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TLIA3107C

Consolidate
freight
Learner Guide
Contents
What this Learner’s Guide is about ........................................ 1  
Plan your learning .................................................................. 2  
How will you be assessed? .................................................... 4  

Section 1 Assess scope to consolidate freight .............................. 8  


How do I assess capability of different transport modes
available to the organisation against the proposed tasks? .. 11  
How do I evaluate individual consignment loads to identify
relevant information needed to combine or consolidate freight?
............................................................................................. 13  
How do I analyse information to determine where opportunities
for freight consolidation exist?.............................................. 16  
How do I make sure packaging requirements for consolidated
cargo conform to regulatory requirements? ......................... 19  
How do I ensure procedures for the loading of cargo are
planned in accordance with established industry practice and
Australian Dangerous Goods (ADG) Code? ........................ 22  
How do I calculate proposed volumes and dimensions of
proposed consolidation? ...................................................... 26  
How do I match proposed consolidation against operational
capacity and capability of carrier?........................................ 28  

Section 2 Prepare consignment documentation .......................... 31  


How do I prepare consignment documentation for consolidated
cargo? .................................................................................. 34  
How do I ensure labelling and marking requirements of cargo
are documented in accordance with domestic and international
regulations, ADG Code and workplace requirements? ........ 37  
How do I complete and file/store consignment documentation in
accordance with workplace procedures including dangerous
goods declaration, where applicable?.................................. 40  
How do I consolidate freight taking into account segregation
requirements for dangerous goods if applicable? ................ 42  

Additional resources....................................................................... 44  

Feedback on activities .................................................................... 47  


TLIA3107C Consolidate freight

What this Learner’s Guide is about

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  about  the  skills  and  knowledge  required  to  
consolidate  freight  including  assessing  the  scope  to  consolidate  
freight,  combining  or  consolidating  multiple  shipments  of  products  
into  higher  volume  shipments,  and  the  related  preparation  of  
consignment  documentation.  

The  unit  of  competency  TLIA3107C  Consolidate  freight  is  from  the  
Transport  and  Distribution  Training  Package  (TLI07).  It  has  a  number  of  
elements  of  competency  that  are  covered  in  this  guide.  These  are:  
• Assess  scope  to  consolidate  freight.  
• Prepare  consignment  documentation.  

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Plan your learning

It  is  important  to  plan  your  learning  before  you  start  because  you  may  
already  have  some  of  the  knowledge  and  skills  that  are  covered  in  this  
Learner’s  Guide.  This  might  be  because:  
• you  have  been  working  in  the  industry  for  some  time,  
and/or  
• you  have  already  completed  training  in  this  area.  

Together  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer,  use  the  checklist  on  the  
following  pages  to  help  you  plan  your  study  program.  Your  answers  to  
the  questions  in  the  checklist  will  help  you  work  out  which  sections  of  
this  Learner’s  Guide  you  need  to  complete.  

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  written  with  the  idea  that  learning  is  made  more  
relevant  when  you,  the  learner,  are  actually  working  in  the  industry.  
This  means  that  you  will  have  people  within  your  enterprise  who  can  
show  you  things,  discuss  how  things  are  done  and  answer  any  
questions  you  have.  Also  you  can  practise  what  you  learn  and  see  how  
what  you  learn  is  applied  in  the  enterprise.  

If  you  are  working  through  this  Learner’s  Guide  and  have  not  yet  found  
a  job  in  the  industry,  you  will  need  to  talk  to  your  trainer  about  doing  
work  experience  or  working  and  learning  in  some  sort  of  simulated  
workplace.  

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Section 1: Assess scope to consolidate freight

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. Assess  capability  of  different  transport  
modes  available  to  the  organisation  
against  the  proposed  tasks?        
2. Evaluate  individual  consignment  loads  to  
identify  relevant  information  needed  to  
combine  or  consolidate  freight?        
3. Analyse  information  to  determine  where  
opportunities  for  freight  consolidation  
exist?        
4. Make  sure  packaging  requirements  for  
consolidated  cargo  conform  to  regulatory  
requirements?        
5. Ensure  procedures  for  the  loading  of  cargo  
are  planned  in  accordance  with  established  
industry  practice  and  Australian  Dangerous  
Goods  (ADG)  Code?        
6. Calculate  proposed  volumes  and  
dimensions  of  proposed  consolidation?        
7. Match  proposed  consolidation  against  
operational  capacity  and  capability  of  
carrier?        

Section 2: Prepare consignment documentation

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. Prepare  consignment  documentation  for  
consolidated  cargo?          
2. Ensure  labelling  and  marking  requirements  
of  cargo  are  documented  in  accordance  
with  domestic  and  international  
regulations,  ADG  Code  and  workplace  
requirements?        
3. Complete  and  file/store  consignment  
documentation  in  accordance  with  
workplace  procedures  including  

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dangerous  goods  declaration,  where  


applicable?          
4. Consolidate  freight  taking  into  account  
segregation  requirements  for  dangerous  
goods  if  applicable?          

How will you be assessed?

Assessment  of  this  unit  of  competency  will  include  observation  of  real  
or  simulated  work  processes  using  workplace  procedures  and  
questioning  on  underpinning  knowledge  and  skills.  It  must  be  
demonstrated  in  an  actual  or  simulated  work  situation  under  
supervision.  

You  will  be  required  to  demonstrate  that  you  can:  


• assess  capability  of  different  transport  modes  available  to  
the  organisation  against  the  proposed  tasks  
• evaluate  individual  consignment  loads  to  identify  relevant  
information  needed  to  combine  or  consolidate  freight  
• analyse  information  to  determine  where  opportunities  for  
freight  consolidation  exist  
• make  sure  packaging  requirements  for  consolidated  cargo  
conform  to  regulatory  requirements  
• ensure  procedures  for  the  loading  of  cargo  are  planned  in  
accordance  with  established  industry  practice  and  
Australian  Dangerous  Goods  (ADG)  Code  
• calculate  proposed  volumes  and  dimensions  of  proposed  
consolidation  
• match  proposed  consolidation  against  operational  
capacity  and  capability  of  carrier  
• prepare  consignment  documentation  for  consolidated  
cargo  
• ensure  labelling  and  marking  requirements  of  cargo  are  
documented  in  accordance  with  domestic  and  
international  regulations,  ADG  Code  and  workplace  
requirements  
• complete  and  file/store  consignment  documentation  in  
accordance  with  workplace  procedures  including  
dangerous  goods  declaration,  where  applicable  

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• consolidate  freight  taking  into  account  segregation  


requirements  for  dangerous  goods  if  applicable.

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Section 1 Assess scope


to consolidate freight

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Section outline
Areas  covered  in  this  section  are:  
• assess  capability  of  different  transport  modes  available  to  
the  organisation  against  the  proposed  tasks  
• evaluate  individual  consignment  loads  to  identify  relevant  
information  needed  to  combine  or  consolidate  freight  
• analyse  information  to  determine  where  opportunities  for  
freight  consolidation  exist  
• make  sure  packaging  requirements  for  consolidated  cargo  
conform  to  regulatory  requirements  
• ensure  procedures  for  the  loading  of  cargo  are  planned  in  
accordance  with  established  industry  practice  and  
Australian  Dangerous  Goods  (ADG)  Code  
• calculate  proposed  volumes  and  dimensions  of  proposed  
consolidation  
• match  proposed  consolidation  against  operational  
capacity  and  capability  of  carrier.  

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How do I assess capability of different transport


modes available to the organisation against the
proposed tasks?

Different  transport  modes  will  be  better  suited  to  some  types  of  
cargo.  For  instance  some  dangerous  goods  cannot  be  transported  by  
air  because  of  their  unstable  nature.  Obviously  if  a  substance  is  too  
dangerous  to  be  carried  on  an  aircraft  another  type  of  transport  will  
have  to  be  arranged.  

The  mode  of  transport  is  also  determined  by  the  measurements  and  
weight  of  the  load.  If  the  freight  is  too  heavy  or  bulky  you  will  have  no  
choice  but  to  ship  it  by  sea,  rail  or  truck  if  you  wish  to  send  it  all  in  one  
go.  

The  amount  of  time  that  a  customer  can  have  their  goods  in  transport  
for  is  also  a  factor  when  deciding  on  the  type  the  transport  mode.  If  
you  transport  something  by  air  it  can  be  in  most  places  around  the  
world  in  a  day.  But  transport  by  sea  or  land  can  take  weeks.  It  depends  
on  the  requirements  of  the  customer  and  if  their  goods  have  a  sense  
of  urgency  surrounding  them.  In  almost  all  cases  air  freight  is  the  most  
expensive  option.  Each  customer  needs  to  weigh  up  the  costs  against  
the  need  to  get  products  quickly  to  their  destination.  

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Activity 1: Assess capability of different transport modes


available to the organisation against the proposed tasks

What  type  of  transport  mode  would  you  suggest  for  the  following  
time-­‐frames  and  weight  of  the  goods  to  be  transported?  Land,  sea  or  
air?    

New  York  4  days  –  220kg _____________________________________  

London  in  4  weeks  –  1000kg __________________________________  

Nearest  Capital  City  in  7  days  –  780kg ___________________________  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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How do I evaluate individual consignment loads


to identify relevant information needed to
combine or consolidate freight?
When  you  consolidate  freight  you  undertake  the  transportation  of  
small  shipments  and  put  them  with  other  freight  to  use  all  the  space  
you  have  booked.  If  you  have  left  over  space  that  is  not  being  used  
then  it  is  a  waste  of  money.  To  be  cost  effective  you  must  assemble  
goods  and  put  them  together  in  the  same  shipment.  This  gives  a  
customer  a  better  rate  because  the  cost  of  the  space  is  offset  by  other  
customers.    

To  consolidate  freight  you  need  to  know  the  volume  of  the  space  
booked  for  transportation  and  the  volume  of  the  goods  to  be  
transported.  You  will  need  to  calculate  the  suitability  of  the  two  so  you  
can  get  optimum  use  from  the  space  and  know  exactly  how  much  is  to  
be  used.  

You  must  have  the  measurements  of  the  carrier  space  before  
attempting  to  consolidate  anything.  It  will  all  hinge  on  the  space  that  is  
available  for  transportation.  Next  you  must  have  an  accurate  
assessment  of  the  customer’s  goods.  You  must  find  out  the:  
• type  of  goods    
• size  of  packaging  
• weight  
• dimensions  
• departure  location  
• destination.  

This  will  give  you  a  clear  indication  of  what  you  will  be  able  to  fit  in  and  
how  to  best  go  about  it.  You  must  have  worked  out  what  order  the  
loads  are  to  be  packed  so  they  can  be  loaded  and  unloaded  efficiently.  
They  must  be  sorted  and  separated  by  someone  when  they  reach  their  
destination.  

It  is  important  to  understand  the  types  of  goods  that  can  be  safely  
consolidated  together  for  transport.  Certain  hazardous  materials  
cannot  be  put  together  and  can  be  highly  dangerous  if  combined.  You  
must  refer  to  legislation  on  transporting  dangerous  goods  and  

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hazardous  materials  before  making  a  decision  about  what  can  be  


consolidated  together  for  transportation.  
Activity 2: Evaluate individual consignment loads to identify
relevant information needed to combine or consolidate freight

During  your  daily  work  activities  attend  to  a  customer  and  use  the  
following  checklist  and  space  below  to  make  sure  you  find  out  the  
details  of  a  customer’s  freight  to  see  if  you  could  consolidate  it  with  
another  load.  

Tick  box  when  you  have  the  appropriate  information     


Type  of  goods    

Size  of  packaging    

Weight    

Dimensions    

Departure  location    

Destination      

Special  requirements  (eg.  refrigeration)    

Type  of  goods ________________________________________________________  

______________________________________________________________________  

Size  of  packaging ____________________________________________  

______________________________________________________________________  

Weight _______________________________________________________________  

______________________________________________________________________  

Dimensions ___________________________________________________________  

______________________________________________________________________  

Departure  location ___________________________________________________  

______________________________________________________________________  

Destination ___________________________________________________________  

______________________________________________________________________  

Special  requirements _________________________________________________  

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There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide  

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How do I analyse information to determine


where opportunities for freight consolidation
exist?

Once  you  have  found  out  all  you  need  to  know  about  individual  
customer  loads,  before  you  can  consolidate  them  together  you  should  
look  at  whether  they  are  compatible  to  be  transported  together.  Some  
goods  are  not  designed  to  travel  with  others.  This  is  governed  by  strict  
regulations  when  it  comes  to  dangerous  goods  and  hazardous  
materials.  When  assessing  the  load  it  must  be  smaller  than  the  
measurements  of  the  freight  space  which  is  booked  to  warrant  any  
opportunity  of  freight  consolidation.    

If  they  are  acceptable  to  travel  together  the  main  thing  to  analyse  is  
the  space  and  weight  restrictions  on  the  carrier  you  intend  to  use.  For  
example  if  you  book  an  area  that  is  too  big  for  a  load  that  you  want  
taken  by  aeroplane  you  can  add  more  only  if  it  does  not  exceed  the  
weight  restrictions.  Whereas  on  a  ship  designed  for  sea  freight  the  
weight  tolerance  will  be  a  lot  more.  

If  you  are  using  a  container  to  place  your  goods  in  for  transport  you  
must  take  into  account  its  weight  also.  For  example  if  the  payload  
limitation  is  20,000kg  and  the  weight  of  a  cargo  container  is  2,000  kg  
then  the  weight  of  the  freight  could  not  exceed  18,000kg,  which  
equals  the  20,000kg  weight  limitation  of  the  container.  

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Activity 3: Analyse information to determine where


opportunities for freight consolidation exist

Joe  has  space  left  in  a  shipping  container  and  has  the  opportunity  to  
consolidate  freight  to  fill  it  up.  The  shipping  container  has  an  11,000kg  
capacity  and  weighs  1125kg.  The  first  load  weighs  6000kg.  Circle  the  
other  loads  Jo  could  consolidate  with  from  the  choices  below.  Hint:  
There  is  more  than  one  answer.  

A. 3875kg  

B. 4025kg  

C. 2175kg  +  1700kg  

D. 3925kg  

Joe  has  a  load  that  is  booked  to  be  air  freighted  to  Europe.  He  has  
another  load  that  it  could  be  consolidated  with  almost  perfectly  so  
both  will  get  to  their  destinations  on  time  so  each  customer  will  be  
satisfied.  He  knows  that  one  of  them  is  classified  as  dangerous  goods  
but  doesn’t  have  time  to  check  the  other  one  and  decides  to  send  
them  anyway.  What  could  be  the  consequences  of  his  actions?  Record  
you  answer  below.      

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What  steps  should  Joe  have  taken  to  check  the  second  load?  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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How do I make sure packaging requirements for


consolidated cargo conform to regulatory
requirements?

Packaging  is  an  essential  component  in  the  safe  transport  of  
dangerous  goods.  The  type  of  packaging  and  the  way  it  is  used  is  very  
important.  It  must  keep  the  consolidated  load  safe  and  secure  in  
transport  and  protect  it  during  loading  and  unloading.  When  packing  
goods  that  are  not  dangerous  or  hazardous  the  packaging  used  will  
need  to  protect  them  during  transportation  and  be  secure  enough  to  
avoid  unrestrictive  movement.  You  should  be  aware  of  the  demands  
that  exporting  puts  on  a  package.    
The  four  problems  listed  below  must  be  kept  in  mind  when  packaging  
goods  for  transportation.  

1. Breakage  
During  transport,  goods  may  be  stacked  on  top  of  one  another  or  
come  into  forceful  contact  with  other  goods.  Overseas,  handling  
facilities  may  be  less  sophisticated  than  in  Australia.  Cargo  can  
sometimes  be  treated  very  roughly  and  be  dragged,  pushed,  rolled,  or  
dropped  during  unloading,  while  moving  through  customs,  or  in  transit  
to  the  destination.  

2. Weight    
Normally,  air  shipments  require  less  heavy  packing  than  ocean  
shipments,  but  they  must  still  be  adequately  protected.  Because  
transportation  costs  are  determined  by  dimensions  and  weight,  special  
reinforced  and  lightweight  packing  materials  have  been  devised  for  
exporting.  Care  in  packing  goods  to  minimize  dimensions  and  weight  
while  giving  strength  may  well  save  money  while  ensuring  that  goods  
are  properly  protected.  

3. Moisture  
There  are  many  ways  moisture  can  affect  freight.  It  can  discolour  
goods,  ruin  electrical  circuits,  cause  mould  to  grow  and  render  a  
product  useless.  It  can  get  into  goods  at  different  stages  such  as:  
• during  loading  and  unloading  
• during  transport  caused  by  condensation  in  cargo  holds  
and  containers  
• rough  sea  conditions  causing  water  spray  

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• moisture  present  before  packing.  

To  avoid  moisture  gaining  access  to  goods  they  need  to  be  packed  
correctly  to  waterproof  them  whilst  first  making  sure  that  no  water  or  
dampness  is  present.    

4. Theft  
Packaging  can  also  help  against  the  possibility  of  theft  occurring.  
Because  the  goods  must  pass  through  so  many  different  hands  to  
reach  their  destination  there  is  always  the  chance  of  dishonesty.  You  
can  make  it  harder  to  steal  goods  by  packaging  them  securely  and  
therefore  reducing  the  incident  of  theft.    

5. Packaging  
Packing  requirements  apply  in  almost  all  circumstances  to  ensure  the  
safety  of  dangerous  goods  in  transport.  The  packing  instructions  
normally  require  the  use  of  United  Nations  (UN)  performance-­‐tested  
specification  packagings.  When  dangerous  goods  are  in  limited  
quantities  these  may  not  be  required.    

There  are  a  number  of  packaging  suppliers  in  Australia  who  can  
provide  UN  specification  packaging.  Selecting  packaging  to  contain  
dangerous  goods  for  a  number  of  small  packages  inside  larger  
packaging  is  not  as  simple  as  just  choosing  a  box  off  a  shelf.  The  
regulations  generally  require  packaging  and  dangerous  goods  to  be  
tested  to  establish  if  they  are  safe  to  be  transported  together.  There  
are  exceptions  to  this  general  rule.  You  should  always  ask  experts  for  
advice  if  in  doubt.    

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Activity 4: Make sure packaging requirements for


consolidated cargo conform to regulatory requirements

Breakage  is  an  important  factor  to  keep  in  mind  when  deciding  on  
which  packaging  to  use  to  protect  goods.  What  are  another  three?  List  
them  below.  

Regulations  for  the  packaging  requirements  of  dangerous  goods  and  


hazardous  materials  are  very  strict.  Ask  your  manager  or  supervisor  to  
show  you  how  to  access  the  United  Nation  specifications  for  
packaging  dangerous  goods.    

Record  in  the  space  provided  the  steps  you  take  to  access  this  
information.  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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How do I ensure procedures for the loading of


cargo are planned in accordance with
established industry practice and Australian
Dangerous Goods (ADG) Code?

Correct  packaging  and  documentation  for  consignments  of  dangerous  


goods  is  essential  so  that  those  engaged  in  the  transport  and  handling  
are  not  exposed  to  risk.  For  this  reason  declarations  in  accordance  
with  the  legal  requirements  should  be  entrusted  to  people  who  know  
what  they  are  doing  within  your  organisation.  The  personnel  engaged  
in  the  packing  of  dangerous  goods  and  the  preparation  of  
documentation  should  be  competent  to  perform  these  tasks  
accurately  and  efficiently.  

After  dangerous  goods  have  been  packed,  the  packages  are  marked  
with  essential  information,  including:  
• the  proper  shipping  name    
• the  UN  number  
• labels  depicting  all  the  potential  hazards.    

This  is  to  ensure  packages  containing  dangerous  goods  can  be  
recognised  and  warning  given  of  the  potential  hazards  without  just  
relying  on  the  information  from  accompanying  documents.  There  is  a  
dangerous  goods  transport  document  which  accompanies  most  
consignments  to  provide  detailed  information  about  the  goods  so  
there  is  a  separate  means  of  identifying  the  contents  of  packages.    

For  the  ease  of  identifying  dangerous  goods,  the  international  


community  has  created  a  classification  system.    

There  is  a  label  for  each  classification  to  categorise  the  nature  of  the  
hazard.  These  labels  are  required  to  be  secured  to  the  outside  of  the  
package  for  transport  and  must  remain  while  it  is  in  transit.  Examples  
of  these  are  illustrated  below:    

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Class  1  Explosives  -­‐  explosive  substances,  explosive  articles,  


pyrotechnic  devices.  Includes  ammunition,  fireworks,  detonators  
and  so  on.  

Class  2  Gases  -­‐  transported  as  either  compressed,  liquefied,  


refrigerated  liquefied  or  gas  in  solution.  Includes  aerosols.      

Class  3  Flammable  liquids  -­‐  includes  liquids  with  a  boiling  point  of  
35  degrees  C  or  less  or  a  flash  point  of  60.5  degrees  C  or  less.  
Examples  are  petrol,  alcohol  and  so  on.  

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Activity 5: Ensure procedures for the loading of cargo are


planned in accordance with established industry practice and
Australian Dangerous Goods (ADG) Code

After  dangerous  goods  have  been  packed,  you  need  to  ensure  they  are  
marked  with  essential  information  for  transport  to  ensure  their  safe  
handling.  List  the  essential  information  below.  

In  your  workplace  locate  a  copy  of  the  classifications  of  dangerous  


goods.  Write  down  the  name  of  five  of  the  classifications  below.  

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For  the  ease  of  identifying  dangerous  goods,  the  international  


community  has  created  a  classification  system.  These  labels  are  
required  to  be  secured  to  the  outside  of  the  package  for  transport  and  
must  remain  while  it  is  in  transit.  How  do  you  ensure  that  these  labels  
are  attached?  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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How do I calculate proposed volumes and


dimensions of proposed consolidation?

To  calculate  whether  a  consolidated  load  will  fit  in  the  space  of  a  
carrier  you  will  need  to  pay  particular  attention  to  the  mass  and  
volume.  

The  mass  generally  refers  to  the  weight  of  something  whilst  the  
volume  refers  to  how  big  an  object  is  or  the  area  it  takes  up.    
• Mass  is  measured  in  tonnes,  kilograms,  grams  and  so  on.  
• Volume  is  measured  in  cubic  metres,  cubic  centimetres  
and  so  on.  (To  calculate  volume  you  multiply  length  x  
width  x  height.)  

You  must  have  the  measurements  of  these  for  the  consolidated  load  
and  compare  it  to  the  space  and  weight  limitations  that  are  permitted  
on  the  carrier  that  you  intend  to  use.  To  obtain  the  measurements  of  
the  consolidated  load  you  must  take  the  measurements  of  each  
individual  package  and  simply  add  them  together.  Your  organisation  
should  have  specific  details  on  how  to  obtain  the  mass  and  volume  for  
goods  and  the  method  you  should  use  to  add  them  together.  For  
example  you  may  need  to  factor  in  space  and  packaging  between  
different  types  of  goods  or  your  organisation  may  have  a  database  of  
measurements  for  common  things  that  have  been  forwarded  in  the  
past.  

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Activity 6: Calculate proposed volumes and dimensions of


proposed consolidation

Estimate  the  volume  of  a  motorcycle  given  the  following  information.    

The  height  of  the  bike  at  its  highest  point  (the  handlebars)  is  1.10m.  
The  total  length  of  the  bike  is  exactly  2.0m  and  the  width  of  the  bike  at  
its  widest  part  is  0.75m.    

How  big  would  the  load  be  if  you  had  to  consolidate  it  with  a  car  that  is  
1.5m  in  height?  The  total  length  is  3.7m  and  the  width  of  the  car  at  its  
widest  part  is  2m.    

 
Record  your  answer  below.  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide  

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How do I match proposed consolidation against


operational capacity and capability of carrier?

Most  measurements  for  freight  forwarding  use  the  dimensions  of  


volume  and  mass.  To  match  a  consolidation  of  goods  you  will  be  
required  to  know  what  the  operational  capacity  and  capability  of  the  
carrier  is.    

There  is  no  point  putting  together  freight  that  needs  to  arrive  at  
different  times,  doesn’t  quite  fit  or  exceeds  weight  limits.  Near  enough  
is  not  good  enough  when  it  comes  to  consolidating  cargo.  For  
example,  if  you  are  using  a  shipping  container  you  will  need  to  know  
the  size  and  weight  it  can  hold  and  what  the  volume  of  the  
consolidated  load  is  to  see  if  the  two  can  match.  If  you  have  a  certain  
amount  of  space  in  the  cargo  hold  of  an  aircraft  booked  there  is  no  
point  consolidating  a  load  that  will  exceed  weight  restrictions  even  if  it  
is  the  correct  dimensions.  Your  aim  is  to  make  a  comparison  of  the  
space  allocated  for  transport  and  the  space  that  the  consolidated  load  
will  occupy  taking  into  account  all  of  the  restrictions  and  requirements  
of  the  transport  mode.  You  should  be  aware  of:  
• time  in  transport    
• arrival  date  
• weight  of  load  
• dimensions  or  area  of  load  
• weight  restrictions  of  carrier  
• dimension  restrictions  of  carrier  
• dangerous  goods  regulations  
• cost.    

Dangerous  goods  are  a  primary  when  deciding  the  mode  of  transport  
that  can  be  used.  When  dealing  with  aircraft  there  are  certain  factors  
that  you  must  take  into  account.  In  general,  dangerous  goods  are  
divided  into  various  classes  and  divisions  according  to  the  hazard  they  
present.  These  include:  
• too  dangerous  ever  to  be  transported  on  an  aircraft    
• forbidden  in  normal  circumstances  but  may  be  carried  
with  the  permission  of  the  aviation  regulator  and  subject  
to  strict  conditions  being  met    
• restricted  to  transport  only  on  cargo  aircraft  
• can  be  transported  on  either  passenger  or  cargo  aircraft.  

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Air  travel  introduces  a  change  of  environment  for  your  dangerous  


goods.  Three  changes  that  these  items  can  be  subject  to  are:  

Temperature    

The  effect  of  a  rise  in  temperature  is  that  the  contents  of  a  package  
filled  at  low  temperature  can  expand  in  volume,  causing  the  discharge  
of  any  liquid  contents  or  the  bursting  of  packages  with  gaseous  
contents.  Temperature  can  vary  from  minus  40  to  plus  55  degrees  
Celsius.  

Pressure    

Atmospheric  pressure  variations  in  flight  range  from  sea  level  where  
normal  pressures  exist  to  a  lesser  pressure  of  about  only  2/3  of  that  
experienced  at  sea  level.  The  pressure  reduction  can  result  in  liquid  
and  gaseous  contents  bursting  out  of  their  containers  into  the  hold  of  
the  aircraft.  This  can  be  very  messy  and  very  dangerous  if  it  is  
flammable.  

Vibration    

Vibration  can  cause  something  to  become  unstable  by  altering  its  
properties  when  it  is  shaken.  It  can  cause  the  expansion  of  liquid  and  
gas  causing  it  to  rupture  or  burst  its  container.  This  can  be  very  messy  
and  very  dangerous  if  it  is  flammable.  

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Activity 7: Match proposed consolidation against operational


capacity and capability of carrier

When  consolidating  freight  you  need  to  take  into  account  a  range  of  
factors.  You  cannot  put  together  freight  that  needs  to  arrive  at  
different  times,  doesn’t  quite  fit  or  exceeds  weight  limits  just  to  try  
and  save  on  costs.  What  are  the  things  that  you  need  to  be  aware  of  
when  matching  proposed  consolidation  and  the  characteristics  of  the  
carrier?  List  them  below.  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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Section 2 Prepare
consignment
documentation

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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  are:  


• prepare  consignment  documentation  for  consolidated  
cargo  
• ensure  labelling  and  marking  requirements  of  cargo  are  
documented  in  accordance  with  domestic  and  
international  regulations,  ADG  Code  and  workplace  
requirements  
• complete  and  file/store  consignment  documentation  in  
accordance  with  workplace  procedures  including  
dangerous  goods  declaration,  where  applicable  
• consolidate  freight  taking  into  account  segregation  
requirements  for  dangerous  goods  if  applicable.  

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How do I prepare consignment documentation


for consolidated cargo?

Freight  forwarders  must  deal  with  a  huge  amount  of  documentation  


The  following  documents  are  commonly  used  in  exporting;  which  of  
them  are  actually  used  in  each  case  depends  on  the  requirements  of  
both  the  Australian  government  and  the  government  of  the  importing  
country.  

Commercial  invoice.  The  commercial  invoice  is  a  bill  for  the  goods  
from  the  buyer  to  the  seller.  A  commercial  invoice  should  include  basic  
information  about  the  transaction,  including  a  description  of  the  
goods,  the  address  of  the  shipper  and  seller,  and  the  delivery  and  
payment  terms.  The  buyer  needs  the  invoice  to  prove  ownership  and  
to  arrange  payment.  Some  governments  use  the  commercial  invoice  to  
assess  customs  duties.    

Bill  of  lading.  A  bill  of  lading  is  a  contract  between  the  owner  of  the  
goods  and  the  carrier.  There  are  two  types.  A  straight  bill  of  lading  is  
nonnegotiable.  A  negotiable  or  shipper's  order  bill  of  lading  can  be  
bought,  sold,  or  traded  while  goods  are  in  transit  and  is  used  for  letter-­‐
of-­‐credit  transactions.  The  customer  usually  needs  the  original  or  a  
copy  as  proof  of  ownership  to  take  possession  of  the  goods.    

Consular  invoice.  Certain  nations  require  a  consular  invoice,  which  is  


used  to  control  and  identify  goods.  The  invoice  must  be  purchased  
from  the  consulate  of  the  country  to  which  the  goods  are  being  
shipped  and  usually  must  be  prepared  in  the  language  of  that  country.    

Certificate  of  origin.  Certain  nations  require  a  signed  statement  as  to  
the  origin  of  the  export  item.  Such  certificates  are  usually  obtained  
through  a  semi-­‐official  organisation  such  as  a  local  chamber  of  
commerce.  A  certificate  may  be  required  even  though  the  commercial  
invoice  contains  the  information.    

Inspection  certification.  Some  purchasers  and  countries  may  require  a  


certificate  of  inspection  attesting  to  the  specifications  of  the  goods  
shipped,  usually  performed  by  a  third  party.  Inspection  certificates  are  
often  obtained  from  independent  testing  organisations.    

Dock  receipt  and  warehouse  receipt.  These  receipts  are  used  to  
transfer  accountability  when  the  export  item  is  moved  to  the  port  and  
left  with  the  international  carrier  for  export.    

Destination  control  statement.  This  statement  appears  on  the  


commercial  invoice  and  ocean  or  air  waybill  of  lading  to  notify  the  

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carrier  and  all  foreign  parties  that  the  item  may  be  exported  only  to  
certain  destinations.    

Insurance  certificate.  If  the  seller  provides  insurance,  the  insurance  


certificate  states  the  type  and  amount  of  coverage.    

Export  license.  A  license  to  export  goods  which  is  not  always  required  
depending  on  the  types  of  goods  being  exported.  For  example  you  will  
require  a  licence  to  export  livestock,  tobacco,  weapons  and  so  on.  

Export  packing  list.  Considerably  more  detailed  and  informative  than  a  


standard  domestic  packing  list,  an  export  packing  list  itemises  the  
material  in  each  individual  package  and  indicates  the  type  of  package:  
box,  crate,  drum,  carton,  and  so  on.  It  shows  the  individual  net,  legal,  
tare,  and  gross  weights  and  measurements  for  each  package.  Package  
markings  should  be  shown  along  with  the  shipper's  and  buyer's  
references.  The  packing  list  should  be  attached  to  the  outside  of  a  
package  in  a  waterproof  pouch.  The  list  is  used  by  the  shipper  or  
forwarding  agent  to  determine:  
• the  total  shipment  weight  and  volume    
• whether  the  correct  cargo  is  being  shipped.    

In  addition,  customs  officials  (both  local  and  foreign)  may  use  the  list  
to  check  the  cargo.  

Documentation  must  be  precise.  Slight  discrepancies  or  omissions  


may  prevent  merchandise  from  being  exported,  result  in  exporting  
firms  not  getting  paid,  or  even  result  in  the  seizure  of  the  exporter's  
goods  by  local  or  foreign  government  customs.  Collection  documents  
are  subject  to  precise  time  limits  and  may  not  be  honored  by  a  bank  if  
out  of  date.  Much  of  the  documentation  is  routine  for  freight  
forwarders  but  the  exporter  is  ultimately  responsible  for  the  accuracy  
of  the  documentation.  

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Activity 8: Prepare consignment documentation for


consolidated cargo

Being  a  freight  forwarder  involves  you  to  handle  a  formidable  amount  


of  documentation  which  exporting  requires.  It  is  important  that  as  a  
freight  forwarder  you  completely  understand  the  process  involved.  
Get  your  manager  or  supervisor  to  show  you  how  to  complete  all  the  
documentation  required  for  a  regular  job  that  involves  consolidating  
freight.  

Ensure  you  spend  the  time  to  become  confident  and  concise  so  you  
can  complete  all  documentation  competently.  Check  with  your  
supervisor  or  manager  that  you  are  doing  it  correctly.  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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How do I ensure labelling and marking


requirements of cargo are documented in
accordance with domestic and international
regulations, ADG Code and workplace
requirements?

Specific  marking  and  labelling  is  used  on  export  cartons  and  containers  
to:    
• meet  shipping  regulations  
• ensure  proper  handling  
• prevent  risk  potentially  caused  by  the  contents  
• help  receivers  identify  shipments.    

The  overseas  buyer  usually  specifies  export  marks  that  should  appear  
on  the  cargo  for  easy  identification  by  receivers.  Many  markings  may  
be  needed  for  shipment.  Exporters  need  to  put  the  following  markings  
on  cartons  to  be  shipped:    
• Shipper's  mark.    
• Country  of  origin.    
• Weight  marking  (pounds  and  kilograms).    
• Number  of  packages  and  size  of  cases  (in  inches  and  
centimetres).    
• Handling  and  cautionary  markings,  such  as  "This  Side  Up"  
or  "Use  No  Hooks",  in  English  and  in  the  language  of  the  
country  of  destination  (example  of  international  symbols  
below).    

 
• Port  of  entry.    
• Labels  for  hazardous  materials  (universal  symbols).    

Legibility  is  extremely  important  to  prevent  misunderstandings  and  


delays  with  transportation.  Letters  are  generally  stencilled  onto  
packages  and  containers  in  waterproof  ink.  Markings  should  appear  on  
three  faces  of  the  container,  preferably  on  the  top  and  on  the  two  
ends  or  the  two  sides.  Old  markings  must  be  completely  removed.  

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In  addition  to  port  marks,  customer  identification  code,  and  indication  


of  origin,  the  marks  should  include  the  package:  
• number    
• gross  and  net  weights  
• dimensions.    

If  more  than  one  package  is  being  shipped,  the  total  number  of  
packages  in  the  shipment  should  be  included  in  the  markings.  
Exporters  may  find  that  customs  regulations  regarding  freight  labelling  
are  strictly  enforced.  For  example,  most  countries  require  that  the  
country  of  origin  be  clearly  labelled  on  each  imported  package.  

Below  is  an  example  of  how  the  markings  on  a  typical  box  should  look:  

Figure  1:  Required  markings  on  a  box  to  be  exported  from  the  United  States  of  
America  to  Spain  

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Activity 9: Labelling and marking requirements of cargo are


documented in accordance with domestic and international
regulations, ADG Code and workplace requirements

Attention  to  detail  is  a  major  issue  when  forwarding  freight.  


Everything  must  be  meticulously  checked  so  no  mistakes  are  made  on  
the  documentation,  the  labelling  and  marking  of  the  freight  packaging.  
Consider  the  following  scenario  and  help  Winston  out  with  what  he  
forgot  to  include.  

Winston  was  forwarding  a  small  consolidated  load  of  glasses  and  


pottery  to  Africa  using  air  freight.  He  had  everything  in  order  so  it  
would  leave  the  warehouse  in  the  morning  to  be  on  the  plane  that  
night.  He  had  placed  on  the  carton  the  following.  
• Shipper's  mark.    
• Country  of  origin  (exporters’  country).    
• Weight  marking  (in  pounds  and  in  kilograms).    
• Number  of  packages  and  size  of  cases  (in  inches  and  centimetres).    
• Port  of  entry.    

When  it  arrived  the  customer  rang  very  angry,  explaining  that  a  lot  of  
the  goods  had  broken.  Winston  couldn’t  see  how  this  would  have  
happened.  Looking  at  the  list  above  what  do  you  think  he  missed  out  
labelling  on  the  box?  Record  you  answer  below.  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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How do I complete and file/store consignment


documentation in accordance with workplace
procedures including dangerous goods
declaration, where applicable?

There  is  a  large  amount  of  documentation  that  needs  to  be  completed  
for  the  forwarding  of  freight  to  take  place.  Accuracy  is  the  key  when  
completing  such  documentation.  Even  the  slightest  discrepancy  can  
hold  up  the  transportation  process.  When  filling  in  documentation  you  
must  pay  close  attention  to  detail  using  all  the  information  available  
about  the  goods  to  be  transported  and  be  honest  at  all  times.  If  you  
miss  out  on  things  such  as  declaring  all  the  types  of  dangerous  goods  
then  you  will  be  putting  lives  at  risk.    

An  accurate  record  must  be  kept  of  all  documentation  for  future  
reference  and  as  a  back-­‐up  copy  if  required.  When  filing  and  storing  
such  documentation  you  must  follow  your  workplace  policy  and  
procedures.  Use  a  methodical  approach  and  do  not  have  the  attitude  
that  you  will  get  to  it  later.  Keeping  all  records  in  order  is  an  essential  
requirement  of  being  a  freight  forwarder.    

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Activity 10: Complete and file/store documentation

Get  your  manager  or  supervisor  to  demonstrate  to  you  the  workplace  
requirements  for  storing  documentation.  Record  below  where  they  
are  to  be  stored.    

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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How do I consolidate freight taking into account


segregation requirements for dangerous goods
if applicable?

Packaging  and  shipping  goods  is  regulated  by  Australian  and  


International  law.  There  are  rules  governing  what  goods  can  travel  
together  and  what  needs  to  be  separated  for  transport.  Specific  goods  
are  banned  from  travelling  collectively  because  they  can  endanger  
other  goods  and  even  life.  That  is  why  all  items  sent  for  transport  need  
to  be  properly  labelled  to  ensure  that  the  regulations  are  correctly  
followed.  Below  is  a  real  example  of  what  can  happen  when  the  
regulations  are  ignored.  

Undeclared  dangerous  goods  described  as  "laundry  products"  almost  


caused  the  loss  of  a  passenger  aircraft.  Loaded  for  only  2  hours  they  
ruptured  from  their  packaging.  When  the  time  the  aircraft  landed  the  
floor  had  already  started  to  sag  from  the  heat  generated  by  a  fire.  It  
was  caused  by  a  mixture  of  a  liquid  hydrogen  oxidiser,  and  only  about  
12  kg  of  a  corrosive  solid.  The  goods  were  not  declared  as  dangerous  
goods  and  had  no  labels  or  orientation  markings  on  the  package.  
When  it  was  loaded  on  its  side  in  the  cargo  hold  the  liquid  leaked  onto  
the  corrosive  solid  causing  a  very  hot  fire.  It  was  estimated  by  aircraft  
accident  investigators  that  the  aircraft  could  have  broken  in  two  within  
another  10-­‐15  minutes.    

From  the  example  above  it  is  obviously  very  important  that  you  follow  
regulations  when  consolidating  different  goods  together.  Complete  
the  following  activity  to  access  these  regulations.  

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Activity 11: Consolidate freight taking into account


segregation requirements

Ask  your  manager  or  supervisor  to  show  you  how  to  access  the  
regulations  and  requirements  that  you  will  have  to  take  into  account  
when  consolidating  goods  to  determine  what  can  be  transported  
together.  Record  at  least  three  things  that  need  to  be  segregated  for  
transportation.  

There  is  feedback  on  this  activity  at  the  back  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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Additional
resources

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The  websites,  organisations  and  resources  listed  below  provide  more  


information  on  topics  relevant  to  unit  TDTA3198B  Consolidate  freight.  

Websites  
• Australian  Customs  Service    
http://www.customs.gov.au  
Information  for  freight  forwarders  and  the  requirements  
they  need  to  following  to  clear  exports  

• Australian  Maritime  Authority  


http://www.amsa.gov.au    

• Department  of  Infrastructure,  Transport,  Regional  Development  &  


Local  Government  
http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/transport/index.aspx  

• Civil  Aviation  Authority    


http://casa.gov.au/dg/  
Dangerous  goods  by  air  

• Chamber  of  Commerce  and  Industry  –  Western  Australia  


http://www.cciwa.com/default.aspx?MenuID=204  
Doing  international  trade  business  in  Australia  

• Australian  Customs  Service    


http://www.customs.gov.au/site/page.cfm?u=422                                            
Customs  guides  to  importing  and  exporting  

• Food  exporters  guide  to  government  services  


http://www.nfis.com.au/dmdocuments/food_exporters_guide.pdf  

• Australian  Government  –  Department  of  Agriculture,  Fisheries  and  


forestry  
http://www.affa.gov.au    
Quarantine  and  export  services  

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Feedback on activities
The  responses  provided  in  this  section  are  suggested  responses.  Because  
every  workplace  is  different,  your  responses  may  vary  according  to  your  
specific  workplace  procedures,  the  equipment  available  and  the  nature  of  the  
business.  

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Activity 1: Assess capability of different transport modes available


to the organisation against the proposed tasks

Cost  is  a  factor  when  looking  at  the  time-­‐frame  that  a  delivery  must  be  made  
within.  The  benefits  of  a  shorter  time  period  for  transport  must  be  weighed  
off  on  the  cost.  The  following  are  examples  of  the  type  of  transport  modes  
you  would  have  to  use  to  ensure  the  delivery  of  goods  within  the  required  
time-­‐frame.  

New  York  4  days  –  220kg  –  Air  freight  

London  in  4  weeks  –  1000kg  –  Sea  Freight  

Nearest  Capital  City  in  7  days  –  Either  rail  or  truck  

Activity 2: Evaluate individual consignment loads to identify


relevant information needed to combine or consolidate freight

You  will  need  to  pay  close  attention  to  make  sure  that  you  obtain  all  the  
details  so  you  can  estimate  if  certain  freight  can  be  consolidated  with  others.  
Having  a  list  of  all  the  details  you  are  required  to  find  out  in  front  of  you  will  
make  the  task  easier  so  you  don’t  forget  any  of  them.    

Activity 3: Analyse information to determine where opportunities


for freight consolidation exist

The  answers  that  you  should  circle  is  A.  and  B.  The  difference  is  3875kg.  

Joe  should  find  out  precisely  what  the  two  loads  consist  of.  You  should  never  
consolidate  dangerous  goods  unless  you  have  analysed  information  to  
determine  whether  they  are  safe  to  be  transported  together.  The  
consequences  of  Joe’s  actions  could  put  lives  in  danger  and  cause  damage  to  
the  freight.    

Activity 4: Make sure packaging requirements for consolidated


cargo conform to regulatory requirements

Other  factors  to  keep  in  mind  beside  breakage  when  packaging  goods  is:  
• weight  
• moisture  

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• theft.  

Activity 5: Ensure procedures for the loading of cargo are planned


in accordance with established industry practice and Australian
Dangerous Goods (ADG) Code

After  dangerous  goods  have  been  packed,  you  need  to  ensure  they  are  
marked  with  essential  information  which  includes:  

• the  proper  shipping  name    

• the  UN  number  

• labels  depicting  all  the  potential  hazards  of  the  contents  are  affixed.    

The  classification  of  dangerous  goods  include  the  following:  

• Class  1  Explosives  -­‐  explosive  substances,  explosive  articles,  pyrotechnic  


devices.  Includes  ammunition,  fireworks,  detonators  and  so  on.  
• Class  2  Gases  -­‐  transported  as  either  compressed,  liquefied,  refrigerated  
liquefied  or  gas  in  solution.  Includes  aerosols.  This  class  has  three  
divisions:    
– Division  2.1  -­‐  flammable  gases  (butane,  propane)    

– Division  2.2  -­‐  non-­‐flammable,  non-­‐toxic  gases  (oxygen,  liquid  nitrogen,  


compressed  air)    

– Division  2.3  -­‐  toxic  gases  (chlorine,  coal  gas).  

• Class  3  Flammable  liquids  -­‐  includes  liquids  with  a  boiling  point  of  35  
degrees  C  or  less  or  a  flash  point  of  60.5  degrees  C  or  less.  Examples  are  
petrol,  alcohol  and  so  on.  
• Class  4  Flammable  solids  -­‐  substances  liable  to  spontaneous  combustion  
and  substances  which,  in  contact  with  water,  emit  flammable  gases.  Class  
4  has  3  divisions:    
– Division  4.1  -­‐  flammable  solids  such  as  hexamine  solid  fuel  tablets  for  
camping  stoves;  self-­‐reactive  substances  and  desensitized  explosives.    

– Division  4.2  -­‐  substances  liable  to  spontaneous  combustion  under  the  
normal  conditions  encountered  in  air  transport  -­‐  such  as  Phosphorus  
which  burns  by  itself  when  exposed  to  air.    

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– Class  4.3  -­‐  substances  which  in  contact  with  water  emit  flammable  
gases.  "Dangerous  when  wet".  Examples  are  sodium,  zinc  particles  and  
so  on.    
• Class  5.1  Oxidising  substances  -­‐  substances  which  in  themselves  
are  not  necessarily  combustible,  but  which  by  yielding  oxygen  
may  cause  or  contribute  to  the  combustion  of  other  material.  An  
example  is  generators  which  produce  oxygen  by  chemical  
reaction.  
• Class  5.2  Organic  peroxides  -­‐  these  are  thermally  unstable  
substance  which  may  undergo  heat  generating,  self  accelerating  
decomposition  -­‐  which  may  be  explosive,  rapid,  sensitive  to  
impact  or  friction  or  react  dangerously  with  other  substances.  
Example  is  Hydrogen  Peroxide  
• Class  6.1  Toxic  substances  -­‐  those  substances  which  are  liable  to  
cause  death  or  injury  if  swallowed,  inhaled  or  absorbed  through  
the  skin.  Examples  are  pesticides  and  poisons.  
• Class  6.2  Infectious  substances  -­‐  those  known  to  contain  or  
reasonably  expected  to  contain  pathogens.  
• Class  7  Radioactive  material  
• Class  8  Corrosives  -­‐  substances  which,  in  the  event  of  leakage,  
can  cause  severe  damage  by  chemical  action  when  in  contact  
with  living  tissue  or  materially  damage  other  freight,  containers  
or  the  aircraft.  Examples  are  Mercury,  Battery  acids  and  so  on.    
• Class  9  Miscellaneous  -­‐  includes  magnetic  articles,  which  can  have  
an  impact  on  the  aircraft's  compass,  Internal  combustion  
engines,  dry  ice  (solid  carbon  dioxide)  and  so  on.  

For  ease  of  identification  of  dangerous  goods,  the  international  community  
has  created  a  classification  system.  Your  organisation  will  have  certain  
procedures  that  you  must  follow  depending  on  the  type  of  goods  being  
transported  when  it  comes  to  labelling.  The  most  important  factor  is  that  they  
are  securely  fixed  and  clearly  visible.  

Activity 6: Calculate proposed volumes and dimensions of


proposed consolidation

The  volume  of  the  bike  would  be  1.65m²  

If  you  consolidate  the  bike  with  the  car  the  volume  would  be  12.75m²  because  
the  car  is  11.1m²  

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TLIA3107C Consolidate freight

Activity 7: Match proposed consolidation against operational


capacity and capability of carrier

When  consolidating  freight  you  need  to  take  into  account  a  range  of  factors.  
You  cannot  put  together  freight  that  needs  to  arrive  at  different  times,  
doesn’t  quite  fit  or  exceeds  weight  limits  just  to  try  and  save  on  costs.  You  
should  be  aware  of:  
• time  in  transport    
• arrival  date  
• weight  of  load  
• dimensions  or  area  of  load  
• weight  restrictions  of  carrier  
• dimension  restrictions  of  carrier  
• dangerous  goods  regulations  
• cost.  

Activity 8: Prepare consignment documentation for consolidated


cargo

This  activity  will  take  some  time  but  it  is  very  beneficial  to  know  what  
documentation  you  have  to  prepare  as  a  freight  forwarder.  Ensure  you  spend  
the  time  to  become  confident  and  concise  so  you  can  complete  all  
documentation  competently.  Check  with  your  supervisor  or  manager  that  you  
are  doing  it  correctly.  Depending  on  what  is  required  you  will  be  preparing  
documentation  such  as  the:    
• commercial  invoice    
• bill  of  lading  
• consular  invoice  
• certificate  of  origin  
• inspection  certification  
• dock  receipt  and  warehouse  receipt  
• destination  control  statement  
• insurance  certificate  
• export  license  
• export  packing  list.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 51


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TLIA3107C Consolidate freight

Activity 9: Labelling and marking requirements of cargo are


documented in accordance with domestic and international
regulations, ADG Code and workplace requirements

Attention  to  detail  is  a  major  issue  when  forwarding  freight.  Everything  must  
be  meticulously  checked  so  no  mistakes  are  made  on  the  documentation,  the  
labelling  and  marking  of  the  freight  packaging.  Winston  forgot  to  put  on:    
• Handling  and  cautionary  international  markings,  such  as  "This  
Side  Up"  or  "Use  No  Hooks",  in  English  and  in  the  language  of  the  
country  of  destination.    

This  clearly  shows  to  all  who  are  going  to  deal  with  it  how  it  should  be  
handled.  

Activity 10: Complete and file/store documentation

What  documentation  you  are  to  complete  and  how  you  file  and  store  it  will  
rely  upon  your  workplace  policy  and  procedures.  These  details  are  essential  to  
know  as  a  freight  forwarder.  You  must  be  absolutely  clear  of  what  your  
workplace  expects  of  you  and  the  processes  they  have  in  place  which  you  
need  to  follow.    

Activity 11: Consolidate freight taking into account segregation


requirements

Ask  your  manager  or  supervisor  to  show  you  how  to  access  the  regulations  
and  requirements  that  you  will  have  to  take  into  account  when  consolidating  
goods.  It  is  very  important  you  take  into  account  the  segregation  of  
dangerous  goods  which  if  ignored  can  put  people’s  life  at  risk.  

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ADELG1025 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L May 2008