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DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROJECT REPORT 2009

LIST OF TABLES

TABLE NAME Pg.


no.
1.Employees’ work experience 51

2.Trainees attended 52

3.Number of training programme attended so far. 53

4.Improvement in performance after training 54

5.Duration of training programme. 55

6.Recommended by department head/supervisor 56


7.Training opportunities availed 57

8.Quality of the training programme received. 58

9.Reflection on the organization’s budget 59

10.Considering the legal requirements. 60

11.Considering KSA while assessing training needs 61

12.Considering mission, objectives, cultural changes and customer 62

orientation in training needs.


13.Organization’ social responsibilities and respect for diversity reflected 63
in training needs

14Training resources coordinated through the following ways 64

15.Cost is considered in the selection of training 65

16.Methods used to track training costs 66

17.Organization’s capacity to meet chosen training and development 67

needs.
18.Future training and development needs communicated to 68

19.Training programmes and opportunities –sources 69

20Subscriptions to training and development journals 70

21.Positions within the organization accountable for overseeing and 71

coordinating training and development

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22.Assessment process for immediate training and individual 72


development needs

LIST OF CHARTS

CHART NAME Pg. no.

1.Employees’ work experience 51

2.Trainees attended 52

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3.Number of training programme attended so far. 53

4.Improvement in performance after training 54

5.Duration of training programme. 55

6.Recommended by department head/supervisor 56

7.Training opportunities availed 57

8.Quality of the training programme received. 58

9.Reflection on the organization’s budget 59

10.Considering the legal requirements. 60

11.Considering KSA while assessing training needs 61

12.Considering mission, objectives, cultural changes and customer orientation 62


in training needs.
13.Organization’ social responsibilities and respect for diversity reflected in 63
training needs

14Training resources coordinated through the following ways 64

15.Cost is considered in the selection of training 65

16.Methods used to track training costs 66

17.Organization’s capacity to meet chosen training and development needs. 67

18.Future training and development needs communicated to 68

19.Training programs and opportunities –sources 69

20Subscriptions to training and development journals 70

21.Positions within the organization accountable for overseeing and 71


coordinating training and development
22.Assessment process for immediate training and individual 72
development needs

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DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROJECT REPORT 2009

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DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROJECT REPORT 2009

CHAPTER 1:
INTRODUCTION
1.1 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY

A study on “the effectiveness of Training and Development


programme for employees in Sreekandapuram Multispeciality Hospital” is
to identify as to what extend this programme is effective on employees
performance in this organization.

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DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROJECT REPORT 2009

Hospital industry is an important component of the value chain in Indian


Healthcare industry rendering services and recognized as healthcare delivery
segment of the healthcare industry, which is growing at an annual rate of 14%.
The size of the Indian healthcare industry is estimated at Rs. 1,717 billion in
2007. It is estimated to grow by 2012 to Rs. 3,163 billion at 13% CAGR. The
private sector accounts for nearly 80% of the healthcare market, while public
expenditure accounts for 20%.

Training is required:-

• To improve the current job performance of employees


• To familiarize employees with the policies and procedures of the
organization.
• To enhance the creativity, adaptability and versatility of the employees
and to facilitate learning at the work place
• To prepare employees for future job.
• To help employees manage their careers.
• To maintain knowledgeable work force.
• To gain competitive advantage through a knowledgeable work force.
• To promote organizational growth through individual growth.

The quality of development opportunities is crucial. It will be important to


raise the level of awareness and knowledge about professional development and
what is available, what is effective and how it is planned and evaluated. By
auditing employees past experiences it is easier to evaluate the effectiveness of
the programme. No organization has a choice of whether to train its employees
or not, the only choice is that of methods. The primary concern of an
organization is its viability, and hence its efficiency. There is a continuous

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DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROJECT REPORT 2009

environmental pressure for efficiency, and if the organization does not respond
to this pressure, it may find itself rapidly losing whatever share in the market.
Training and development programme imparts skills and efficiency and be able
to cope up with pressures of changing environment. The viability of an
organization depends to a considerable extend on the skills of different
employees.

This study provides an overview on the systematic development of the


knowledge, skills and attitudes required by an employee to perform adequately
a given task or job. Training refers to efforts that help enhance employee skills
for carrying out the present job.

1.2 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

Training is must for every individual when he enters into the


organization. Even though the candidate has experience, he also should get
training regarding the organization culture, values and beliefs. Due to this,
training programme plays a key role in every organization. This study is carried
out to identify the effectiveness of Training and Development programme
provided to the employees in the organization.

1.3 NEED AND IMPORTANCE OF STUDY

The study was conducted in Sreekandapuram Multispeciality Hospital


Mavelikara, Alapuzha Dt to know whether their employees are satisfied with
the present Training and Development programme. It was conducted to identify
effectiveness of Training and Development programme provided to the
employees in the organization, so as to improve the employee performance,

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DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROJECT REPORT 2009

guide them in career upliftment leading to organizational growth and


development.

1.4 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

The main objective of doing this project is to study employee attitude


regarding the training programme and the benefits of the Training and
Development programme. The following were the objectives considered for the
study.

1. To study the various Training and development programme in the


organization.

2. To identify the effectiveness of Training and Development programme


provided for employees.

3. To fulfill the learners’ objective.

4. To determine the major factors influencing the effectiveness of Training


and Development programme.

5. To find out the problems involved in measuring the training effectiveness


and making suggestions for improvement

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CHAPTER 2:
INDUSTRY
PROFILE
INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITAL INDUSTRY

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Combining medical technology, Training and Development programme


and the human touch, the hospitals administrates care and security around the
clock, responding to the needs of millions of people-from newborns to the
critically ill too.

Definition of hospital

“An institution operating under the supervision of a licensed physician

Primarily for the care and treatment of injured and sick persons confined

as inpatients, having organized facilities on the premises for diagnosis,

major surgery and 24 hour-a-day nursing services but not primarily a

place” .

HISTORY

In ancient cultures, religion and medicine were linked. The earliest known
institutions aiming to provide cure were Egyptian temples. Greek temples
dedicated to the healer-god Asclepius might admit the sick, who would wait for
guidance from the god in a dream. The Romans adopted his worship. Under his
Roman name Æsculapius, he was provided with a temple (291 BC) on an island
in the Tiber in Rome, where similar rites were performed. The Sinhalese (Sri
Lankans) are perhaps responsible for introducing the concept of dedicated
hospitals to the world. According to the Mahavamsa, the ancient chronicle of
Sinhalese royalty written in the 6th century A.D., King Pandukabhaya (4th
century BC) had lying-in-homes and hospitals (Sivikasotthi-Sala) built in
various parts of the country. This is the earliest documentary evidence we have
of institutions specifically dedicated to the care of the sick anywhere in the
world. Mihintale Hospital is the oldest in the world. Ruins of ancient hospitals
in Sri Lanka are still in existence in Mihintale, Anuradhapura and Medirigiriya.

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Institutions created specifically to care for the ill also appeared early in India.
King Ashoka is said to have founded at least 18 hospitals ca. 230 BC, with
physicians and nursing staff, the expense being borne by the royal treasury.
Stanley Finger (2001) in his book Origins of Neuroscience: A History of
Explorations Into Brain Function cites an Ashokan edict translated as:
"Everywhere King Piyadasi (Asoka) erected two kinds of hospitals, hospitals
for people and hospitals for animals. Where there were no healing herbs for
people and animals, he ordered that they be bought and planted." However
Dominik Wujastyk of the University College London disputes this, arguing that
the edict indicates that Ashoka built rest houses (for travellers) instead of
hospitals, and that this was misinterpreted due to the reference to medical herbs.

The first teaching hospital where students were authorized to methodically


practice on patients under the supervision of physicians as part of their
education, was the Academy of Gundishapur in the Persian Empire. One expert
has argued that "to a very large extent, the credit for the whole hospital system
must be given to Persia".[

HOSPITAL INDUSTRY

A hospital is an institution for health care providing patient treatment by


specialized staff and equipment, and often but not always providing for longer-
term patient stays.

Today, hospitals are usually funded by the state, by health organizations, (for
profit or non-profit), health insurances or charities, including by direct
charitable donations. In history, however, hospitals were often founded and
funded by religious orders or charitable individuals and leaders. Similarly,
modern-day hospitals are largely staffed by professional physicians, surgeons,
and nurses, whereas in history, this work was usually done by the founding
religious orders or by volunteers

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DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROJECT REPORT 2009

Hospital industry is an important component of the value chain in Indian


Healthcare industry rendering services and recognized as healthcare delivery
segment of the healthcare industry, which is growing at an annual rate of 14%.
The size of the Indian healthcare industry is estimated at Rs. 1,717 billion in
2007. It is estimated to grow by 2012 to Rs. 3,163 billion at 13% CAGR. The
private sector accounts for nearly 80% of the healthcare market, while public
expenditure accounts for 20%. The country had 15,393 (2005) hospitals, which
had 8.75 lakh hospital beds. According to the WHO report, India needs to add
80,000 hospital beds each year for the next five years to meet the demands of its
growing population. Newfound prosperity of many Indian households is
spurring demand for high-quality medical care, transforming the healthcare
delivery sector into a profitable industry.

Medial tourism is changing the face of traditional healthcare industry in


India. India’s excellence in the field of modern medicine and its ancient
methods of physical and spiritual wellbeing make it the most favourable
destination for good health and peaceful living. India’s cost advantage and
explosivegrowth of private hospitals, equipped with latest technology and
skilled healthcare professionals has made it a preferred destination for medical
tourism.

According to Ministry of Commerce and Industry, Indian medical


tourism that was valued at US$350 million in 2006, is estimated to grow
into a US$2 billion industry by 2012. The above background initiated need
for a comprehensive Industry Insight on Hospital industry.

SPECIALIZED

Types of specialized hospitals include trauma centers, rehabilitation hospitals,


children's hospitals, seniors' (geriatric) hospitals, and hospitals for dealing with
specific medical needs such as psychiatric problems (see psychiatric hospital),
certain disease categories, and so forth.

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A hospital may be a single building or a campus. Many hospitals with pre-20th-


century origins began as one building and evolved into campuses. Some
hospitals are affiliated with universities for medical research and the training of
medical personnel. Worldwide, most hospitals are run on a non-profit basis by
governments or charities.

DEPARTMENTS

Hospitals vary widely in the services they offer, and therefore in the
departments they have. They may have acute services such as an emergency
department or specialist trauma centre, burn unit, surgery or urgent care. These
can then be backed up by more specialist units such as cardiology or coronary
care unit, intensive care unit, neurology, cancer center and obstetrics and
gynecology.

Some hospitals will have Outpatient departments and some will have chronic
treatment units such as behavioral health services, dentistry, dermatology,
psychiatric ward, rehabilitation services and physical therapy.

Common support units include a dispensary or pharmacy, pathology and


radiology, and on the non-medical side, there are often medical records
departments and/or release of information department.

NATURE OF THE INDUSTRY

Combining medical technology and the human touch, the health care industry
administers care around the clock, responding to the needs of millions of people
—from newborns to the critically ill.

Industry organization. About 580,000 establishments make up the health care


industry; they vary greatly in terms of size, staffing patterns, and organizational
structures. Nearly 77 percent of health care establishments are offices of
physicians, dentists, or other health practitioners. Although hospitals constitute
only 1 percent of all health care establishments, they employ 35 percent of all

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workers. The health care industry includes establishments ranging from small-
town private practices of physicians who employ only one medical assistant to
busy inner-city hospitals that provide thousands of diverse jobs.

The health care industry consists of the following nine segments:

Hospitals . Hospitals provide complete medical care, ranging from diagnostic


services, to surgery, to continuous nursing care. Some hospitals specialize in
treatment of the mentally ill, cancer patients, or children. Hospital-based care
may be on an inpatient (overnight) or outpatient basis. The mix of workers
needed varies, depending on the size, geographic location, goals, philosophy,
funding, organization, and management style of the institution. As hospitals
work to improve efficiency, care continues to shift from an inpatient to
outpatient basis whenever possible. Many hospitals have expanded into long-
term and home health care services, providing a wide range of care for the
communities they serve.

Nursing and residential care facilities. Nursing care facilities provide inpatient
nursing, rehabilitation, and health-related personal care to those who need
continuous nursing care, but do not require hospital services. Nursing aides
provide the vast majority of direct care. Other facilities, such as convalescent
homes, help patients who need less assistance. Residential care facilities provide
around-the-clock social and personal care to children, the elderly, and others
who have limited ability to care for themselves. Workers care for residents of
assisted-living facilities, alcohol and drug rehabilitation centers, group homes,
and halfway houses. Nursing and medical care, however, are not the main
functions of establishments providing residential care, as they are in nursing
care facilities.

Offices of physicians. About 37 percent of all health care establishments fall


into this industry segment. Physicians and surgeons practice privately or in
groups of practitioners who have the same or different specialties. Many
physicians and surgeons prefer to join group practices because they afford

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backup coverage, reduce overhead expenses, and facilitate consultation with


peers. Physicians and surgeons are increasingly working as salaried employees
of group medical practices, clinics, or integrated health systems.

Offices of dentists. About 1 out of every 5 health care establishments is a


dentist’s office. Most employ only a few workers, who provide preventative,
cosmetic, or emergency care. Some offices specialize in a single field of
dentistry such as orthodontics or periodontics.

Home health care services. Skilled nursing or medical care is sometimes


provided in the home, under a physician’s supervision. Home health care
services are provided mainly to the elderly. The development of in-home
medical technologies, substantial cost savings, and patients’ preference for care
in the home have helped change this once-small segment of the industry into
one of the fastest growing parts of the economy.

Offices of other health practitioners. This segment of the industry includes the
offices of chiropractors, optometrists, podiatrists, occupational and physical
therapists, psychologists, audiologists, speech-language pathologists, dietitians,
and other health practitioners. Demand for the services of this segment is related
to the ability of patients to pay, either directly or through health insurance.
Hospitals and nursing facilities may contract out for these services. This
segment also includes the offices of practitioners of alternative medicine, such
as acupuncturists, homeopaths, hypnotherapists, and naturopaths.

Outpatient care centers. The diverse establishments in this group include


kidney dialysis centers, outpatient mental health and substance abuse centers,
health maintenance organization medical centers, and freestanding ambulatory
surgical and emergency centers.

Other ambulatory health care services. This relatively small industry segment
includes ambulance and helicopter transport services, blood and organ banks,
and other ambulatory health care services, such as pacemaker monitoring
services and smoking cessation programs.

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Medical and diagnostic laboratories. Medical and diagnostic laboratories


provide analytic or diagnostic services to the medical profession or directly to
patients following a physician’s prescription. Workers may analyze blood, take
x rays and computerized tomography scans, or perform other clinical tests.
Medical and diagnostic laboratories provide the fewest number of jobs in the
health care industry.

HEALTH CARE IN INDIA

Health care facilities and personnel increased substantially between the early
1950s and early 1980s, but because of fast population growth, the number of
licensed medical practitioners per 10,000 individuals had fallen by the late
1980s to three per 10,000 from the 1981 level of four per 10,000. In 1991 there
were approximately ten hospital beds per 10,000 individuals.

Primary health centers are the cornerstone of the rural health care system. By
1991, India had about 22,400 primary health centers, 11,200 hospitals, and
27,400 dispensaries. These facilities are part of a tiered health care system that
funnels more difficult cases into urban hospitals while attempting to provide
routine medical care to the vast majority in the countryside. Primary health
centers and sub centers rely on trained paramedics to meet most of their needs.
MAJOR PLAYERS IN INDIA

India’s healthcare sector has made impressive strides in recent years. From a US
$ 20.6 billion industry in 2001 it is expected to touch US $ 46.4 billion by 2012.
This includes the Pharma market, Govt. spending and Private Spending. India’s
healthcare industry is expected to grow by around 15% a year for the next 6
years.

Major corporations like the Apollo Group, Fortis, Max, Wockhardt, and Escorts
Group have made significant investments in setting up state-of –the-art private
hospitals in cities like Mumbai, New Delhi, Chennai and Hyderabad. Using the

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latest technical equipment and the services of highly skilled medical personnel
these hospitals are in a position to provide a variety of general as well as
specialists’ services. These services are available at extremely competitive
prices, encouraging patients not only from developing countries but even from a
number of developed ones to come to India for specialized treatment.

In the next ten years, Tertiary Care in India will be predominantly Private
Healthcare and extensive Public & Private partnerships. The Secondary Care
would be Private & Public Healthcare and selective public & private
partnerships. The Primary Care would be predominantly public, especially in
the rural areas

HEALTH CARE IN KERALA

Kerala has a long history of organized healthcare. As per documents, by the


time the state was formed in 1956, the foundation for a medical care system
accessible to all citizens was already laid. The easy accessibility and coverage
of medical care facilities has played a dominant role in shaping the health status
of Kerala. Some of the hospitals in Kerala are more than 50 years old. Health
had been a major area of spending in the budget from early years in Kerala

The annual growth rate of Government healthcare expenditure has been


showing a steady increase. India’s first ever Human Development Report
published in 2002, placed the Southern state of Kerala on top of all the other
states in India, because of easy accessibility and coverage of medical care
facilities.

Kerala is one state where private health sector, both indigenous and Western
systems of medicine, has played a crucial role. The Ayurvedic system of
treatment practiced in Kerala dates back to centuries. In the field of Allopathic
system, missionary hospitals have contributed profusely by even going into the
interiors of the state.

High levels of education especially among women and greater health


consciousness have played a key role in the attainment of good health standards

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in Kerala. Today, with the mushrooming of private hospitals that offer quality
services matching international standards, and with the tie up of the healthcare
industry with the tourism sector, healthcare in Kerala is growing by leaps and
bounds.

MAJOR PLAYERS IN KERALA

“The growth has been spectacular in Malabar. It is expected to grow multi-fold


in the coming years,” says K.G. Alexander, chairman and chief physician of
Baby Memorial Hospital. And certainly, it is the private sector that is taking the
lead. Seventy per cent of the health-care services are in the private sector. The
drivers of change are the better health awareness among people and new
treatment methods in the hospitals. Many hospitals now have state-of-the-art
equipment for diagnosis and treatment. An ageing population, lifestyle diseases
and rising levels of income are other factors contributing to the growth of the
sector. Several medical institutions foresee immense possibility in the health-
care industry.

Many of them are going on an expansion mode, such as upgrading


infrastructure and adding modern facilities. Baby Memorial Hospital has
launched a Rs. 100-crore project to increase the number of beds to 800 from
480. “We are planning to set up exclusive departments for oncology,
cardiothoracic surgery and nephrology. Besides, it will relieve the rush at our
multi-storied complex,” Mr. Alexander says. Setting up a 300-bed hospital
means employing 500 people. The growth might not be as astounding as the
information technology or the information technology enabled services sectors.
But the development is sustainable, he says.

Likewise, the Malabar Institute of Medical Sciences (MIMS), which is


celebrating its seventh anniversary, has roped in leading doctors and
internationally qualified specialists in various departments. “Efficient doctors
who have worked at cancer centers are now serving at our institute,” says S.
Lejpathroy, assistant manager, relations, MIMS.

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MIMS is a referral hospital where stress is on advanced tertiary- care


procedures for serious medical problems. It was established with NRI
investments of Rs.50 core. New projects are also in the offing. One of them is
the multi-core Metro International Cardiac Centre (MICC) at Palazhi. “India has
a great potential to tap in the health-care segment. Now Bangalore and Chennai
are providing back offices of the service industry in the U.S. and Europe,” says
P.P. Mohammed Musthafa, managing director, MICC.

KIMS is a 450-bed multi-specialty hospital where a competent team of


specialists and sophisticated technology come together to deliver high-quality
medical aid. Launched in January 2002, KIMS has emerged as one of the
leading centers of pioneering medical work, research and academics in South
India with a global outreach

Kerala Institute of Medical Sciences (KIMS), one of Asia's leading tertiary care
hospitals, is a landmark healthcare destination in Kerala initiated by KIMS
Healthcare Management Ltd. The 450 bed multi disciplinary super specialty
hospital was started with the objective of providing world class healthcare
services and specialized medical facilities at affordable costs.

KIMS has to its credit the unique achievement of National (National


Accreditation Board for Hospitals & Healthcare Providers - NABH), and
International (Australian Council on Healthcare Standards International -
ACHSI) accreditations for its dedicated healthcare of uncompromising quality.
It is empanelled with Government & Semi-Government Institutions in India,
Republic of Maldives, Sultanate of Oman, Bahrain, UAE, US and UK. Awarded
with ISO 9001:2000, KIMS is poised to become one of the most preferred
healthcare and health tourism destination in Asia with focus on medicine,
education and research.

RECENT DEVELOPMENT IN THE HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY

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In the rapidly changing health care industry, technological advances have made
many new procedures and methods of diagnosis and treatment possible. Clinical
developments, such as infection control, less invasive surgical techniques,
advances in reproductive technology, and gene therapy for cancer treatment,
continue to increase the longevity and improve the quality of life of many
Americans. Advances in medical technology also have improved the survival
rates of trauma victims and the severely ill, who need extensive care from
therapists and social workers as well as other support personnel.

In addition, advances in information technology continue to improve patient


care and worker efficiency with devices such as hand-held computers that
record notes on each patient. Information on vital signs and orders for tests are
transferred electronically to a main database; this process eliminates the need
for paper and reduces recordkeeping errors.

Cost containment also is shaping the health care industry, as shown by the
growing emphasis on providing services on an outpatient, ambulatory basis;
limiting unnecessary or low-priority services; and stressing preventive care,
which reduces the potential cost of undiagnosed, untreated medical conditions.
Enrollment in managed care programs—predominantly preferred provider
organizations, health maintenance organizations, and hybrid plans such as
point-of-service programs—continues to grow. These prepaid plans provide
comprehensive coverage to members and control health insurance costs by
emphasizing preventive care. Cost effectiveness also is improved with the
increased use of integrated delivery systems, which combine two or more
segments of the industry to increase efficiency through the streamlining of
functions, primarily financial and managerial. These changes will continue to
reshape not only the nature of the health care workforce, but also the manner in
which health care is provided

As the largest industry in 2006, health care provided 14 million jobs—13.6


million jobs for wage and salary workers and about 438,000 jobs for self-

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employed and unpaid family workers. Of the 13.6 million wage and salary jobs,
40 percent were in hospitals; another 21 percent were in nursing and residential
care facilities; and 16 percent were in offices of physicians. The majority of jobs
for self-employed and unpaid family workers in health care were in offices of
physicians, dentists, and other health practitioners—about 295,000 out of the
438,000 total self-employed.

Health care jobs are found throughout the country, but they are concentrated in
the largest States—in particular, California, New York, Florida, Texas, and
Pennsylvania.

Workers in health care tend to be older than workers in other industries. Health
care workers also are more likely to remain employed in the same occupation,
in part because of the high level of education and training required for many
health occupations

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CHAPTER
4:
COMPANY
PROFILE

COMPANY PROFILE

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Sreekandapuram Multispeciality Hospital is self sufficient with a separate


nursing home and it provides Training and Development programme to nursing
staff. The hospital as thoughtfully planned, will be a multi-specialty facility
with luxury, premium and budget rooms to suit every stratum of society. The
specialty and auxiliary departments will provide primary, secondary and tertiary
care backed by world class amenities and most experienced professionals.

Depending on the need and vision, Sreekandapura Multispeciality


Hospital has molded their training structure. At Sreekandapuram Hospital, HR
department identifies the training needs of its employees for the calendar year,
comes up with a calendar and sticks to it. Depending upon the type of
programme, a decision is taken to conduct the training programme internally or
to outsource it. The main parameters are the category of people who are to be
trained, the subjects on whom they need training and the kind of output the
hospital is looking at in the end. Sreekandapuram Multispeciality hospital has a
full-fledged centralized training cell in the form of Sreekandapuram nursing
home, which takes care of all its technical training requirements. On the other
hand, soft-skills and service training is handled by the HR department. "It is not
the question of benefits, but what works best for an organization. If we have
resources within the company, why not utilize them?

Sreekandapuram Multispeciality Hospital widely used the concept of 'Training


the Trainer', where an internal resource is identified for this programme, who
then assists the training department to conduct various training programmes.

It has now become a referral medical institute for most parts of Kerala,
especially for south Kerala. Set up nine years ago, this 225-bed multi-specialty
hospital with around Rs 5core NRI investment has to a great extent succeeded
in delivering good healthcare to the people of Mavelikara.

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Unique Features “From the current strength of 225 beds, we plan to acquire
more than 300 beds in the next three months" - Dr Ravi Shankar (Medical
Director S.M.H)

It is equipped with one of the best intensive care facilities in the country having
state-of-the-art 'hospital on wheels' ambulance facility. It also is one of the few
hospitals in the country with a full-fledged nuclear medicine department.

FUNCTIONAL DEPARTMENT

Functional department deals with the overall functioning of the entire


organization. In Sreekandapuram Multispeciality Hospital the major functional
departments are

 Administration Department
 HR Department
 Marketing Department
 Finance And Account Department
 Quality System Department
 Material Management Department
 Nursing Department
 Supporting Service Department
 Medical Record Department
 Maintenance Department

 ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT

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The responsibility of the management to see that there is proper enforcement of


various provisions, rules and policies in the day to day functioning of the
hospital

CHAIRMAN

VICE CHAIRMAN

EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR

CHIEF CO ORDINATOR DIRECTOR OF DIRECTOR OF


ADMINISTRATION MEDICAL SERVICE SURGICAL SERVICE

 HUMAN RESOURCE DEPARTMENT

SENIOR MANAGER HR

SENIOR EXECUIVE HR

HR EXECUTIVE HR EXECUTIVE HR EXECUTIVE

HUMAN RESOURCE ACTIVITIES

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DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROJECT REPORT 2009

HR department is responsible for coordinating the process for man power


estimation. Functional in charge in various departments are responsible for
assisting the HRD providing information on man power needs as required.

The management trusts their staff. They respect the values of their
employees. Human resource is one of the greatest resources in this industry.
They recruit the right people for the right job. The management identifies the
talents and utilizes it for achieving business excellence. It also helps them to
identify the training needs and provides facilities in developing their knowledge
and skills. Strength and weakness of employees are identified through best
performance appraisal system. The total of all individual contribution will mean
continuing success and hope our associations will be sincere, lasting and
mutually beneficial.

Training needs are identified though various training methods and


training is being given to fill up the shortfall to perform well. Employee can
approach the coordinators and request for necessary training which is relevant
to job requirement. The human resource department coordinator in identifying
training needs, organizing and evaluating the same.

Attendance for training classes is compulsory. It will help you to develop


your professional skills for advancement when an opportunity arises.
RECRUITMENT

Recruitment will be based on the annual man power plan report. Department
wise quarterly man power statement will be generated by the HRD for the
review of top management. The statement includes the number of staffs joined
on the month, number of staffs resigned and the total strength as on date.

TRAINING

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It is the process established by the hospital for identifying and providing


required and adequate training to various personal to empower their skill,
knowledge, attitude and experience for optimal performance.
• In service education training
• Internal training program
• External training program
• Job orientation and training
PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL

This hospital has a very good performance appraisal system by


incorporating various behavior traits which are relevant to job requirement and
organizational needs. Employee’s strengths and weaknesses are evaluated and
appraisal to them for further improvement. Training needs are needs are also
identified through performance appraisal. Attendance and punctuality play a
vital role in determining other performance ratings such as communication
skills, leadership skills, motivation skills, analytical skills job knowledge.

Employee also shall feel free to discuss their weakness with their
coordinators and HR manager. The parameters which are measured in
performance appraisal are;

a) Job knowledge
b) Attitude to work
c) Initiative
d) Quality of work
e) Reliability
f) Leadership
g) Attendance
REMUNERATION

The salary of an employee for his service during each month will become
due within the first seven working days of the month and will be paid on any
day on or before the 7th of the next month.

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Salary will be credited to employee’s bank account. Salary slip will be sent
to you by human resource department. Any discrepancy in your salary slip may
please be brought to the notice of the human resource department or accounts
department for clarification and rectification. It is advised that you retain your
monthly pay slip for future reference.
GRIEVANCE HANDILING

All grievances should be in writing and shall be handed in accordance with the
procedures laid down below.

The employee in person will first take up his grievance to his immediate
supervisor. If he fails to receive the decision of immediate supervisor , he may
refer the grievance to the coordinator. If the decision of the coordinator is not
satisfactory or a reply is not received from him, the employee will present the
grievance to the management, executive director through HRD.

 NURSING DEPARTMENT

Nursing department is the major care giving section. This department consists
of dedicated and well trained nursing personnel. It is concerned with health
promotion, maintenance and restoration. Nursing department is headed by
nursing coordinator and assisted by nursing super indents, supervisors, staff
nurse, ANM, and nursing orderlies.

 QUALITY SYSTEM DEPARTMENT

Senior Manager Quality


System

Assistant Manager Quality


System

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Quality System Executives Quality System Executives Quality System Executives
DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROJECT REPORT 2009

Quality system department directs, control and oversees Sreekandapuram


Multispeciality Hospital activities with regard to quality. The department is
headed by senior manager quality system and assisted by assistant manager and
quality executives.

 MARKETING DEPARTMENT
Marketing department is said to be the voice of hospital where the brand
is fashioned and communicated, internally as well as to the community at large.
Sreekandapuram Multispeciality Hospital makes a lot of investments in setting
up the infrastructure and offering its services, selling the services of a hospital
needs a proper systems.

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Marketing Department

GENERAL MANAGER
PROJECT AND
BUSINESS
DEVELOPMENT

SENIOR MANAGER
MARKETING

MARKETING MARKETING MARKETING


EXECUTIVES EXECUTIVES EXECUTIVES

 FINANCE AND ACCOUNT DEPARTMENT

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

ACCOUNTS DEPUTY ASSISTANT ACCOUNT CHIEF


MANAGER REVENUE MANAGER OFFICER CASHIER
MANAGER
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The finance and accounts department is headed by chief financial officer and
assisted by accounts manager, deputy revenue manager, assistant manager,
account officers and cashier. Finance department play very important role in
salary administration. Financial appraisals are made by the account manager for
sanctioning loans from financial institution.

TECHNOLOGY ABSORPTION

It is one of the most IT- savvy hospitals. As part of its mission to provide
healthcare of international standards, Sreekandapuram Multispeciality Hospital
has been keeping pace with the latest developments in the technology, thus
utilizing the technological advancements for better patient service and cost
reduction.

Now, a new system of recording and retrieval for discharge summary dictation
by doctors has been installed, whereby multiple doctors can dictate the
summaries simultaneously. "This has reduced the time consumed in releasing
the patients from our hospital and also saved the precious time of the doctors,
which can be utilized in caring for the other patients," informs Dr Ravi Sankar.
Vision and Mission

CORPORATE SERVICES

Protecting your Employees

The single most important asset of any organization is its people. And like any
other asset it has to be protected. To this end, more and more companies are
recognizing the value of adopting a strategic healthcare policy. Many are

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already sponsoring medical expenses programs. Not just for senior


management, but for all levels of staff as well as immediate family members.

But there is more to a strategic healthcare policy than medical expenses. Should
procedures be widened to include health screening or to assess the risk of
sickness and stress in the workplace or to manage such risks.

Companies driving for cost efficiency and reducing the number of employees
are more likely to affect by days lost through sickness. Rising medical costs are
leading to significant increases in the cost of funding employees medical
expenses benefit plans.

These trends raise a wide range of financial and human resource issues. They do
so at a time when companies are already under pressure to contain operating
costs, to improve margins and to improve competitive advantage in a liberalized
economy.

What Sreekandapuram Multispeciality Hospital Can Offer

Round the clock help desk for medical emergencies and assistance and
hospitalization.

 Corporate advisory services


 Corporate health planning
 Advice on health insurance
 Medical crisis, rapid response and first aid protocol
programs.
 Occupational Health and Risk Management Services
 Health and well being programmes
 Health publications

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 Health Awareness Programme


 Health Screening
 Wellness Programme for Lifestyle & Stress
Management
 Immunization drives for preventable diseases

All services are available to any size of organization, from small


independent companies to major multinationals. Whether used individually or in
combination they can all be tailored to your specific requirements. Moreover,
we will ensure that they are cost effective and value for money.

Advice and help employers with professional input and services to


"round out" the health benefit plans and cover a wider spectrum of health
benefits for your employees & their families. We will help devise and
implement strategies to improve the general health status of your working
population and ensure that your corporation receives good value for money, by
way of health management and administration programme.

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CHAPTER 3:

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LITERATURE
REVIEW

*Training as continuous improvement: Training faces increasing demands to


demonstrate results in terms of return on investment. With these demands come
increased opportunities for the training function to influence the direction and
operations of the company. Changing demographics, the increasing
competitiveness of the market place, high demand for and short supply of
knowledge workers, and customer demands for high-quality products and
services all challenge companies and their training development.

Important concepts and terms in the field of training were defined and discussed
including learning, three types of knowledge, two levels of skills and attitudes.

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The manner in which attitude affect motivation which in turn affects behavior
was explained. Though different opinions exist in the field of training about
what constitutes training versus development and education, training in this
article will be considered to be the experiences provided to people and enable
them to learn job related KSA’s. Education will be considered to be experiences
that enable people to earn more general KSA’s that are related to, but not
specifically tailored to person’s job. Development will be considered to be the
learning that occurs as a result of training and education.

Evidence is accumulating that those companies that spend more on training are
achieving better financial results. Improved operating methods (such as ISO
9000) and increasing employee competencies are also resulted in declining
union membership. This trend place the leadership of the unions in dilemma
demanding increased training for their membership ensures job-security.
Large firms may be able to engage in elaborate types of training, but the
processes that make for effective training are the same for both large and small
to medium-sized enterprises. What differs is the method used to complete the
processes. Larger firms can rely on economies of scale to keep the cost of
training per employee down. Small –medium sized firms also find economical
ways of providing training. The way the large firms organizes their human
resource activities into operations differs from that of small-medium sized
enterprises. Larger firms maintain a more centralized HR department within
which are many specialized functions. Small firms typically do not use a small
distinct HR department but spread HR duties among the management of the
firm .in larger organizations HRD areas must understand and work
collaboratively with other HR activities to achieve the organization objective. In
smaller firms it is not as much as of an issue because HRD activities carried out
by high managers.
Many career options exist within the training field ranging from outside
consultants to internal specialist. A more traditional careers path in training

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begins with entry level position as a specialist with a larger firm and moves the
position for greater responsibility until reaching a generalist position. The
individual may then move into another area of HR or move to a external firm
providing training services. However this part is subject to many exceptions
and many different entry points depending on experience and qualification. The
skills and competencies of organization development practitioners are important
to training professionals a well. Likewise the skills and competencies of trainers
are important to OD professionals.
Effective training occurs as set of phases in which each phase acquires input
engages in set of processes and produces output needed for the next phase.hte
training process model provides a visual understanding how the phases relate to
each other although model shows the stages occur as sequential steps (needs
analysis, design, development, implementation, evaluation). In fact these cases
occur in a dynamic fashion with feedback from one phase leading to the next
phase as well as recycling through s0me aspects of the previous phase.

* Ref: Training as continuous improvement, P Nick Blanchard, James W Thacker, Effective training
systems, strategies and practices, Second edition 2006, Pg no. 46

*Review of literature-Performance Appraisal and Training & Development:


Training leads to development of individual knowledge, skill and attitude. The
need for training arises in order to meet certain demands of the organization
such as introduction of new lines of production, changes in design, the demand
of competition and economy, promotion, career development, job and personal
changes and changes in the volume of business. This paper narrates the
Performance Appraisal and Training & Development at Vediocon Ltd., Mumbai.

Performance appraisal has been considered as the most significant and


indispensable tool for an organization. It provides valuable information for
decision making purposes related to human resource development. Several
methods and technique of appraisal are available for measurement of the

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performance of the employee. The ideal approach to performance appraisal is


that in which the evaluator is free from personal bias, prejudices and
idiosyncrasies. When an evaluation method is objective, it minimizes the
potential dysfunctional behavior of the evaluator which may be detrimental to
the achievement of the organizational goal.

Learning a sequence of programmed behavior with the application of


knowledge is called training. Training and Development programmes foster the
initiative and creativity of the employees and help to prevent manpower
obsolescence, which may be due to age temperament or motivation or the
inability of the person to adapt him/her to technologic changes.

Any organization will be successful if it uses integrated HR approaches. The


vitality and success of any HR process depends upon intelligent networking of
different processes with each other. Training and Development should upgrade
the skill and competence of the individuals and in turn should facilitate in
enhancing the performance of the employees. Performance Appraisal system
should act as a feedback to Training and Development Programmes. This kind
of supportive approach will only enhance the image of organization but also
will keep up the satisfaction and motivation of employees

The company reviews career progress of employees within the organization at


least once in every two year. HRM department is responsible for employee
development and training.21 hours training per year is compulsory for each and
every employee in the organization. Training target is set by regional office in
the month of December of each year. Based on the targets given by the regional
office, training need analysis (TNA) form is given to all the heads of the
department for getting them filled up. After one month training, post course
evaluation (PCE) form is given to the immediate supervisors of all the trainees.
This form is to be filled by the immediate superiors, mentioning the
improvement in the performance of their subordinates. Training target is
monitored periodically by the HR head.

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The Training and Development system and performance appraisal system


should be complementary in nature, be it a consumer durable company or a
finance company. Employee performance is measured in terms of job
knowledge, skill and competence and also quality and quantity of output.
However to get positive rating one has to be trained depending upon the needs
and demands.

*Ref: Dr.Anjali Ganesh. Asst Professor,St. Joseph Engineering College, Mangalore. AJBMR,
Volume 3, no.2, September 2008

*Training and Development Often Starts With Training the Trainer


New trainers should have attended some form of training the trainer course.
They need to understand education, training and development and how to
facilitate learning. Good trainers do more than just talk to their classes. Learners
leave empowered with knowledge that will make a practical difference to their
lives. They might forget the class and the trainer, but they will retain a
substantial amount of what they learned for many years to come.

Good trainers are made, not born. Natural ability helps, but there are two
elements essential to every trainer's own development. One is the training that
trainers themselves receive, and the other is their experience. The most effective
way to learn how to train is to attend a train the trainer course. Books and online
resources can be helpful, but because a training class is a live, dynamic
environment, it is also the best place in to learn how to train.

There is no formal train the trainer certification program that is recognized


nationally or internationally. Various organizations offer certification in training
particular products, or offer their own form of accreditation.

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The most important element of training the trainer is teaching about different
learning styles and how to structure a class that appeals to each one. People
learn in a number of different ways and a good trainer will ensure that his
course addresses all of these.

Another essential component is facilitation training. A training class should be


an interactive environment and not a series of lectures from the front. A good
trainer will engage with learners, fostering discussion within the class. Good
trainers will also be good learners. They understand the importance of
continuous improvement and take responsibility for their on-going self
development.

Every training class, even one on a subject that has been taught many times
before, should be regarded as a learning experience of the trainer. Inevitably
they will learn the most from their first few classes, as they develop the
confidence to manage a group of learners and to control the agenda.

Trainers will quickly learn what style of course delivery works best for them,
and what techniques they can employ to deal with specific situations. They will
develop their own training strategies, along with useful resources. They will
come to understand their own strengths and weaknesses in the classroom, and
the importance of preparation and assessment.

A good trainer will do more than just deliver a class. She will illuminate the
subject, increasing the knowledge and capability of the learners and allowing
them the leave the room much richer than when they arrived.

**Training and Development in an Era of Downsizing: This conceptual paper


examines downsizing in the context of the management of a firm’s human
resources during downsizing. It presents the main theories, assertions, and
empirical findings regarding the role of the HR function, in general, and training
and development (T&D), more specifically. As such, the paper reviews the
existing body of literature associated with HR plans, programs and policies that

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firms adopting downsizing must provide their surviving workforces. Finally, the
paper presents a number of concluding comments regarding effective
downsizing practices that have emerged in the literature.

*Ref: Training and Development Often Starts With Training the Trainer, Andrew Knowles , and Oct
12, 2009.

** Ref: Training and Development in an Era of Downsizing, Franco Gandolfi, Journal of


Management Research, Volume 9, Number1. April 2009

*Training and development –A cost-benefit research: This article reviews


current literature related to cost-benefit analysis of employee training programs.
After a conceptual stage is set and the meaning of terms is clarified,
methodologies for measuring costs and benefits, and problems related to
this process are discussed. Primary and secondary beneficiaries of training are
identified. The need for distributional assignments of costs as a function of
benefit is described. Following the identification of problems inherent in cost-
benefit research, concluding comments focus on the need for practical
applications of cost-benefit research.

The purpose of this study was to discuss progress and gaps in the scientific
training and development literature. In particular, we first delineate three criteria
against which scientific progress in Human Resource Management fields can be
evaluated. We then review examples from the training and development
literature that illustrate progress toward meeting each scientific criterion.
Finally, we identify several gaps in the literature that require further theory
development and empirical research. Although our general assessment of
scientific progress in the training and development literature is positive, we also
argue that more multilevel research is needed to better understand how learning
is influenced by factors residing at multiple levels of analysis, as well as how
learning generalizes to influence practically meaningful outcomes at higher

organizational levels.

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*Ref: Training and Development, Robert Blomberg, Rochester Methodist Hospital, Rochester
September 12, 2007

*How to Become a Professional Trainer: A trainer delivers training. Training


specialists exist in every profession. Here are some tips on why you should
consider a career in training and how to achieve it. A career in training can be
extremely rewarding both financially and professionally. Even spending a few
years in training delivers enormous benefits and can give you skills you need to
progress.

Trainers exist in whatever field you work in, whether it is accounting or


acupuncture, mechanical engineering or medicine. Good trainers share common
skills and attributes but they can be drawn from a wide variety of backgrounds.

Training is a great way to build self-confidence. It is easy to assume that the


people who go into training are naturally outgoing and confident, which is why
they are happy to stand in front of a class of people for much of their day.

However, most people who go into training have a very different motivation.
They love to share their knowledge and to see others develop and improve. To
become a trainer often means overcoming nerves about standing up and talking.

Training offers huge variety. Most trainers do not want to deliver the same
material every day. They are also keen learners, wanting to expand their
knowledge of the subject they are already experts in. A good trainer will always
aim to learn something new every time they teach

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*Ref; How to Become a Professional Trainer, Andrew Knowles, Oct 20, 2009

*United Parcel Service uses 360-degree feedback and training: At United


Parcel Service (UPS) in Louisville, Kentucky, about 1200 management
employees participate in automated 360-degree feedback process. The managers
are measured on a number of critical skills “customer focus,” “people skill,”
“business values,” and so forth. But, before any of this valuation happens, HR
trainers hold mini training sessions to explain the purpose and process of 360-
degree feedback to those involved. At these sessions, training is also provided
on how to give and receive feedback.

After receiving training, peers, supervisors, and subordinates rate a manager


once every six months on the critical skills. They do so by completing a
questionnaire. The manager then sits down with her supervisor and discusses
the feedback. The manager then sets objective for the improvement over the
next six month. The manager chooses to attend the programmes that provide
skills training and practice in the areas of improvement. Six months later the
manager receives another round of feedback that indicates that information
session that indicates any improvement in the areas targeted. How is the process
being received? Hope Zoeller Stith , trainer at UPS, indicates that information
sessions that incorporate discussion about the purpose of the process, along with
the feedback training, helped everyone see the benefits of the process.
Employee reacted positively, Stith says.

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*Ref: Wells,S. 1999. A new road traveling beyond 360-degree evaluation.HR manager 4:83-91

CHAPTER 5:
RESEARCH
METHODOLOGY

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5.1 Research Methodology:


The Research and Methodology adopted for the present study has been
systematic and was done in accordance to the objectives set which has been
detailed as below.

Research Definition

Research is a process in which the researcher wishers to find out the end result
for a given problem and thus the solution helps in future course of action.

According to Redman & Mory research is defined as a “Systemized effort to


gain new knowledge”.

5.2 RESEARCH DESIGN

According to “Claire Seltiz”, a research design is the arrangement of condition


and analysis of data in manner that aims to combine relevance to the research
purpose with economy in procedure.

5.3 TYPE OF RESEARCH

Research is basically of two types.

1. Descriptive research

2. Explorative research

1. Descriptive Research: These studies are concerned with describing the


characteristic of a particular individual or a group.

Determining sources of Data:

There are two main sources of data

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1. Primary data

2. Secondary data

Primary Data: It consists of original information collected for specific


research. Primary data for this research study was collected through a direct
survey to obtain this primary data a well structured questionnaire was prepared
by the researcher.

Secondary Data: It consists of information that already exists somewhere and


has been collected for some specific purpose in the study. The secondary data
for this study is collected from various management books.

Questionnaire: A set of questions containing a few Technical questions and


more number of opinionated questions are prepared for the employees of both
Centralized and Decentralized sections of HR Department. A questionnaire is
determined after gathering preliminary information about training and
development programmes for employees in this organization. Questionnaire
Development:

Questionnaire is the most common instrument in collecting


primary data. In order to gather primary data from viewers.

The present questionnaire consists of following type of questions.

1. Closed ended questions


2. Dichotomous questions
3. Multiple choice questions
4. Ranking question.

Closed ended questions: Closed ended questions have no other options other
than the selecting the one that close matches the respondent’s opinion or
attitude.

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Dichotomous questions: A dichotomous questions refers to one, which offers


the respondents a choice between only two alternatives.

Multiple Questions: A multiple choice question refers to one, which provides


several sets of alternatives for the respondents’ choice.

Ranking questions: These questions are given when there are many points to
be considered and to be ranked in priority.

5.4 POPULATION

Permanent employees of the organization were considered as the population for


the study.

5.5SAMPLING METHOD

The required data in this research may be obtained by the sampling method.
Convenience sampling has been used for the purpose of drawing samples from
the population. When population elements are selected for inclusion in the
sample based on the ease of access, it can be called convenience sampling.

5.6 SAMPLE SIZE

Sample size is 5o which is consisting of nurses.

5.7 SOURCE OF DATA

The data mainly belongs to primary data. To explain some relevant matters
secondary data were also used. Sources were company reports, websites,
articles etc..,

5.8 TOOLS FOR ANALYSIS

The tools used are percentage analysis, likert scale and averages. Graphs and
charts are used for presentation.

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5.9 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

a. An inherent limitation of questionnaire method and survey is applicable


in this study. Convenient sampling was used which has its own limitation.

b. Lack of the cooperation of the employees in gathering their opinion will


be a limitation.

c. The sample size was limited.

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CHAPTER: 6
DATA ANALYSIS

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&
INTERPRETATIO
NS
ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATIONS

The data available from the questionnaire was classified and tabulated with the
help of tables and figures. The classification and tabulation of each
questionnaire is given below.

1. Employees’ work experience


Table.1

Option No: of respondents (%)Percentage


Below 1 year 10 20
1-5 year 15 30
5-10 year 13 26
10 year 12 24
Total 50 100
Source: primary data

Fig .1 : Employees’ work experience

INFERENCE

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From the above information, about 20% of the respondents have an experience
below 1 year, 30% have an experience of 1-5 years, 26% have an experience of
5-10 years, and 26% have an experience of 10 years.

2. Trainees attended

Table.2

Option No: of respondents (%)Percentage


Yes 36 72
No 14 28
Total 50 100
Source: primary data
Fig .2: Trainees attended

INFERENCE

It is inferred that, 72% of the respondents attended the training programme


conducted by the organization. The total number of respondents who attended
the training programme was 36% and the remaining 14 %could not attend the
programme due to their routine work.

3. Number of training programmes attended so far

Table.3
Option No: of respondents (%)Percentage
1 8 16

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More than 1 12 24
3 17 34
More than 3 13 26
Total 50 100
Source: primary data
Fig .3: Number of training programmes attended so far

INFERENCE

From the above table it is clear that about 16% of the respondents have attended
at least one training programmes, 24% of the respondents have attended more
than one training programmes, 34% of the respondents have attended three
training programmes and 26% of the respondents have attended more than three
training programmes.

4. Improvement in performance after training

Table.4
Option Opinion (%)Percentage
Yes 43 86
No 7 14
Total 50 100
Source: primary data

Fig .4: Improvement in performance after training

INFERENCE

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About 86% of the respondents improved their performance and skill after
getting the training and the remaining 14% have not indicated any improvement
as they are not satisfied with current training programme.

5. Duration of training programmes

Table.4
Training period No: of respondents (%)Percentage
1 month 15 30
4 month 20 40
6 month and above 15 30
Total 50 100

Source: primary data

Fig .5: Duration of training programmes

INFERENCE

From the above information, it is inferred that about 30% of the respondents
have attended one month training programme, 40% of the respondents have
attended four months training programme and the remaining 30% have attended
six months and above training programme.

6. Recommended by department head/supervisor

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Table.6
Option No: of respondents (%)Percentage
Always 13 26
Frequently 17 34

Less frequently 15 30

Some times 5 10

Total 50 100
Source: primary data
Fig .6: Recommended for training by department head/supervisor

INFERENCE

It is inferred that, 26% of the respondents are always recommended for future
training, 36% of the respondents are frequently recommended for future
training, 20% remaining respondents are sometimes recommended for future
training.

7. Training opportunities availed

Table .7
Option No: of respondents (%)Percentage

Always 14 28
Frequently 17 34
Less frequently 11 22
Some times 8 16
Total 50 100
Source: primary data
Fig .7: Training opportunities availed

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INFERENCE

From the above information, about 28% of the respondents are availing training
programmess themselves always, 34% of the respondents are availing trainings
programmess themselves frequently and 19% of the respondents availing
training programmes themselves sometimes.

8. Quality of the training programme received

Table. 8

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


Satisfactory 15 30
Fully satisfactory 10 20
Neutral 10 20
Dissatisfactory 10 20
Fully dissatisfactory 5 10
Total 50 100
Source: primary data

Fig .8: Quality of training programme received

INFERENCE

From the above information, about 30% of the respondents are satisfied with the
current training programme, 20% of the respondents are fully satisfied but 20%
of the respondents have no opinion with regard to the quality of training and the
remaining 15% of the respondents are not fully satisfied with the current
training programme .

9. Reflection on the organization’s budget.

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Table. 9

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


Always 15 30
Frequently 10 20
Less frequently 10 20
Sometimes 15 30
Total 50 100
Source: primary data
Fig. 9: Reflection on the organization’s budget

INFERENCE

It is inferred that, 30% of the respondents agree that the training needs are
always reflected in the organization budget, 20% of the respondents agree that
the training needs are sometimes reflected in the organization budget.

10.Considering the legal requirements


Table.10

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


Always 10 20
Frequently 10 20
Less frequently 5 10
Sometimes 25 50
Total 50 100
Source: primary data

Fig.10: Considering the legal requirements

INFERENCE

The above chart showing that, 20% of the respondents agree that the legal
requirements are always considered in training needs. 20% of the respondents

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agree that the legal requirements are frequently considered in training needs.
25% of the respondents agree that the legal requirements are sometimes
considered in training needs.

11.Considering KSA while assessing training needs.

Table.11

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


Always 25 50
Frequently 10 20
Less frequently 10 20
Sometimes 5 10
Total 50 100
Source: primary data

Fig .11: Considering KSA while assessing training needs.

INFERENCE

From the above chart, 50% of the respondents agree that employee job skill,
knowledge etc, are always considered while assessing training needs. While the
remaining opines that the job skill, knowledge etc, are sometimes considered
while assessing training needs.

12. Considering mission, objectives, cultural changes and customer


orientation in training needs.

Table.12

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


Always 20 40
Frequently 15 30
Less frequently 5 10
Sometimes 10 20
Total 50 100

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Source: primary data

Fig.12: Considering mission, objectives, cultural changes and customer


orientation in training needs.

INFERENCE
Among the 50 employees surveyed, 40% of the respondents opine that mission,
objectives, cultural changes and customer orientation are always considered in
training needs.30% speak out that it is only frequently considered, 10% are with
view that it is less frequently considered and the rest 20% says that it is
considered only sometimes.

13. Organization’ social responsibilities and respect for diversity


reflected in training needs.
Table.13

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


Always 10 20
Frequently 15 30
Less frequently 5 10
Sometimes 20 40
Total 50 100
Source: primary data

Fig.13: Organization’ social responsibilities and respect for diversity


reflected in training needs.

INFERENCE

The table above indicates that, 20% of the respondents are with the view that
Organization’s social responsibilities and respect for diversity are always
reflected in training needs, 30% of the respondents indicates that it is frequently
reflected in training needs, 10% opine that it is less frequently reflected and rest
40% employees outlook is that it is reflected only sometimes.

14. Training programmes coordinated through the following ways

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Table.14

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


Mentoring 10 20
pre-planning 10 20
performance try-out 10 20
Others 20 40
Total 50 100
Source: primary data

Fig.14: Training programmes coordinated through the following ways

INFERENCE

Among the 50 employees surveyed, 20% of the respondents opine that training
programmes are coordinated through mentoring, 20% of the respondents
opinion is that it is coordinated through preplanning,20% are with the view that
it is coordinated through performance try out, rest 40% says that it is
coordinated through other means

15.Cost is considered in the selection of training.

Table.15

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


Always 10 20
Frequently 15 30
Less frequently 5 10
Sometimes 20 40
Total 50 100
Source: primary data

Fig.15: Cost is considered in the selection of training

INFERENCE

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Among 50 employees surveyed, 20% of the respondents are in the view that
cost is considered in the selection of training resources.30% are in the opinion
that cost is considered only frequently, and 10% indicates that is considered less
frequently the rest 40% says that cost considered only sometimes in training
needs.

16.Methods used to track training costs

Table.16

Options No. of respondents %(percentage)


Yes 15 30
No 35 70
Total 50 100
Source: primary data

Fig.16: Methods used to track training costs

INFERENCE

Among the 50 employees surveyed, 30% of the respondents have come up with
an opinion that some methods are used to track training costs in terms of lost
work time. Rests 70% of them are not aware about any specific methods used
for the same.

17. Organization’s capacity to meet chosen training and development


needs.
Table.17

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


Yes 15 30
No 35 70
Total 50 100
Source: primary data

Fig.17: Organization’s capacity to meet chosen training and development


needs.

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INFERENCE

It is inferred that 50% of the respondents are with the view that measurement of
return on investment in training is done by the organization the rest 50% opine
that it is not done by organization

18. Future training and development needs communicated

Table.18

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


HR department 15 30
Immediate supervisors 10 20
other personnel 25 50
Total 50 100
Source: primary data

Fig.18: Future training and development needs communicated

INFERENCE

The table above indicates that, 30% of the employees communicate


organizations immediate and future training and development needs to HR
department.20% employees communicate their needs to immediate supervisors,
50% employees communicate organization’s immediate and future training and
development needs to other personnel.

19.Training programs and opportunities -sources


Table.19

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


Circular 10 20
Notice board 10 20
Meeting 10 20
Others 20 40
Total 50 100

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Source: primary data

Fig.19: Training programs and opportunities -sources

INFERENCE

It is inferred that, 20% of the respondents get the training related information
through circulars; 20% get information about Training programmess through
notice board, 20% are communicated through meeting and rest 40% gets
information through other means.

20. Subscriptions to training and development journals.

Table.20

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


Always 10 20
Frequently 15 30
Less frequently 5 10
Sometimes 20 40
Total 50 100
Source: primary data

Fig.20: Subscriptions to training and development journals.

INFERENCE

The table above indicates that, 20% of the respondents say that subscriptions to
professional training and development journals are always maintained and
circulated among department members,30% of the respondents indicate that it is
frequently maintained,10% opine that it is less frequently maintained and rest
40% disclose that it is maintained and circulated only sometimes.

21. Positions within the organization accountable for overseeing and


coordinating training and development.
Table.21

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


Yes 35 70

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No 15 30
Total 50 100
Source: primary data

Fig.21: Positions within the organization accountable for overseeing and


coordinating training and development

INFERENCE

70% of the respondents are of the view that positions within the organization
are accountable for overseeing and coordinating training and development
activities and the rest 30% does not have this view.

22. Assessment process for immediate training and individual


development needs.

Table.22

Options No: of respondents %(percentage)


Yes 20 40
No 30 60
Total 50 100

Source: primary data

Fig.22: Assessment process for immediate training and individual


development needs.

INFERENCE

Among 50 employees surveyed, 40% of the respondents say that processes are
available for the assessment of organizations immediate training and individual
development needs 60% of the respondents say that assessment is not available.

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CHAPTER 4:

FINDINGS
SUGGESTIONS
CONCLUSION
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7.1 FINDINGS

• It was found that 72% of the employees had shown keen interest in the
training programme organized.
• 86% of the employees have experienced improvement in their
performance due to the training programme attended by them.
• 30% of the employees are of the view that the organization includes
training and development expenses while preparing the organization
budget.
• 50% of the employees are with the view that KSA are always considered
in the assessment of training needs.
• Only 40% of the employees feel that mission, objective and cultural
changes are considered in training needs.
• Only 30% of the employees are satisfied with current training
programme.
• 52% of the employees agree that a proper assessment should be adopted
for periodic measurement of training needs
• 92% of the employees are of the opinion that effective training leads to
quality performance.

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7.2 SUGGESTIONS

• The hospital has to standardize its training procedures as part of its


growth strategy.
• Organizational awareness, such as mission, objectives, cultural changes
and customer orientation has to be considered while assessing training
needs.
• The organization should give more priority to KSA (knowledge, skill and
ability/attitude) while assessing training needs.
• The expenses related to training and development must be mentioned
clearly while preparing the organization budget.
• The HR department can establish a training assessment center for further
performance evaluation.
• They must try working upon various performance appraisal methods like
360-degree feedback to keep track of employees.
• Training audit must be conducted as part of the HR audit so as to bring in
effective development.
• Training programmes can be outsourced to experts in specialized areas
through tie-ups with premier institutes like Apollo Medvarsity’s hospital
administration programmes.
• Technical training related to hospital equipments must be provided at
continuous basis for better updations to the concerned employees.
• A proper schedule for training must be prepared for the active
participation of employees.
• The organization must work upon motivational strategies in training and
implement it for the betterment of employees.

The above given suggestions will help the organization to fulfill its NABH
standards and make its training programmes more effective

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CONCLUSION

This report is an attempt to study the effectiveness of training and development


programmes conducted by Sreekandapuram Multispeciality Hospital
Mavelikara and its benefits for the employees. This study reveals that training
plays an important role in every organization especially in service sector so an
up-to-date assessment of the effectiveness of the training and development
programme is essential to enhance the future development of the organization.

In this Knowledge-based economy, training helps people to learn how make


themselves productive to the organization. To cope with the challenges and
competitiveness in the world, every organization needs the services of trained
persons for performing the activities in the systematic way. So, training
programme must play a key role in individual as well as organizational
performance.

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BIBILIOGRAPHY

1) Bhatnagar O.P, “Evaluation methodology for training”, New Delhi:


Oxford and IBH publishing co.pvt.ltd.
2) “Personnel management”, Mc. Graw Hill, 6th ed., 1981.
3) C R Kothari, “Research Methodology- Methods and techniques”, second
edition.
4) P Nick Blanchard & James W. Thancker, “Effective training systems,
strategies, and practices”, Second edition-2006, Published by Dorling
Kindersly (India) Pvt. Ltd,
5) Dr Hari Dayal Gupta, Editor–in-chief, “Journal of Management
Research”, Volume 9, April 2009.

Websites:-
www.google.com
www.wikipedia.com

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CHAPTER: 8
ANNEXURE
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QUESTIONNAIRE
“A study on effectiveness of training and development
programmes for employees in Sreekandapuram Multispeciality
Hospital, Mavelikara, Alappuzha Dt”
The information collected is only for study purpose for my third semester
minor project as part of my MBA course at MES College of Engineering. I
request you to kindly record your responses for the questions given below.

Name: ________________
Sex ; male [ ] female [ ]
Position Title/Role: __________________________
Experience: Below 1Year [ ] 1-5 year [ ] 5-10 year [ ] 10 year [ ]

1. Have you attended any training programme conducted by your organization?

Yes [ ] No [ ]

2. How many training programme have you attended so far?

1[ ] more than 1 [ ] 3[ ] more than 3 [ ]

3. Is there any improvement in performance after getting the training?

Yes [ ] No [ ]

4.Is there a process to assess the organization’s future training needs?

Yes [ ] No [ ]

5.How long is your training period?

1 month [ ] 4 month [ ] 6 month and above [ ]

6.Does your dept.head/supervisor recommend you for training ?

Always [ ] Frequently [ ] Less frequently [ ] sometimes [ ]

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7. Are employees availing themselves the training opportunities?

Always [ ] Frequently [ ] Less frequently [ ] sometimes [ ]

8.The quality of orientation and training received for your current position in the
Company-

Satisfied [ ] Fully satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ] Dissatisfied [ ] fully dissatisfied [ ]

9. Are training and development needs reflected in the organization’s budget?

Always [ ] Frequently [ ] Less frequently [ ] sometimes [ ]

10. Are legal requirements considered in training needs?

Always [ ] Frequently [ ] Less frequently [ ] sometimes [ ]

11. Are employee development plans addressed in performance appraisals.

Always [ ] Frequently [ ] Less frequently [ ] sometimes [ ]

12. Are job skills, knowledge and ability considered in assessing training needs?

Always [ ] Frequently [ ] Less frequently [ ] sometimes [ ]

13. Are organizational awareness, such as mission, objectives, cultural changes and
customer orientation considered in training needs?

Always [ ] Frequently [ ] Less frequently [ ] sometimes [ ]

14. Are the organization’s social responsibilities and respect for diversity reflected in
training needs?

Always [ ] Frequently [ ] Less frequently [ ] sometimes [ ]

15. All training programmes are coordinated through:

Mentoring [ ] pre-planning [ ] performance try-out [ ] others [ ]

16. Are the results of the training programmes monitored and evaluated?

Always [ ] Frequently [ ] Less frequently [ ] sometimes [ ]

17. Is cost considered in the selection of training resources?

Always [ ] Frequently [ ] Less frequently [ ] sometimes [ ]

18. Is there a method to track training costs in terms of lost work time?

Yes [ ] No [ ]

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19. Does your organization measure a return on investment in training?

Yes [ ] No [ ]

20. Does the organization provide adequate capacity to meet chosen training and
development needs?

Yes [ ] No [ ]

21. To whom are the organization’s immediate and future training and development
needs communicated?

HR department [ ] Immediate supervisors [ ] other personnels [ ]

a. How often?

Monthly [ ] quarterly [ ] yearly [ ]

22. How are all training programmes related information communicated to employees?

Circular [ ] notice board [ ] meeting [ ] others (specify) [ ]

23. Are subscriptions to professional training and development journals maintained and
circulated among department members?

Always [ ] Frequently [ ] Less frequently [ ] sometimes [ ]

24. Is there a position within the organization accountable for overseeing and
coordinating training and development activities?

Yes [ ] No [ ]

25. Is there a process for assessing the organization’s immediate training needs and
individual development needs?

Yes [ ] No [ ]

……………………………………….THANK YOU………………………………………....

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

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