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TLIA1307C

Receive goods
Learner Guide
Contents
What this Learner’s Guide is about ........................................ 1
Planning your learning ........................................................... 2
How you will be assessed ...................................................... 4

Section 1............................................................................................. 5
What documentation is involved when receiving stock? ........ 5

Section 2........................................................................................... 25
What does checking and inspecting goods involve?............ 25

Section 3........................................................................................... 39
What do I need to know to assist with unloading, unpacking and
putaway of stock? ................................................................ 39

Additional resources ....................................................................... 69

Feedback on activities .................................................................... 71


TLIA1307C Receive goods

What this Learner’s Guide is about

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  about  the  knowledge  and  skills  you  require  to  
receive  goods  in  accordance  with  regulatory  and  workplace  
requirements,  including:  identifying  workplace  procedures  and  
documentation  requirements  for  the  receipt  of  goods,  checking  and  
inspecting  for  the  receipt  of  goods,  checking  and  inspecting  goods  on  
arrival  and  completing  workplace  documentation  and  unloading,  
packing  and  storing  stock.    

The  Elements  of  Competency  from  the  unit  TLIA1307C  Receive  goods  
covered  in  this  Learner’s  Guide  are  listed  below.  

Identify  workplace  procedures  and  documentation  requirements  for  


the  receipt  of  goods  

Check  and  inspect  goods  on  arrival  and  complete  workplace  


documentation  

Unload,  unpack  and  store  stock  

This  unit  of  competency  is  from  the  Transport  and  Logistics  Training  
Package  (TLI07).  

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Planning your learning

It  is  important  to  plan  your  learning  before  you  start  because  you  may  
already  have  some  of  the  knowledge  and  skills  that  are  covered  in  this  
Learner’s  Guide.  This  might  be  because:  
• you  have  been  working  in  the  industry  for  some  time,  
and/or  
• you  have  already  completed  training  in  this  area.  

Together  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer  use  the  checklists  on  the  
following  pages  to  help  you  plan  your  study  program.  Your  answers  to  
the  questions  in  the  checklist  will  help  you  work  out  which  sections  of  
this  Learner’s  Guide  you  need  to  complete.  

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  written  with  the  idea  that  learning  is  made  more  
relevant  when  you,  the  learner,  are  actually  working  in  the  industry.  
This  means  that  you  will  have  people  within  the  enterprise  who  can  
show  you  things,  discuss  how  things  are  done  and  answer  any  
questions  you  have.  Also  you  can  practise  what  you  learn  and  see  how  
what  you  learn  is  applied  in  the  enterprise.  

If  you  are  working  through  this  Learner’s  Guide  and  have  not  yet  found  
a  job  in  the  industry,  you  will  need  to  talk  to  your  trainer  about  doing  
work  experience  or  working  and  learning  in  some  sort  of  simulated  
workplace.    

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Section 1: What documentation is involved


when receiving stock?

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. identify  the  documentation  used  to  
receive  stock  into  a  warehouse?        
2. highlight  the  more  important  parts  of  this    
documentation?        

Section 2: What does checking and inspecting


goods involve?

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. give  a  summary  of  what  receival  involves?        
2. list  steps  for  checking  goods  against  
documentation?        
3. list  procedures  for  reporting  damages/  
discrepancies?        
4. select  the  correct  manual  materials  
handling  
techniques  and  equipment  to  be  used  for    
unloading,  and  putting  away?        
5. identify  steps  for  recording  returns?          

Section 3: What do I need to know to assist with


unloading, unpacking and putaway of
stock?

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. demonstrate  safe  unpacking  procedure?        
2. assist  with  the  putaway  of  goods?        

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How you will be assessed

Assessment  of  this  Unit  of  Competency  will  include  observation  of  real  
or  simulated  work  processes  using  workplace  procedures  and  
questioning  on  underpinning  knowledge  and  skills.  It  must  be  
demonstrated  in  an  actual  or  simulated  work  situation  under  
supervision.  

You  will  be  required  to:  


• identify  relevant  workplace  documents  
• assist  with  the  receival  of  deliveries  
• demonstrate  safe  unloading,  unpacking  and  put  away  according  to  
workplace  procedures.  
 

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Section 1

What documentation is involved


when receiving stock?

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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Stock  integrity  

Consignment  notes  

Internal  packing  slips  

Electronic  data  systems  

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What does receival involve?

Receival  involves:  
• arrival  
• unloading  
• unpacking  
• checking  
• entry  in  system.  

Goods  may  arrive  at  the  warehouse  in  many  ways.    They  may  arrive  on  
trains,  aircraft  or  trucks,  and  they  may  be  packed  in  containers,  cartons  
or  simply  on  pallets.    Road  trucks  are  the  most  common  form  of  
transport  for  the  distribution  of  goods.    Some  road  trucks  are  enclosed  
containers  and  are  loaded/unloaded  from  the  rear.    Other  types  are  
loaded/unloaded  from  the  side.  

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Activity 1: What are the procedures for receiving stock into


the warehouse where you work?

Discuss with your trainer, the steps for receiving stock into the
warehouse where you work. Make some notes about the main
steps involved. Compare what you have written with the list above.
Are there any differences?

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What about stock integrity?

At  receival  it  is  important  to  make  sure  the  quality  and  quantity  of  
goods  is  what  is  expected.    Goods  must  be  received  properly  and  put  
away  in  the  correct  place.  If  you  don’t  get  it  right  here,  the  whole  
supply  chain  is  incorrect.    It  is  also  very  important  that  the  integrity  of  
stock  is  also  protected.  

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Activity 2: What is stock integrity?

If you are not sure what ‘stock integrity’ means, ask your trainer or
work mate to explain to you what it means and why it is important.
You might like to make some notes in the space provided.

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There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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The  warehouse  where  you  work  is  a  critical  link  of  goods  exchange.  
Goods  exchange  involves  many  different  groups:      
• suppliers  
• purchasers  
• carriers  
• distribution  centres.  

All  these  groups  work  together  in  a  system  to  guarantee  the  customer  
gets  what  they  want,  when  they  want  it  and  at  the  right  cost.  

Receival  at  a  warehouse  must  ensure  that  goods  flow  through  the  
warehouse  as  smoothly  as  possible,  not  making  mistakes  and  not  
causing  delays.  

What documentation is involved with receiving


stock?

To  make  sure  the  flow  of  goods  through  a  warehouse  is  smooth  and  
effective,  we  need  a  method  of  recording  and  tracking  goods  between  
all  groups  involved  in  the  exchange  process.  We  need  a  way  to  show  
that  suppliers,  purchasers,  carriers  and  distribution  centres  have  all  
played  their  part  correctly.    This  is  necessary  to  show  exactly  what  
goods  have  been  given  to  whom,  and  as  evidence  of  work  and  receipt  
of  goods  on  which  payments  will  be  based.  

Individual  warehouses  will  have  different  systems  for  recording  the  


movement  and  storage  of  goods.    These  systems  can  be  manual  or  
computerised.  

Making  sure  the  system  works  involves  many  different  types  of  
documentation.  

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Delivery note

A  delivery  note  is  usually  supplied  with  the  goods  at  the  time  of  
delivery.    It  will  state  what  the  supplier  has  actually  delivered  to  the  
store.    This  is  probably  the  most  important  receipt  document  of  all.    
Goods  delivered  are  checked  against  the  delivery  note  to  confirm  the  
delivery  is  correct.  
 

Sample  delivery  note  

GOODS SHIFTER LTD Date: 4/7/03


DELIVERY NOTE

To: Coles

Address: Jay Street, Melbourne

Please accept delivery of the following items

Item Code No. Description Quantity Method of


Delivery
Saucepans 02 stainless steel - copper base 100 carrier
30cm

Method of delivery:

Good received by: (signature) John Foreman

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Activity 3: What information on a delivery note is


important/relevant?

The delivery note is used to check the delivery has come to the
right place and it contains the correct goods. On the sample
delivery note above, circle or tick the information you think will
show the delivery has come to the right place and contains the
correct goods.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Invoice

Invoices  are  used  for  the  same  purpose  as  the  delivery  document.    
However,  invoices  are  used  in  situations  where  the  distribution  centre  
actually  purchases  the  goods  rather  than  just  distributing  them  for  
somebody  else.    Goods  received  are  checked  against  the  amount  and  
description  stated  on  the  invoice.  The  invoice  may  contain:  
• a  single  item  or    
• many  items.    

Invoices  are  normally  sent  with  the  load  of  goods.  

Invoices  are  very  important  documents  as  they  are  used  to  bill  the  
receiving  company.    

Great  care  must  be  taken  to  make  sure  that  goods  received  are  
accurately  checked  against  the  invoice.    

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A  sample  invoice    
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
STICKY HONEY CORPORATION OF AUSTRALIA LIMITED

Head office Payment address


Sticky Honey Corporation 39 Archerfield Road
PO Box 666 Poorlands 7704
Poorlands 7704 Queensland Australia
Queensland Australia
Phone (16) (70) 777 3573 Fax (16) (70) 039 3573

Grocery Hold It Invoice No. 687710 V


Post Office Box 691 Invoice Date 16 Apr 1996
SOUTH LAUNCESTON TAS 7249 Customer No. Groce16
Cust. Order No. 96103N
V/No 53522 Sales Tax No.
INVOICE
PRODUCT CODE & DESCRIPTION PACKAGE QUANTITY QUANTITY QUANTITY QUANTITY UNIT S/T% AMOUNT
TYPE PER ORDERED BACK ORD. DELIVERED PRICE
PACKAGE
23CAC Good Pure Honey 375g 12 21 21 19.00 399.00
09STC Sticky Honey 400g 12 48 48 22.55 1082.40
05CVS Bush Honey 750g 12 39 39 25.06 977.34

2458.74
GST 245.87
INVOICE TOTAL 2704.61
Delivered To:
GROCERY HOLD IT
B & D TRANSPORT
530 GARFIELD STREET
LAUNCESTON

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Activity 4: What parts of an invoice are important/relevant


when receiving goods?

Like the delivery docket, the invoice is used to check that:


• the delivery is at the right place
• the delivery has the right products
• the delivery has the right amount of products.

Using the sample invoice above, circle or tick the information you
would use to check the three points listed above.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Manifest

Some  warehouses  are  ‘care  takers’  of  goods,  (that  is  they  do  not  
actually  purchase  the  goods).  These  warehouses  receive  goods  using  a  
document  called  a  manifest.  

The  manifest  is  similar  to  an  invoice.  They  are  used  mostly  when  
importing  or  exporting  goods.    The  information  on  a  manifest  is  used  
to  check  the  delivery  and  make  sure  all  the  goods  consigned  have  
arrived.    

A  delivery  note,  invoice  or  manifest  will  be  used  at  different  times  to  
check  that  the  goods  delivered  are  the  right  goods  and  the  right  
quantity.  

A  sample  manifest  

Time: _____:_____ PUFF Ltd MANIFEST OF CIGARETTES NO _________


DOMESTIC CIGARETTES EXCISE TARIFFS Home Consumption - Export DCS Document:
______________
From: DISPATCH DATE: _____/_____/_____ Manifest:

V______________

To: _________________ INTO STORE: _____/_____/_____ Carrier: _______________

No Long Variant No of Each Quantity Net Total Net


Plts Description Unit Par'ls Contain Under Bond Duty Paid Wt/M Weight
PUFF1 PUFFING BILLY 20X200 10,000
MORE MOREPUFF 20X200 5,000
CANST CANCERSTICK 25X200 5,000
DAN1 DANGERBLOCK 25X200 5,000
DAN2 D/BLOCK LIGHTS 25X200 5,000
SMOK SMOKEROLL 25X200 5,000
ROLL ROLLYEROWN 30X240 12,000
TAR1 TARANICOTINE 35X210 10,500

Total

Prepared by: _______________ Total:

Checked by: ________________ Pan No: ________ Seal No:____________

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Activity 5: What parts of a manifest are important/relevant


when receiving goods?

Circle or tick the sections of the sample manifest which you think
are important/relevant when receiving goods.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Consignment note

A  consignment  note  is  used  when  the  delivery  is  contracted  out  to  a  
private  carrier.    They  show  what  is  to  be  receipted  and  are  usually  
issued  by  the  carrier  of  the  delivery,  as  a  record  of  what  has  actually  
been  sent.  

A  sample  consignment  note    


_____________________________________________________________________________________________

Shippers Pty Ltd


Interstate Hauliers A.C.N. 047 494 900  T D TYPE OF SERVICE  D T 1 3 3 4 2 0

LAUNCESTON: 930 FORSTER STREET, INVERMAY 7248


TELEPHONE: (003) 88 8373
HOBART: RAIL YARDS, SNAVE STREET, 7000 PALLETS CHEP LOSCAM PLAIN CHARGES
TELEPHONE: (002) 00 9963 ...................................................................
.
PAYABLE BY:
DEVONPORT: RAIL YARDS, DEVONPORT, 7310 ...................................................................
TELEPHONE: (004) 63 5142 EX-CHANGE ...........................
MELBOURNE: 230 - 303 PLUMMER ST, PORT ...................................................................
MELBOURNE, 3207 EXCHANGED ...........................
TELEPHONE: (03) 6622 5469
SYDNEY: UNIT 33, HALE STREET, BOTANY ...................................................................
2000 OWING ...........................
TELEPHONE: (02) 886 5613

FROM (SENDER) TO (RECEIVER)


..................................................................................................... ..............................................................................................................................
..................................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................
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.................................. ........................................................................................................
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Sender's No. Items DESCRIPTION Length Width Height M3 Weight
Ref. M M M KGS

TOTAL INSURANCE (See Reverse) TOTAL M3 TOTAL KGS


ITEMS
VALUE OF GOODS: $
SIGNATURE OF SENDER: RECEIVED FOR shippers UNIT No. SIGNATURE OF RECEIVER:

*............................................................................. ................................................................................ *..........................................................................


. . ..........................
DATE DATE DATE

* CARRIAGE OF GOODS SUBJECT TO CONDITIONS PRINTED ON THE BUFF: ADMIN COPY GREEN: RECEIVERS COPY MANIFEST No.
REVERSE SIDE OF THIS DOCUMENT AND ARE ACCEPTED AS READ ON THE WHITE: FREIGHT COPY BLUE: SENDERS COPY
SIGNING OF THIS DOCUMENT PINK: P.O.D. COPY

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In  some  cases,  the  goods  on  a  consignment  note  may  be  checked  with  other  
delivery  documents  (invoice,  manifest  etc).    A  consignment  note  usually  does  
not  give  a  product  description,  but  will  give  information  like  how  many  boxes,  
pallets,  bags,  bales  etc.  

The  important  sections  are:  


• pallet  control  information  
• number  of  items  
• description  
• receiver  
• signature  of  receiver.  

If  you  are  not  sure  why  the  points  listed  above  are  important  to  
receiving  goods,  please  discuss  consignment  notes  with  your  trainer.  

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Activity 6: What documents will you see when receiving


goods?

Ask your trainer to help you collect a sample of the types of


documents used for receiving goods where you work. Compare
what you collect with what is talked about in this Learner’s Guide.
To complete this Learner’s Guide, you need to be able to identify
the important parts that are relevant to your job when receiving
goods. If you think you will have trouble doing this, ask your trainer
for help.

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Internal packing note

The  internal  packing  note  is  used  to  carry  out  a  more  detailed  check  of  
the  stock  delivered,  once  the  outer  containers,  such  as  cartons,  drums,  
boxes  and  pallets  have  been  broken  down  and  the  stock  is  ready  for  
inspection  and  then  storage.    The  packing  note  lists  what  is  actually  
within  each  unit  delivered.    It  should  give  specific  information  
regarding  quantity,  type,  size,  specifications,  colours,  etc.  

Internal  packing  note  example  

PACKING SLIP

Account No. Date Page Number


WY6196 1/4/96 2 27

Container Item No. Qty Part Number Description Location Code Cum
No.
04 26 100 027 Bearings Melb 0019

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Electronic data systems

Many  warehouses  today  use  special  computer  systems  in  the  receival  
of  goods.  This  is  called  an  automated  system.  Automated  systems  cut  
down  on  paper  work  and  are  very  quick  when  it  comes  to  checking  
and  transferring  information.    

The  main  features  of  an  automated  system  are:  


• consignment  notes  sent  through  a  computer  as  proof  of  delivery  
• barcodes  used  on  consignment  notes  
• barcoded  delivery  labels  
• speedy  pricing.  

Sometimes  with  automated  receival  systems,  computers  can  be  used  


to  provide  extra  information.  Daily  dispatch  details  can  be  looked  at  
for  numbers  of:  
• deliveries  
• amounts  
• weights    
• money  charged.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 23


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Activity 7: Does your warehouse use special computer


systems in the receival of goods?

Does your warehouse use special computer systems in the receival


of goods? If yes, ask your trainer why computer methods are used.
If your warehouse does not use computer systems for receiving
goods, ask your trainer if, in the future, they will be used and why
they might be used.

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TLIA1307C Receive goods

Section 2

What does checking and


inspecting goods involve?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 25


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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  


Accepting  and  receiving  delivery  of  goods  
Checking  the  consignment  is  correct  
Checking  the  consignment  for  damage  on  the  truck  and  off  
the  truck  

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The receipts area

The  receipts  area  is  a  special  area  within  the  warehouse  for  the  
receival  of  goods.  It  is  a  separate  area  away  from  all  existing  stock.  
Sometimes  this  area  is  called  the  Quality  Control  area  or  ‘QC’.    This  is  
because  all  incoming  deliveries  must  be  carefully  checked  before  the  
goods  are  mixed  with  stock  on  hand.  

The  receival  area  is  usually  located  close  to  loading  and  unloading  
docks.  This  helps  to  save  handling  time  and  allows  Forklifts,  trolleys,  
etc,  to  be  used.  The  receival  area  should  be  large  enough  to  allow  
goods  to  be  carefully  checked.    

When  doing  a  first  check,  look  for  pallets  with  product  overhang  or  
wet  and  damaged  stock.  Some  warehouses  only  accept  single  item  
pallets.  If  this  is  the  case  in  the  warehouse  where  you  work,  pallets  
with  mixed  items  will  also  need  to  be  labelled  for  return.    If  mixed  
pallets  are  accepted,  then  they  should  be  referred  to  the  receival  
trainer.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 27


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Activity 8: Does your warehouse accept mixed pallets?

Find out from your trainer if your warehouse accepts mixed pallets.
If no, how are mixed pallets treated?

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It  is  also  important  to  check  any  security  or  quality  control  devices.  In  
many  warehouses,  loads  or  containers  that  are  delivered  must  be  
sealed.  This  may  be  done  using  some  type  of  plastic  tag  or  even  a  key  
and  lock  system.  These  load  security  procedures  are  used  to  prevent  
consignments  from  being  tampered  with  during  transportation.  

When  checking  a  load,  if  you  notice  that  the  seal  or  lock  is  broken,  you  
should  immediately  notify  your  work  supervisor.    Usually  the  carrier  is  
asked  to  verify  the  damaged  seal  and  the  sender  or  client  is  notified  
before  the  stock  is  checked.    In  some  situations  it  may  be  warehouse  
policy  to  actually  collect  photographic  evidence  of  damaged  deliveries.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 29


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Activity 9: Do you deal with security control devices?

Do any deliveries arrive at your warehouse with locks or security


control devices? Ask your trainer to comment and make notes in
the space provided.

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Physical checking

After  goods  are  unloaded,  physical  checking  is  carried  out  to  make  
sure  the  goods  delivered  are  what  is  described  on:  
• manifests  
• consignment  notes  
• invoices.  

Deliveries  are  checked  against  delivery  documentation  to  make  sure:  


• the  total  count  is  correct  
• individual  product  count  is  correct  
• any  damage  is  recorded  and  reported  immediately.  

Goods  may  be  checked  by:  


• counting  
• weighing  
• measuring.  

Quality  may  be  checked  by:  


• colour  
• size/weight  
• specification  
• packaging  
• best  by  dates.  

Once  the  goods  have  been  checked  they  are  entered  into  the  system  
and  recorded  as  goods  in  stock.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 31


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Activity 10: How are goods checked against documentation?

In Section one, you looked at sections of documentation which


provide information used for checking deliveries. Can you
remember where you would look on a delivery docket, invoice or
manifest to check the following information:
• is the delivery at the right place?
• is the stock the right item?
• are the item quantities correct?

If you cannot remember, revise Section one or ask your trainer for
help.

Page 32 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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Activity 11: Assisting loads

It is time to get some practice at assisting with the checking of


loads. Ask your work trainer to help you arrange to do this. You
should try to do at least three different deliveries. Use the following
checklist as a guide.

Checklist - 1
Date: __________________________________________________
Time of delivery:__________________________________________
Carrier: _________________________________________________
Sender: ________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
Invoice/manifest number:___________________________________
Product type: ____________________________________________

Correct product: Yes  No 


Number of pallets Yes  No 
Count is correct Yes  No 
Any damage Yes  No 
Best by date apply Yes  No 

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 33


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Checklist - 2
Date: __________________________________________________
Time of delivery:__________________________________________
Carrier: _________________________________________________
Sender: ________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
Invoice/manifest number:___________________________________
Product type: ____________________________________________

Correct product: Yes  No 


Number of pallets Yes  No 
Count is correct Yes  No 
Any damage Yes  No 
Best by date apply Yes  No 

Checklist - 3
Date: __________________________________________________
Time of delivery:__________________________________________
Carrier: _________________________________________________
Sender: ________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
Invoice/manifest number:___________________________________
Product type: ____________________________________________

Correct product: Yes  No 


Number of pallets Yes  No 
Count is correct Yes  No 
Any damage Yes  No 
Best by date apply Yes  No 

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What do I do if deliveries are incorrect or


damaged?

A  damage  or  shortage  report  must  be  completed  when:  


• goods  arrive  damaged  
• a  shortage  occurs  in  delivery  
• goods  fail  to  arrive  at  the  stipulated  time.  

There  are  also  correct  procedures  for  cases  of  wrong  and  surplus  
delivery.  
 

Problem   Action  

Goods  arrive  damaged   Usually  taken  to  a  special  area  set  aside  for  damaged  
goods.    A  damage  report  form  is  then  filled  out.    It  is  
from  this  damage  report  form  that  claims  against  
suppliers  or  carriers  are  made.  

Not  enough  goods  arrive   A  discrepancy  report  must  be  completed.    The  carrier,  
supplier  and  invoice  department  all  get  a  copy  of  the  
discrepancy  report.    The  warehouse  also  keeps  a  copy.    
Where  possible  a  copy  of  the  consignment  note  or  
invoice  are  attached  to  the  report.  

Non  deliveries   The  carrier  is  immediately  advised  in  writing.  

DAMAGED STOCK RECORD FORM

DATE ITEM CODE DESCRIPTION ISSUE QUANTITY PACK SIZE SIGNATURE

DISTRIBUTION CENTRE MANAGER

Damaged   stock   is   recorded   on   a   Damaged   Stock   Record   Form   (as  


above).  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 35


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1008
TLIA1307C Receive goods

Activity 12: What happens in your warehouse if deliveries are


wrong?

When working in receivals, you may come across situations where:


• goods are damaged
• wrong goods are delivered
• too many items are delivered
• too few items are delivered.

With your trainer’s help, list what happens in your warehouse if


discrepancies or damage occurs to deliveries.

What happens when:

Loads are damaged?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Wrong goods are delivered?

____________________________________________________

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____________________________________________________

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____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

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Too many items are delivered?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Too few items are delivered?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

What are the procedures for recording returns?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 37


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Page 38 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1008 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March
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Section 3

What do I need to know to assist


with unloading, unpacking and
putaway of stock?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 39


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1008
TLIA1307C Receive goods

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Unloading  goods  

Handling  goods  with  special  handling  instructions  

Different  container  types  

Different  types  of  goods  and  their  storage  requirements  

Putaway  of  goods  

Page 40 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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Unloading

When  the  goods  have  passed  the  first  check  they  are  ready  for  
unloading.  Use  the  following  three  activities  that  follow  to  help  you.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 41


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1008
TLIA1307C Receive goods

Activity 13: Manual handling equipment

List the manual equipment required to receive and unload these


specific deliveries.

Delivery Equipment required

Nine pallets of mixed


cartons

A pallet of six 50 litre plastic


drums of sulphuric acid

Gas bottles

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 42 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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Activity 14: Hazards to avoid when manual handling

List four hazards you should avoid when manual handling.

1. ___________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

3. ___________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

4. ___________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 43


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1008
TLIA1307C Receive goods

Activity 15: Procedures to follow when performing manual


routines

List the procedures you should follow when performing each of the
following routines.

Task Procedure

Lifting

Lowering and
carrying

Pulling and
Pushing

Team Lifting

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 44 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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What are the different types of packing


containers?

Goods  can  arrive  at  a  warehouse  in  many  ways  and  container  types.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 45


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TLIA1307C Receive goods

Activity 16: What container types are handled at your


warehouse?

Have a look around the warehouse where you work. Using the
space provided, list all the different types of packing containers you
can see.

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____________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 46 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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Do some goods need to be handled carefully?

Sometimes  cartons  come  with  special  signs  or  instructions  on  how  
they  should  be  handled.    Care  must  be  taken  because  these  
instructions  relate  to  the  goods  inside  the  cartons.  Failure  to  follow  
carton  instructions  may  result  in  damage  to  the  goods.  In  the  case  of  
dangerous  goods,  workers  may  be  injured  if  these  instructions  are  not  
followed.    Some  examples  of  common  handling  instructions  are  given  
below.  
Handling  instructions  
 

THIS   This  label  means  the  containers  should  be  

⇑  
stored  with  the  arrow  pointing  up.    This  is  
WAY   to  avoid  damage  to  the  goods  or  for  
safety  reasons.  

   UP  
 
This  label  means  the  goods  could  be  
FRAGILE    
easily  damaged.    Great  care  should  be  
taken.  
 
This  label  means  the  goods  could  
explode  or  catch  fire  if  heated.    The  
goods  are  dangerous  and  should  be  
handled  carefully.  

 
 
This  label  asks  you  to  place  the  
THIS  SIDE    
container  with  the  label  facing  up.    This  
could  be  to  avoid  damage  to  the  goods  
UP   or  spillage  of  the  contents.  
 
   

Some  goods  have  a  weight  related  


Over  20Kg    
sticker  attached,  e.g.  over  20kg.    See  
product  supplied  for  details.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 47


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1008
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Activity 17: Where you work, are there goods with special
handling requirements?

Look around the warehouse where you work. See if you can
identify any goods with special handling requirements.

Use this checklist to help.

 Dangerous goods  Poisons

 Fragile goods  Food items

 Gases  Goods with stacking instructions

Shrink/stretch film wrapping is commonly used to secure loads. It


may be used at times when the load will not tolerate tight or heavy
strapping, or when loads include unusual shapes. Shrink wrap can
also be used for pallets which contain a lot of small items. It may
not be suitable for loads which are heavy, or those which require
heavy holding power. Clear and black wrap is available. Black is
used to conceal the contents from the public eye, e.g. TV sets.

In some circumstances you may be required to remove the shrink


wrap before the goods are put away. However, this is unlikely in
cases where loads are unstable.

Page 48 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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Activity 18: What is done with shrink wrap where you work?

Your warehouse will have its own procedure for shrink wrap. Ask
your trainer to explain to you what happens with shrink wrap
deliveries in the warehouse where you work. Make some notes as
to whether the shrink wrap is left on or taken off.

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 49


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What types of goods does your warehouse


receive?

As  mentioned  previously,  loads  may  be  delivered  as  single  items  or  as  
multiple  product  delivery.  

Page 50 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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Activity 19: What goods does your warehouse receive?

Have a look at the types of goods that are delivered to the


distribution center where you work. Using the space provide below,
list four products that are delivered as a single line and four that are
received as mixed stock.

Single line Mixed line

1. 1.

2. 2.

3. 3.

4. 4.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 51


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TLIA1307C Receive goods

The  source  of  the  goods  may  also  differ.  Goods  may  come  from  a  local  
or  an  Australian  source,  or  may  even  be  imported  from  overseas.  
Goods  that  are  sourced  from  different  places  may  require  different  
receival  procedure.  Also,  certain  types  of  goods  may  require  special  
delivery  procedure  such  as  chemicals,  petroleum  products,  unusual  
sizes  and  shapes  special  arrangements  for  receival  would  be  made  for  
deliveries.  

Some  products  by  their  nature  may  require  special  and  expert  handling  
to  reduce  risk  of  accident  or  damage.  

Putting goods away

Once  the  goods  have  been  checked  and  accepted  as  scheduled,  they  
are  formally  entered  onto  the  ‘stock  on  hand’  record  system.    This  
system  is  used  to  produce  a  ‘Putaway  label’.    Manual  labels  can  also  be  
used  to  trap  the  inventory  but  do  not  produce  a  putaway  label.  

Selection slot label putaway

000N4 0020 19068

Aisle  AQ.28.2.1 Location  Level


ITEM M/PK NOODLES CHICKEN 4X 85.00GM

PO 00347335 EXPR DATE 06-06-96 OM


REC 02030 DATE 06-06-96 TIME 09:21 0008
FROM 0000000 TIHI 10X09QTY 0000020
Product SLOC AQ.28.2.1 CASES 020
Code  ASGN CHK ADV LABEL 01

1180090
ݳºÞº³ÝººÝ
 Scanning Code

This  label  is  placed  on  stock  when  deliveries  have  been  accepted.      

Page 52 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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Activity 20: Do you understand the purpose of putaway


labels?

Get an example of a putaway label from your warehouse.


Compare it to the example above. Ask your trainer to show you
how to locate the following information about where the goods will
be put away.
• the isle
• the location
• the level.

Where goods are stored is often called a ‘slot’.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 53


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TLIA1307C Receive goods

Not  all  computer  systems  can  provide  information  such  as  locations  of  
goods.    If  your  warehouse  does  not  use  locations  for  slotting  of  goods,  
ask  your  trainer  to  explain  how  you  would  know  where  products  are?  

Of  the  many  different  lines  in  a  warehouse,  some  will  move  through  
the  system  quicker  than  others.    Generally,  goods  are  classified  as  fast  
moving,  medium  moving,  slow  moving.    What  and  how  many  people  
buy  in  the  supermarkets  and  shops  will  determine  how  fast  any  goods  
move  through  the  warehouse  system.    Most  times  it  is  necessary  to  
keep  a  reserve  supply  of  fast  moving  goods.    Reserve  items  are  usually  
stored  in  a  distinct  location  and  are  often  called  ‘piggy  backs’,  which  
means  that  many  pallets  are  stacked  on  top  of  each  other.    Reserve  
items  are  stored  on  the  high  slots  on  most  occasions.  
     
Piggy back

PAGE: 002
00000 0012 19070

Aisle  BH.044.D4 Location  Level-SetD


ITEM TRIDENT DATES PITTED 250.00GM 4th pallet

PO 00347335 EXPR DATE 06-06-96 OM In this case 'D'

REC 02030 DATE 06-06-96 TIME 09:21 0030 indicates it is a


FROM 0000000 TIHI 12X08QTY 0000012 reserve item.
Product SLOC BH.43.3.3 CASES 012
Code ASGN CHK ADV LABEL 01

1747720
ݳºÞº³ÝººÝE
 ScanningCode

This  is  the  putaway  label  which  is  termed  a  'piggy  back'.      

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Where are the new lines put?

New  lines  into  the  warehouse  can  be  identified  by  a  new  stock  
identification  label.    This  label  is  the  same  as  a  putaway,  but  it  does  not  
have  a  location  destination.  

New stock

Thissymbol 00000 0048 18975

*01701
indicatesnew
stock 

ITEMPINEBARKBAGMED 1.00EA
PO00346714
REC02017 DATE06-06-96 TIME08:46
EXPRDATE06-06-96
OM
FROM0000000 TIHI04X12 QTY0000048 0001
SLOCAU.07.1.1 CASES048
ASGN CHKAJM LABEL02

4628460  Product Code/No.

ݳºÞº³ÝººÝº³
 

If  a  delivery  arrives  with  new  stock  or  goods  that  have  not  been  stored  
before,  this  new  stock  label  is  generated.    The  star  shape  indicates  new  
stock.    This  label  is  placed  on  the  goods  and  the  'slotter'  will  then  find  a  
vacant  location.  

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Activity 21: What happens when new stock arrives at your


warehouse?

Ask you trainer if you can work for a short time with the person
responsible for slotting new stock. Sometimes in more advanced
warehouse systems (WMS) the system automatically allocates this
slot on the putaway label. Use the space below to list the steps
taken in your warehouse when finding locations for new stock.

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Stock location
All  types  of  goods  ranging  in  various  shapes/sizes  are  stored  in  
warehouses.    As  mentioned  previously  in  this  section,  some  goods  
move  faster  through  the  system  than  others.    Some  warehouses  will  
also  store  flammable  and  dangerous  goods.      

Listed  below  are  some  questions  to  be  answered  before  storing  stock.  
• What  type  of  stock  is  it?      
• How  fast  does  it  move?      
• Is  it  dangerous?  
• Is  it  large  or  small?      
• Is  it  easy  to  stack?      
• Does  it  require  cold  storage?      

Sometimes  in  more  advanced  warehouse  systems,  the  computer  


system  automatically  slots  new  goods  into  storage  based  on  the  
criteria  above.  

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Activity 22: Reasons for different storage areas

Discuss the above factors with your trainer and see if you can
come up with any other reasons why warehouses might have
different storage areas. List any additional factors in the space
provided.

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There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Temperature controlled warehousing

Temperature  controlled  warehousing  fits  in  between  cold  storage  and  


normal  ‘dry’  warehousing  where  goods  are  stored  at  room  (ambient)  
temperatures.  

Although  there  are  a  number  of  goods  that  require  temperature  


controlled  atmospheres,  very  few  warehouses  specialise  in  this  type  of  
warehousing  alone.    Many  of  the  larger  warehouses  have  an  area  set  
aside  within  the  warehouse  that  is  used  for  stock  that  requires  a  
controlled  temperature,  for  example,  chocolates.  

Other  warehouses  ensure  that  stock  requiring  a  cooler  atmosphere  are  


stored  in  the  cooler  areas  of  the  store.    For  example,  at  ground  level  
rather  than  on  top  of  shelves  close  to  the  roof.  

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Activity 23: Coldstores and temperature control stores

List two goods you believe would be stored in:

A coldstore
1. ___________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________

A temperature control store


1. ___________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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How do you keep track of where the various


stock is?

In  modern  warehousing  systems,  once  goods  are  entered  onto  the  


computer  system,  they  can  be  tracked  right  through  to  dispatch.  You  
may  recall  earlier  in  this  section  putaway  labels  were  mentioned.    
Written  on  the  putaway  labels  there  is  the  aisle  and  level  where  the  
stock  is  to  be  located.    Workers  putting  goods  away  use  this  
information  to  guide  them  to  the  correct  slot.    Here  is  an  example  of  a  
location  address.    Such  labels  are  fixed  to  the  shelving  or  bins.  
 
A  location  label  

³ÝÞº³º DA. 1. 1. 1 
   
Some labels have barcodes Aisle Location Level
for electronic tracking

This  label  is  fixed  on  the  shelves  located  in  slots.    It  allows  the  
warehouse  to  keep  track  of  the  stock  location.    It  also  helps  Forklift  
drivers  to  identify  the  putaway  slot  and  order  pickers  to  find  the  goods  
when  picking  an  order.    Some  labels  also  have  barcodes  to  identify  the  
location  to  the  system.  

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Activity 24: Do you understand a location label?

Have a look at the type of location labels used in the warehouse


where you work. How does this label compare to the example
label? List any differences.

Discuss these differences with your trainer.

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What is meant by stock rotation?

Most  warehouses  have  a  plan  to  make  sure  that  old  stock  is  shifted  
first.    In  your  warehouse  job,  it  is  important  for  you  to  keep  in  mind  
that  many  products  (especially  consumables)  cannot  be  used  after  a  
certain  time.    With  foodstuffs,  this  will  be  the  best  by  date.    Some  
stock  moves  faster  than  other  stock  in  a  warehouse.  

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Activity 25: How fast do items move though your warehouse?

Think about the stock held in the warehouse where you work.
Identify two items considered fast moving and two items considered
slow moving.

Fast moving Slow moving

1. ________________________ 1.______________________

2. ________________________ 2.______________________

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There  are  terms  used  to  identify  stock  rotation  systems  in  a  
warehouse.    These  terms  are:  

First  In  First  Out  (FIFO)  

This  means  stock  that  comes  in  first  is  despatched  first.  

First  In  Last  Out  (FILO)  

Under  this  method  the  stock  received  first  is  the  last  to  go.  

Stock  rotation  is  important  when  putting  goods  away.    In  some  
instances  pallets  may  need  to  be  rearranged  before  putting  fresh  stock  
away.    You  may  have  to  shift  pallets  from  reserve  slots  to  pick  slots  or  
you  may  have  to  move  stock  forward  that  already  exists  in  pick  slots.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 65


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Activity 26: What are the principles of stock rotation where


you work?

Ask your work trainer about the principles of stock rotation at the
warehouse where you work. Make some notes.

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Activity 27: Can you assist with unloading, unpacking and


putaway of stock?

To successfully complete this unit, you need to be able to help


unload and unpack stock. You also need to be able to help and
follow directions with the putaway of stock into the correct storage
location. This activity is for you to get some practice at these tasks.
See your trainer and explain this activity to them. Ask your trainer if
they can help you arrange some practice with unloading, unpacking
and putaway of stock.

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Additional
resources

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Publications:  
• Workplace  Health  &  Safety  Handbook,  Occupational  Health  &  
Safety  Commission,  1992  

Video:  
• Manual  Handling  -­‐  Safetycare  Series  

Web  sites:  
• NOHSC  (National  OHS  Committee  –  Publications)  
http://www.nohsc.gov.au/OHSInformation/NOHSCPublications/  
• Workcover  Authority  of  NSW  
http://www.workcover.nsw.gov.au/  
• Victorian  WorkCover  Authority  
http://www.workcover.vic.gov.au/  
• WorkCover  Queensland    
http://www.workcover.qld.gov.au/  
• WorkCover  WA      
http://www.workcover.wa.gov.au/  
• WorkCover  Corporation  of  SA  
http://www.workcover.wa.gov.au/  
• ACT  WorkCover    
http://www.workcover.act.gov.au/  
• Workplace  Standards  Tasmania    
http://www.wst.tas.gov.au/node/WST.htm  
• Work  Health  Authority  NT  
http://www.deet.nt.gov.au/wha/index.html  

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Feedback on
activities
The responses provided in this section are suggested responses.
Because every workplace is different, your responses may vary
according to your specific workplace procedures, the equipment
available and the nature of the business.

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Activity 2: Understanding stock integrity?

What does stock integrity mean?

Stock integrity means that the particular stock remains in its original
state. This means that the goods are not tampered with or
damaged in any way. The goods must be the type and quality they
are said to be. Stock integrity ensures that customers who order
the goods get what they want and when they want it. Stock
integrity is a vital part of quality assurance.

Activity 3: What information on a delivery note is


important/relevant when receiving goods?

Sample delivery note

GOODS SHIFTER LTD Date: 4/7/03


DELIVERY NOTE

To: Coles

Address: Jay Street, Melbourne

Please accept delivery of the following items

Item Code Description Quantity Method of


No. Delivery
Saucepans 02 stainless steel - copper base 100 carrier
30cm

Method of delivery:

Good received by
(signature) John Foreman

• The delivery note indicates who the goods are to be delivered


to and to what address. This is checked at receival to see if
the delivery has come to the right place.

• The item column is important because it shows what the


delivery contains. In this case it is saucepans.

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• The quantity column shows how many units in the delivery. In


this case the delivery should contain 100 saucepans.

• The goods received by signature is important and relevant


when receiving goods. The signature says, yes, the goods
have been received.

• The description column becomes important when there is more


than one type of the same item. For example, two lots of 100
saucepans can be delivered:
− one lot might be copper base 30cm
− one lot might be copper base 15cm.

The description column is then used to check that the saucepans


are two different sizes.

Activity 4: What parts of an invoice are important/relevant


when receiving goods?
Sticky Honey Corporation of Australia Limited

Head Office Payment Address


Sticky Honey Corporation 39 Archerfield Road
PO Box 666 Poorlands 7704
Poorlands 7704 Queensland Australia
Queensland Australia
Phone (16) (70) 777 3573 Fax (16) (70) 039 3573

Grocery Hold It Invoice No. 687710 V


Post Office Box 691 Invoice Date 16 Apr 1996
SOUTH LAUNCESTON TAS 7249 Customer No. Groce16
Cust. Order No. 96103N
V/No 53522 Sales Tax No.
INVOICE
PRODUCT CODE & DESCRIPTION PACKAGE QUANTITY QUANTITY QUANTITY QUANTITY UNIT S/T% AMOUNT
TYPE PER ORDERED BACK ORD. DELIVERED PRICE
PACKAGE
23CAC Good Pure Honey 375g 12 21 21 19.00 399.00
09STC Sticky Honey 400g 12 48 48 22.55 1082.40
05CVS Bush Honey 750g 12 39 39 25.06 977.34

2458.74
INVOICE
TOTAL
Delivered To:
GROCERY HOLD IT
B & D TRANSPORT
530 GARFIELD STREET
LAUNCESTON

Did you tick or circle the shaded areas?

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Activity 5: What parts of a manifest are important/relevant


when receiving goods?

Time: _____:_____ PUFF Ltd MANIFEST OF CIGARETTES NO _________


DOMESTIC CIGARETTES EXCISE TARIFFS Home Consumption - Export DCS Document: ______________
From: DISPATCH DATE: _____/_____/_____ Manifest: V______________

To: __________________ INTO STORE: _____/_____/_____ Carrier: ________________

No Long Variant No of Each Quantity Net Total Net


Plts Description Unit Par'ls Contain Under Bond Duty Paid Wt/M Weight
PUFF1 PUFFING BILLY 20X200 10,000
MORE MOREPUFF 20X200 5,000
CANST CANCERSTICK 25X200 5,000
DAN1 DANGERBLOCK 25X200 5,000
DAN2 D/BLOCK LIGHTS 25X200 5,000
SMOK SMOKEROLL 25X200 5,000
ROLL ROLLYEROWN 30X240 12,000
TAR1 TARANICOTINE 35X210 10,500

Total

Prepared by: _______________ Total:

Checked by: ________________ Pan No: Seal No:


__________ _________________

Did you identify the sections shaded above?

To: _____________________

Shows who the delivery is to go to.


Into store: _______________________

This data is important because it helps plan stock rotation.

This is extra important if goods delivered have a ‘best by date’.


Long description

This helps identify products by name.


Variant unit

This section gives the quantity of goods.


Seal No. ____________________

This is important when deliveries have a security seal. This seal is


checked to see that the delivery has not been tampered with.

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Activity 13: Manual handling equipment

List the manual handling equipment required to receive and unload


the following deliveries.

Delivery Equipment required

Nine pallets of mixed cartons Hand jack and trolley

A pallet of six 50 litre plastic Hand jack and trolley


drums of sulphuric acid

4 Gas cylinders (5kg each) Lifting clamps

Activity 14: Hazards to avoid when manual handling

List seven hazards to avoid when handling stock manually.

1. Incorrect bending

2. Incorrect twisting

3. Jerky movements

4. Exceeding physical capability

5. Lifting too high

6. Holding too low

7. Attempting work when you need help from others

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Activity 15: Procedures to follow when performing manual


routines

List the procedures to be followed when performing each of the


following routines.

Task Procedure

Lifting Lifting is done by bending at the knees and keeping your


back straight.

Lowering and carrying Get a secure grip. Check the package is safe. Check
that the route is suitable and safe.

Pulling and Pushing See if there is suitable tools to help (eg. dragging mat).
Check pathway is safe.

Team Lifting Check safety of pathway. Check teams capabilities.


Check teams understanding of what is to happen. Only
move when everyone has a secure grip. Raise and
lower at the same time.

Activity 16: What container types are handled at your


warehouse?

Compare the list you have made with the following container types.

• Cardboard cartons (various design) are one of the main ways


to package goods.

• Loose support pads are strapped to goods to provide storage


protection and access for handling.

• Simple boards of wood, metal or plastic hold goods together.

• Bins, boxes and baskets for manual handling, made of wood or


plastic are used for consolidating smaller goods into one order.

• Bins, boxes and crates are used for mechanised handling of


larger items. These will normally have slots at bottom to allow
for lifting and are made of wood, plastic, sheet metal or wire
mesh.

• Disposable or re-useable pallets are used to stack packaged


goods on for movement. This is the primary load carrier in a

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warehouse. These can be made from metal, plastic, foam or


cardboard but are mostly wood.

• Roll pallets are simply a pallet on wheels with wire mesh sides
and gates and they are handling for packing loose goods.

• Metal ISO containers come in a number of sizes and designs.


They are used to move general cargo in bulk; some examples
are freezer, tanker and general cargo. They can come in 10 -
40 foot, the most common being the 20 foot metal container.

Activity 22: Reasons for different storage areas

Compare your list to the following:

• security issues

• level of automation

• storage guidelines used in:


− FIFO - First in first out
− LILO - Last in last out
− JIT - Just in time supply

• the stock location system used in:


− fixed storage - where goods are given a fixed location
− random storage - where location is allocated randomly
− zoned storage - where product grouping is applied

• the type of operation (for example, consolidation, stockpiling,


product mixing, or distribution operation).

Fast moving stock should be placed in slot locations which are as


close to the dispatch areas as possible. Fast moving stock should
also be easy to get at. Stack ability and efficiency are vital
principles of storing goods. Inflammable and dangerous goods
need to be located in a separate location away from all other
goods. Large, heavy items are usually stacked on pallets in
standard shelving. Smaller, fast to medium moving items may be
stored in what is known as a gravity fed system. This is sometimes
called a gravity fed ‘live system’.

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Activity 23: Coldstores and temperature control stores

There are many goods that are stored in a coldstore or under


controlled temperature. Compare your list with the examples
provided below:

• coldstore - meat, snack foods, iced products and poultry.

• controlled temperature - medical supplies, sweets, fruit and


dairy products.

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