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22A The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Sun..

July 12,1981

No trains to catch for WW II rail builders DELHI — They came by car and drals; men at work assembling railway
they came by van to their 23rd reunion cars or repairing tracks; weekend breaks
at Delhi and Dyersville this weekend, in London, chow lines . . . pictures of
but none of these men who helped keep his buddies at work and at play.
the railroads running for t h e Allies in Jack quickly shuffled through the pile
World War II came by rail. That was the of pictures, talking as he went along:
irony for these surviving members of
Company A, 728th Railway Operating "This," he laughed, "looks like they
Battalion: you can't get here from there were ready for a big battle. Actually,
on a train anymore. they were going for a beer in Germany.
"One time, one of the cars derailed,"
Between 30 and 35 veterans of "A" Boston for the European Theater of he held up another picture, "and the
and their families are winding down Operations, where they served for two guard was thrown off. He hit a dog. A
three days of fun and nostalgia this years in England, France and Germany. farm girl came running out. They
morning, preparatory to heading back to The 728th was composed of four thought she wanted to look after the
Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee and Pennsyl­ companies, A, B, C and Headquarters, guard. She went for the dog."
vania, as well as parts of Iowa and its most of them seasoned railroad men.
neighboring states. Company A was for section men; B, the Wadsworth, 66, graduated from the
Dick and Marian Overman of Delhi roundhouse gang, and C, train and University of Iowa in 1941 with a
hosted this year's reunion, which was engine, brakemen and conductors, fire­ bachelor's degree in commerce. He took
officially headquartered in the Colonial men and engineers. a job with the Milwaukee Road a t
Motel at Dyersville. Jack Wadsworth of Waukon, a mem­ Savanna, 111. Later, he got a job in train
Friday was sort of a get-reacquainted ber of Company A, was "official" service with the Milwaukee at Dubuque.
day a t the motel. On Saturday the photographer for his company. An He enlisted in 1943 at the age of 28.
reunioners traveled to Delhi for a picnic expert photographer, he shot several
get-together a t the Overman home, hundred pictures, starting with basic Still single when he returned t o
followed by some pontoon boating on technical training at Clovis in 1943. He Waukon after the war, he had to register
Lake Delhi. They held their banquet and brought along to the reunion over 50 of with the draft board. Which was a good
business meeting Saturday evening at the enlarged photographs, to feed the thing, because that's how he met the
Ertl's restaurant in Dyersville. nostalgia of his former buddies. present Mrs. Wadsworth, who was a
It was a relatively quiet weekend for Jack recalls the company trained in clerk in the Selective Service office.
survivors of Company A, which origi­ England for almost a year, putting They were married in 1946 and have five
nally numbered about 200, quiet com­ together gondolas and boxcars so they children.
pared to what these former railroad men were ready for use when they got to
were doing in Europe nearly 40 years Jack worked for the state Highway
France. Jack helped draw up maps of Department for a year and then was with
ago. French railroads during the bombing of the Welfare Department from 1950 to
Railroad battalions played vital roles London. 1955, and with Iowa Blue Cross-Blue
in World Wars I and II. They served for In Germany, he said, there wasn't a Shield from 1955 t o 1968. He was
the last time in the Korean conflict. train running when they got there. He district manager at Wenatchee, Wash.,
Their purpose was to move ammunition, said the Americans more or less super­ of the Washington-Alaska Blue Cross-
food, fuel, etc., across war-torn coun­ vised the reconstruction of the German Blue Shield from 1968 until his retire­
tries, because railroads could move more railroads, traveling through Bavaria by ment in 1978.
in volume than any other source of motor car to check the facilities.
transportation. Wadsworth, who ended the war with Railroads played a tremendous part in
Company A went to France with the the rank of T / 5 instrument m a n / moving troops and war materiel across
b a t t a l i o n a f t e r D-Day a n d r e b u i l t surveyor, is high in his praise of the men the United States during World War II.
bombed railroad yards and bridges and of Company A, most of whom were But, most of the railroads are gone or
operated railroads that had been taken railroad section hands long before the going now and in response to a question,
over by the U.S. war started. Jack Wadsworth painted a bleak picture
"We used to try to lay out switches — not only for the future of railroads,
Railroad battalions were part of with stakes," he recalled. "These old but for the future of civilization.
Railway Grand Divisions, which oper­ section foremen would stand back with "Well, you know, if we have another
ated under Military Railway Service, their eye and look down the track. They war I don't think it will be the war we
each battalion sponsored by a U.S. wouldn't pay any attention to the stakes, knew," he said. "I think it will be a
railroad. The 728th was sponsored by see, and they could lay out a switch terrible, destructive war, an atomic war.
the L&N Railroad. The battalion, about better than we could." I don't think we'll use ground troops or
1,000 strong a t the start, took i t s Using his Zeiss Ikonta camera, Wads­ infantry.
Photo by Art Hough
technical training under the Santa Fe worth collected a variety of pictures of
J a c k W a d s w o r t h of W a u k o n d i s p l a y s o n e of s e v e r a l d o z e n p h o t o g r a p h s Railroad, in Clovis, N.M., spent a month "If they get this nuclear program
the war — from complete devastation of moving, it will be the end of us.
h e t o o k of t h e r e c o n s t r u c t i o n of r a i l r o a d s in E u r o p e d u r i n g W o r l d W a r II. at Fort Snelling, Minn., then sailed from bridges and cities to unscathed cathe­ "We won't need railroads."

Brewing beer was integral part


of Amana Colonies' early days
Editor's Note: Ted Heinze, a is an innovation of American brew­ high beer consumption was during a
native of Middle Amana, occasion­ eries. time of hard work for Amana
ally writes articles on historic as­ There were four breweries in the settlers. There was construction oi*
pects of the Amana Colonies. Colonies: one each in Amana, Mid­ residences in the seven villages,
dle Amana, Homestead and South factories and shops, and the digging
By Ted Heinze Amana. All the breweries had of a six-mile canal from the Iowa
Free-lance writer cellars that were dug into hillsides River.
THE AMANA COLONIES — and were located near the village ice Also, it is notable that beer was
W h i l e w i n e r i e s a b o u n d in t h e house or butcher shop. produced and consumed during the
Amana Colonies today, at one time The best known brewery was at entire time when the Colonies had
the settlement could boast of four Amana just east of the Meat Market. inspired religious leaders. Though,
b e e r breweries. The brewery was built into and over as in most religions, excessive use
The brewing of beer by the the hillside, and large hooks in the was denounced, beer drinking was
founders of the Colonies dates back ceiling on the main floor were used accepted and used as a natural part
to the earlier settlements of Upper, to suspend hoses so the beer of life in the Colonies.
Middle, Lower and New Ebenezer, mixture could flow from upper It is surprising that many resi­
in New York state near Buffalo, floors to a deep cellar for cooling dents of the Amanas did not know
following. the settlers' emigration and fermenting. The brewery was about the old breweries until about
from Germany. razed in the 1950s. 10 years ago when Paul and Emma
When the settlers moved into Figures on the beer production, Zimmerman of South Amana began
their new home in Iowa in the early taken from a register of U.S. marketing beer m a d e with t h e old-
1850s, the C o l o n i e s e s t a b l i s h e d breweries from 1876 to 1976, show time Amana recipes. The beer is
breweries because beer remained that the Colonies' breweries brewed in Wisconsin and distributed
m o r e palatable, possibly safer to produced approximately 62,000 gal­ in the Colonies under the name
drink than the local water and it did lons annually. This amounted to an " G e m e i n d e B r a u " and " C o l o n i e
supply some nourishment. average consumption of 35.3 gallons Brau."
It is believed that the two beer of beer per person, which is some­ This lack of knowledge about the
formulas used by the Amanas were what more than the current U.S. breweries is possible because they
developed in the old Ebenezer average of 24.3 gallons. However, operated from the 1850s until 1884,
breweries, rather than in Germany, the Colonies' beer consumption was when Iowa adopted a prohibition
because the formulas contain corn less than in most European coun­ law. The breweries were then closed
as an adjunct to the barley malt to tries, according to the U.S. Brewers and eventually abandoned. How­ An old photo shows the brewery at Amana before it was razed in the 1950s.
provide a percentage of the starches Association and Encyclopedia Brit- ever, for a time they were used to
that are converted into sugar during tanica. store communal wine used for
the brewing process. The use of corn It is notable that the Colonies' sacramental services.

'Concerts-in-the-park' On this date


In 1933, a new industrial code was established
to fix a minimum wage of 40 cents an hour in the
IOWA RUSIC INC.

planned at West Branch United States.


• ANNOUNCING: "PRODUCT OF THE MONTH" SPECIAL!
WEST BRANCH — The West Charles Gavin brass quintet; Aug. 6, if you live in one of these 16 Eastern
Branch Chamber of Commerce and
the National Park Service have
a surprise performance; Aug. 13, the
Ed Sarath jazz quartet; and Aug. 20, Iowa counties and normally pay a toll NOW! SUPER JULY SAVINGS!
scheduled six musical "concerts-in- West Branch Minstrels. charge to order a Gazette want ad . . . Plus Reduced Cooling and Heating Costs!
the-park" t o be offered free of
charge on consecutive Thursday With Rusco's revolutionary New
nights, beginning July 16, at the DIAL
Herbert Hoover National Historic
Site in West Branch. Coffee drinkers
The SUPER SEAL STORM DOOR
The concerts will be held at the Finland is the champion per
TOLL FREE Self-sealing all-weather Storm Door that seals like your
refrigerator door!
National Historic Site bandstand at capita coffee-consuming country in PRIVATE LOOK AT THESE GREAT FEATURES OF SUPER SEAL:
Parkside and Main streets. In the the world, gulping down about five Want Ad • MAGNETIC WEATHER SEAL • SELF-STORING SYSTEM
event of rain, the concerts will be cups a day for every man, woman • DRIP CAP-FOR CLEAN WINDOW • RUGGED FIBERGLASS SCREENS
held in the West Branch Town Hall
Number
and child. But the United States, • STRENGTH OF STEEL • MAR-RESISTANT
across the street from the band­ which averages less than half that 800-332-7976 • TEMPERED SAFETY GLASS • ADVANCED DESIGN
stand. amount per person, buys more • By 4:45 PM Day
All concerts begin at 7 p.m. The
schedule includes: July 16, West
coffee than anyone else; it pur­
chased some 1.2 million tons in
Preceding
Publication
'25 OFF SUPER SEAL STORM DOOR! • Choose yours
in exciting new
Branch Community Band; July 23, 1979.
Sweet Adelines Chorus; July 30, • 7:00 PM Friday
for Sunday
'25 OFF RUSCO'S NEW " R " DOOR! decorator colors

EXECUTIVE $ | 99 • 8 to 9 AM * Check everyday specials on super-saver Rusco windows.,. Plus


DRIVE PACIFIERS Saturday
for Monday
great values on the Complete RUSCO line!
COOL ^Hollywoo^Glasse^^^
J u m b o Playing Cards MATI/lEa Cancellations or cor-
CEDAR RAPIDS' Q U A L I T Y H O M E IMPROVEMENT C O M P A N Y
IN Your Car or Truck Invisible D o g Leash
HU I l V t « rections of want ads,

RUSIC
TOTAL AIR Hobo Cigar
CONDITIONING SERVICE. And Many More ^ or any other Gazette business, can­
. .and a whole lot morel not be accepted on the toll-free line. IOWA ImllVlrWILWii^J INC.
JIT/* AUT0&
Phone Orders Contract advertisers are requested to
HI V TRUCK CENTER
941 66th A v e . SW if 400 K I R K W O O D W Welcome call their regular account representa­ 801 3 3 r d A V E N U E S W • C E D A R RAPIDS • 364-0295
363-0229 (Off The Corner of Gilbert) Branch Stores in Ames tive on The Gazette number they nor-
4 Blocks West of TSC I O W A CITY 338-3330 and Dts Moines mally use.
22A The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Sun.. July 12,1981

No trains to catch for WW II rail builders DELHI — They came by car and drals; men at work assembling railway
they came by van to their 23rd reunion cars or repairing tracks; weekend breaks
at Delhi and Dyersville this weekend, in London, chow lines . . . pictures of
but none of these men who helped keep his buddies at work and at play.
the railroads running for t h e Allies in Jack quickly shuffled through the pile
World War II came by rail. That was the of pictures, talking as he went along:
irony for these surviving members of
Company A, 728th Railway Operating "This," he laughed, "looks like they
Battalion: you can't get here from there were ready for a big battle. Actually,
on a train anymore. they were going for a beer in Germany.
"One time, one of the cars derailed,"
Between 30 and 35 veterans of "A" Boston for the European Theater of he held up another picture, "and the
and their families are winding down Operations, where they served for two guard was thrown off. He hit a dog. A
three days of fun and nostalgia this years in England, France and Germany. farm girl came running out. They
morning, preparatory to heading back to The 728th was composed of four thought she wanted to look after the
Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee and Pennsyl­ companies, A, B, C and Headquarters, guard. She went for the dog."
vania, as well as parts of Iowa and its most of them seasoned railroad men.
neighboring states. Company A was for section men; B, the Wadsworth, 66, graduated from the
Dick and Marian Overman of Delhi roundhouse gang, and C, train and University of Iowa in 1941 with a
hosted this year's reunion, which was engine, brakemen and conductors, fire­ bachelor's degree in commerce. He took
officially headquartered in the Colonial men and engineers. a job with the Milwaukee Road a t
Motel at Dyersville. Jack Wadsworth of Waukon, a mem­ Savanna, 111. Later, he got a job in train
Friday was sort of a get-reacquainted ber of Company A, was "official" service with the Milwaukee at Dubuque.
day a t the motel. On Saturday the photographer for his company. An He enlisted in 1943 at the age of 28.
reunioners traveled to Delhi for a picnic expert photographer, he shot several
get-together a t the Overman home, hundred pictures, starting with basic Still single when he returned t o
followed by some pontoon boating on technical training at Clovis in 1943. He Waukon after the war, he had to register
Lake Delhi. They held their banquet and brought along to the reunion over 50 of with the draft board. Which was a good
business meeting Saturday evening at the enlarged photographs, to feed the thing, because that's how he met the
Ertl's restaurant in Dyersville. nostalgia of his former buddies. present Mrs. Wadsworth, who was a
It was a relatively quiet weekend for Jack recalls the company trained in clerk in the Selective Service office.
survivors of Company A, which origi­ England for almost a year, putting They were married in 1946 and have five
nally numbered about 200, quiet com­ together gondolas and boxcars so they children.
pared to what these former railroad men were ready for use when they got to
were doing in Europe nearly 40 years Jack worked for the state Highway
France. Jack helped draw up maps of Department for a year and then was with
ago. French railroads during the bombing of the Welfare Department from 1950 to
Railroad battalions played vital roles London. 1955, and with Iowa Blue Cross-Blue
in World Wars I and II. They served for In Germany, he said, there wasn't a Shield from 1955 t o 1968. He was
the last time in the Korean conflict. train running when they got there. He district manager at Wenatchee, Wash.,
Their purpose was to move ammunition, said the Americans more or less super­ of the Washington-Alaska Blue Cross-
food, fuel, etc., across war-torn coun­ vised the reconstruction of the German Blue Shield from 1968 until his retire­
tries, because railroads could move more railroads, traveling through Bavaria by ment in 1978.
in volume than any other source of motor car to check the facilities.
transportation. Wadsworth, who ended the war with Railroads played a tremendous part in
Company A went to France with the the rank of T / 5 instrument m a n / moving troops and war materiel across
b a t t a l i o n a f t e r D-Day a n d r e b u i l t surveyor, is high in his praise of the men the United States during World War II.
bombed railroad yards and bridges and of Company A, most of whom were But, most of the railroads are gone or
operated railroads that had been taken railroad section hands long before the going now and in response to a question,
over by the U.S. war started. Jack Wadsworth painted a bleak picture
"We used to try to lay out switches — not only for the future of railroads,
Railroad battalions were part of with stakes," he recalled. "These old but for the future of civilization.
Railway Grand Divisions, which oper­ section foremen would stand back with "Well, you know, if we have another
ated under Military Railway Service, their eye and look down the track. They war I don't think it will be the war we
each battalion sponsored by a U.S. wouldn't pay any attention to the stakes, knew," he said. "I think it will be a
railroad. The 728th was sponsored by see, and they could lay out a switch terrible, destructive war, an atomic war.
the L&N Railroad. The battalion, about better than we could." I don't think we'll use ground troops or
1,000 strong a t the start, took i t s Using his Zeiss Ikonta camera, Wads­ infantry.
Photo by Art Hough
technical training under the Santa Fe worth collected a variety of pictures of
J a c k W a d s w o r t h of W a u k o n d i s p l a y s o n e of s e v e r a l d o z e n p h o t o g r a p h s Railroad, in Clovis, N.M., spent a month "If they get this nuclear program
the war — from complete devastation of moving, it will be the end of us.
h e t o o k of t h e r e c o n s t r u c t i o n of r a i l r o a d s in E u r o p e d u r i n g W o r l d W a r II. at Fort Snelling, Minn., then sailed from bridges and cities to unscathed cathe­ "We won't need railroads."

Brewing beer was integral part


of Amana Colonies' early days
Editor's Note: Ted Heinze, a is an innovation of American brew­ high beer consumption was during a
native of Middle Amana, occasion­ eries. time of hard work for Amana
ally writes articles on historic as­ There were four breweries in the settlers. There was construction oi*
pects of the Amana Colonies. Colonies: one each in Amana, Mid­ residences in the seven villages,
dle Amana, Homestead and South factories and shops, and the digging
By Ted Heinze Amana. All the breweries had of a six-mile canal from the Iowa
Free-lance writer cellars that were dug into hillsides River.
THE AMANA COLONIES — and were located near the village ice Also, it is notable that beer was
W h i l e w i n e r i e s a b o u n d in t h e house or butcher shop. produced and consumed during the
Amana Colonies today, at one time The best known brewery was at entire time when the Colonies had
the settlement could boast of four Amana just east of the Meat Market. inspired religious leaders. Though,
b e e r breweries. The brewery was built into and over as in most religions, excessive use
The brewing of beer by the the hillside, and large hooks in the was denounced, beer drinking was
founders of the Colonies dates back ceiling on the main floor were used accepted and used as a natural part
to the earlier settlements of Upper, to suspend hoses so the beer of life in the Colonies.
Middle, Lower and New Ebenezer, mixture could flow from upper It is surprising that many resi­
in New York state near Buffalo, floors to a deep cellar for cooling dents of the Amanas did not know
following. the settlers' emigration and fermenting. The brewery was about the old breweries until about
from Germany. razed in the 1950s. 10 years ago when Paul and Emma
When the settlers moved into Figures on the beer production, Zimmerman of South Amana began
their new home in Iowa in the early taken from a register of U.S. marketing beer m a d e with t h e old-
1850s, the C o l o n i e s e s t a b l i s h e d breweries from 1876 to 1976, show time Amana recipes. The beer is
breweries because beer remained that the Colonies' breweries brewed in Wisconsin and distributed
m o r e palatable, possibly safer to produced approximately 62,000 gal­ in the Colonies under the name
drink than the local water and it did lons annually. This amounted to an " G e m e i n d e B r a u " and " C o l o n i e
supply some nourishment. average consumption of 35.3 gallons Brau."
It is believed that the two beer of beer per person, which is some­ This lack of knowledge about the
formulas used by the Amanas were what more than the current U.S. breweries is possible because they
developed in the old Ebenezer average of 24.3 gallons. However, operated from the 1850s until 1884,
breweries, rather than in Germany, the Colonies' beer consumption was when Iowa adopted a prohibition
because the formulas contain corn less than in most European coun­ law. The breweries were then closed
as an adjunct to the barley malt to tries, according to the U.S. Brewers and eventually abandoned. How­ An old photo shows the brewery at Amana before it was razed in the 1950s.
provide a percentage of the starches Association and Encyclopedia Brit- ever, for a time they were used to
that are converted into sugar during tanica. store communal wine used for
the brewing process. The use of corn It is notable that the Colonies' sacramental services.

'Concerts-in-the-park' On this date


In 1933, a new industrial code was established
to fix a minimum wage of 40 cents an hour in the
IOWA RUSIC INC.

planned at West Branch United States.


• ANNOUNCING: "PRODUCT OF THE MONTH" SPECIAL!
WEST BRANCH — The West Charles Gavin brass quintet; Aug. 6, if you live in one of these 16 Eastern
Branch Chamber of Commerce and
the National Park Service have
a surprise performance; Aug. 13, the
Ed Sarath jazz quartet; and Aug. 20, Iowa counties and normally pay a toll NOW! SUPER JULY SAVINGS!
scheduled six musical "concerts-in- West Branch Minstrels. charge to order a Gazette want ad . . . Plus Reduced Cooling and Heating Costs!
the-park" t o be offered free of
charge on consecutive Thursday With Rusco's revolutionary New
nights, beginning July 16, at the DIAL
Herbert Hoover National Historic
Site in West Branch. Coffee drinkers
The SUPER SEAL STORM DOOR
The concerts will be held at the Finland is the champion per
TOLL FREE Self-sealing all-weather Storm Door that seals like your
refrigerator door!
National Historic Site bandstand at capita coffee-consuming country in PRIVATE LOOK AT THESE GREAT FEATURES OF SUPER SEAL:
Parkside and Main streets. In the the world, gulping down about five Want Ad • MAGNETIC WEATHER SEAL • SELF-STORING SYSTEM
event of rain, the concerts will be cups a day for every man, woman • DRIP CAP-FOR CLEAN WINDOW • RUGGED FIBERGLASS SCREENS
held in the West Branch Town Hall
Number
and child. But the United States, • STRENGTH OF STEEL • MAR-RESISTANT
across the street from the band­ which averages less than half that 800-332-7976 • TEMPERED SAFETY GLASS • ADVANCED DESIGN
stand. amount per person, buys more • By 4:45 PM Day
All concerts begin at 7 p.m. The
schedule includes: July 16, West
coffee than anyone else; it pur­
chased some 1.2 million tons in
Preceding
Publication
'25 OFF SUPER SEAL STORM DOOR! • Choose yours
in exciting new
Branch Community Band; July 23, 1979.
Sweet Adelines Chorus; July 30, • 7:00 PM Friday
for Sunday
'25 OFF RUSCO'S NEW " R " DOOR! decorator colors

EXECUTIVE $ | 99 • 8 to 9 AM * Check everyday specials on super-saver Rusco windows.,. Plus


DRIVE PACIFIERS Saturday
for Monday
great values on the Complete RUSCO line!
COOL ^Hollywoo^Glasse^^^
J u m b o Playing Cards MATI/lEa Cancellations or cor-
CEDAR RAPIDS' Q U A L I T Y H O M E IMPROVEMENT C O M P A N Y
IN Your Car or Truck Invisible D o g Leash
HU I l V t « rections of want ads,

RUSIC
TOTAL AIR Hobo Cigar
CONDITIONING SERVICE. And Many More ^ or any other Gazette business, can­
. .and a whole lot morel not be accepted on the toll-free line. IOWA ImllVlrWILWii^J INC.
JIT/* AUT0&
Phone Orders Contract advertisers are requested to
HI V TRUCK CENTER
941 66th A v e . SW if 400 K I R K W O O D W Welcome call their regular account representa­ 801 3 3 r d A V E N U E S W • C E D A R RAPIDS • 364-0295
363-0229 (Off The Corner of Gilbert) Branch Stores in Ames tive on The Gazette number they nor-
4 Blocks West of TSC I O W A CITY 338-3330 and Dts Moines mally use.