You are on page 1of 40

TLIA2507D Regulate

temperature
controlled stock
Learner Guide
Contents
What this Learner’s Guide is about ........................................ 1
Plan your learning .................................................................. 2
How will you be assessed? .................................................... 4

Section 1 Identifying goods that require temperature control...... 5


How are goods, requiring temperature control, identified? .... 8
How do you match storage temperature to product types? . 11
How  do  you  identify  storage  separation  and    co-storage
applications for products? .................................................... 13

Section 2 Monitoring goods that require temperature control ... 15


How do you identify appropriate methods for determining the
temperature of goods? ......................................................... 18
How do you monitor storage areas to ensure they remain within
the temperature range of products stored?.......................... 20

Section 3 Identifying and rectifying problems with temperature


control .............................................................................................. 22
What are the implications of incorrect temperatures on the
storage of goods? ................................................................ 25
How would you go about identifying damaged goods and
undertake appropriate action? ............................................. 27

Additional resources....................................................................... 29

Feedback on activities .................................................................... 33


TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

What this Learner’s Guide is about

This Learner’s Guide is about the skills and knowledge required to


regulate temperature controlled stock in accordance with workplace
requirements including identifying goods requiring temperature
control, monitoring temperature of goods, and identifying and
rectifying any identified problems in accordance with workplace
procedures.

The unit of competency TLIA2507D Regulate temperature


controlled stock is from the Transport and Logistics Training
Package (TLI07). It has a number of elements of competency that
are covered in this guide. These are:
• Identify goods requiring temperature control.
• Monitor temperature.
• Identify and rectify problems.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 1


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Plan your learning

It  is  important  to  plan  your  learning  before  you  start  because  you  may  
already  have  some  of  the  knowledge  and  skills  that  are  covered  in  this  
Learner’s  Guide.  This  might  be  because:  
• you  have  been  working  in  the  industry  for  some  time,  
and/or  
• you  have  already  completed  training  in  this  area.  

Together  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer,  use  the  checklist  on  the  
following  pages  to  help  you  plan  your  study  program.  Your  answers  to  
the  questions  in  the  checklist  will  help  you  work  out  which  sections  of  
this  Learner’s  Guide  you  need  to  complete.  

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  written  with  the  idea  that  learning  is  made  more  
relevant  when  you,  the  learner,  are  actually  working  in  the  industry.  
This  means  that  you  will  have  people  within  your  enterprise  that  can  
show  you  things  discuss  how  things  are  done  and  answer  any  
questions  you  have.  Also  you  can  practise  what  you  learn  and  see  how  
what  you  learn  is  applied  in  the  enterprise.  

If  you  are  working  through  this  Learner’s  Guide  and  have  not  yet  found  
a  job  in  the  industry,  you  will  need  to  talk  to  your  trainer  about  doing  
work  experience  or  working  and  learning  in  some  sort  of  simulated  
workplace.      

Page 2 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Section 1: Identifying goods that require


temperature control

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. Identify  goods  requiring  temperature  
control?        
2. Select  the  correct  temperature  for  long  
and  short  term  storage  of  goods?        
3. Identify  storage  separations  and  co-­‐storage  
applications  for  products?        

Section 2: Monitor goods requiring temperature


control

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. Identify  the  appropriate  methods  for  
determining  the  temperature  of  goods?        
2. Monitor  the  temperature  of  storage  areas  
within  the  range  required  by  products?        

Section 3: Identify and rectify problems with


temperature control

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. Identify  the  implications  of  incorrect  
storage  temperatures?        
2. Identify  damaged  goods  and  undertake  
appropriate  action?        

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 3


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

How will you be assessed?

Assessment of this unit of competency will include observation of


real or simulated work processes using workplace procedures and
questioning on underpinning knowledge and skills. It must be
demonstrated in an actual or simulated work situation under
supervision.

You will be required to demonstrate that you can:


• identify goods that require temperature controlled
storage
• select the correct temperature for short and long term
storage products
• determine product storage separation and co-storage
applications for stored products
• identify appropriate methods for determining the
temperature required for stored goods
• monitor the temperature of storage areas within the
range required by products
• identify the implications of incorrect storage
temperatures
• identify damaged goods and undertake appropriate
action.

Page 4 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Section 1 Identifying
goods that require
temperature control

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 5


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Section outline
Areas  covered  in  this  section  are:  
• identifying  goods  that  require  temperature  control  
• selecting  temperatures  for  the  short  and  long  term  
storage  of  goods  
• identifying  storage  separations  and  co-­‐storage  
applications  of  goods.  

Page 6 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 7


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

How are goods, requiring temperature control,


identified?

Many types of goods require temperature control for effective short


term and long term storage situations. Temperature control
generally refers to any measures necessary to keep goods in good
condition and can include the use of cool stores and refrigerators,
but it may also include storing goods correctly at ambient
temperatures. Some types of the groups requiring temperature
control include:
• foods
• chemicals
• explosives
• pharmaceutical
• therapeutic goods
• flowers and ornamental plants.

Since food is probably the most common item requiring regulated


temperature control, food products will be used as examples within
this Learner’s guides

For example, chilled and frozen foods must be managed, stored


and transported within specific temperature ranges to ensure
optimum freshness is preserved and that a safe and high quality
product is delivered to consumers.

Temperatures warmer than specified ranges foster the growth of


bacteria which can increase the risk of food-borne illness and
reduce product quality. Temperature requirements for goods may
be identified by examining packaging labels. For example the label
o
on frozen food may indicate, ‘store below 4 C’. If you manage a
storage facility or run a transport company your clients should tell
you in writing the conditions under which they want their goods
stored and transported.

Chemical, explosive and pharmaceutical goods also have specific


temperature ranges they must be kept in to keep them from
degrading while in transport or storage.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 8


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Information regarding temperature control can be found at food


resource centres, which provide recommendations for storage
conditions. You can also refer to a code of practice for the Road
Transportation of Fresh Produce has been developed by the
Australian United Fresh Transport Advisory Committee. Storage,
handling and transportation of frozen products information can be
found in the Australian Cold Chain Guidelines (1999). In the
handouts you will find the document Maintaining the Cold Chain
which provides and overview of the Guidelines. Australian
Standards for meat production and transportation can be found at
CSIRO Publishing Web site under Agriculture: Animal Production.
Refer to the web site listed in the Additional Resources section at
the back of this guide. If you don’t have a copy of theses
publications in your workplace, ask your manager or supervisor to
obtain copies.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 9


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Activity 1: Identifying goods that require temperature control

Look  around  your  work  area  and  identify  which  goods  require  
temperature  control.  Speak  with  work  mates  or  your  supervisor  if  you  
are  unsure  which  goods  require  temperature  control  when  being  
stored  or  transported.  

What  characteristics  identify  products  that  need  to  be  temperature  


controlled  while  in  storage?  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

Page 10 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

How do you match storage temperature to


product types?

Maintaining  product  quality  through  the  marketing  chain  is  essential  


for  delivering  the  best  product  so  that  your  customers  will  want  to  
keep  buying  again  and  again.  However,  to  do  this  it  is  important  to  
understand  and  use  the  most  appropriate  handling  conditions  for  your  
product.  

Information  from  the  manufacturer,  your  clients,  and  regulations  or  


from  the  packaging  will  explain  the  temperature  and  storage  
requirements  for  product  types.  

As  an  example  temperature  control  for  food  products  involves:  


• restricting  the  time  high  risk  foods  such  as  seafood  
products  are  left  at  temperatures  in  the  danger  zone,  50C  
to  600C  
• keeping  cold  food  really  cold  
• keeping  hot  food  really  hot.  

Some  examples  of  high  risk  foods  are:  


• cooked  meat  and  poultry  
• meat  and  fish  pâtés  and  spreads  
• milk  and  eggs  
• seafood  
• cooked  rice.  

Information  from  the  manufacturer,  regulations  or  information  


contained  in  the  packaging  will  explain  the  temperature  and  storage  
requirements  for  product  types.  Some  products  require  storage  within  
a  specific  temperature  range  (upper  and  lower)  of  temperatures.  

The  upper  and  lower  temperature  limits  for  stored  products  depends  
on  the  characteristics  of  the  product  being  stored.  For  example,  the  
temperature  requirements  for  foods  may  be  different  than  the  
requirements  for  chemicals  and  pharmaceuticals.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 11


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Activity 2: Matching storage temperature to product types

Discuss  with  your  work  mates  or  your  supervisor  how  they  go  about  
matching  product  types  with  storage  temperatures.  

List  ways  in  which  you  can  match  the  correct  storage  temperature,  
storage  times  and  product  types  with  products  you  require  to  store.  

What  workplace  documentation  do  you  have  available  to  assist  you  in  
determining  the  correct  temperatures  for  long  and  short  term  
storage?  

How  do  you  identify  the  upper  and  lower  temperature  limits  for  the  
products  you  have  in  store  at  your  workplace?  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

Page 12 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

How  do  you  identify  storage  separation  and    


co-storage applications for products?

Using  food  products  as  an  example,  the  storage  separation  and  co-­‐
storage  of  products  is  explained  in  the  following  notes.  

When  stacking  food  in  a  cold  storage  facility  you  should  use  separate  
cold  stores  for  both  raw  foods,  such  as  meat  and  poultry,  and  other  
high  risk  foods,  such  as  dairy  products  and  cooked  meats.  Where  multi-­‐
purpose  cold  stores  are  used  always  store  raw  meat  and  poultry  below  
other  foods  or  in  a  separate  section  of  the  cold  store.  This  will  prevent  
any  liquids  from  the  meat  or  poultry  contaminating  foods  place  below  
them  on  the  shelves.    Stack  the  shelves  in  a  way  so  that  cold  air  can  
circulate  and  stock  can  be  checked  for  condition.  

When  stacking  a  freezer  place  raw  foods  below  high  risk  foods  to  
avoid  any  risk  of  contamination.  Place  stock  with  the  longest  shelf  life  
below  or  behind  stock  with  a  short  shelf  life  to  allow  the  short  term  
stock  a  quicker  turn  around.  Keep  the  food  in  the  supplier’s  packaging.  

When  storing  dry  goods,  keep  them  in  a  cool,  dry  and  well  ventilated  
location.  There  must  be  sufficient  space  between  supplies  to  allow  air  
to  flow  freely  and  for  you  to  check  the  goods.  Dry  foods  must  be  kept  
in  secure  packaging  so  as  not  to  attract  pests.  Dry  foods  must  be  
checked  and  rotated  regularly.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 13


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Activity 3: Identify storage separation and co-storage


applications for products

In  a  situation  where  you  were  involved  in  receiving  and  storing  goods,  
explain  how  you  would  identify  storage  separations  and  co-­‐storage  
applications  for  those  goods?  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

Page 14 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Section 2 Monitoring
goods that require
temperature control

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 15


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  are:  


• identifying  methods  for  determining  the  temperature  
requirements  of  goods  
• monitoring  the  temperature  of  storage  areas  within  the  
range  required  by  products  

Page 16 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 17


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

How do you identify appropriate methods for


determining the temperature of goods?

Measuring  temperature  is  important  for  understanding  the  handling  


conditions  that  your  product  experiences.  A  probe  thermometer  will  
accurately  assess  the  actual  product  core  temperature.  However  
thermometers  only  measure  temperature  at  a  single  point  in  time.  
Temperature  data  loggers  can  be  used  to  measure  temperature  
throughout  the  whole  storage  facility  continuously  recording  
temperature.  

To  accurately  measure  product  temperature,  temperature  data  


loggers  should  be  fitted  with  external  probes  that  can  be  inserted  into  
or  placed  alongside  the  product.  They  can  be  set  to  record  the  
temperature  every  few  minutes  or  shorter  depending  on  your  testing  
equipment.  The  data  collected  can  be  presented  as  a  graph  so  that  the  
temperature  trends  can  be  determined  easily.  

Temperature  data  loggers  can  also  be  used  for:  


• monitoring  temperature  inside  packing  sheds,  cool  stores,  
or  other  storage  and  processing  areas    
• measuring  the  microclimates  of  different  properties,  
fields,  or  areas  used  for  production    
• as  frost  warning  devices.    

Storage  temperatures  may  also  be  automatically  monitored  through  


electronic  temperature  sensing  devices.  Spot  temperatures  can  also  
be  measured  with  the  use  of  hand  held  scanners  that  allow  spot  
temperatures  to  be  measured.  

All  food  businesses  must  check  food  temperatures  regularly  and  keep  
records  of  the  readings,  this  is  a  legal  requirement.  If  it  is  your  job  to  
check  the  temperature  of  goods,  you  must  be  trained  how  to  do  so  
and  told  which  temperatures  are  unsafe  and  what  action  to  take  if  a  
reading  is  unsafe.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 18


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Activity 4: Identifying appropriate methods for determining


the temperature of goods

Describe  the  temperature  monitoring  system  set  up  and  used  at  your  
storage  facility.  

What  goods  require  temperature  controlled  storage  at  your  


workplace?  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 19


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

How do you monitor storage areas to ensure


they remain within the temperature range of
products stored?

Technology  plays  a  large  part  in  running  a  temperature  controlled  


warehouse  or  storage  facility.  Technical  equipment  includes  remote  
electronic  monitoring  systems  which  ensure  that  temperature  of  
various  cold  rooms  is  maintained  and  constantly  monitored.  These  
systems  consist  of  a  number  of  thermostats,  linked  together  to  a  
central  monitoring  device  that  alerts  users  to  power  failures,  or  
instances  when  temperatures  deviate  outside  the  specified  
temperature  ranges.  

You  should  notify  the  appropriate  personnel,  your  supervisor  and  the  
maintenance  department  if  the  temperature  of  the  storage  facility  
changes.  It  is  important  that  correct  temperatures  are  maintained  to  
preserve  the  quality  of  the  stored  goods,  so  as  soon  as  there  is  a  
problem,  you  should  get  it  repaired.  

Page 20 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Activity 5: Monitor storage areas to ensure they remain within


the temperature range of products stored

Look  around  your  work  area  and  speak  with  work  mates  and  your  
supervisor  to  determine  how  temperature  control  is  managed.  

Describe  the  temperature  control  used  at  your  storage  facility  and  
explain  how  it  operates?  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 21


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Section 3 Identifying
and rectifying problems
with temperature
control

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 22


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Section outline
Areas  covered  in  this  section  are:  
• the  implications  of  incorrect  storage  temperatures  
• identifying  damaged  goods  and  undertake  appropriate  
action  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 23


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Page 24 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

What are the implications of incorrect


temperatures on the storage of goods?

In  the  case  of  food,  incorrect  storage  temperatures  may  lead  to  
bacterial  growth  within  the  product.  Food  poisoning  bacteria  multiply  
when  they  have  ideal  conditions.  These  conditions  include:  
• food  type  
• moisture  
• warmth  
• time.  

Incorrect  storage  temperatures  can  degrade  the  quality  of  goods.  


Goods,  such  as  chemicals,  may  even  become  unstable  and  dangerous  if  
storage  temperatures  are  not  correct.  

Pharmaceuticals  and  chemicals  will  become  chemically  unstable  and  


even  dangerous  if  they  are  not  kept  stored  at  their  correct  
temperatures  and  therefore  will  not  work  correctly.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 25


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Activity 6: Implications of incorrect temperatures on the


storage of goods

If  the  storage  temperature  of  the  goods  in  your  work  area  were  not  
correctly  set,  what  would  happen  to  those  goods?  Provide  three  
examples  from  your  workplace.  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

Page 26 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

How would you go about identifying damaged


goods and undertake appropriate action?

Discolouration,  odour  and  heating  of  the  product  may  be  indicators  
that  suggest  the  goods  in  storage  have  been  damaged.  

Spoilt  goods  can  be  recognised  by  the  following  signs:  


• discolouration  
• mould  
• changes  in  smell  
• changes  in  texture  
• changes  in  flavour.  

Spoilage  to  foods  and  other  goods  can  be  minimised  by:  
• covering  food  and  sealing  it  off  from  other  foods  and  
contaminants  
• keeping  yourself  and  your  work  area  clean  
• maintaining  the  correct  storage  temperature  
• reducing  moisture  levels  
• by  not  storing  goods  in  excess  of  recommended  storage  
times.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 27


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Activity 7: Identifying damaged goods and undertaking


appropriate action

How  do  you  know  when  the  goods  in  storage  at  your  workplace  are  
damaged?  

What  action  do  you  need  to  take  when  you  suspect  goods  are  
damaged?  

What  can  you  do  to  reduce  the  risk  of  damage  to  goods  stored  at  your  
workplace?  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

Page 28 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Additional
resources

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 29


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Page 30 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

The  websites,  organisations  and  resources  listed  below  provide  more  


information  on  topics  relevant  to  unit  TDTA2597C  Regulate  
temperature  controlled  stock.  

Web  sites  
• Temperatures.com  
http://www.temperatures.com/sensors.html  
• Phamaceutical-­‐technology.com  
http://www.pharmaceutical-­‐
technology.com/contractors/materials-­‐handling/  
• Kodak  
http://www.kodak.com/global/plugins/acrobat/en/service/t
ib/pdf/tib5202.pdf  
• Sydney  Post  Harvest  Laboratory  
http://www.postharvest.com.au  
• Australian  United  Fresh  Transport  Advisory  Committee  
http://www.auftac.com.au/mainframeset.html  
• Dairy  Food  Safety  Victoria  
http://www.dairysafe.vic.gov.au/documents.htm  
• CSIRO  Publishing,  under  Agriculture:  Animal  Production  
http://www.publish.csiro.au/bcid/2.htm  
• HACCP  Australia  
http://www.haccp.com.au/  

 
 
 

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 31


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Feedback on activities
The  responses  provided  in  this  section  are  suggested  responses.  
Because  every  workplace  is  different,  your  responses  may  vary  
according  to  your  specific  workplace  procedures,  the  equipment  
available  and  the  nature  of  the  business.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 33


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Page 34 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Activity 1: Identifying goods that require temperature control

Products  that  require  temperature  controlled  storage  are  identified  by:  


• storage  temperatures  on  the  packaging  
• instructions  from  the  manufacturer  
• Government  regulations  
• workplace  policies.  

Activity 2: Matching storage temperature to product types

Information  from  the  manufacturer,  your  clients,  regulations  and  from  


information  contained  on  the  packaging  will  explain  the  temperature  and  
storage  requirements  for  product  types.  

Workplace  documentation  to  assist  you  in  determining  product  storage  


temperatures  for  short  and  long  term  storage  requirements  include:  
• workplace  policies  
• product  storage  regulations  
• instructions  from  the  manufacturer.  

Activity 3: Identify storage separation and co-storage applications


for products

Product  characteristics  will  influence  the  way  products  can  be  stored.  

When  stacking  food  in  a  cold  storage  facility  you  should  use  separate  cold  
stores  for  both  raw  foods,  such  as  meat  and  poultry,  and  other  high  risk  
foods,  such  as  dairy  products  and  cooked  meats.  Where  multi-­‐purpose  cold  
stores  are  used  always  store  raw  meat  and  poultry  below  other  foods  or  in  a  
separate  section  of  the  cold  store.  This  will  prevent  any  liquids  from  the  meat  
or  poultry  contaminating  foods  place  below  them  on  the  shelves.    Stack  the  
shelves  in  a  way  so  that  cold  air  can  circulate  and  stock  can  be  checked  for  
condition.  

When  stacking  a  freezer  place  raw  foods  below  high  risk  foods  to  avoid  any  
risk  of  contamination.  Place  stock  with  the  longest  shelf  life  below  or  behind  
stock  with  a  short  shelf  life  to  allow  the  short  term  stock  a  quicker  turn  
around.  Keep  the  food  in  the  supplier’s  packaging.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 35


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

When  storing  dry  goods,  keep  them  in  a  cool,  dry  and  well  ventilated  location.  
There  must  be  sufficient  space  between  supplies  to  allow  air  to  flow  freely  
and  for  you  to  check  the  goods.  Dry  foods  must  be  kept  in  secure  packaging  
so  as  not  to  attract  pests.  Dry  foods  must  be  checked  and  rotated  regularly.  

Activity 4: Identifying appropriate methods for determining the


temperature of goods

Measuring  temperature  is  important  for  understanding  the  handling  


conditions  that  your  product  experiences.  A  probe  thermometer  will  
accurately  assess  the  actual  product  core  temperature.  However  to  
accurately  measure  product  temperature,  temperature  data  loggers  should  
be  fitted  with  external  probes  that  can  be  inserted  into  or  placed  alongside  
the  product.  They  can  be  set  to  record  the  temperature  every  few  minutes.  
The  data  collected  can  be  presented  as  a  graph  so  that  the  temperature  
trends  can  be  determined  easily.  

Storage  temperatures  may  also  be  determined  with  a  thermometer  that  


monitors  automatically  through  electronic  temperature  sensing  devices.  
Temperatures  can  also  be  determined  with  the  use  of  hand  held  scanners  that  
allow  spot  temperatures  to  be  measured.  

Activity 5: Monitor storage areas to ensure they remain within the


temperature range of products stored

Technology  plays  a  large  part  in  running  a  temperature  controlled  warehouse.  


Technical  equipment  includes  remote  electronic  monitoring  systems  which  
ensure  that  temperature  of  various  cold  rooms  is  maintained  and  constantly  
monitored.  These  systems  consist  of  a  number  of  thermostats,  linked  
together  to  a  central  monitoring  device  that  alerts  users  to  power  failures,  or  
instances  when  temperatures  deviate  outside  the  specified  temperature  
ranges.  

Page 36 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

Activity 6: Implications of incorrect temperatures on the storage of


goods

In  the  case  of  food,  incorrect  storage  temperatures  may  lead  to  bacterial  
growth  within  the  product.  Food  poisoning  bacteria  multiply  when  they  have  
ideal  conditions.  These  conditions  include:  
• food  type  
• moisture  
• warmth  
• time.  

Incorrect  storage  temperatures  can  degrade  the  quality  of  goods.  

Pharmaceuticals  and  chemicals  will  become  chemically  unstable  and  even  


dangerous  if  they  are  not  kept  stored  at  their  correct  temperatures  and  
therefore  will  not  work  correctly.  

Activity 7: Identifying damaged goods and undertaking appropriate


action

Damaged  goods  may  be  identified  by  their  discolouration,  by  the  odour  they  
emit  or  by  temperature  changes  of  the  product.  For  example,  some  chemicals  
when  they  come  in  contact  with  air  may  heat  up.  

Spoilt  goods  can  be  recognised  by  the  following  signs:  


• discolouration  
• mould  
• changes  in  smell  
• changes  in  texture  
• changes  in  flavour.  

When  you  encounter  damaged  goods  you  should  remove  them  from  storage  
so  that  contamination  of  other  products  can  not  happen.  

Damage  to  goods  can  be  reduced  by:  


• keeping  the  work  area  clean  
• wrapping  goods  that  may  contaminate  other  products  
• maintaining  correct  storage  temperatures  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 37


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008 ADELG1022
TLIA2507D Regulate temperature controlled stock

• reducing  moisture  levels  


• maintaining  correct  storage  times.  

Page 38 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1022 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008