                                                                                                           cases/pallets  54  

                                                                                                           height  include  pallet  1.34  m  

                                                                                                           weight  include  pallet  835kgs  

 
                                                                                                           pattern    -­‐  block                                                

Example  of  documents  used  in  packing  goods  


• package  labels.  For  example  an  address  label  which  
provides  such  things  as  delivery  details  and  product  
information.  The  package  label  is  fixed  to  the  outer  
container,  in  a  position  where  it  can  be  easily  seen.  An  
example  is  provided  below.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
S10004006001  
 
                                         Supplier:   ABC  Distributors  
                                                                                     1  Story  street  
                                                                                     Mile  End.    SA  
                                           
    Deliver  to:        Best  Wholesalers  
                                                                                     245  Port  Road  
                                                                                     Woodville.      SA  
                                           
    Carrier:                Arc  Road  Express  
 
                                        Order  No:          S10004    
                               
    Pack:        1.                                                      Device:        2.  
                                                                                                               
                                       Grid                                                                        Route  
                                          01                                                                              02  

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• order  picking  slips  are  the  main  documents  used  in  the  
packing  area  to  check  the  order.  In  some  warehouses  the  
picking  slip  is  a  multi-­‐copy  document  that  also  serves  as  a  
delivery  note.  This  reduces  the  number  of  documents  
required  in  the  order  process.  An  example  of  a  picking  slip  
is  produced  below.  
 
 
ABC  DISTRIBUTORS  
PICKING  SLIP  
 
SOLD  TO:    Best  Wholesalers                        ORDER  REF:                    S10004  
 
DEL  TO:          245  Port  Rd                                          Authorised  by:                B.  Quick  
                                         Woodville      SA                              Date:                                                09  Jul  1996  
 
Order  No:        Various                                                      Dispatch  by:                          Arc  Rd  Exp  
 
Attention:          I.A.  Hurry                                            Required  by:                        10  Jul  1996  
 
Locn          Code                          Description                  Order          Picked          B/O            SKU  
 
A1C2      50041              Toilet  paper  rolls                      6                            6                          -­‐                    CTNS  
 
B2C3      41321                Paper  hand  towels                9                            9                          -­‐                    CTNS  
 
B4B1      39042                Plastic  cups                                    6                            6                          -­‐                    CTNS  
 
B6A3      66112              Paper  plates                                    6                            6                            -­‐                  CTNS  
 
 
                                                                                         ITEMS  PACKED  
 
_________  Parcels                                                                                          Total  Packages                
 
             27                Cartons                                                                                        Total  Weight        .25  tonne    
 
                 1                Pallets                                                                                            Freight  Co.                          Arc    
 
       
• packing  slips  are  used  in  most  warehouses  to  provide  a  
check  at  the  receiving  end  of  what  is  actually  packed  in  a  
container  or  load  carrier.  Once  completed  by  the  packer  it  
is,  normally,  sealed  in  an  envelope  and  attached  to  the  
load  carrier.  

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                                                                       ABC  DISTRIBUTORS  
                                                                                       PACKING  SLIP  
 
                 Account  No:      SX1000                                                  Page      1        of          2  
             
                   Date:      7  Aug  1996                                                            Carrier:  Arc  Rd  Exp                      
           
                   Customer:      Best  Wholesalers  
 
Con   Item  No.   Qty   Part  No.   Description   Location   SKU  
No.  
1   1   6   54-­‐100-­‐12   Toilet  paper   W’Ville   CTNS  
  2   9   56-­‐109-­‐23   Paper  Towels      
  3   6   66-­‐270-­‐09   Plastic  Cups      
  4   6   44-­‐700-­‐11   Paper  Plates      
2   1   27   54-­‐100-­‐12   Toilet  Paper   W’Ville   CTNS  
 
• advice  and  delivery  notes  are  completed  in  the  dispatch  
area.  They  are  used  to  let  the  customer  know  the  order  is  
on  the  way,  and  to  confirm  delivery.  You  may  be  required  
to  fill  out  these  documents  when  packing  and  dispatch  
functions  are  combined.  
• pre-­‐printed  stick-­‐on  symbols  or  handling  instructions.  
These  forms  are  covered  in  detail  in  section  three  of  this  
Learner’s  Guide  
• packaging  specifications,  an  example  appears  in  the  
‘additional  resources’  section  of  this  Learner’s  Guide  
• bar  codes  which  will  be  covered  in  section  three.  

Example  of  document  flow  in  a  packing  area  

The  documentation  flow  in  a  packing  area  may  look  like  this:  
• order  arrives  in  packing  area  with  the  picking  slip  
• the  order  is  checked  against  the  pick  slip    
• the  order  is  assembled  or  consolidated    
• orders  are  weighed  and  tallied  
• information  is  entered  on  the  picking  slip  
• labels  are  fixed  to  the  order  and  information  entered  on  
labels  
• packing  note  or  delivery  advice  is  completed  and  fixed  to  
the  order.  This  may  be  a  carbon  copy  of  the  picking  slip.  

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Examples  of  technology  and  equipment  used  for  packing  


The  information  that  follows  is  a  selection  of  the  more  common  types  
of  technology  and  equipment  you  will  use  in  a  warehouse  to  pack  
goods.  

Glue  and  sealing  equipment  

In  the  packing  area  you  will  be  required  to  use  tape  dispensers,  glue  
guns  and  stapling  guns.  These  items  of  equipment  are  used  to  seal  
closed  packages.  They  are  also  used  in  assembling  and  consolidating  
orders  to  hold  packages  together  on  load  carriers.  

Banding  and  strapping  equipment  

There  are  many  kinds  of  banding  and  strapping  equipment.  They  range  
from  hand  operated  tools  to  automatic  machines  that  operate  as  part  
of  a  production  line.  The  main  aim  of  banding  or  strapping  is  to  hold  
goods  and  loads  together.  

This  type  of  equipment  suits  goods  which  have  a  regular  shape  and  are  
not  too  soft.  Metal  straps  are  used  for  heavier,  more  durable  loads.  A  
wide  range  of  plastic  straps  are  available  for  light  and  heavy  loads.  
Their  use  will  depend  on  the  nature  of  the  goods  being  packed.  

Typical  uses  for  banding  and  strapping  are:  


• for  cardboard  cartons  on  pallets,  these  may  require  the  
use  of  right  angle,  edge  protectors  
• for  bundles  of  wood  or  metal  piping  
• to  secure  wooden  crates  and  boxes.  

Bin  stackers  

Orders  that  are  made  up  of  several  small  items  may  arrive  in  the  
packing  area  in  plastic  or  wood  bins.  If  the  bins  are  a  standard  size,  a  
bin  stacker  could  be  used.  These  machines  are  designed  to  load  
pallets.  A  simple  example  is  soft  drink  crates  which  are  transferred  in  
complete  layers  of  nine  crates  onto  a  pallet.  The  pallet  is  then  lowered,  
ready  to  receive  the  next  layer  of  crates.  

Palletisers  

These  are  machines  that  automatically  stack  the  goods  on  to  pallets.  
They  are  normally  sited  at  the  end  of  a  production  line,  or  in  a  fully  
automated  warehouse  used  for  high  volume,  standard  units  of  pack.  A  
similar  result  is  being  achieved  with  robots  today.    

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For  example,  paving  bricks  are  stacked  onto  pallets  and,  once  a  layer  is  
complete  the  pallet  is  lowered  to  receive  the  next  layer.  An  example  is  
shown  below.  

Pallet  inverter  

Assembled  loads  often  arrive  in  the  packing  area  on  damaged  pallets.  
Or  you  may  require  to  swap  a  purpose  designed  pallet  used  on  the  
production  line  with  a  general  purpose  pallet.  An  example  is  in  the  
food  industry  where  special  hygienic  pallets  are  used  internally  and  are  
very  costly  to  replace.  

When  these  situations  arise  a  pallet  inverter  can  be  used  to  exchange  
pallets  without  having  to  unload  and  restack.  This  equipment  comes  in  
different  designs.  An  inverter  can  simply  turn  a  loaded  pallet  upside  
down  to  enable  the  pallet  to  be  exchanged.  An  example  is  shown  
below.  

       

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Conveyors  and  rollers  

This  equipment  comes  in  a  variety  of  types.    They  range  from  simple  
gravity  fed  roller  systems  to  high  tech  automatic  roller  and  conveyor  
systems.  Rollers  and  conveyors  will  normally  feed  into  or  through  the  
packing  area.  This  type  of  equipment  reduces  manual  handling.  A  
scissor  lift  platform  can  be  added  to  the  system  for  stacking  pallets.  
Examples  are  shown  below.  

                               
      Mobile  conveyor  system  feeding  into  vehicle  from  dock  

           
      Roller  conveyor                                            

Shrink  wrap  equipment  

Orders  can  be  secured  once  assembled  or  consolidated  by  using  a  
shrink  wrap.  This  involves  placing  a  plastic  film  jacket  over  the  order  
and  applying  heat  to  the  plastic.  The  plastic  then  shrinks  to  the  shape  
of  the  order  to  provide  a  sturdy  seal  and  protection  from  movement  
and  the  elements.  

The  basic  way  to  shrink  wrap  is  by  using  an  electric  or  gas  operated  
heat  gun.  When  applying  heat  you  must  be  careful  not  to  blister  the  
plastic.  This  is  done  by  keeping  the  heat  gun  away  from  the  order  and  
applying  heat  evenly.  

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In  larger  warehouses  or  factories  a  shrink  wrap  machine  or  oven  is  
used.  An  example  of  a  shrink  wrapped  pallet  is  shown  below.  

         
Stretch  wrap  equipment  

Stretch  wrapping  involves  exactly  what  is  said.  Plastic  film  is  stretched  
around  and  over  an  order.  This  can  be  achieved  using  a  hand  held  reel.  
However,  for  better  results  it  is  best  to  use  a  stretch  wrap  machine.  
There  are  basically  two  types  of  machinery  used:  
• a  push  through  machine  has  orders  carried  into  and  
through  a  sheet  of  plastic.  As  the  order  passes  through,  
the  plastic  stretches  over  and  around  the  order.  It  is  then  
weld  sealed.  
• the  most  common  stretch  wrap  machine  is  a  spiral  winding  
type.  In  this  method  an  order  is  placed  on  a  turntable.  The  
wrap  is  fixed  to  the  bottom  of  the  order.  As  the  turntable  
rotates  the  wrap  is  wound  tightly  around  the  order.  The  
machine  moves  the  wrap  up  the  order  until  it  reaches  the  
top.  It  then  repeats  the  process  back  to  the  bottom.  This  is  
normally  programmed  into  the  machine.  The  wrap  is  then  
cut  and  tied  of  to  the  load  carrier.  

Stretch  wrap  is  best  used  in  pallet  load  operations.  An  example  of  a  
stretch  wrap  machine  is  shown  below.  

       

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Examples  of  pallet  patterns  

Block  pattern  

This  is  used  for  round  or  square  items  of  uniform  shape.  With  this  
pattern  there  is  no  bonding  (interlocking  of  goods).  Wood  or  
cardboard  sheets  can  be  placed  between  layers  to  make  the  load  more  
stable.  An  example  of  the  block  pattern  stack  is  laid  out  below:  

‘Top view looking


down on the stack’

‘Side view of block pattern on a pallet’

Row  pattern  

This  is  used  for  rectangular  packages.  The  pattern  gains  stability  by  
having  each  successive  layer  run  at  right  angles  to  the  last  layer.  This  
provides  bonding  by  layers.  An  example  of  the  row  pattern  is  shown  
below:  

‘Top view looking


down on the stack’

‘Side view of row pattern on a pallet’

Page 50 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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Brick  pattern  

This  is  the  most  common  pattern.  It  is  suitable  for  rectangular  
packages  of  standard  size.  The  pattern  is  similar  in  look  to  a  brick  wall.  
Each  layer  is  placed  at  right  angle  to  the  layers  above  and  below  it.  This  
provides  bonding  between  layers,  which  gives  the  pattern  a  high  
degree  of  stability.  An  example  of  the  brick  pattern  is  shown  below:  

‘Top view looking down


on the stack’

‘Side view of brick pattern on a pallet’

Pinwheel  pattern  

Another  way  of  stacking  rectangular  packages  on  a  pallet.  The  pattern  
when  built  has  a  good  stability  and  each  layer  is  bonded  together.  A  
small  amount  of  open  space  remains  unused  in  the  centre  of  the  pallet.  
An  example  of  the  pinwheel  pattern  is  shown  below:  
 
 

‘Top view looking down


on the stack. Shaded area
‘Side view of pinwheel pattern shows unused space’
on a pallet’

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Examples  of  symbols  

It  will  not  be  possible  to  cover  every  symbol  in  this  Learner’s  Guide.  
The  more  common  types  of  symbols  appear  below  along  with  their  
meaning:  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
   

  ‘Keep  away  from  heat’                                                          ‘Keep  dry’                                                          


 

   
 
 

‘Fragile  -­‐  handle  with  care’                         ‘Use  no  hooks’  

                               
  ‘Heavy  weight  this  end’                                                    ‘This  way  up’  
 

                                                               

               ‘Sling  points’                                                                    ‘Centre  of  Mass’  

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For  symbols  and  special  handling  labels  that  relate  to  dangerous  
materials  and  chemicals  you  will  be  given  detailed  training  in  the  
Learner’s  Guide  Handle  dangerous  and  Hazardous  Goods.  

Special  handling  labels  can  appear  as  symbols  (refer  above).  Or  they  
can  be  in  written  form.  They  can  be  expressed  simply,  for  example,  
‘this  way  up’  and  ‘open  other  end’.  Labels  can  also  contain  detailed  
instruction  on  how  to  handle  a  certain  product,  or  what  is  contained  in  
the  package.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 53


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L – April 2008 ADELG1033
TLIA1107C Package goods

These  assessment  tasks  relate  to  the  Unit  of  Competency    


TDT  A11  97B  Package  goods  
Elements  of  competency  

Select  materials  and  pack  and  wrap  products  

Use  labeling  standards  to  label  packaged  products/loads  

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ADELG1033 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIA1107C Package goods

Feedback on
activities
The responses provided in this section are suggested responses.
Because every workplace is different, your responses may vary
according to your specific workplace procedures, the equipment
available and the nature of the business.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 55


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L – April 2008 ADELG1033
TLIA1107C Package goods

Activity 1: Packing materials

Compare your list of materials in activity 1 with the following


examples of packaging materials:

Material Types Uses

paper tissue to wrap small packages or


butchers secure items inside of
packages and newsprint
containers

shredded wadding

cardboard corrugated cartons mainly used to make


sheets or layers inside of
packages

particles sawdust secure items inside


popcorn polystyrene chips
packages wood shavings
or containers crushed ice

moulded polystyrene same as for particles


inserts wood
plastic
cardboard

plastics bubblewrap for inside or external


sheet wrap securing of goods and
stretch wrap shrink wrap loads

banding or metal straps to secure packages and


strapping plastic straps loads to containers or
tapes load shift equipment twine
(string)

glues as per banding

netting secure pallets

The above list is only a sample of packing materials you could


expect to use in a warehouse.

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ADELG1033 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIA1107C Package goods

Activity 2: Packing containers

Compare your list of containers in activity 2 with the following


examples:
• cardboard cartons (various design). This is one of the main
ways to package goods
• loose support pads which are strapped to goods to provide
storage protection and access for handling
• simple boards of wood, metal or plastic which hold goods
together. Used mainly in roller conveyor handling
• bins, boxes and baskets for manual handling, made of wood,
plastic, sheet metal, or wire mesh. Used for consolidating
smaller goods into one order
• bins, boxes and crates for mechanised handling of larger
items. Will normally have slots at bottom to allow for lifting.
Made from wood, plastic, sheet metal or wire mesh

Steel pallet
Cage pallet
• disposable or re-useable pallets used to stack packaged goods
on for movement. This is the primary load carrier in a
warehouse. Can be made from metal, plastic, foam or
cardboard but are mostly wood

4 Way pallet Wing pallet

Reversible pallet

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 57


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L – April 2008 ADELG1033
TLIA1107C Package goods

• roll pallets are simply a pallet on wheels with wire mesh sides
and gates. Handy for packing loose goods

• metal ISO containers. The big brother of load carriers. They


come in a number of sizes and designs. Used to move general
cargo in bulk. Some examples are freezer, tanker and general
cargo. They can come in 10 to 40 foot, the most common being
the 20 foot metal container.

The equipment detailed above is only a sample of containers or


load carriers that are used in a warehouse.

Activity 3: Packing area health and safety

Compare your list in activity 3 with the following OHS issues that
need to be considered in a packing area. Ask yourself:
• is the area kept clean and tidy?
• are there guards on moving parts of packing equipment?
• are workbenches at the correct height for manual tasks?
• are proper safety signs and floor markings in place?
• do you know how to operate equipment correctly?
• do you know how to pack goods correctly?
• is the proper safety gear available?
• are goods being packed to specification?

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ADELG1033 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIA1107C Package goods

The questions listed above do not fully cover the requirements of


OHS. However, they do give you an idea of what you need to
consider.

Activity 4: Packing operations

Response a - protection, containment, information, utility

True

Response b - how the goods are to be moved

False - it allows goods to be grouped together into a single load

True.

Activity 5: Identify packing materials

Feedback is provided in the form of an example. This is done to


show you how to approach the activity. You need only list the
materials in your response.
• an electric clock radio would be packed in a plastic bag. The
product is then placed in polystyrene moulded inserts and
packed into an individual cardboard box, which is then sealed
with tape or staples
• each individually boxed item is then grouped into a unit load of
10 per cardboard carton. For movement in bulk, the cartons
may then be put on a pallet. The pallet load could then be
secured using stretch wrap.

In this example you can see that several packing materials have
been used these include:
• plastic bags
• polystyrene moulded inserts
• cardboard boxes
• glue
• staples or tape
• cardboard cartons
• wooden pallet
• stretch wrap.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 59


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L – April 2008 ADELG1033
TLIA1107C Package goods

Activity 6: Assemble and consolidate orders

You can compare your response to activity 6 with the following


definitions of assemble and consolidate:
• assemble - means to pick the customers order and to place it
on the correct container ready for packing and dispatch. You
should note that a container could consist of any type of load
carrier. For example, pallets, cartons, boxes and so on
• consolidate - means to group a number of customer orders into
a single load. An example of this would be where a warehouse
assembles five orders, each in a carton. These are then placed
on a pallet for movement to the same delivery place.

Activity 7: Packaging specifications

The following types of information can be found on the specification


sheets or on the outer package:
• pack size
• unit dimensions
• carton size
• pallet load pattern
• product name
• item numbers
• goods codes
• symbols and labels.

Activity 8: Packaging technology and equipment

Some examples of technology and equipment, including their uses


are:
• banding machine - used to strap goods to load carriers
• glue gun - seal cartons and stick cartons together on load
carriers
• shrink wrap gun - secure goods to load carrier using plastic film
• stretch wrap machine - same as shrink wrap
• netting - secure goods to load carriers.

Page 60 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1033 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIA1107C Package goods

Activity 10: Stacking a pallet

In doing this activity you must consider the following:


• the use of a stacking pattern that suits the packages being used
• that packages do not overlap the pallet
• that packages are stacked tight thus using all space
• that boards are used between layers if packages are fragile
• the use of a suitable pallet load securing material. For example,
shrink or stretch wrap, strapping and banding
• the proper use of packing equipment. For example, strapping
tools.

Activity 12: Packing goods for dispatch

The intention of this activity is to get you to put into practice what
you have learnt. It may be that many of you will be in a work
situation and will get the chance to do this as a part of your job. For
those that do not have that opportunity, this will at least enable
some practical training as a lead in to your assessment.

There is no set solution to this activity. However in doing the task


set by your trainer you should have:
• checked the order against the pick slip for accuracy. This could
be a manual check or electronic using a scanning device
• selected the correct container/load carrier. For example, a pallet
• selected the correct packing material. For example, wrap or
banding
• selected and correctly operated the right packing equipment to
apply the packing material. For example, shrink wrap gun
• fixed the correct labels to the order. For example, address label
and handling symbols
• completed the final check and weighing of the order
• filled out all documentation or downloaded information if it’s an
electronic system. For example, packing notes, complete pick
slip, or scan information
• moved order to the dispatch area with all necessary
documentation.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 61


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L – April 2008 ADELG1033