You are on page 1of 53

TLIA1707C Apply product

knowledge to organise
work operations
Learner Guide
Contents
What this Learner’s Guide is about ........................................ 1  
Planning your learning ........................................................... 2  
How you will be assessed ...................................................... 5  

Section 1............................................................................................. 7  
How do you classify warehouse products? ............................ 7  

Section 2........................................................................................... 21  
How do you store products in your warehouse? .................. 21  

Section 3........................................................................................... 27  
How are products moved through the warehouse? ............. 27  

Section 4........................................................................................... 37  
Problem solving in the warehouse ....................................... 37  

Additional resources ....................................................................... 46  

Feedback on activities .................................................................... 48  


TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

What this Learner’s Guide is about

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  about  product  knowledge  and  involves  the  skills  
and  knowledge  to  apply  product.    Knowledge  to  the  organisation  of  
work  operations  including:  identifying  and  categorising  projects,  
matching  products  to  locations  based  on  specified  criteria  and  
assisting  individuals  to  solve  stock  identification  and  location  
problems.      

Product  knowledge  is  all  about  how  you  organise  the  classification,  
storage,  identification  and  movement  of  products  in  your  warehouse.    
This  module  will  also  help  you  to  develop  skills  in  communicating  with  
your  work  team,  and  solving  workplace  problems.  

The  Elements  of  Competency  from  the  unit  TLIA1707C  Apply  product  
knowledge  to  organise  work  operations  covered  in  this  Learner’s  
Guide  are  listed  below.  

Identify  and  categorise  products    

Match  products  to  locations  based  on  specified  criteria  

Assist  individuals  to  solve  stock  identification  and  location  problems  

Identify  appropriate  transport  and  handling  requirements    

Contribute  to  continuous  improvement  

This  unit  of  competency  is  from  the  Transport  and  Logistics  Training  
Package  (TLI07).  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 1


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Planning your learning

It  is  important  to  plan  your  learning  before  you  start  because  you  may  
already  have  some  of  the  knowledge  and  skills  that  are  covered  in  this  
Learner’s  Guide.  This  might  be  because:  
• you  have  been  working  in  the  industry  for  some  time,  
and/or  
• you  have  already  completed  training  in  this  area.  

Together  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer  use  the  checklists  on  the  
following  pages  to  help  you  plan  your  study  program.  Your  answers  to  
the  questions  in  the  checklist  will  help  you  work  out  which  sections  of  
this  Learner’s  Guide  you  need  to  complete.  

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  written  with  the  idea  that  learning  is  made  more  
relevant  when  you,  the  learner,  are  actually  working  in  the  industry.  
This  means  that  you  will  have  people  within  the  enterprise  who  can  
show  you  things,  discuss  how  things  are  done  and  answer  any  
questions  you  have.  Also  you  can  practise  what  you  learn  and  see  how  
what  you  learn  is  applied  in  the  enterprise.  

If  you  are  working  through  this  Learner’s  Guide  and  have  not  yet  found  
a  job  in  the  industry,  you  will  need  to  talk  to  your  trainer  about  doing  
work  experience  or  working  and  learning  in  some  sort  of  simulated  
workplace.    

Page 2 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Section 1: How do you classify warehouse


products?

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. list  twenty  products  stored  in  your  
warehouse?        
2. explain  how  each  product  is  classified?        
3. describe  and  explain  the  kind  of  
identification  that  is  used  with  each  of  the  
products  you  have  listed?        

Section 2: How do you store products in your


warehouse?

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. list  five  different  ways  in  which  products  
are  stored?        
2. explain  the  different  storage  requirements  
of  different  products?        
3. explain  what  is  meant  by  the  words  ‘pick’  
and  ‘range’?        

Section 3: How are products moved through the


warehouse?

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. list  four  ways  products  are  moved  within  
the  warehouse?        
2. describe  the  occupational  health  and  safety  
regulations  which  apply  to  work  in  your  
warehouse?        
3. list  the  documents  that  have  to  be  filled  in  
when  goods  are  moved  into  and  out  of  the  
warehouse?        

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 3


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Section 4: Problem solving in the warehouse

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. identify  likely  queries  that  team  members  
may  have  about  products  in  the  
warehouse?        
2. list  the  problem  solving  techniques  you  
could  use  in  your  warehouse  section?        
3. apply  product  knowledge  and  instructional  
techniques  to  assist  team  members  with  
product  inquiries?        

Page 4 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

How you will be assessed

Assessment  of  this  Unit  of  Competency  will  include  observation  of  real  
or  simulated  work  processes  using  workplace  procedures  and  
questioning  on  underpinning  knowledge  and  skills.  It  must  be  
demonstrated  in  an  actual  or  simulated  work  situation  under  
supervision.  

You  will  be  required  to:  


• describe  how  goods  are  classified  in  your  workhouse  
• describe  problem  solving  processes  you  use  in  the  
workplace  
• identify  and  respond  to  problems  arising  in  the  workplace.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 5


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Page 6 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Section 1

How do you classify warehouse


products?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 7


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

What  are  your  warehouse  products?  

How  do  you  classify  your  products?  

How  do  you  identify  your  products?  

How  can  you  locate  products  in  your  warehouse?    

Page 8 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

What are your warehouse products?

In  this  section  you  have  to  consider  the  range  of  products  in  your  
warehouse.    The  range  of  products  stored  in  your  warehouse  will  
determine  the  way  your  classification,  location,  storage  and  
identification  systems  are  set  up.  

When  looking  at  the  range  of  products  stored  in  your  warehouse  you  
need  to  consider:  
• size  of  products  
• shape  of  products  
• weight  of  products  
• volume  of  products  
• if  products  are  dangerous  
• high  and  low  value  items  
• seasonality  of  sales  
• frequency  of  pick  –  fast  or  slow  moving  items.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 9


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Activity 1: Products in your warehouse

Identify the main types of products stored and dispatched from your
warehouse. List them below.

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Now think about some of the ways some products resemble other
products – in size, for instance, or colour, or what they’re made
from – wood, plastic, steel, etc.

What product characteristics influence how products are classified


in your warehouse?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 10 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

How do you classify your products?

Next  you  need  to  look  carefully  at  how  products  in  your  warehouse  are  
classified.  

Products  are  classified  so  that:  


• they  are  easier  to  find  
• they  are  easier  to  store  
• similar  products  can  share  similar  conditions;  for  example,  
refrigerated  goods  can  all  be  kept  cold,  dangerous  goods  
can  all  be  kept  in  a  safe  area.  

How  you  classify  your  products  will  depend  on  what  products  you  
have  and  your  storage  system.    Some  common  classifications  include:  
• size  
• shape  
• weight  
• shelf  life  
• degree  of  danger  
• when  they  will  be  sold  (seasonality)  
• expense;  whether  goods  are  cheap  or  expensive  
• frequency  of  use;  slow  moving  or  fast  moving  items.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 11


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Activity 2: Classifying products

You work in a warehouse that stores and dispatches products for a


major hardware chain-store. Some of the products include:
• bagged cement
• gardening implements
• cleaning chemicals
• nails, screws, bolts, etc.
• crockery
• cooking utensils
• light bulbs
• plastic washing buckets
• bagged gravel
• tools (hammers, screw drivers, etc.)
• weed killer
• small hooks for pictures, bathrobes, etc.

Describe how you might classify these things. Consider things


such as:
• how often they are used
• how big they are
• whether they break easily
• if Occupational Health and Safety regulations apply to their
storage or use
• whether they have a high turnover.
Discuss your suggested answers with your trainer, and add any
extra suggestions they may have.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 12 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

How do you identify your products?

Apart  from  being  classified,  goods  have  to  be  marked  in  a  way  that  will  
identify  them.    This  is  important  because:  
• pickers  need  to  be  able  to  find  products  quickly  and  easily  
• you  need  to  be  able  to  identify  quickly  how  much  of  each  
product  you  have  
• a  good  identification  system  will  help  you  to  keep  accurate  
records.  

Identification  is  very  important  with  packaged  goods.    If  goods  are  
stored  in  packets  or  boxes  you  need  some  way  of  knowing  what  is  
inside  the  box  or  package.  

Sometimes  packages  have  labels.    Sometimes  they  have  other  kinds  of  
marking  and  identification,  such  as  barcodes.  

When  labelling  products,  you  should  make  sure  that  your  labelling  
system  is:  
• as  simple  as  possible  
• easy  to  read  and  understand.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 13


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Activity 3: How do you identify products?

Describe the identification system currently used in your


warehouse.

Does it use numbers or letters?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Are items bar coded?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Are items colour coded?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Is the system easy to understand?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Is it easy to learn?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Discuss the following questions with your trainer and record your
answers below.

Why is an identification system used in your warehouse?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Page 14 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

What do you think are the basic principles of good identification?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

What are some common identification systems?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

What problems could be caused by a poor identification system?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Now think about the identification techniques used in your


warehouse. Discuss the following questions with your trainer and
record your answers below.

Is there something different or special about the kind of


identification system used in your warehouse?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

In what way do you think the types of products stored in your


warehouse affect the method of identification you use?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Do you think this type of classification is effective?

____________________________________________________

What are its good features?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 15


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Are there any improvements you can suggest?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 16 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

How do you locate products in your


warehouse?

It  is  important  to  know  how  to  find  the  products  which  are  stored  in  
your  warehouse.  

Your stock location system

You  need  to  have  a  systematic  approach  to  locating  products,  so  that  
‘local  knowledge’  is  not  the  only  way  of  finding  things.    A  systematic  
approach  to  stock  location  will:  
• cut  down  on  distances  travelled  to  pick  orders  and  
replenish  stock  
• allow  workers  to  know  the  exact  location  of  each  bulk  
storage  product  
• improve  the  productivity  and  efficiency  of  the  warehouse  
operation.  

How should stock be located?

When  allocating  stock  locations  in  your  warehouse  you  should:  


• allocate  sequenced  pick  location  numbers  to  every  pick  
face  and  storage  location  
• separate  fast  and  slow  moving  items  
• have  frequently  picked  materials  closest  to  the  dispatch  
docks  
• group  together  products  which  are  likely  to  be  on  the  
same  delivery  
• as  much  as  possible  group  together  items  which  are  
received  together  as  this  will  help  you  in  putting  away  
• store  heavy  or  awkward  items  in  accessible  and  suitable  
handling  locations;  the  system  should  lock  out  certain  
products  from  certain  areas  
• separate  items  which  are  similar  in  appearance  to  reduce  
picking  errors  
• avoid  grouping  products  with  high  turnover  along  narrow  
aisles.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 17


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

How does your warehouse layout affect the


location of stock?

The  way  your  warehouse  is  layed  out  will  influence  your  stock  location  
system.    If  possible  your  warehouse  layout  should  incorporate  the  
following  features:  
• the  separation  of  stock  for:  
− quarantine  
− bulk  or  reserve  stock  
− picking  stock  
− damaged  stock  
− returned  stock  
• the  separation  of  batches  so  that  they  can  be  ‘tracked’  if  
necessary.  

Maps,  signs  and  floor  plans  will  also  help  pickers  to  find  the  goods  they  
need  quickly  and  efficiently.  

How can you make sure that stock is rotated?

You  can  rotate  your  stock  more  efficiently  if  it  is  well  located.    Oldest  
stock  will  be  used  first  if  you:  
• clearly  label  every  pallet  
• store  different  batches  of  a  product  in  separate  locations    
• store  all  items  by  location  number  
• avoid  mixed  storage  locations  
• continually  monitor  shelf  life.  

Stock  rotation  can  be  made  more  difficult  if  you  have:  
• a  lack  of  space  
• storage  locations  which  are  too  deep.  

Page 18 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Activity 4: Showing where things are

In the space provided draw a simple map of your warehouse. Use a


‘key’ and indicate where products are stored. Your map will be
simple and may look something like this:

Key
Carpark A = aluminium
B = building materials
C = ceramics
Ci = cisterns
Ce = bagged cement
G = guttering

Offices

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 19


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Page 20 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Section 2

How do you store products in


your warehouse?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 21


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  


How  are  products  stored  in  your  warehouse?  

Page 22 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

How are products stored in your warehouse?

Products  are  stored  in  many  ways.    Some,  for  instance,  are  stored  in  
bins,  on  racks,  stacked  on  pallets  or  in  reserved  floor  space.    Certain  
kinds  of  products  –  mainly  foodstuffs  –  must  be  refrigerated  or  deep-­‐
frozen.  

Then  there  are  products  that  require  constant  observation.    Again,  


these  will  include  foodstuffs  with  use  by  dates.  They  will  also  include  
items  such  as  plants  which  require  feeding  and  watering.  

Some  chemical  products  have  use  by  dates  and  so  do  medicines.    
There  may  be  Occupational  Health  and  Safety  regulations  which  
control  the  storage  of  these  materials.  

Special  arrangements  must  be  made  for  products  that  are  very  big  or  
very  small.  Special  storage  is  needed,  for  instance,  for  some  very  large  
do-­‐it-­‐yourself  kits.  Special  storage  is  also  needed  for  very  small  
electronic  components.  

The  size  and  the  weight  of  products  will  determine  the  combination  of  
bins,  racks  and  pallets  used  in  your  warehouse.  

Goods  which  move  quickly  through  a  warehouse  may  also  require  


convenient  storage.    On  the  other  hand,  goods  which  move  slowly  can  
be  placed  in  less  accessible  places.  

When  planning  placement  in  a  warehouse  the  so-­‐called  ‘80/20  rule’  is  
used.  This  rule  says  that  80%  of  the  movement  will  concern  20%  of  the  
stock.    In  other  words  there  will  be  a  fraction  or  part  of  the  stock  that  
is  in  high  demand  and  has  high  turnover.    

Workers  need  easy  access  to  high  turnover  stock.  

You  can  decide  what  is  high  turnover  stock  using  the  ‘rule  of  thumb.’    
This  is  another  name  for  experience.    The  warehouse  manager    is  
expected  to  be  able  to  judge  which  products  move  most  quickly.  

Of  course,  the  manager  will  check  and  be  familiar  with  turnover  
figures.    These  tell  the  manager  how  long  goods  usually  stay  in  the  
warehouse  before  they  are  moved  to  some  other  place.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 23


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Activity 5: Locating some goods and products

Sketch a map of your warehouse. On it, indicate where the


following are stored:
• refrigerated goods
• goods that are extremely large and heavy
• goods that are very small
• high demand goods
• very expensive materials
• perishable goods with a relatively short shelf-life
• dangerous goods.

Now explain how it is made easy for workers to find products that
are needed to fill out an order.

Which of these are used? (Put ticks beside the ones used in your
warehouse).
• overhead signs 
• floor markings 
• maps of the warehouse displayed prominently 
• shelf labels with names and bar codes. 

If any of these are not used explain why you think they’re not used.

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Page 24 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Do you use any other systems apart from those listed? Describe
them below:

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 25


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Page 26 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Section 3

How are products moved through


the warehouse?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 27


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  


How  are  products  moved  through  the  warehouse?  

Page 28 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

How are products moved through the


warehouse?

Products  can  be  moved  in  various  ways  such  as:  


• Manual  handling    

This  is  used  for  smaller  goods  which  are  picked  up  and  then  carried  to  
a  delivery  department.    sometimes  a  basket  or  a  trolley  is  used.  
• Motorised  vehicles  like  Forklifts    

These  are  useful  for  larger  or  awkward  shaped  goods.    


• Motorised  conveyor  belts    

These  can  carry  heavy  items  from  one  place  to  another  within  the  
warehouse.  

What about Occupational Health and Safety?

Lifting  and  moving  heavy  goods  can  cause  strains,  sprains  and  other  
physical  problems  for  workers.    Because  of  this  there  are  many  rules  
that  a  worker  must  know  and  abide  by  when  lifting  heavy  items.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 29


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Activity 6: What about Occupational Health and Safety?

Find out (from your OHS officer or your trainer) the correct
procedures for lifting a heavy box, and record them below.
______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 30 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

There  are  other  rules  that  apply  to  handling  dangerous  goods  such  as  
toxic  chemicals  and  gases.  

Regulations  concerning  the  movement  of  heavy  and  dangerous  items  


require  that  certain  notices  and  warnings  be  displayed  in  a  warehouse.  

You  should  make  sure  that  these  notices  are  displayed  in  your  
warehouse,  and  that  everyone  knows  what  they  mean.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 31


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Activity 7: Dangerous goods

What hazardous or dangerous goods must you move in your


warehouse? (You may need to ask your OHS officer or trainer.)

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

Are there any special procedures you must follow when moving
these goods?

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

Page 32 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Activity 8: Warnings and safety

Note the warning signs on display in your warehouse. In the


following space sketch each one and explain the message it is
meant to give:

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 33


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Fill in the following table for five different items stored in your
warehouse. In your ‘comment,’ mention why you think legislation is
necessary for the movement of this particular product

(Note: you may need to approach your warehouse’s Occupational


Health and Safety Officer to obtain this information).

Product Classification Usual Appropriate Comment


name method of legislation
movement

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 34 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Despatch

Care  must  be  taken  when  moving  items  out  of  a  warehouse.  

The  first  thing  you  need  to  consider  is  the  handling  of  the  goods.  

Goods  must  be  packed  properly.    They  must  also  be  made  ready  for  
quick  and  easy  removal.  

Special  attention  must  be  given  to  goods  that  are  perishable  as  well  as  
other  goods  that  need  special  handling  and  storage.  

Attention  is  also  needed  for  record  keeping.    In  dispatching  goods,  
proper  records  must  be  made.    Orders  must  be  marked  off  to  show  
that  they  have  been  filled  and  the  goods  dispatched.    Stock  records  
need  to  be  changed  to  show  that  goods  have  left  the  warehouse.    This  
way  you  can  be  sure  that  orders  are  made  for  the  replacement  of  
stock.  

Transportation  records  must  also  be  kept.    Drivers  collecting  goods  for  
dispatch  will  have  delivery  dockets  that  must  be  made  out  for  them.    
These  will  show  what  goods  they  are  responsible  for.    They  will  also  be  
marked  so  that  the  driver  can  have  them  confirmed  once  the  goods  
have  been  delivered.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 35


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Activity 9: Despatch procedures

Make a flowchart showing all the dispatch procedures for your


warehouse. (If you need help in constructing this flowchart ask
your trainer where you might get assistance).

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 36 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Section 4

Problem solving in the warehouse

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 37


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

What  questions  might  your  work  team  have?  

Problem  solving  with  your  work  team  

Page 38 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

What questions might your work team have?

When  you  are  supervising  you  are  dealing  with  workers  who  will  need  
your  instruction,  assistance  and  advice.    The  workers  will  present  you  
with  problems  and  ask  you  questions.  

Your  work  team  might  ask  for  help  with:  


• where  a  product  is  
• how  to  identify  a  product  
• how  a  product  is  labelled  
• cataloguing,  microfiche  or  computer  scanning  systems.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 39


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Activity 10: Noting problems

Keep a record of all the work related questions you are asked by
your work team for two days. Note when the questions were asked
and who asked them.

Date Time Name Questions

List the questions that were asked more than once.

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

If you find yourself answering the same question over and over
what steps might you take to deal with this problem? (List three.)
______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 40 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Problem solving with your work team


A  problem  occurs  when  there  is  a  difference  between  what  should  be  
happening  in  your  workplace  and  what  is  actually  happening.    For  
example,  as  pickers  fill  orders,  they  should  be  able  to  locate  items  
quickly  and  easily.    If  they  can’t,  there  is  a  problem.  

The  problem  solving  process  is  explained  below.    It  is  also  detailed  in  
this  flowchart.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 41


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Step  1   Problem  definition  

When  trying  to  solve  a  problem  in  your  workplace  you  must  first  
identify  what  the  problem  is.    This  is  known  as  problem  definition.    You  
should  ask  yourself:  
• what  is  the  problem?  
• where  is  it?  
• when  did  it  happen?  
• when  was  it  noticed?  
• how  bad  is  the  problem?  
• who  does  it  affect?  

These  questions  will  help  you  to  get  a  better  understanding  of  what  
the  problem  is,  and  what  it  is  about.  

Step  2   Problem  solution  

Having  identified  what  the  problem  is  and  gathered  some  information  
about  it  you  can  now  begin  to  come  up  with  some  solutions  using  the  
following  techniques:  

Brainstorming  is  a  simple  ideas  session  where  everyone  freely  


contributes  as  many  ideas  about  the  problem  and  its  solutions  as  
possible  –  someone  might  take  notes  

Sorting  out  the  ideas  


This  involves  clustering  ideas  from  your  brainstorm  into  groups  of  
possible  solutions.  

Step  3   Solution  implementation  

Having  identified  a  solution  you  now  need  to  be  sure  that  it  will  be  put  
into  action.    When  implementing  your  solution  ask  yourself  the  
following  questions:  
• who  will  be  doing  the  work?  
• what  needs  to  be  done?  
• when  does  it  need  to  be  done  by?  
• how  much  will  it  cost  and  how  much  will  it  save  the  
company?  

Page 42 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Step  4   Review  

Review  is  important  in  any  problem  situation.    When  a  solution  is  put  in  
place  it  must  be  monitored  carefully  to  see  that  it  works.    If  it  doesn’t  
you  have  a  new  problem  and  you  start  again.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 43


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

How can you give clear instructions to your


work team?

It  is  important  that  the  instruction  and  advice  you  give  your  team  is  
clear  and  accurate.    Without  clear  instructions,  workers  will  not  know  
what  they’re  doing  and  many  mistakes  can  be  made.    Try  the  following  
steps  when  giving  instructions:  
• wherever  possible,  deliver  your  instructions  face-­‐to-­‐face  
• think  through  instructions  before  you  give  them;  unclear  
or  incorrect  instructions  are  often  worse  than  none  at  all  
• choose  the  best  words  you  can  for  your  message  
• watch  for  any  signs  that  your  listener  does  not  understand  
what  you  are  saying  
• when  you  have  finished,  ask  if  your  listener  has  any  
questions  about  what  you  have  just  said.  

Note  that  a  sign  of  good  management  is  the  ability  to  predict  and  
anticipate  problems  before  they  occur  and  to  have  solutions  ready  
when  the  problems  do  arise.  

The  ability  to  predict  and  anticipate  problems  comes  from  experience  
and  thorough  study  of:  
• warehouse  operation  and  procedures  
• customer  activity  and  requirements.  

Remember,  too,  that  dealing  with  problems  often  requires  the  efforts  
of  more  than  just  one  person.    What  this  means  is  that  your  workplace  
will  be  more  effective  if  people  are  able  to  work  together,  particularly  
in  the  problem-­‐solving  process.  

Page 44 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Activity 11: Solving a problem

Consider the given situations and suggest how you might address
these problems.
• A bar code has been knocked off a box of goods that is
currently in storage.
• You realise that a pallet of goods has been incorrectly labelled.
The pallet is only half filled which means that many orders have
already been incorrectly picked.
• Pickers have noticed that many small items are falling through
their racks and becoming damaged.

Give instructions to other team members concerning:


• product features
• location storage requirements
• other sources of information (catalogue, microfiche, computer,
other staff).

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 45


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Additional
resources

Page 46 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Resources  to  support  learners  in  this  unit  will  be  workplace  based  
and  could  include:  
• workplace  reports  
• issues  arising  from  meetings  and  day-­‐to-­‐day  work  
• flowcharts  used  in  the  workplace  to  describe  work  processes  
• discussions  with  teams  
• quality  manuals,  SOPs,  etc.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 47


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Feedback on
activities
The responses provided in this section are suggested responses.
Because every workplace is different, your responses may vary
according to your specific workplace procedures, the equipment
available and the nature of the business.

Page 48 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Activity 1: Products in your warehouse

Answers will vary from one warehouse to another. Most


warehouses carry a wide range of goods.

Goods might be classified as:


• large
• heavy
• long
• of certain shapes
• possibly dangerous
• carrying a use by date
• picked frequently.

They may have other identifying characteristics such as colour or


content.

Activity 2: Classifying products

The classification characteristics from Activity 1 might be useful.

Activity 3: How do you identify products?

1. Your answers will depend on the systems used in your


warehouse.

2. • Identification systems help you recognise and find various


goods.

• Good identification is clear and sensible.

• Goods are identified using numbers, letters, and barcodes.

• Poor identification will mean inefficiency in the warehouse.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 49


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

3. • Special features will relate to the kind of products stored in


the warehouse.

• Classifications and identification systems are effective if they


help workers to find and move goods easily.

• Other answers will vary from one warehouse to another.

Activity 4: Showing where things are

Answers will vary.

You should show all areas clearly and accurately.

Activity 5: Locating some goods and products

Your sketch map needs to be accurate and note the kind of goods
the warehouse carries.

Activity 6: What about Occupational Health and Safety?

When lifting heavy goods you should:


• stand close to the load
• bend at the knees
• keep the spine straight
• get a firm grip on the load
• lift by straightening the legs and keeping the spine straight
• keep the object close to you
• take short, careful steps
• avoid sudden, jarring movements.

Page 50 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1068 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009
TLIA1707C Apply product knowledge to organise work operations

Activity 7: Warnings and safety

1. • Note particularly if HAZCHEM signs are in use.

• NO SMOKING signs will also be used.

• Often there are signs to warn of dangerous work practices.

• Notices might explain First Aid procedures.

2. Legal provisions are sometimes covered in industry awards and


agreements. Union officers will have access to these.

Activity 8: Dispatch procedures

• Your flowchart should centre on the warehouse.


• You may need to refer to your warehouse’s procedures or work
instructions to do this activity.

Activity 9: Noting problems

1. Questions asked frequently might be answered:


• at team meetings
• by placing the answers on notices
• by giving out bulletins
• by giving messages over a public address system.

Activity 10: Solving a problem

• Team members must be informed of the problem.


• Defective labelling and packaging must be removed or fixed.
• Workers must be encouraged to report similar occurrences.
• It is good policy to ask workers for suggestions on how
problems might be addressed. Questions can be asked to
individual workers or the questions can be raised in team
meetings.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 51


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd May 2009 ADELG1068

Related Interests