_____________________________________________________________ DRAFT HDFS 295: Foundations of Gerontology, Fall 2010 (04/20/10) _____________________________________________________________

Instructor: Class Meetings: Credits: Office Hours: Blackboard: Email: Phone/Fax.: Mailing Address: Jeanne L. Shea, Ph.D, Associate Professor June 28-July 30, TWR, face-to-face course, 5:00-8:00 pm 3 credits, 9 contact hours per week, 45 contact hours total Thursdays 8:00 pm, directly following class https://bb.uvm.edu Use Messages in Blackboard for this course to email me Phone: 802-656-3884, Fax: 802-656-4406 Department of Anthropology, 515 Williams Hall, 72 Univ. Place, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 Course Description This course provides an introduction to foundations in gerontology or the study of aging and the elderly in interdisciplinarly perspective. The course is divided into 5 units: I. Introduction, II. The Biological and Physiological Context of Aging, III. The Psychologic al Context of Aging, IV. The Social Context of Aging, and V. The Societal Context of Aging. In the course, we explore social theories of aging and social science approaches to the study of the elderly; diversity in physical, cognitive, and mental health in elderly populations, strategies for prevention and chronic disease management; diverse cultural meanings and customs associated with aging; impacts of gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status; dynamics of intimate relationships, social support, living arrangements, caregiving, receiving care, and bereavement; and social policies and programs related to aging and the elderly. The course will meet face-to-face in the evenings three days a week.. Guided by a UVM faculty member with expertise in psychological and medical anthropology and aging in cross-cultural perspective, the course gives students the opportunity to read cutting-edge readings in social gerontology, take in lectures and films on the social study of aging, reflect upon and discuss these readings, lectures, and film in interactive class discussions, learn how to do ethnographic interviews and conduct participant observation, do some interviews and engage in participant observation with elders and caregivers in the community, and relate this experiential learning back to the readings, lectures, films, and class discussions in the course through research reports and a final term paper. Assignments are designed to meet the following learning objectives:   To critically analyze, write about, discuss, and research issues, theories, and research findings related to aging. To explore the role of social, cultural, economic and political forces in shaping aging, examine examples of human variation and commonality, and question normalizing discourses about the nature of aging.

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To develop and improve our reading, research, communication, and writing skills. To discuss and write about our own responses to readings, class discussions, course lectures, and films, in order to draw new creative connections and generate questions and critique. To practice peer-to-peer dialogue as part of learning what it means to be part of a research community engaged in dynamic and creative intellectual interchange. To develop skills of reflexivity and personal and social reflection as a tool for reading, analysis, research, writing, and peer review. To develop a habit of regularly recording one’s thoughts and reflections to learn what you think, share ideas and get feed back, and free working memory for critical and synergistic processes (as well as reduce stress). To learn to view and use writing as a process rather than just product and to feel that your writing is not you; rather it is a tool for thinking and communicating with various audiences. To learn how to conduct ethnographic interviews and participant observation. To identify research subjects, settings, topics and approaches that optimally use our own research interests, skills, and passions. To relate findings from experiential research back to the readings, lectures, films and discussions in the course. To learn how to research and write an excellent term paper engaging a research topic related to central issues in the course. Professor Profile

Member of the faculty at the University of Vermont since 1998. Focus on cultural, medical, and psychological anthropology, culture, health, the lifecycle, aging, gender, and Chinese culture. Ph.D. (1998) and M.A. (1994) in Anthropology, Harvard University. B.A. (1989) in Asian Studies, Dartmouth College. Multiple years of fieldwork in China and Montréal.Grew up in rural northern Vermont. Enjoys reading, travel, interviewing people about their life experiences, hiking, gardening, and spending time with her husband, daughter, family, and friends. Assigned Work Assignments, Due Dates, and Grade Distribution Class participation (c.p.) Healthy Elder Interview, Participant Observation, and Report Relating to Course Readings, Lectures, Films, and Discussions Frail Elder Interview, Participant Observation, and Reading, homework, attendance, & class discussions throughout summer session Tues., July 7 by or before 5:00 pm, posted to Class Blog on BB 30% 20%

Wed., July. 14 by or before 5:00 pm, posted to Class Blog on BB

20%

Report Relating to Course Readings, Lectures, Films, and Discussions Caregiver for the Elderly Interview and Report Relating to Course Readings, Lectures, Films, and Discussions Final Term Paper on Semester Project Relating Interviews, Participant Observations, Assigned Readings, Course Lectures, Films, and Discussions, and Outside Scholarly Articles Assigned Readings Book (Required):

Wed., July 21 by or before 5:00 pm, posted to Class Blog on BB

10%

Fri., July 30 by or before 12:00 noon, posted to Class Blog on BB

20%

Nancy R. Hooyman and H. Asuman Kiyak, Social Gerontology: A Multidisciplinary Perspective, Ninth Edition, New York: Allyn and Bacon/Pearson, 2010. Online Materials (Required): TBA, to be provided on Blackboard. Some Supplemental Readings (Optional, Not Required, Student May Read Portions If Interested To Help Them With Their Final Term Paper) John C. Cavanaugh and Susan Krauss Whitbourne, Gerontology: An Interdisciplinary Perspective, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. Silverman, Myrna; Nutini, Jean; Musa, Donald; Schoenberg, Nancy E.; and Albert, Steven M.. “Is It Half Full or Half Empty? Affective Responses to Chronic Illness,” Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, Sept. 2009(24:3):291-306. Nummela, Olli; Sulander, Tommi; Rahkonen, Ossi; and Uutela, Antti. “The Effect of Trust and Change in Trust on Self-Rated Health: A Longitudinal Study Among Aging People,” Archives of Gerontology & Geriatrics, Nov. 2009(49:3):339-342. Hsu, Hui-Chuan; Ting, Yu-Shan; Jiang, Ting-Wen; Chien, Ming-Chih; and Chien, ChihHsin. “Autonomy and the Acceptance of Long Term Care,” Educational Gerontology, Dec. 2009(35:11): 949-962. Iecovich, Esther; Carmel, Sara; Bachner, and Yaacov G.. “Where They Want to Die: Correlates of Elderly Persons’ Preferences for Death Site,” Social Work in Public Health, Nov./Dec. 2009(24:6):527-542.

Stein, Gary L.; Sherman, Patricia A.; and Bullock, Karen. “Educating Gerontologists for Cultural Proficiency in End-Of-Life Care Practice,” Educational Gerontology, Dec. 2009(35:11):1008-1025. Jay Sokolovsky, ed., The Cultural Context of Aging: Worldwide Perspectives, Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 2009. Description of Assignments ●Class Participation (30% of overall grade): Attendance and prompt arrival at all class meetings. Completion of assigned readings prior to class. Considerate, respectful conduct during class and in any online interactions. Attentive listening to the teaching staff and students in the class and regular active oral participation in class discussions, contributing questions, comments, examples, and analyses in class as appropriate. Giving and receiving peer feedback on oral and written assignments. ●Semester Project Interviews, Participant Observations, and Analytical Reports: Conduct interviews with two elderly person(s), one quite healthy and the other frail, and with one caregiver for an elderly person, conduct participant observation and observe interactions in two social settings involving old people, one setting with quite healthy elder(s) and one setting with frail elder(s), and record in the class blog your findings from each exercise relating what you learned to assigned readings and lectures/films/ discussions in this course, as follows: -Healthy Elder Interview, Participant Observation, and Report: Conduct and report to class blog on an interview and participant observation with an elderly person who is relatively healthy and does not need regular assistance with activities of daily living and may be still quite active with household duties, paid work and/or volunteer service. In the interview, ask the elder about their experience of aging and what they could share with you about their experience of physical, mental, emotional, interpersonal, social, economic, and cultural aspects of aging in their lives. In the participant observation, observe the same elder in a social context of their choice (e.g., interacting with family at home, or with friends at a community function). Throughout your blog entry, relate what you learned to themes in your assigned readings and lectures/films/discussions in this course, citing the specific course materials upon which you draw. Report results in manner that protects the elder’s anonymity. Post to Class Blog on Blackboard (20% of overall grade) -Frail Elder Interview, Participant Observation, and Report: Conduct and report to class blog on an interview and participant observation with an elderly person who has substantial health problems and is receiving regular assistance with activities of daily living. In the interview, ask the elder about their experience of aging and what they could share with you about their experience of physical, mental, emotional, interpersonal, social, economic, and cultural aspects of aging in their

lives. In the participant observation, observe the same elder in a social context in which an elderly person(s) with health problems is/are receiving assistance with activities of daily living (e.g., in-home kin care, assisted living facility, nursing home, hospital, or hospice). Throughout your blog entry, relate what you learned to themes in your assigned readings and lectures/films/discussions in this course, citing the specific course materials upon which you draw. Report results in manner that protects the elder’s anonymity. Post to Class Blog on Blackboard (20% of overall grade) -Caregiver for the Elderly Interview and Report: Conduct and report to class blog on an interview with someone caregiving for an elderly person(s) who needs regular assistance with activities of daily living. Ask them about their experience of caregiving and the challenges and satisfactions involved (-may be but does not need to be a person caregiving for the frail elder you interviewed above). Throughout your blog entry, relate what you learned to themes in your assigned readings and lectures/films/discussions in this course, citing the specific course materials upon which you draw. Report results in manner that protects their anonymity. Post to Class Blog on Blackboard (10% of overall grade) ●Final Term Paper on Semester Project synthesizing and critically analyzing what you learned through your series of interviews and participant observations (above) and relating this experiential learning what you learned from our assigned readings, our lectures/films/discussions in this course, and at least four additional scholarly peerreviewed chapters or articles. Body of paper should be 10-12 pages, double-spaced, 12 point font, with one-inch margins; in addition, a cover page, thesis/outline/table of contents page, and an annotated bibliography in AAA format should be included; all materials should be attached in an rtf to the class blog on Blackboard. See Tips for Writing and Evaluating Papers and the AAA style guide in Course Materials on Blackboard. (20% of overall grade) Notes on Critical Analysis and Constructive Feedback What is critical analysis? Critical analysis involves various ways of taking ownership of the information you encounter by registering your active engagement with that information. While the ability to formulate an accurate summary of the main points made in the readings or lectures is vitally important, critical analysis goes beyond summarization. Critical analysis can be done in various ways, including placing information into some broader context (e.g., historical, social, cultural, political, economic, regional, global, or theoretical), breaking it down into underlying assumptions, assessing the perspective from which it is coming, relating it to other information or experiences from outside the class, comparing and contrasting the ideas or findings that were presented by different sources, synthesizing different pieces of the puzzle into a new combination, offering new examples that illustrate a point made, questioning the logic or evidential support of points that were made, questioning the way in which an idea was summarized or how a culture or practice

was represented, finding contradictions between different statements made, tracing the broader significance or implications, and/or raising additional related questions, etcetera. What is constructive feedback? Learning how to give and receive constructive feedback is an important part of developing as a participant in the scholarly community. In essence, scholarship is an ongoing dialogue, involving the creation of scholarly work, responses from the scholarly community, and further scholarly creations, all within the context of a community of shared concepts and methods. When responding to the work of others, it is important to comment respectfully on both the strengths and contributions and the weaknesses and limitations of that work in anthropological perspective. When receiving feedback, it is important to separate one’s sense of self from the products of one’s work and to listen and learn from the responses of anthropologically-informed peers and mentors. Course Schedule: Part I. Introduction Tues., June 29 Orientation and Introduction to Social Gerontology ●Readings due [42 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Part I: Introduction, pp. 1-2, and Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 1. The Growth of Social Gerontology, pp. 3-42 ●Discussion: Introduce yourself, your goals in the course, and any questions you have for the Professor. ● Watch Film: Number Our Days (1 hour, asynchronous) ●Discussion: Discuss the film and relate to the readings and your interests, questions, and experiences. Wed., June 30 Social and Cultural Variation in Aging ●Readings due [61 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 2. Aging in Other Countries and across Cultures in the United States, pp. 43-66, and Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 14. The Resilience of Elders of Color, pp. 590-638 ● Lecture on Conducting Ethnographic Interviews With Elderly Persons About their Experiences with Aging and on Conducting Participant Observations on Social Interactions in Settings With Elderly Persons ●Group Q/A: Ask Professor and your classmates any questions you have concerning the readings for today and about the assignment of interviewing and elderly person about their experience of aging and read and comment on two other students’ blog entries ●Homework: Complete online IRB Training on Ethics of Working With Human Subjects Part II. The Biological and Physiological Context of Social Aging Thurs., July 1 Physical Aging and Its Social Consequences ●Readings due [46 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Part II: Introduction, pp. 67-69, and Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 3. The Social Consequences of Physical Aging, pp. 70-113 ●Class discussion, part 1: Discussion of the social consequences of physical aging.

●Class discussion, part 2: Discuss how you will identify potential elderly persons and a caregiver who you can ask for an interview and settings with old people which you can inquire about doing participant observations, and begin process of contacting those person(s) and setting(s) to ask them if they would be willing. ●Homework: Over the weekend, interview a relatively healthy elderly person (age 65+) who does not require assistance with Activities of Daily Living about their experience of aging – ask what they would be able to share with you about their experience of physical, mental, emotional, interpersonal, social, economic, and cultural aspects of aging in their lives. Jot down notes on what they tell you as you interview them and type them up right afterward. Add/Drop Deadline Tues., July 6 Workshop on Drafts of Healthy Elder Report ●Readings due [56 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 4. Managing Chronic Diseases and Promoting Well-Being in Old Age, pp. 114-170 ●Lecture on Promoting Well-Being and Managing Disease. ●Workshop on Your Interview Transcripts, Fieldnotes, and Drafts of Your Healthy Elder Report Part III. The Psychological Context of Social Aging Wed., July 7 Cognitive Functioning in Old Age ●Readings due [36 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Part III: Introduction, pp. 171-173 Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 5. Cognitive Changes with Aging, pp. 174-207 ●Watch film on cognitive function in elderly and discuss in light of readings for today. ●Projects due: Report on Healthy Elder Interview and Participant Observation due – Post to Class Blog by 5:00 pm. Without giving their name or otherwise revealing their identity, write up a report on your findings from the interview you did and how it relates to our assigned readings/lectures/discussions/film(s) so far in the course, and post it to the Class Blog. ●Class discussion, part 1: Discuss what you found in your Healthy Elder Project. ●Class discussion, part 2: Discuss your plans and progress on contacting an elderly person for your second interview and participant observation, this time with a frail elder (which you should conduct before Monday) and any questions or concerns you may have about finding a research subject, the interview, the participant observation, or the report. Thurs., July 8 Mental Health and Personality in Old Age ●Readings due [62 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 6. Personality and Mental Health in Old Age, pp. 208-270. ●Lecture and class discussion on personality and mental health in old age. ●Homework: Over the weekend, do an interview and participant observation with a frail elderly person (age 65+) who requires assistance with Activities of Daily Living. Jot down notes on what they tell you as you interview and observe them and type them up right afterward.

Part IV. The Social Context of Aging Tuesday, July 13 Workshop on Drafts of Frail Elder Report ●Readings due [30 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Part IV: Introduction, pp. 301-304 Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 8. Social Theories of Aging, pp. 305-332. ●Lecture on Social Theories of Aging. ●Workshop on Interview Transcripts and Drafts of Frail Elder Report. Wed., July 14 Social Supports in Old Age ●Readings due [51 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 9. The Importance of Social Supports: Family, Friends, Neighbors, and Communities, pp. 333-384. ●Lecture and discussion on social supports in old age. ●Discuss your plans and progress on contacting caregiver for an interview and participant observation (which you should conduct before Monday) and any questions or concerns you may have about finding a research subject, the interview, the participant observation, or the report. ●Projects due: *Report on Your Frail Elder Interview and Participant Observation due – Post to Class Blog by 5:00 pm. Thurs., July 15 Informal Caregiving ●Readings due [43 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 10. Opportunities and Challenges of Informal Caregiving, pp. 385-428. ●Lecture and discussion on informal caregiving. ●Homework: Over the weekend, do an interview and participant observation with someone who is caregiving for a frail elderly person (age 65+) who requires assistance with Activities of Daily Living. Jot down notes on what they tell you as you interview them and type them up right afterward. Tues., July 20 Workshop on Drafts of Caregiver Report ●Readings due [74 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 11. Living Arrangements and Social Interactions, pp. 429-473. Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 7. Love, Intimacy, and Sexuality in Old Age, pp. 271-300. ●Lecture and discussion on living arrangements, social interactions, and love, intimacy, and sexuality in old age ●Workshop on Interview Transcripts and Drafts of Caregiver Report. Wed., July 21 Productive Aging ●Readings due [64 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 12. Productive Aging: Paid and Nonpaid Roles and Activities, pp. 474-538. ●Lecture and discussion on productive aging. ●Projects due: *Report on Your Caregiver Interview due – Post to Class Blog by 5:00 pm. ●Class discussion: Brainstorm for your final term papers – what will likely be your analytical focus and thesis statement for your final term paper, given the interviews and participant observations you have done so far and how they intersect with our assigned readings, lectures, films, and discussions? Come with some citations of relevant

scholarly peer-reviewed articles and/or chapters or books that you propose to use in writing your final term paper, and develop an annotated bibliography. Thurs., July 22 Death, Dying , Bereavement, and Widowhood ●Readings due [50 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 13. Death, Dying, Bereavement, and Widowhood, pp. 539-589 ●Lecture, film, and discussion on death, dying, and bereavement. Part V. The Societal Context of Aging Tues., July 27 Aging and Social Policy ●Readings due [44 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Introduction to Part V, pp. 671-673 Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 16. Social Policies to Address Social Problems, pp. 674715 ●Lecture and discussion on social policy and programs for the elderly. ●Post to class blog by 5:00 pm today: Post a rough draft of your final paper including thesis statement, detailed outline (argument- and evidence-based), at least several pages of the body, and an annotated bibliography. ●Homework: Read and comment on two classmates’ rough drafts based on the partnerships that we assign in class. Wed., July 28 Policies and Programs: Health and Long-Term Care ●Readings due [36 pages]: Hooyman and Kiyak, Chapter 17. Health and Long-Term Care Policy and Programs, pp. 716-752 ●Lecture and discussion on long term care policies and programs. Thurs., July 29 Workshop on Drafts of Final Term Papers ● Workshop on Drafts of Final Term Papers Fri., July 30 Final Term Paper due posted to BB Class Blog by 12:00 noon

Guidelines for Contacting the Professor   Seek me out whenever you need help. Due to other commitments, I may not be able to help you immediately, but I will be glad to help you as soon as I can. Asynchronous email is great for quick questions requiring a brief response. If a dialogue is what you need (i.e., the response to the question will result in more questions/comments from you, you are having problems, etc.), a synchronous discussion is much more suitable, and we can set up an appointment to chat online. Because I have many students to serve, please not email questions for which answers are available in the syllabus, on Blackboard, in your readings, dictionaries or glossaries, or from a reference librarian. These emails will not be answered. Professor Shea’s online office hours: My office hours are Thursdays 8:00-9:00 pm directly after class. Students are welcome to drop in during office hours, or if you know ahead of time that you will be coming to online office hours, I encourage you to

make an appointment to reserve a time slot. If you cannot make those times, we can try to make an appointment for another time. Instead of regular email, please use the Blackboard message function to email me about this course. Please note the course, your name, phone number, email address, the date and time, and a brief description of the issue. Course Policies

This section addresses course policies to ensure a positive and fair learning environment and to make sure that everyone has a clear understanding of course expectations. Preparation: Assigned readings should completed on time. Inadequate preparation will impair your ability to perform well in the class. Class lectures will assume completion of assigned readings. It is your responsibility to make sure to complete all of the readings in a timely fashion. Attendance: Attendance at each class meeting is crucial to your ability to do well in this course. Unexcused absences will bring down the student's class participation grade. If you do need to be absent, with or without an excused reason, please touch base with the Professor via a brief email as soon as you can, putting in the subject line of the email: Class Absence, your name, and the date you were absent. It is your responsibility to make up any content that you miss due to absence from class. Accommodations for disabilities, religious holidays, or travel for university teams: An important part of your responsibilities as a college student is to inform your instructors in a timely manner of any documented disabilities, scheduling conflicts, religious obligations, university team competitions, medical problems, work obligations, or family duties that may affect your ability to complete your coursework. If you need accommodations, you must notify the professors about them with written documentation by the end of our first full week of CE summer class. If a new condition arises, send this documentation in immediately. If unexpected health problems, physical or mental or emotional difficulties, scheduling conflicts, or personal, work, or family emergencies arise, you should contact the Professor as soon as you possible if these challenges may affect your ability to carry out your responsibilities in the course. In addition, please don’t be shy to seek guidance from the staff at the Office of Continuing Education. We all need a hand sometimes, and it is a sign of strength to recognize that we are struggling and reach out for help. Conduct: All members of the class are expected to be attentive and considerate, to work together to create a positive and invigorating learning environment, and to treat each other with respect and compassion. In online class contexts such as Blackboard, students should observe appropriate online etiquette, treat classmates and instructors and their work with respect, and refrain from flaming and other online misconduct. Inappropriate conduct will bring down the student's class participation grade, and students who continue to engage inappropriate conduct may be required to leave the virtual classroom and/or be disenrolled from the course.

Late assignments and make-ups: Late assignments cannot be accepted, extensions cannot be granted, and make-ups cannot be given without documentation of a serious health problem, family emergency, religious obligation, or other excused reason. Please mark your calendars and set your alarm clocks carefully, and please let us know if you are experiencing difficulty as soon as you can, whether or not you think that it is related to an excused reason. Unexcused late assignments will be marked down by a full letter grade per day late (e.g., one to twenty-four hours late, an A- becomes a B-). Plagiarism and cheating: Plagiarism and cheating hamper a person's ability to learn and grow and create original work, and they stunt a group's ability to maintain fairness, honesty, and trust. Please familiarize yourself with proper citation practices and definitions of plagiarism and cheating. In your oral and written work for the course, make sure to cite your sources and to indicate when you are quoting or paraphrasing a source. During quizzes, you must not look at other people’s quizzes or allow others to look at your quiz or in any other way share answers to a quiz. It is important to be aware that violations can result in serious consequences, and sanctions may include a failing grade on the assignment, a failing grade of XF for the course, and/or suspension or dismissal from the university. If you any questions concerning the line between doing your own work and copying the work of others, please do not hesitate to ask. For more information on academic integrity, see http://www.uvm.edu/~uvmppg/ppg/student/acadintegrity.pdf. Although it is painful, we do turn students in for lack of academic integrity. Plagiarism, copying, and cheating will not be tolerated. [Note: This syllabus is provisional and may be subject to modification by the professor during the course of the semester in the event of unexpected opportunities or unforeseen challenges encountered by the class.]
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Welcome to the course! Best wishes for a fulfilling summer session! 

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