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INSDSG 690 Capstone Seminar Fall

Syllabus 2015
University of Massachusetts Boston
College of Advancing and Professional Studies
Instructional Design Graduate Program

Capstone Advisor Information


Section 1
Jeffrey Keefer, PhD
jk904@nyu.edu (will update to UMB once it is available)
Skype (W): jeffreykeefer
Google Hangout (W): jk904@nyu.edu
Office Hours: virtual office hours by request
Section 2
Apostolos Koutropoulos, MBA, MSIT, MEd, MA
a.koutropoulos@umb.edu
Phone (W): 617-287-5990
Skype (W): akoutropoulos
Office Hours: virtual office hours by request
Note: Throughout the semester, I will communicate with you via your UMB email
account. Please review the following website for a job aid that will assist you in
forwarding your UMB email account to your personal account if you prefer:
http://howto.wikispaces.umb.edu/Forward+Student+UMB+Email+to+Personal+Acc
ount
Classes begin Monday September 14, 2015 and ends Friday December 11,
2015

Course Information
Course Title:

Capstone Seminar

Completion of 8 or more courses in the Instructional Design


program.

Prerequisites:

Skills:

During the time that learners spend in the Capstone Seminar,


learners independently demonstrate the culmination of
knowledge and skills developed as part of their studies in the
Instructional Design program. This can be accomplished through
a design and implementation of a learning intervention, or the
completion of an original empirical research piece in the field of
Instructional Design.

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INSDSG 690 Capstone Seminar Fall


Syllabus 2015
Course
Description:

This course provides guidance and a structured


environment in which students develop advanced instructional
design skills in the context of their capstone project. Based on
the nature and complexity of the students projects, the course
deals with such topics as component display analysis, needs
assessment data, analysis and reporting techniques, cognitive
flexibility theory, competencies modeling, and selfdirected/learner-centered strategies. Students who have
completed eight or more requirements for the Instructional
Design M.Ed. should enroll in this course.

Additional
Note:

This course is more like an independent study that a traditional


instructor-led and paced course. Students work independently to
complete an instructional design project from soup to nuts. While
we do have a space on Blackboard as a way of meeting your
advisor and communicating with other students there is no required
participation. The faculty member for this course takes the role of
advisor and peer reviewer of your project. Students take the role of
an independent instructional design consultant. Students may, with
approval of their advisor, work on projects at their workplace, but
they must be able to explore best practices, and reach a level of
detail that isnt usually available in workplace efforts. Workplace
projects needs to not require any special permissions to share
content with the instructor, fellow learners, and the Instructional
Design Department. Working on proprietary company projects may
not be an option.
Suggested
Text(s):
All students are encouraged to obtain a copy of the APA Style

Guide:
American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication Manual
of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington,
D. C.
ISBN 13: 978-1-4338-0562-2 ISBN 10: 1-4338-0562-6
Students should rely on and cite course texts from previous
courses and other sources in the development of the
Instructional Design or research project.
Technical
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INSDSG 690 Capstone Seminar Fall


Syllabus 2015
Requirements:
Students will be developing designs for their own learning
intervention projects during the semester however there is no
requirement to use specific applications for development. This choice
is up to the student and is often driven by what is available at the
worksite or owned personally.
Communication in this course will be accomplished, in part, through
technologies such as Skype, Google Hangouts, and Blackboard
Collaborate. You will also need a headset with microphone to fully
participate and can also use a webcam if you have one. If you
experience difficulty with the audio over the web then there is an
opportunity to also call in via phone (phone charges may apply
depending on your location). There is also the capability to upload
PowerPoint presentations, use a group whiteboard and utilize text chat.
All group Blackboard Collaborate sessions are recorded and archived
for future reference

The Capstone Seminar is focused on the independent


completion of a single assignment: an Instructional Design
Project or an original research paper. The Capstone should be a
reflection of student learning attained through participation in
the required and elected instructional design courses. Expected
components of an Instructional Design project are described in
the Instructional Design Project guidelines below. If you are
interested in doing an original research paper do get in contact
with me so we can discuss parameters.

Assignments:

Methods:

Apostolos Koutropoulos (AK) and Jeffrey Keefer will both serve


as advisors for the Capstone Seminar for Fall 2015. Each student
will be assigned to one as a primary advisor. The primary
advisors role includes:
Orienting the students to the Capstone
Approving the Capstone Project Proposal
Receiving major deliverables
Providing feedback and support to the students throughout
the semester
Evaluating and grading the Final Capstone Project
The other will serve as a second reader on the project. The
second readers role is to provide additional peer review and
feedback if there are major issues with the capstone project that
is submitted.

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Each Primary Advisor will hold an individual meetings to discuss
expectations and to answer any possible questions. This meeting
will be scheduled by the student by the first week of the
semester. Please contact your primary advisor to set up this
meeting.
The advisors will be available throughout the semester to discuss
project progress and provide feedback. There are no regularly
scheduled meetings or class sessions. Thus for guidance, please
contact your primary advisor.
Course
Policies:

Late Work
As part of your Capstone Project, you are required to develop
either a design document for a learning intervention, or to write
a publishable quality original research paper. Since project
planning and the ability to meet deadlines are important
professional skills, you should be able to demonstrate those skills
by adhering to your development schedule. Reasons
necessitating a change in this schedule are to be submitted to
and cleared by your advisor. One 13-week semester is not
necessarily a lot of time to develop a design document and
implement your learning project. There will be a partial-grade
penalty for late-work for each day it is late (without prior
appropriate justification).
Capstone Completion
If a student plans to walk at the formal graduation ceremony at
the end of the spring semester, the Capstone MUST be
completed prior to the end of the spring semester. The Capstone
is NOT offered during the summer semester. Therefore, if a
student is granted an incomplete for the spring semester, the
student will submit their Capstone in the fall semester to be
reviewed and graded at that time, or within a year of their initial
registration (see incomplete policy below).
University Incomplete Policy
A grade of Incomplete (INC) is not automatically awarded when a
student fails to complete a course. A grade of Incomplete is
given at the discretion of the instructor. It is awarded when
satisfactory work has been accomplished in the majority of the
course work, but the student is unable to complete course

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INSDSG 690 Capstone Seminar Fall


Syllabus 2015
requirements as a result of circumstances beyond their control.
The student must negotiate with and receive the approval of the
course instructor in order to receive a grade of incomplete. A
copy of a written agreement between the faculty member and
the student specifying the work to be completed and the terms
and deadline for completion must be kept on file in the program
office.
Grading:

Your grade for this course will be a whole or partial letter grade
based on your final submitted project. Projects will be evaluated
using the Capstone Project Rubric. Note: the lowest passing
grade for a graduate student is a C. Grades lower than a C
that are submitted by faculty will automatically be recorded as
an F. Please see the Graduate Bulletin for more detailed
information on the Universitys grading policy.

Accommodations:

Section 504 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 offer
guidelines for curriculum modifications and adaptations for
students with documented disabilities. If applicable, you may
obtain adaptation recommendations from the UMass Boston Ross
Center (508-287-7430. You need to present and discuss these
recommendations with me within a reasonable period, prior to
the end of the Drop/Add period.

You are advised to retain a copy of this syllabus in your personal files for use
when applying for future degrees, certification, licensure, or transfer of
credit.
Students are required to adhere to the Code of Student Conduct, including
requirements for the Academic Honesty Policy, delineated in the
University of Massachusetts Boston Graduate Studies Bulletin and relevant
program student handbook(s). http://media.umassp.edu/massedu/policy/308%20UMB%20Code%20of%20Conduct.pdf

Instructional Design Project Guidelines


Description: The Instructional Design project comprises the design and

development of a training/learning event for a specific audience


and context. The project must clearly demonstrate mastery of
instructional design theories, principles, concepts, and
applications.
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INSDSG 690 Capstone Seminar Fall


Syllabus 2015
Project
Objectives:

By completing the Instructional Design Project option, you


should demonstrate your ability to:
1. Identify an organizational problem for which training or
performance support may be a solution.
2. Create and implement a Front End Analysis.
3. Analyze and interpret the gathered data.
4. Define performance objectives.
5. Use and cite current theory and best practices to make
informed design decisions.
6. Design the strategy, the materials and assessment for
intervention.
7. Develop plans for formative and summative evaluation.
8. Create and follow a project plan for an instruction
design/development project.
9. Develop the interventions detailed in the project plan.
10.
Implement, at least as a pilot, the intervention
developed.
11.
Evaluate the implementation and present
recommendations for further improvements based on the
evaluation.
12.
Develop and implement learner assessments.
13.
Use learner assessments to evaluate efficacy of
interventions.
14.
Report and reflect upon activities, effect and lessons
learned.
15.
Write at a professional level using APA citation style.

Major
Deliverables:

If you are pursuing the learning Intervention Project route


there are three (3) major deliverables are required during the
semester (for research paper talk to me for specifics):
1. Project Proposal (20% of grade)
Due date: Friday 9/18/2015 by noon EST
Final approval by 9/21/2015
Using the Instructional Design Capstone Proposal Form found
on page 15 of this syllabus, develop a 1-2 page proposal for
your project and upload it in the appropriate Blackboard
assignment dropbox. The proposal includes a project plan that
defines your development schedule. It should include 5 & 6
from the Project Guideline below.

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INSDSG 690 Capstone Seminar Fall


Syllabus 2015
NOTE: This proposal must be approved by your capstone
advisor. The advisor must approve the:
Scope of the project,
Methods for front end analysis,
Anticipated types of interventions,
Evaluation tools and
Schedule for completion of the project.
2. Design Document (40% of grade)
Due date: no later than Sunday 10/18/2015 at noon EST
Based on the front end analysis detailed in deliverable one, the
student must propose a solution and present a design
document. The Design Document is a common deliverable for
instructional designers in professional situations. In this
seminar, the Design Document will provide an opportunity for
formal feedback from the instructor. The Design Document
should include all sections in the Project Outline Section.
This document must be approved by the capstone advisor.
After approval, the student develops the solutions, implements
them and conducts evaluation of the implementation.
3. Final Capstone Project (40% of grade)
Due date: Friday 12/4/2015 by noon EST
Final rewrite (if revisions are necessary) due: Thursday
12/10/2015
Due date is the due date. If the advisor deems revisions are
necessary, you will need to do a final rewrite. Due at the end
of the course, the final project should following the Capstone
Project Guidelines below.
Proposed
Schedule:
Though you only need to turn in the three main deliverables
listed above, the following proposed schedule may help you stay
on track. You are encouraged to be in contact with your primary
advisor along the way and to share drafts of your work. It
includes suggested entries for your reflection paper*.
NOTE:* At each milestone, you should write an entry into your
reflection paper. Five (5) entries total.
Week

Task

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INSDSG 690 Capstone Seminar Fall


Syllabus 2015
1
9/14-9/20

Schedule and complete conversation with


primary advisor early in the week. Monday,
Tuesday, or Wednesday are preferable because it
gives you time to work on your proposal due this
week. Proposal Due at the end of this week.

2
9/21-9/27

Revisions on proposal if needed; Final Approval of


Proposal. Start working on your Design Doc.

Work on your design doc. Submit for review as


needed. When a section is deemed complete
by you, you should solicit comments from your
3&4
instructor. You should be able to complete 2
9/28-10/11
sections of the design document each week.
Between Weeks 2 and 5 you should be able to
complete items 5 to 13 (see below).
5
10/1210/18

Design Document Due.

6-11
10/1911/29

Begin building your final deliverable and keep


working on your final implementation during
these weeks. Check in with your instructor.

12
Final Implementation Due.
11/30-12/6 Start working on your reflection piece
13
Final revisions due (if necessary).
12/7-12/11 Reflection piece is due this week

Project
Guidelines:
This section describes the expected components of an
Instructional Design Project. If you envision a project that does
not include all of these components, please explain this in detail
in your Project Proposal.
Your project, with the exception of the reflection piece, should be
written in the third-person. Do not say things like I chose to work
on this project because I Think of your instructional design
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project as a piece you could show potential employers, not a
conversation between you and your instructor.

Project Outline
Front Matter:
1. Title Page
The Title Page format must be followed as is appears in an Appendix to
this syllabus.
2. Acknowledgement or dedication Optional
3. Abstract
After completion, present a one page overview of the entire project,
including goals and objectives, methodology, and conclusions.
4. Table of Contents
Include all major topics and page numbers. Include Appendices, as
needed, to support your project.
Project Phase Documents:
Phase I: Analysis
5. Background Information provide the context of your project
including the organization you will be working with, key stakeholders,
the mission and vision of the organization, etc.
6. Analysis Plan describe the plan you followed to conduct your needs
assessment including specific methodologies, surveys, questionnaires,
and other documents you used in the process.
7. Analysis Report describe the findings from implementing your
Analysis Plan. In this section, use the data you collected to identify a
gap between the desired level of performance and the current level of
performance and write up a problem statement that will explain the
need for your project. In your report, you should include the target
audience and characteristics, resources available in your specific
context, a proposed delivery method for your solution to the problem,
and instructional goals.
Phase II: Design
8. Learning/Performance Objectives identify what the program
participants will be expected to perform as a result of completing the
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Syllabus 2015
program. These should be in alignment with the instructional goals you
identified during the Analysis phase.
9. Instructional Strategy outline the plan for helping learners to meet
the objectives. Describe the overall instructional and assessment
approach and justify it by referring to theory. Sequence your objectives
into units of instruction (lessons, modules, etc.) Create a table of
contents for each unit of instruction identifying each component to be
included.
Phase III: Develop
10.
Introduction describe what materials were created for your
project and how they were created.
11.
Instructional Materials For the design document phase, this
section should provide an overview of the materials you are designing
and are planning on developing for your curriculum content, activities,
and assessments. Just include the introduction for the materials and a
few descriptive screenshots for them. Also describe ways that this
material connects with teaching and facilitation techniques,
assessment strategies, learner motivation strategies, and overall
learning outcomes for your course. for your course.
For your final implementation (not the design document) if appropriate,
develop instructor notes, including all pertinent information concerning
instructional techniques, materials, timing and technologies. Develop
any supporting materials, such as case studies, role-plays, group
exercises and activities as applicable. If any elements of the instruction
require the skills of other professionals to develop and are not
included, describe them in the design document.
Phase IV-V: Implementation and Evaluation
12.
Evaluation Plan describe how you will evaluate the success of
the project. Describe the type of evaluation that will take place, who
the participants will be, and how data will be collected. Use Kirkpatrick,
or other research-based model(s). Include both formative and
summative evaluation strategies and materials.
13.
Improvement Plan if you are able to conduct a formative
assessment of some of your materials, present the data and planned
improvements.
Back Matter:

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INSDSG 690 Capstone Seminar Fall


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14.
Bibliography
Identify all reference materials used in researching and creating your
project. Include web citations. Use APA style guidelines for citations
and bibliographic formatting. See:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/ (Please note: APA style
is required for citations and bibliography, NOT for document
formatting.)
15.
Appendices
Include any supplemental materials as deemed necessary to support
the project. Instructional materials may be submitted as separate files.
16.
Vita
Include a 1 2 page vita, listing name, contact information,
educational background, work experience, publications,
honors/awards, and associations.
Reflection Paper
17.
Reflection - Write a 5-7 page, double-spaced, reflection on the
instructional design process and your educational journey in
instructional design as whole. Spanning your entire course of studies
think about, and reflect on, question such as the following: what did
you learn? What worked well? What didnt work as you expected and
how could it be improved upon? What were some major inspirations to
you as a learner and as a designer? What theories, practices, and
approaches made sense to you and why? What is still fuzzy and how
might you further explore this? What are some of the ways of taking
what you learned and experienced as a learner in the MEd program
and applying that to your own professional contexts? (Note: This is the
only section of your project that should be written in the first-person.)

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Evaluation Rubric:
Criteria

Competen
cy1

Weak (75 pts


possible)

Proficient (80-90
points)

Exceptional (91-100 pts


possible)

Problem
identification
and goals
(5%)

1.5

The training proposal


is not an appropriate
solution to the problem
identified, or the goal
is either unclear or not
stated in measurable
terms.

The project addresses a


problem for which
training is an
appropriate solution.
The goal is clearly
stated, addresses the
performance context,
and is measurable.

In addition to previous level:


The goal is substantive in
scope and the project will
clearly make a meaningful
contribution to its intended
audience.

Analysis
(15%)

1.4, 2.1, 2.3,


2.4, 2.5, 2.7

The needs assessment


approach is insufficient
to determine
meaningful
implications.
Implications for
instruction are not
drawn from analysis.
Instructional analysis
does not address
performance context
or lacks sufficient
detail.

The needs assessment


approach is appropriate
and sufficient for the
project. Relevant
characteristics of
learners and contexts
are described along
with implications for
instruction.

In addition to previous level:


Needs assessment instruments
and resulting data and/or
content and instructional
analysis procedures are
documented and presented as
support materials.

1 Please see end of document for MEd Program Level Competencies


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Criteria

Competen
cy

Weak

Proficient

Exceptional

Objectives
and
Instructional
Strategy
(15%)

1.2, 3.1, 3.2,


3.5

Objectives include only


behavioral statements
and/or are not written
in observable terms.
Components of
instruction are
missing. Elements of
strategy are not
congruent or do not
map to objectives.

Objectives are written


in observable terms
and include condition,
behavior and criteria
(as necessary).
Instructional strategy
defines methods of
content delivery,
learner practice and
assessment. All
components are
congruent and will
enable learners to
meet the objectives.

In addition to previous level:


Instructional strategy clearly
relates to results of the analysis
phase. Activities are varied and
engaging. The theory informing
design choices is explained and
logically connected to the
design.

Instructional
materials
(20%)

3.3, 3.4

Elements of a
complete package of
materials are missing
or materials are
incomplete. Visual
design of materials
does not meet
professional standards.

The project includes a


complete package of
instructional
materials necessary
to implement the
program. Student
develops and
incorporates material.
Role of professionals
used to develop or
produce material is
described.

In addition to previous level:


Materials are presented in a
professional manner with
attention to detail. The set of
material is compiled as a
complete package that is easy
to use.

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Note: Depending on the scope of


the project, you should include a
complete set of materials or a
sub-section of materials
identified during the Design
phase.

Criteria

Competen
cy

Weak

Proficient

Exceptional

Evaluation
(20%)

3.6

Student includes an
evaluation plan but
does not justify
choices. Plan is
insufficient to evaluate
effectiveness or
impact of training.

Project includes a
plan for conducting
both formative and
summative
evaluation, including
procedures and
instruments to be
used. Student justifies
the selection of
specific methods.

In addition to previous level: If


evaluation was implemented,
results and implications are
included. If it was not
implemented, plan includes
description of anticipated
potential room for improvement
for special attention in the
evaluation.

Project
planning
(10%)

4.1, 4.2, 4.3

Student is not able to


plan for work
necessary to complete
the project or does not
allow reasonable time
for identified steps or
simply fails to meet
own schedule.

Student is able to
create a plan for
completing the
project that identifies
interim steps, project
deliverables, and
schedules interim
deliverables in
reasonable
timeframes. Student
meets the schedule.

In addition to previous level:


Includes support materials for
project planning (i.e.,
dependencies, project plan
matrix or Gantt chart, etc.)

Writing and
document
quality
(clarity,
grammar,
APA style)
(15%)

1.1

Project includes
grammatical and/or
spelling errors that
detract from meaning.
Writing is difficult to
follow. APA citation
style guidelines are not
applied.

Project has small


grammatical or
spelling errors which
detract from
meaning. Writing is
clear and logical.
Citation and
references follow APA
style guidelines.

Project is free of grammatical


and spelling errors. Writing style
enhances understanding of the
project. APA style guidelines are
followed for citations and
references. Visual presentation
is at a professional level.

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Submitting
your work:
You should submit all of your project files to the appropriate
assignment drop-box in Blackboard.
The INSDSG program will archive your Capstone. Print copies of
student capstone projects will no longer be collected.
You are highly encouraged, though not required, to submit your
capstone to the UMass Boston institutional repository which is
called ScholarWorks. You will be able to share your work easily
with prospective employers and others through including your
project here. Also, you will be helping out future capstone
students who are always in need of completed capstone
example. Finally, you will be a part of highlighting the INSDSG
program to the UMass Boston community and beyond.
Here is the website to review past ID Capstones:
http://scholarworks.umb.edu/instruction_capstone/

Instructional Design Capstone Proposal Form

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Capstone Project Title:


Proposal Content
Name:
Phone (best contact):
Phone (alternate):
e-mail:
Mailing address:

Anticipated Graduation Date (Please Check):


____Spring 20__
____Fall 20__
Capstone Project Title:
Proposal Content
1. Provide an overview of the project including background information, problem statement,
and ultimate organizational goals.
2. Describe the anticipated format and scope of the learning event to be designed and list
possible deliverables for the project. NOTE: The design will be driven by your formative
analysis. So, you should not definitely state what the solution will be. However, you
should cover limitations that will direct your decisions (for example, if you are faced with
a world-wide target population, the possibilities of bringing people in for a week long
training is probably not a valid option within the constraints of the organization.
3. Develop a project plan / schedule for completing the project that includes completion of
major milestones (the design document and final project). In addition to these required
deliverables, define interim steps to achieving the milestones, and interim
points/deliverables for feedback.

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Final Project Title Page Format

A final project presented to the faculty of the


Instructional Design Masters Degree Program
University of Massachusetts at Boston

TITLE
(Include Sub-title if needed)

Submitted by
(Name and credentials)

in partial fulfillment for the requirement of the degree


MASTER OF EDUCATION
(Date)

_______________________________________
Approved by (Capstone Advisor's name)
Faculty

MEd Program Learning Outcomes (reference)


approved March 14, 2013
1. Theory into Practice
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Rather than relying on intuition and guesswork, instructional design professionals base
their instructional solutions on theoretical bases and practical implications from research
in the field. In order to do this, graduates of the Instructional Design program will be able
to:
1.1 Complete scholarly research including searching, locating, and analyzing literature
in the field;
1.2 Interpret practical learning principles and their applications from various landmark
learning theories;
1.3 Apply interdisciplinary research findings to the solution of performance problems;
1.4 Critically assess reliable publications, literature, trends, theories, data, and tools
used in the field of instructional design.
2. Analysis
Instructional design professionals seek solutions, both instructional and systemic, which
lead to performance goals. Understanding that, as with all design fields, instructional
designers continually seek input and feedback from learners and systems to discover
and meet needs and continually improve. In order to do this, graduates of the
Instructional Design program will be able to:
2.1 Seek multiple data and information points when conducting analysis;
2.2 Apply tools of analysis including task and needs analysis;
2.3 Analyze performance gaps;
2.4 Identify causes of performance gaps;
2.5 Use analysis to recommend instructional and non-instructional solutions;
2.6 Report analysis and proposed solutions in a clear, concise manner so that others
can understand and evaluate proposed solutions.
3. Design
Instructional design professionals create effective interventions, choosing and using
methods that meet the needs of the organization, while balancing ROI and usefulness
of the selected methods. Throughout their careers, they continually seek to stay current
in emerging methods so that they may be a resource for thoughtful and considered
innovation. In order to do this, graduates of the Instructional Design program will be able
to:
3.1 Develop performance outcomes that are measurable, have a specific action, and
have specific conditions stated;
3.2 Use evidence-based instructional strategies to maximize learning;
3.3 Design appropriate multimodal instructional delivery, including face-to-face, online,
blended, and emerging modes;
3.4 Develop formative and summative learner assessments;
3.5 Draw on a range of instructional design models to craft effective instructional
interventions;
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3.6 Design effective formal and informal learning solutions.


4. Develop
In the development phase, instructional design professionals select and create learning
materials, oftentimes in collaboration with other professionals. In order to do this,
graduates of the Instructional Design program will be able to:
4.1 Evaluate the relevancy and effectiveness of the instructional materials to help
learners attain learning objectives;
4.2 Demonstrate competency using a range of current and emerging technologies to
build learning solutions;
4.3 Develop learning materials that are accessible to diverse audiences;
4.4 Apply visual literacy concepts and principles in the planning, layout, and design of
learning materials;
4.5 Create rapid prototypes and mock-ups that developers can use to create learning
products;
4.6 Develop learning materials based on sound cognitive research findings.
5. Implement
Instructional design professionals successfully implement learning solutions using
multiple modalities. In order to do this, graduates of the Instructional Design program
will be able to:
5.1 Develop implementation plans, taking into consideration social, organizational, and
technical implications;
5.2 Facilitate instruction using multiple delivery modes including face-to-face and
distance learning;
5.3 Apply effective practices that encourage learner interaction, engagement, and
learning;
5.4 Stay current with emerging trends in delivery modes and their related technologies;
5.5 Manage the implementation process.
6. Evaluate
Instructional designers artfully incorporate formative and summative evaluation for
continual improvement of instruction, learning, and program effectiveness. In order to do
this, graduates of the Instructional Design program will be able to:
6.1 Evaluate instructional materials for usability and effectiveness;
6.2 Use learner assessment data to improve instructional solutions;
6.3 Accurately measure targeted performance outcomes identified by stakeholders;
6.4 Produce a comprehensive report of evaluation findings to aid in future program
improvement.
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7. Reflective Practice
Instructional designers apply basic principles of reflective practice, that is, the capacity
to reflect on and learn from professional experience and action, to develop personal
insight and continuous professional improvement. In order to do this, graduates of the
Instructional Design program will be able to:
7.1 Act in ethically sound ways while executing all duties;
7.2 Act mindfully and advocate on behalf of the learner;
7.3 Distinguish process from content issues and determine how process can block or
enhance group effectiveness;
7.4 Communicate clearly, collegially, and credibly in written and verbal discourse;
7.5 Engage respectfully, fairly, and cooperatively as part of a team;
7.6 Consider connections between instructional design and other disciplines to inform
the instructional design process.
8. Leadership
Instructional designers that work at the graduate level provide leadership in their
professional positions and in the field. In order to do this, graduates of the Instructional
Design program will be able to:
8.1 Justify the need for specific educational and training programs;
8.2 Practice collaborative and team work strategies that build rapport and trust, mediate
and resolve conflicts, and influence people;
8.3 Implement processes to effectively manage people and projects;
8.4 Manage change initiatives in an effective and supportive way;
8.5 Document all phases of the instructional design process in a professional manner;
8.6 Provide leadership throughout different functions and levels of an organization.

Updated: September 1, 2015


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