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MONTGOMERY 2050

AN URBAN VILLAGE
The Montgomery 2050 Urban Village project is a vision established by a group of
University of Calgary student representatives which explores what this Calgary
community could potentially look like in the year 2050.

4/23/2012

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section 1.0 Executive Summary ..................................................................................... 2
Section 2.0 Introduction................................................................................................... 4
2.1 Visioning Session ................................................................................................... 4
Section 3.0 Background .................................................................................................. 5
3.1 History .................................................................................................................... 5
3.2 Demographics ........................................................................................................ 6
Section 4.0 Site Map ....................................................................................................... 7
Section 5.0 16th Avenue ................................................................................................. 8
5.1 No Truck Zone ....................................................................................................... 8
5.2 Lane Reduction ...................................................................................................... 9
5.3 Pedestrian Scramble ............................................................................................ 10
Section 6.0 Bowness (Shouldice) Road ........................................................................ 11
6.1 Street Renaming .................................................................................................. 11
6.2 Tram..................................................................................................................... 11
6.3 Farmers Market .................................................................................................... 13
6.4 Complete Streets ................................................................................................. 14
Section 7.0 Montgomery Park ....................................................................................... 15
7.1 Community Garden .............................................................................................. 15
Section 8.0 Shouldice Park ........................................................................................... 16
8.1 Montgomery Amenity Center (MAC Block) .......................................................... 16
8.2 Festival Space ..................................................................................................... 19
8.3 Movies in the Park ............................................................................................... 19
Section 9.0 LeBaron Plaza ............................................................................................ 20
9.1 Community Plaza ................................................................................................. 20
Section 10.0 Shouldice Terrace .................................................................................... 22
10.1 Affordable Housing............................................................................................. 22
Section 11.0 Bernard Boardwalk ................................................................................... 23
11.1 Boardwalk .......................................................................................................... 23
Section 12.0 Community Wide ...................................................................................... 25
12.1 Transit Oriented Development ........................................................................... 25
12.2 Cycling Network ................................................................................................. 28
12.3 Vehicle Sharing Programs ................................................................................. 29
12.4 Walkability .......................................................................................................... 30
12.5 Accessibility ....................................................................................................... 31
12.6 Heritage Initiatives ............................................................................................. 33
12.7 Public Art............................................................................................................ 35
12.8 Green Initiatives ................................................................................................. 35
12.9 Zoning and Building Height ................................................................................ 36
12.10 Public Toilets and Water Fountains ................................................................. 37
12.11 Mixed Use Development .................................................................................. 38
Section 13.0 Conclusion................................................................................................ 39
Section 14.0 References ............................................................................................... 40

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SECTION 1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


The Montgomery 2050 Urban Village Project explores what this Calgary community
could potentially look like in the year 2050. A group of University of Calgary student
representatives attended a Visioning Session at the Montgomery Community Association on
February 4, 2012. This Visioning Session was an opportunity for community members and
other City officials to come together and communicate what they would like to see for the
community in the future.

By taking many of the ideas that were brought forth by community members, a vision of
the community, using sustainability as a key design feature, was created. Sustainability, in this
sense, incorporates aspects of the environmental, as well as the social and economic realms. It
is through this mixture of neighborhood design elements that a city can truly be sustainable.

Montgomery is a community with a rich history, and has the benefit of being an
established neighborhood close to the downtown, the University of Calgary, the Foothills
Hospital, the Albertas Childrens Hospital and the Rocky Mountains. This neighborhood is
situated in a location that provides a positive feature for the community. Preserving the small
town feel to this section of the City is very important to the residents. It is also recognized that
the neighborhood is connected to the rest of Calgary as a system of systems.

This vision of Montgomery for 2050 pays close attention to different aspects of
environmental, social and economic features of urban redevelopment. The main vision is to
create an Urban Village situated within the greater context of Calgary. The following proposal
outlined in this report contributes to the enhancement of the environmental, social and economic
sustainability of the future of Montgomery. The guiding principles used for this of this vision for
Montgomery in 2050 are: sustainability, identity, accessibility, and diversity.

Six key areas within Montgomery have been identified for redevelopment by 2050.
These primary locations include: 16th Avenue, Bowness (Shouldice) Road, Montgomery Park,
LeBaron Plaza, Shouldice Terrace, and Bernard Boardwalk. Sustainability aspects were taken
into account with attention being paid to improved connectivity problems for pedestrians and
automobile traffic.

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The primary Redevelopment Plan for Montgomery in 2050 will involve removing large
truck traffic from 16th Avenue and reducing lane sizes in order to be more pedestrian and cycle
friendly. Also, Bowness Road will be renamed to Shouldice Road, creating a more unified
community identity. The introduction of a tramline running down Bowness Road is another
aspect of the redevelopment, increasing the density and allowing for a diverse variety of
commuting options, designation of Farmers markets and festivals space to create more social
cohesion among residents, as well as the attraction other Calgarians to the area, increasing
economic benefits. Another positive impact will be the addition of complete streets to the
neighborhood, allowing all forms of commuters to move freely and safely throughout the
community. The community garden in the neighborhood will be enhanced by increasing the size
and by making it more aesthetically pleasing. The redevelopment of Montgomery also allows
for an increase in affordable housing which is important in a city like Calgary that has seen
fewer and fewer affordable housing options being built.

The community is home to many natural elements, such as, Shouldice Park and the Bow
River. These features will undergo some improvements to help foster better options for social
interaction and improved quality of life. Along with this, the redevelopment of Montgomery will
see increased densities without compromising the small town character of the
neighborhood. There will be increased mixed use developments with businesses on the street
level and residential options on the floors above. Increased densities do not mean that the
neighborhood will see large towers constructed, instead the building heights will remain to be
around five or six stories in height through bylaws to be implemented in the area.

This vision pays close attention to the ability of community members to move freely
through the community by using a variety of transit choices. By making the community more
pedestrian accessible, the current small town feel of the neighborhood will be maintained, or
even improved by fostering social aspects which are important to the residents.

Environmental sustainability will be addressed through Green building initiatives, such as


green roofs and solar panels being grandfathered into existing buildings, as well as by
incorporating these elements into newly built structures. Also, the overall enhancement to the
public realm will be benefited by adding free of charge public toilets and drinking fountains in the
area.

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SECTION 2.0 INTRODUCTION


2.1 VISIONING SESSION

A visioning session was conducted for the community of Montgomery in February 2012,
which included members of; the Montgomery Community Association, other community
residents, The Federation of Calgary Communities, the local Business Revitalization Zone,
along with a variety of other Calgarians with vested interests in the community. These people
were able to voice their opinions on four questions posed to them:
(1) What do you like about Montgomery?
(2) What do you dislike about Montgomery?
(3) What changes would you like to see in the community?
(4) What changes would you not like to see in the community?

FIGURE 1: WORD CLOUD CREATED BY STUDENTS FROM THE VISIONING SESSION WITH THE COMMUNITY

Some common themes were a general appreciation for the geographical location
of the community in terms of the nearby amenities and community pride for its small
town heritage. A main problem brought up was the use of community roads for through
traffic, primarily 16th Avenue, desire for increased connectivity across 16th Avenue and
establishing Montgomery as a destination instead of a pass-through community. These
themes along with many others were combined with contemporary urban planning and
sustainable community initiatives in order to create a vision of what Montgomery could
look like in 2050.
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SECTION 3.0 BACKGROUND


3.1 HISTORY
The present character of Montgomery stems
partially from its history as an independent municipality
outside the limits of the city of Calgary. Purchased in
1906 by James Shouldice, the community was originally
known as Shouldice Terrace after the landowners and
the benefactor of the space known as Shouldice Park. In
1910 the park was dedicated to the City of Calgary and in
exchange, streetcar service was secured to the proposed
new residential area (Land Use Planning & Policy, 2008).
FIGURE 2: THE PASSING OF THE KEY

Postal delivery problems over the name and its similarity to the town of Shouldice
prompted the need for a name change in the 1940s. The Shouldice family selected
Montgomery after Bernard Law Montgomery of Alamein, an esteemed military officer from Great
Britain who participated in both WWI and WWII.

In 1955 Montgomery was designated as a Hamlet


and in 1963 the town was annexed to Calgary at its own
request. During that time Montgomery contained 1100
homes and was the largest undeveloped area located in
the easterly 1/3 of the community. In 1995 the Bowness
Area Redevelopment Plan was adopted by Council and in
2000 the planning process was initiated to prepare an
Area Redevelopment Plan for Montgomery. In 2002 the
Shouldice Park Master plan was adopted (Land Use
Planning & Policy, 2008). Montgomery has grown and
matured from numerous development plans and civic
ordinances to what it is today. Residents still believe it
retains much of its small-town feel.
FIGURE 3: MR. AND MRS. SHOULDICE

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3.2 DEMOGRAPHICS
Currently Montgomery has a population of 3, 795 (City of Calgary, 2009). There is a
large proportion of residents between the ages of twenty five and fifty four, while senior citizens
account for about ten percent of the total population in the area.

In 2050, the projected population is 6,500 residents and the total proportion of seniors is
expected to grow to about sixteen percent of the population. The community will be home to a
wider range of people of different ages with more diversity. It is projected that the neighborhood
will attract mature students, and young families causing the neighborhood to grow. This will
create the ability to support a variety of locally owned businesses and allow for the schools to
remain open.

FIGURE 4: POPULATION CHARTS OF MONTGOMERY

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SECTION 4.0 SITE MAP

FIGURE 5: MONTGOMERY SITE MAP HIGHLIGHTING THE KEY AREAS OF DEVELOPMENT

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

16TH AVENUE
BOWNESS (SHOULDICE) ROAD
MONTGOMERY PARK
SHOULDICE PARK
LEBARON PLAZA
SHOULDICE TERRACE
BERNARD BOARDWALK

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SECTION 5.0 16TH AVENUE


5.1 NO TRUCK ZONE
The TransCanada highway or better known as 16th Avenue, currently runs across the
southern portion of the community, poses many concerns to the local residents. The highway
accounts for high volumes of heavy truck and automobile traffic that acts as a barrier between
the divided sections on either side of the road in Montgomery. The high volume and speed of
traffic on the road makes for an undesirable and unsafe environment, resulting in a less
desirable landscape.

Due to provincial interest in creating a ring road (Stoney Trail), 16th Avenue has the
ability to become a no truck zone serving mainly light commuter vehicles by the year 2050.
Stoney Trail is planned to be a high capacity provincial freeway to accommodate growth in
Calgary for the next 50+ years that allows heavy truck traffic to pass through Calgary by
rerouting them towards the edges of the city rather than through established communities.

A similar initiative was taken in Cornwall, Ontario where excessive amounts of truck
traffic on Richmond Drive posed safety concerns. After analyzing variables such as speed,
accidents, and volumes, they found that the benefits of a no truck zone and its impact on the
surrounding community outweighed the convenience of shorter travel times for heavy transport
trucks (Levac, 2009).

Through the implementation of a no truck zone, intersections like the one at the junction
of Home road and 16th avenue can look into innovative options to make it a more desirable
crossing. This will also make other intersections along the road safer and decrease the sense of
it being a barrier in the community. Environmentally the traffic demographic change will help
reduce vibrations and lower carbon and noise pollution for the surrounding area. The City of
Calgary also benefits from lower maintenance costs as lighter vehicles cause less degradation
to the asphalt requiring fewer tax dollars for upkeep (Levac, 2009).

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5.2 LANE REDUCTION


Currently, 16th Avenue is seen as a barrier separating the residents on the south edge
of Montgomery from the amenities and business in the neighborhoods center as well as
separating the bulk of the community from Shouldice Park. Reducing the lane size of the
highway from 4 lanes to 2 will be an implemented by 2050 and will help bring cohesion between
the two sides of Montgomery as well as bringing the traffic on the highway to a community
based level which will reduce the attractiveness of the corridor as a thoroughfare for motorists in
other communities.

What makes the proposed lane reduction a reality for the future is the combination of
high fuel prices which are expected to severely curtail future automobile traffic away from its
current levels and the reinvigoration of public transit throughout the city which will be one of the
most cost effective means of transportation for commuter traffic. Even though 16th Avenue is a
provincially managed highway, mediating its reduction between the different levels of
government will be eased by the existence of Provincial Highway 201, also known as the
Stoney Trail ring-road, which will be able to accommodate regional traffic much for efficiently,
hence lowering traffic volumes on 16th Ave.

FIGURE 6: LANE REDUCTION AND DIVIDER

These factors pointing to a lowered demand for traffic use along the highway combine
with the maintenance savings for the city to make a lane reduction along 16th Avenue a cost
effective decision for the city that aligns with the goals of designing a more cohesive community
for the residents of Montgomery.

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5.3 PEDESTRIAN SCRAMBLE


A desire for increased pedestrian connectivity, especially across 16th Avenue has
indicated a need for change. Considering the fact that the reduction in road width and traffic
volume, as well as the potential installation of a median similar to that of Memorial Drive in
Calgary will already make 16th Avenue easier and safer to cross, however, pedestrian
accessibility remains an important concern. While a variety of solutions were considered,
including pedestrian overpasses, there are a couple of alternatives which see pedestrian traffic
stay at the street level, including the replacement of the currently signaled pedestrian
crosswalks with traffic lights specifically for pedestrians, much like that of Memorial Drive.

Regardless of other alterations, the intersection of 16th Avenue and Home Road poses
a particular problem. A pedestrian
scramble has been seen as the best
solution and will be implemented in
this location in the near future. The
pedestrian scramble separates
pedestrian and vehicular traffic by
allowing all foot traffic to cross at
once, in any direction and then
allowing vehicular traffic to travel
normally without pedestrians in the
FIGURE 7: PEDESTRIAN SCARAMBLE

intersection. This will create a safer

and more accessible intersection for both pedestrians and vehicles. It has the added benefit of
slowing down traffic in the area and reducing commuter traffic through the area, while increasing
connectivity.

Another additional positive feature is the at-grade alternative which results in better
accessibility, especially for those with disabilities. Low initial infrastructure costs as well as long
term maintenance costs make it an extremely affordable alternative, allowing funds to be
allocated elsewhere. Though it would not be effective now, as it would require a large amount of
surrounding foot traffic in order to be efficient, it is expected that by 2050, the combination of the
already existing pedestrian volumes along with increased density in the community, the
expanding amenities in the vicinity and the promotion of Montgomery as a destination will allow
this to be a sustainable alternative.
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SECTION 6.0 BOWNESS (SHOULDICE) ROAD


6.1 STREET RENAMING
Following the 2012 Visioning Session held at the Montgomery Community Centre, it
became clear that residents wanted to have a more distinct identity for Montgomery. One way
of achieving this will be to change the name of Bowness Road to Shouldice Road, which
represents Montgomerys history. The name Shouldice Road is available and in 2050 will be
the name of the section of road which runs from the Shouldice Bridge to the 16th Avenue on
and off ramps. Renaming this roadway will strengthen the sense of community and identity
within Montgomery by localizing the name of the communitys main street.

As Shouldice Road NW will run right through the Business Revitalization Zone (BRZ)
and will be host to the communitys tram line, it is important for the name of the roadway to
reflect Montgomery and not neighboring communities as it currently does. The renaming of this
roadway will have no impacts on the environment other than the installation of new street
signs. Costs of renaming the roadway will be minimal, involving the application fee required by
the City of Calgary and the costs associated with the altering of signs along the roadway.

6.2 TRAM
Along the major corridor of what will soon be
Shouldice Road, a tram will be integrated into the
current street. The tram will be part of a future tram
network for the City of Calgary and will share the
road with vehicles, facilitating travels through the
community as well as to adjacent communities and
potentially the downtown core. These connections
will not only make it easier for community residents to
travel through the community and externally but will
have the added benefit of bringing other Calgarians
FIGURE 8: PROPOSED TRAM ROUTE

and tourists to the area.

The result is an environmentally friendly form of transit which is minimally invasive to the
currently existing street and will create a more integrated environment. Furthermore, it is a cost
effective mode of transport which promotes social interaction and vibrant street life while

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bringing back a piece of Montgomerys history to life. Not only this, but it also bring a great deal
of capital investment into the community, furthering investment into other realms. This effect of
increased investment along the tram corridor was seen in Portland for example, where the
introduction of a tramline encouraged $2.28 billion dollars in new investment in two blocks alone
(Condon, 2010). Condon (2010) argues that the streetcar is the form of transit that best
achieves complete community goals, (p. 38) by creating a balance among density, land use,
connectivity, transit vehicles and the public realm (p. 37) while ensuring that walking is remains
a daily activity and is one of the prime modes of travel. This fits perfectly into the vision of an
urban village, a connected and integrated community which is able to be an isolated and
sustainable system, fulfilling the majority of needs of residents, while interacting with the larger
system of the city.

FIGURE 9: SHOULDICE ROAD TRAM CORRIDOR RENDERING

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6.3 FARMERS MARKET


By 2050, it is recommended that the Montgomery Community Association host an
annual weekly Farmers and Artisans Market on Sundays from May to October. The market
shall cover the span of five blocks along Shouldice Road NW, from 43rd Street NW to 48th
Street NW. During market hours, traffic will not permitted along this portion of Shouldice Road
but the tram will continue to run. Vendors will be able to use the parking stalls along Shouldice
Road to set up stands, and pedestrians will be able to walk up and down the street and use the
tram to participate in the market.

Farmers markets have been a part of Calgary for quite some time but have not yet
played a role in the community of Montgomery. The Montgomery Cultural Committee along with
the BRZ can work together with the City of Calgary to obtain weekly road closure permission
along Shouldice Road, while still allowing the tram to operate. Some examples of successful
markets exist in large cities around the world such as Hong Kong, Seattle, and Los Angeles.
Farmers markets can revitalize downtown streets and turn sleepy towns into vibrant shopping
hubs and major draws for tourists, (Chorney, 2010).

The market will provide further opportunity for the community to showcase its cultural
identity. Also, the market will benefit the community economically, as people from around the
city are likely to be drawn in by what the community has to offer. The market will have
environmental guidelines for vendors in order to reduce the carbon footprint of the
community. Montgomerys farmers market will allow community members to come together on
a weekly basis, promoting stronger community ties, as well as further enhancing the character
of this vibrant community with a lot of potential.

FIGURE 10: FARMERS MARKET

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6.4 COMPLETE STREETS


Complete streets are streets designed to be used by all forms of transportation, including
cycling, walking, and public transit, instead of being designed solely for automobile traffic. The
complete street design has been growing in popularity as a way to lower automobile
dependency and increase the usage of more sustainable modes of transportation. Places that
have implemented these designs have been successful in not only increasing the safety of
pedestrians and cyclists, but these locations have also seen increases in all non-automobile
forms of transportation.

While many forms of a complete street design are possible, the design philosophy is to
focus on each form of transportation that can be used on the road and include the usage of that
format in the design of the street and street scape as well as influencing the policy options
surrounding how the street is regulated. As implementing complete streets requires many
modes of input, the implementation of the concept in Montgomery will begin with Shouldice
Road since it is a main corridor which will be home to the majority of businesses and higher
density housing in the community. Due to these factors, this is where the increases in
alternative modes of transportation will have the greatest success and largest impact.

FIGURE 11: COMPLETE STREETS SECTION VIEW

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Designing Shouldice Road to incorporate complete street practices will be done by


moving mass parking lots underground while leaving parallel parking along the street side as it
helps serve as a buffer between the street and the sidewalk. This ensures that businesses and
housing are flush with the sidewalks to increase the attractiveness to human scale
transportation. Designation of bicycle only lanes, as well as giving precedence of the tram over
automobile traffic will encourage their use over personal automobiles.

For Montgomery, implementing the complete street design by 2050 will enhance public
safety, increase the attractiveness of the Shouldice Road BRZ as a commercial hub and foster
designs that bring the street back to the human scale. The complete street model builds upon
the strong community bonds already present in Montgomery.

SECTION 7.0 MONTGOMERY PARK


7.1 COMMUNITY GARDEN
In order to help create a more sustainable future for the community of Montgomery, it is
recommended that the current community garden be expanded and relocated from 48th Street
NW and Montalban Drive to Montgomery Park. A community garden can provide many benefits
for a community which includes:

a way to save money on the food


bill without sacrificing flavor or
nutrition

improved air quality

helps storm water runoff


absorption

reduces the food transportation


footprint

encourages community
involvement and social interaction

a venue for knowledge sharing

FIGURE 12: COMMUNITY GARDEN

and skill building

creates a connection to nature for children, youth and families

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By expanding the old community garden of Montgomery, the plan is to encourage more
residents to participate in sustainable food practices while also beautifying their community. The
Garden will also provide increased areas for
communal gathering, storage facilities, and
demonstration areas to learn and share gardening
skills. Relocating the community garden to
Montgomery Park will allow residents to utilize the
parks full potential. An example of a successful
community garden is the Scotts Miracle-Grow
Company Community Garden Campus in
Columbus, Ohio which includes demonstration
FIGURE 13: SCOTTS MIRACLE-GROW COMPANY
COMMUNITY GARDEN CAMPUS IN COLUMBUS, OHIO

work areas, storage, garden nooks, spaces for

communal gatherings, a stone fountain, and stone seating areas (Scotts Company LLC, 2002).

SECTION 8.0 SHOULDICE PARK


8.1 MONTGOMERY AMENITY CENTER (MAC BLOCK)
One of Montgomerys great assets is the active and passionate members of the
Community Association. Recent examples of this passion are seen in the committees response
to ensure Terrace Road Elementary School stay open once the city had slated it for closure as
well as the ongoing creation of local youth soccer teams (Montgomery Community Association,
2012). The home of this Community Association, the Montgomery Community Centre is
currently of concern to residents due to its isolated location on the south side of 16th Avenue,
next to Shouldice Athletic Park. Currently, based on its location, the Montgomery Community
Centre is not reaching its full potential of:

The development of groups for educational, social, or neighborhood benefit

The encouragement for community social contact

Efforts to coordinate and extend community services


(Broady et al., 1990)

It is recommended that the Montgomery Community Centre be provided with a more


inclusive location, allowing for easy access to all community members. Due to Montgomery
being a well-established community there is little land available for development within the
geographic center of the community. The current location of the community center has a large
parking lot and an underutilized grass field adjacent to the building. It is therefore more feasible
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to reduce the isolation of the community center in its current location than to move it to a less
isolating land plot. This will be done by bringing other community amenities to the current
community center location to share facilities, resources and attract residents to frequent this
facility. The proposed lane reduction of 16th Avenue and the addition of a pedestrian scramble
at the intersection of 16th Avenue and Home Road will also help make this location more
accessible to the majority of the community. Shouldice Park will also help attract residents to
the south side of 16th Avenue.

FIGURE 14: MAC DEVELOPMENT AERIAL VIEW

The proposed mixed use facility based around the established community center will be
named the Montgomery Amenities Centre (MAC Block). This facility will host:

The Montgomery Community Centre

Montgomery Branch of the Calgary Public Library

Indoor community based recreation space

Having these amenities in one facility will lower the costs of infrastructural heating and
maintenance, while creating a community hub for residents to socialize and participate with
other community members. These affects are seen in a similar establishment in Brooklyn, New
York. Various other Calgary communities also have comparable venues, however, they include
local schools as opposed to community centers and are of a much larger scale than this
proposed project.

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Having a library within the community of Montgomery will provide the community with
many benefits. These benefits include:

The financial well-being of community businesses and residents

The facilitation of life-long learning

The provision of community programs, such as employment search assistance and book
clubs

The creation of a community gathering spot for all ages


(McClure et al. 2000)

With the projected increase in Montgomerys population, especially in the age group of
eight to twenty-two, the two local schools will not be adequate to host all of the indoor
recreational needs of community based sports teams. With the inclusion of indoor recreation
space to the MAC Block these stresses will be alleviated. Since these teams are run by the
Montgomery Community Association, it will be beneficial to have administration and
participation in the same venue, making MAC Block the central community hub. A proposed
fitness center may also be included in this facility for the use of all community residents to
facilitate an active lifestyle year round. This will help promote community health, increase life
expectancy and decrease stress on local health services (Bloom et al. 2005).

FIGURE 15: MIXED USE FACILITY

Through the creation of the proposed Montgomery Amenities Centre, the current
community center, and therefore Montgomery Community Association will become less isolated.
This center will act as a community hub and local gathering space for all residents to interact
and participate in community activities together. This along with other infrastructural changes to
Shouldice Park and 16th Avenue will make the MAC Block even more accessible to the
community.

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8.2 FESTIVAL SPACE


It is recommended that in 2050, Montgomery be the home to a permanent festival
space, incorporated into Shouldice Park along the Bow River. When the designated space is
not being used for festivals, it should still
be very accommodating to other various
recreational activities. The festival space
should be capable of holding an annual
festival which will allow Montgomery to
develop an identity and reputation
respected by all Calgary residents. The
permanent festival space will remind
Shouldice Park users of the importance of
community space for Montgomery despite
FIGURE 16: PROPOSED LOCATION FOR AMPHITHEATRE IN
SHOULDICE PARK

the fact that it has historically been used


by members of other communities for

recreation activities. It has been found that, festivals and city advertising can make especially
important contributions to the process of changing the image of a city, (Shin, 2004).

A proposal to the City of Calgary should recommend the construction of a permanent


stage and washroom facilities in Shouldice Park under the condition that it will not prevent
recreation activities when not being used. The result will be the opportunity for Montgomery to
showcase its identity to the rest of the
city, all year round. The festival will
bring in economic activity to the local
businesses of Montgomery without
disrupting the pre-existing park. The
festival will allow members of the
community to work together on a
common project that will benefit the
entire community.
FIGURE 17: FESTIVAL SPACE IN CALGARY, AB

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8.3 MOVIES IN THE PARK


In 2050, the area of Shouldice Park which is to
be designated for festival space could potentiality host
a variety of other events including outdoor movies.
These will take place weekly throughout the summer,
weather permitting. The stage constructed for festival
use provides an optimal venue, boasting a beautiful
backdrop, adequate space, available parking and bike
racks, as well as proximity to public transit. The
sharing of the facility will result in decreased
infrastructure and production costs. In addition,

FIGURE 18: AN EXAMPLE OF MOVIES IN THE


PARK

outdoor movies are a popular, environmentally friendly alternative to the traditional drive-in
movie, bringing a group of people together to a shared space. This fosters social interaction and
community cohesion while attracting other Calgarians, putting Montgomery on the map. These
proposed alterations will not only further promote Shouldice Park as a regional facility but turn it
into something that is a piece of Montgomery, a place residents can feel connected to and be
proud to call their own.

SECTION 9.0 LEBARON PLAZA


9.1 COMMUNITY PLAZA
With the redevelopment of the Safeway site
into a mixed use complex, the adjacent open space
will be transformed into an urban plaza that
encompasses flexible design to create a destination
and increase the image and identity of Montgomery.
Location is key for it to be a vital part of the
neighborhood, therefore placing the plaza adjacent to
the Safeway, near the intersection of Home Road and
FIGURE 19: LEBARON PLAZA MIXED USE
COMPLEX

Bowness (Shouldice) Road will allow it to be at the

heart of Montgomerys commercial corridor. Its location will also allow it to be close to the future
tram line on Bowness (Shouldice) Road.

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The plaza will provide a public open space rich with nature that can transform with the
seasons. In the summer it can act as an outdoor festival area and market venue while in the
winter months the plaza can be converted into an outdoor ice rink.

The design of the plaza will consider guidelines


pertaining to crime prevention through environmental design
(CPTED) to make for a safe destination with ample lighting and
barrier free design (Schneider, 2005). With the help of
community wide ideas such as public art, public washrooms
and fountains, the LeBaron Plaza will be able to cater to
patrons throughout the year, making it a popular destination in
Montgomery.
FIGURE 20: EXAMPLE OF AN URBAN
PLAZA

Many urban centers are now implementing the idea of a plaza such as Torontos YongeDundas Square, the Rockefeller Center Plaza in New York and the local Olympic Plaza in
Calgary. Plazas offer a wide range of benefits as they are economically stimulating for the area
by attracting investment and raising, as well as sustaining, land values. Environmentally they
preserve natural habitats that the local ecosystems benefit from. They become an escape for
people that would like to get away from the concrete jungle that most have been accustomed to
in an urban setting. It is said that plazas can improve physical and mental health (Woolley &
Rose, 2010). The community plazas function as a meeting spot encourages human interaction
and promotes community cohesion. The end result of increased foot traffic in the area is also a
key ingredient in reducing crime and fear of crime. The notion of Jane Jacobs eyes on the
street comes into play as the people in the community become more aware of their
surroundings due to more people on the street (Jacobs, 1961).

FIGURE 21: FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, OLYMPIC PLAZA AND YONGE-DUNDAS SQUARE

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SECTION 10.0 SHOULDICE TERRACE


10.1 AFFORDABLE HOUSING
Gentrification is a problem many communities in Calgary face. Gentrification on one side
has the effect of raising property values and removing blight. However, gentrification also
causes displacement through the speculation of capital gains due to housing improvement.
Gentrification turns a community into a site of capital investment. Amongst the most effective
solutions to gentrification is to maintain a stock of off market housing, along with other housing
policies. If Montgomery and the greater city of Calgary could maintain a ten percent minimum of
off market housing, community residents would have a better chance of keeping Montgomery a
socially inclusive community.

The City of Calgary suggests that affordable housing adequately suits the needs of lowand moderate- income households at costs below those generally found in the Calgary market.
It may take a number of forms that exist along a continuum (City of Calgary, 2002: 18). This
continuum can include a variety of housing stock to accommodate a diversity of lifestyles and
family sizes. The price of this housing is relative to the occupants income, typically costing
approximately one third.

The available off market housing in Montgomery will be integrated throughout new
developments, and will even include a number of fully detached and semidetached houses.
These houses will not be identifiable as social housing. Other additional measures to ensure
social justice in response to gentrification include rent controls and fixed property tax rates. Rent
controls prevent abuse from landlords to tenants by mandating the maximum increase of rent
over a certain period of time. Rent controls also prevent landlords from evicting tenants without
fair warning and adequate reasons. People with fixed incomes can apply for a property tax
freeze. It is often difficult for seniors and other residents on fixed incomes to predict and
anticipate changes in property taxes every year. To allow these residents predictability, a fixed
property tax system has been implemented for citizens on fixed incomes.

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Section 11.0 Bernard Boardwalk


11.1 BOARDWALK
One of Montgomerys most underutilized assets is the Bow River. The vision for
Montgomery 2050 includes the Bow River reaching its maximum potential as a useful
and attractive recreational space. Currently many cities situated along oceans, lakes or
rivers have a boardwalk or pathway system that helps improve access to, or at the very
least, enjoyment of the waterfront. These cities include Toronto and San Francisco.

FIGURE 22: AERIAL VIEW OF THE PROPOSED BERNARD BOARDWALK

As of 2012, Calgary does have a pathway system along the majority of the Bow
River, including the portion within Montgomery. However, improvement of this system
can have many social and economic benefits to the community. For example, in 2010
Calgarys East Village started the improvement of the Bow River pathway system east
of Centre Street. Upon the completion of the 2nd phase of this project, usage was
instantly increased while crime and deviance in the area dropped by up to seventy
percent in a few major crime categories (RCMP Centralized Analysis Section, 2012).
This drop in crime was also associated with the addition of new economic activities
taking place within the East Village.

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The 2012 Visioning Session revealed that


Montgomery residents were concerned with the
transient activity associated with the river and the
crime it brought to the community. With an
improved river system pathway, as well as diverse
economic pursuits in Montgomery this issue can
be resolved. It is recommended that an improved
Bow River Pathway be established along the
Montgomery section of the Bow River. This
pathway system should include:

multiple entrance points to the community

bicycle parking and sharing stations

public bathrooms and water fountains

raft rental and a launch point into the river

FIGURE 23: A BOARDWALK WALKWAY

The improvement of the river pathway into a boardwalk type atmosphere has the
potential to attract the commuter and recreational populations that use the current
pathway system, showcasing Montgomery as a destination community. The close
proximity to Shouldice Park will help ensure a regional population is frequenting the
area, potentially improving the economy of local Montgomery businesses as well. Being
able to use the river as another form of transportation, whether for commuting or
recreation, helps the sustainability of the community as well as it provides a diversified
range of activities for local residents.

FIGURE 24: NEWLY CONSTRUCTED RIVER WALK IN CALGARY, AB

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Section 12.0 Community Wide


12.1 TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT
One main goal for this redevelopment is to create a vibrant and successful Transit
Oriented Development (TOD) with the implementation and integration of successful design
practices. Bowness (Shouldice) Road is the main focus area that will be developed under TOD
guidelines as it will be the road that the future tram line will pass on. It will also act as a link
between the denser mixed use developments of Shouldice Terrace and LeBaron Plaza. TODs
are known to accompany a variety of housing, shopping and employment opportunities
connected through a network of streets and pathways for different mobility options (Belzer &
Autler, 2002). Special focus will be emphasized on walking and bicycling needs coupled by the
close proximity of amenities and services with minimum travel times. With the implementation of
a tram system on Bowness (Shouldice) road, Montgomery can become a vital hub
encompassing a complete, livable center.

Efficient Land Use


The goal of establishing a more
efficient land use pattern is to encourage
transit supportive land designations through
zoning. Offices, educational institutions,
retail, restaurants, civic services and
medium to high density residential are vital
aspects in its creation of an active regional
node. A good mix of uses close to the
transit station, approximately 400 to 600
meters in walking distance is one of TODs
vital elements (City of Calgary, 2006). This
proximity is also required to discourage non
transit supportive uses such as low intensity
development, warehouses, large format

FIGURE 25: TOD AREA OF INFLUENCE. 400M 600M


WALKING DISTANCE

wholesale stores, parking and car dealerships that shifts towards automobile focused
development rivaling the notion of a pedestrian oriented landscape.

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Density
Density can be defined as a physical description of people in relation to space (Pacione,
2001). It has become a word with varying emotions and its context differs depending on an
individuals perspective, but undoubtedly is one of the key traits of sustainable urban
developments. In terms of transit
oriented developments density should
be concentrated near the transit
station, lowering in density as it grows
outwards. Its success is dependent on
the initial plan, phasing strategies and
flexibility to meet changing community
needs. It is not to be forgotten that
density still has to pertain to the basic
guidelines of TODs 10 minute walking
radius centered on the town center

FIGURE 26: TOD IN SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA

or train station through high quality compact developments. This is achieved using a close
cluster building format regulated by various codes and restrictions to maintain a human scale
(Gordon and Richardson, 1997).

Design
Good design is required when dealing with compact area developments such as TODs.
Dense mixed use areas can become lackluster
loathsome places when not designed to the
volume of traffic or appropriate scale. The urban
landscape and architecture has to provide form
and function to the native area. With the
implementation of barrier free designs, it is
possible to create accessibility for all types of
people no matter what their demographic. The
architecture if possible needs to enable for all
FIGURE 27: AN EXAMPLE OF A STATION PLAZA

season design considering minor details such as

setbacks, attractiveness, and cohesiveness to existing structures in the vicinity (City of Calgary,
2006). Design includes more than the individual components, as every aspect is related to one
another such as the options of transit systems (trolleys, streetcars, light rail and buses) and
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mobility (bicycles, cars and foot traffic). Each has an effect on one another and must be taken
into consideration when planning and designing.

A key issue in designing TODs is


the ability to manage and balance non
transit supportive development such as
parking. Realistically vehicle use cannot
be eliminated so parking management
becomes crucial in balancing between the
pedestrian and automobile realm. It is
possible to accommodate automobiles by
providing sufficient small parking lots
without making it a priority over pedestrian
friendly development. By orienting the
buildings to the street and locating parking
to the rear and sides, there becomes a
greater emphasis on the pedestrian
domain (City of Calgary, 2006). This can
result in high quality streetscapes with
interesting varying architectural designs

FIGURE 28: TOD INTEGRATION

that put pedestrians at-grade (The


Canadian Urban Transit Association, 2004). Some cities have accomplished this in what is
called high streets such as Stephen Avenue in downtown Calgary.

Place Making
The last element that helps a TOD thrive and gain a unique identity is its ability to create
a sense of place. The train station or transit hub acts as a gateway to a destination, easily
accessible by foot, bicycle or transit by commuters, residents and visitors. This is made possible
through many ingenious ideas such as landmark buildings, public art, public spaces and
heritage of the area (City of Edmonton, 2007). In Montgomery LeBaron Plaza will be the
gateway and center for the community due to its convenient location to the various amenities in
the neighborhood.

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Some examples of successful transit oriented developments include Collingwood


Village in Vancouver and The Bridges in Calgary. Both cases saw increased benefits in the
economic, environmental and social realm. Economically TODs create jobs by increased
private and public investment that leads to higher and more stable property values for the area
(CMHC, 2009). Higher densities and increased ridership also leads to increased foot traffic for
local businesses. The city also gains from the compact developments as it reduces urban
sprawl and wasteful infrastructure. The denser development and lower use of automobiles has
many environmental benefits as it reduces traffic pollution, congestion and environmental
destruction (Parker and Arrington, 2002). Overall these benefits work together to provide the
people with a higher quality of life. It creates an atmosphere where residents can live, work and
play in close proximity through greater mobility options. Through reduced household spending
on transportation, and lowered automobile use, people can distribute their income into other
important needs and lead a healthier walking oriented lifestyle (Transportation Research Board,
2002).

12.2 CYCLING NETWORK


By 2050, Calgarys Municipal Development Plans stats the current city-wide cycling
network will be expanded. As Montgomery is part of this network, it is recommended that
upgrades take place to the current
infrastructure. The plan is to improve
Montgomerys cycling pathways by
implementing two types of paths in the
community. One will be a mixture of leisure
pathways which cater to slower cyclists and
leisure purposes. These pathways will
connect to green spaces and leisure
facilities, such as the MAC Block, the
FIGURE 29: DESIGNATED BICYLE PATHWAYS

Bernard Boardwalk and a number of parks.

The other will be a faster network of pathways which cater to faster cyclists, providing a sort of
bicycle highway for commuters. These pathways will connect to the downtown, the University of
Calgary and other major employment areas.

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This type of system would be modeled off of the Dutch main cycling network which
consists of 3 different types of pathways; one pathway or leisure types of riding, the second type
of pathways that run along residential and inner city roads and lastly the highway pathways
which is meant for long distance commuter riding (Fietsberaad, 2012).

Cycling networks have a variety of benefits spurring from the increased ridership,
including that cycling is a zero emissions mode of transportation. This means that it does not
release greenhouse gases into the environment (City of Calgary, 2009 CTP). In addition, this
mode of transportation is also a cheaper alternative to owning an automobile, as the cost of
owning a bicycling is only a fraction of owning a car. Increased cycling activity has other benefits
as well, for example, people get exercise while traveling, which can result in a decrease in
health problems and hence less spending on health care (City of Calgary, 2011 Cycling
Strategy). Finally, the infrastructure needed for cars such as roads, signals and maintenance of
roads far outweighs the cost of infrastructure needed for cycling (Katzey, 2003).

12.3 VEHICLE SHARING PROGRAMS


In 2050, it is expected that Calgary will have
implemented a citywide bicycle-sharing program as the
result of the creation of Calgarys cycling network.
Calgarys bicycle-sharing program would follow the
same format as Montreals Bixi bicycle sharing
program. The bicycle-sharing program would work in

FIGURE 30: CAR SHARING PROGRAM

the following way: docking stations would be built in


various locations around Calgary, including Montgomery. The public could borrow a bicycle for
period of time for a small fee (Bixi/ DDM Media, 2003). This allows the public to use a bicycle
without needing to own one, making this a convenient and affordable alternative. In 2050,
several docking stations should be located near public transit stations and major plazas or
destinations throughout Montgomery.

Due to the projected rising costs of fuel, in 2050, Calgarys current car-sharing program
is expected to expand to Montgomery. A fleet of shared vehicles will be scattered throughout
Montgomery, allowing the public to borrow a car for a period of time and return it (TRB, 2005).
Similarly to bike-sharing, this allows individuals to use a car while not having to deal with the
problems and costs of ownership (TRB, 2005).
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There are also benefits to having a bicycling sharing program, which includes the
benefits listed for cycling. It also allows the public to borrow a bicycle as necessity arises, for an
inexpensive rate while not having to worry about maintaining it. Another benefit of a car-sharing
program is that it will ultimately decrease the amount of cars on the road (TRB, 2005). This will
decrease our carbon footprint since less cars are on the road releasing greenhouse gases.

12.4 WALKABILITY
Walkability is a reflection of how friendly an area is to walking. Academically it is defined
as:
The extent to which the built environment
supports and encourages walking by
providing for pedestrian comfort and safety,
connecting people with varied destinations
within a reasonable amount of time and
effort, and offering visual interest in journeys
throughout the network. (Bernick, 1997)
FIGURE 31: MULTI-USE PATHS IN CALGARY, AB

The goal for the community of Montgomery is to create a walkable community which will
facilitate efficient, safe, and enjoyable travel and universal accessibility through the expansion
and improvement of pedestrian sidewalks, pathways, and crosswalks. Expansion and
improvements include:

eliminating sidewalk gaps to create connectivity,

increasing the width of pathways to increase flow of pedestrian traffic in both directions

removing obstructions such as sign posts and utility poles

adding more light along walkways to increase safety at all hours of the day

implement buffers between the street and sidewalks to safely separate vehicles, cyclists,
and pedestrians

increase connectivity to transit and mix use developments offering goods and services

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The expansion and improvement of walkability in Montgomery can lead to higher density
streets which can be beneficial for the community in many ways, including:

a reduction in infrastructure costs for automobiles (e.g., traffic lights, larger roads, etc.)

reduces the dependence on automobile transportation, hence reducing congestion


problems

improves air quality

helps increase safety by lowering crime and deviance with the increase of eyes on the
streets

leads to social interaction

promotes active communities

In addition, studies have shown that walkable communities can significantly increase
retail sales and property values (Victoria Transport Policy Institute, 2011). According to Joe
Cortright (2009), the President and principal economist for Impresa, a Portland consulting firm
which specializes in regional economic analysis, innovation and industry clusters, Houses with
the above-average levels of walkability command a premium of about $4,000 to $34,000 over
houses with just average levels of walkability in the typical metropolitan areas studied. By using
an economic technique called hedonic regression and Walk Score algorithm, he was able to
estimate how much market value home buyers implicitly attach to houses with higher Walk
Scores. Walk Score measures the number of typical consumer destinations within walking
distance of a house, with scores ranging from 0 (car dependent) to 100 (most walkable). His
study showed that in the typical market, an additional one point increase in Walk Score was
associated with between a $700 and $3,000 increase in home values. By creating a more
walkable community, we hope to make Montgomery one of the most desirable, unique, and
inviting communities in the City of Calgary.

12.5 ACCESSIBILITY
By 2050, the public realm of Montgomery should be modified to accommodate an aging
population with limited mobility along with differently abled residents in the community through a
community redesign of public spaces, roads and sidewalks to accommodate people with limited
mobility.

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One such policy of Urban Braille is defined as a system of tactile information serving the
needs of the visually impaired. By utilizing both color and texture contrast it provides warning
signals and clues related to orientation. (City of Hamilton, 2012). The sidewalks and crosswalks
in Montgomery can be fitted with a multi-textured walking surface that allows for visually
impaired residents to feel the direction
of the street. A change in texture is
applied to corners and crosswalks to
notify pedestrians of the different
terrain. Larger intersections are fitted
with sirens that when activated
provided an auditory clue to the
direction of the street. Street furniture
and business signs could be relocated
FIGURE 32: MULTI-TEXTERED WALKING SURFACE

to not obstruct the sidewalk.

Other design details can be implemented to accommodate residents with limited


mobility. All sidewalks could be widened to allow for a minimum of two wheelchairs to move side
by side. Main roads should be wide enough for three or more wheelchairs to move side by side.
Street corners should have a ramp to allow easy wheelchair access. On residential roads the
crosswalk should be built at grade with the sidewalk. A raised crosswalk is both easier for
wheelchair bound residents and residents with limited mobility to cross, and it has a secondary
effect of slowing vehicular traffic similar to a normal speed bump. Additional measures to
accommodate for persons with limited mobility include general traffic calming measures and the
implementation of pedestrian scrambles.

The quality of sidewalk and street scape will extend to the many parks within
Montgomery. Additional paved pathways could be installed to allow easy access for residents
with limited mobility. Additionally, seating and furniture in parks allows residents to rest and
enjoy the green space. Specific tables and furniture can be designed to allow wheelchair
access.

The motivation to cater and accommodate for persons with disabilities reflects the
communities desire to be inclusive, and promote a better quality of life for the entire population.
Through design initiatives, all community members can have better access to the various
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services and businesses available to residents. By accommodating more residents, the


economic base of the community can grow from increased pedestrian traffic. These design
initiatives provide sustainable economic growth to local businesses by accommodating this
often neglected group. The renovations of the public realm will have a secondary effect of
encouraging walking and park use.

12.6 HERITAGE INITIATIVES


The Calgary Heritage Strategy, adopted by the City of Calgary in 2008 is aimed at
making the city a leader in the preservation of historic buildings and resources (Calgary
Heritage Strategy, 2008). Even earlier than this, in 2002, Calgary implemented the Citys Open
Space Plan, which included the preservation and promotion of cultural landscapes within the
city (Calgary Heritage Strategy, 2008). These landscapes can include land patterns, roadways,
paths, water features and vegetation. This is important to individual communities, as well as the
city as a whole for the following reasons:

Knowledge of the past helps to foster a community understanding and appreciation of


how the current situation arose

The reuse of buildings significantly reduces the energy costs of demolition and
construction

Provides a unique and attractive street scape that adds a local character and sense of
place

The plan for Montgomery, while adhering to the preservation policies outlined in the
Calgary Heritage Strategy and the Open Space Plan, is to take preservation one step further by
also acknowledging and honoring the past through other measures as well. Unfortunately,
buildings such as the Shouldice Family Mansion, which would now match the criteria for historic
preservation, were destroyed many years ago. As such, the historic initiatives of preservation for
these buildings are impossible.

As the community stands in 2012, it is recommended that preservation techniques be


implemented on the former Montgomery Town Hall, as it was a major institution in the creation,
growth, prosperity and eventually annexation of Montgomery by the City of Calgary. These
techniques, including tax incentives, demolition disincentives, and direct land use designation
should be easy to implement as the property is owned by the City of Calgary.

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While preservation does not guarantee heritage status to the building, it does help make
the building eligible through the Calgary Heritage Authority, as well as provides the listed
benefits mentioned above (Calgary Heritage Strategy, 2008). Similar preservation techniques
are also recommended for cultural landscapes within Montgomery. These landscapes include
the Bow River basin and the grid patterned street scape.

Montgomerys Heritage initiatives will go beyond just preservation. Due to the rich history
of Montgomery and the lack of physical spaces left to preserve, an awareness and educational
branch of these heritage initiatives will also take place. This will be implemented mainly through
the strategic naming, or renaming, of roads, public spaces or developments. While the history
and significance of these spaces may not be seen through their physical nature, the names of
these places will provide the same knowledge, understanding and local sense of place as
preservation does. Proposed names are:

Bernard Boardwalk (named after James Bernard Shouldice)

LeBaron Plaza (named after the first mayor of Montgomery)

Shouldice Terrace (named after Montgomerys original name)

FIGURE 33: HERITAGE CYCLE

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The renaming of Bowness Road to Shouldice Road (named after James Bernard
Shouldice). Through funding from the Calgary Heritage Authority, based on heritage advocacy
and educational contributions, plaques, monuments or other forms of public art will be erected
at each of these sites to illustrate the historical significance of the name to the present day
community (Calgary Heritage Strategy, 2008).Similar name changes and implementations have
taken place worldwide in successful attempts at preserving history. Red Square in Moscow
provides a good example, as the squares name was changed several times to reflect different
aspects of Russias past. Also, several monuments and plaques currently exist in the square to
educate visitors on the areas heritage. (History of Red Square, 2012) Implementing these
heritage policies will help Montgomery residents appreciate and understand the community they
live in and are a part of. This understanding can lead to value, pride and camaraderie which will
create social bonds that have the potential to help make Montgomery one of the most complete
communities in Calgary.

12.7 PUBLIC ART


An increase in public art throughout the community will help to foster a greater sense of
community, as well as promote Montgomery as a more cultural community. Public art positively
reflects upon the community, as well as offers educational experiences for community residents
and visitors. Public art helps to energize park spaces and is atheistically pleasing. Outdoor art
spaces will create a more welcoming and beautiful environment for the community of
Montgomery. It also provides the potential for the creation and awareness of a unified
Montgomery identity, which will be shared with the City of Calgary and further distinguish it from
surrounding communities, such as Bowness.

12.8 GREEN INITIATIVES


Green infrastructure solutions should exist throughout the entire community of
Montgomery in 2050, ranging from small-scale home improvements to larger green roof
developments. Green initiatives are to be implemented to help protect and restore naturally
occurring ecosystems. Sustainability goals throughout the community strive to maintain and
create a biodiversity of ecological, social and economic benefits.

Benefits to creating a more green-friendly community can include, but are not limited to,
environmental improvements, preservation of the natural surroundings, increased recreational
opportunities, and a greater sense of connection with the neighboring environment and
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community. Green initiatives can be identified in many forms of environmentally friendly


construction, building, or renovations.

Green roof polices are most effective in areas where a drainage basin contains high
proportion of roof top areas, which often cosines with large areas with impervious surfaces
(Carter and Fowler, 2008). Green
rooftops are a sustainable option to
address concerns regarding excess
storm water runoff, lack of green space,
and urban thermal impacts. The
existence of these three issues is
justification enough to suggest the
need to construct green roofs in
Montgomery, which is an acceptable
location for potential green roofs. Three
major benefits that are associated with
FIGURE 34: AN EXAMPLE OF A GREEN INITIATIVE - SOLAR PANEL
ROOFS

the construction of green roofs are:


energy conservation, storm water

reduction, and air quality improvement (Carter and Fowler, 2008). Additional advantages to
constructing a green roof include; increased aesthetics, new habitat provisions, and an increase
in biodiversity. Green roofs also absorb sound waves; whereas hard urban surfaces normally
reflect and project sound (Getter and Rowe, 2006).

The existence of green roofs in residential neighborhoods, like Montgomery, introduces


a more appealing draw to the outdoors. Green roofs can be viewed as a positive, aesthetically
pleasing feature in communities (Tzoulas et al., 2007). Green roofs and other green
improvements throughout the neighborhood will encourage stronger social cohesion. The
presence of people outdoors creates a greater sense of public security, and helps to preserve a
greater sense of community.

12.9 ZONING AND BUILDING HEIGHT


By 2050, Montgomery should be zoned to accommodate a variety of housing densities
and options throughout the community. Zoning regulations will be in place to allow locals to set
up small businesses while big box developments will be discouraged. Chain stores may be
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present in the community, but they will remain at a smaller scale rather than a big box type of
development. Building heights will need to be addressed in order to accommodate the
projected increase in density to the neighborhood in 2050. In keeping with the small town
character of Montgomery, buildings will be a maximum of five or six stories in height.

Rezoning the area to allow for mixed use developments and a wider variety of housing
options will have economic, social and environmental benefits. There will be increased space
for a wider variety of business options. This cuts down on the need for community residents to
leave the community to get the things they need. Also, since the development is happening
upward rather than consuming new land, there is a decreased need to provide new
infrastructure. This would also accommodate a wider variety of residents that could afford to
live in the neighborhood.

12.10 PUBLIC TOILETS AND WATER FOUNTAINS


Following the 2012 Visionary Session, it is suggested that planners work to expand an
existing program in Calgary that began in 2005 (City of Calgary, 2008) to construct fully
automated, public washroom and water fountain facilities throughout the city. Some
recommended areas throughout
Montgomery to construct these
structures are:

along Shouldice Road NW

within Shouldice Park

Along with consideration for


other locations, such as
Montalban Park and LeBaron
Plaza.
FIGURE 35: EXAMPLE OF PUBLIC TOILET IN CALGARY, AB

The facilities will provide the


necessary services for people using public space whether it is in the streets or the park. The
automated facilities have many features including:

They are self-managing; they open themselves in the morning and close themselves in
the evening at pre-set times (or 24 hour operation if so desired) while traditional
bathrooms require personnel to do that.

They have anti-vandalism and anti-loitering features which traditional bathrooms do not.

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They have self-cleaning features to keep the unit clean between manual cleanings,
which in traditional bathrooms would require full time attendants.

They have monitoring systems which provide operational and system performance
metrics including diagnostics for problems.

They can be picked up and moved to another location since they are pre-fabricated
structures.

They are cleaner than traditional restrooms because of the self-cleaning cycle that uses
fresh sanitizer and water to clean, while traditional toilets use mop water.

Automated Public Toilets can also be retrofitted into existing bathrooms to convert that
facility into an automated toilet. (City of Calgary, 2008)

The inclusion of automated toilet and water fountain facilities makes for a clean and
inclusive environment for both residents and visitors of the community.

12.11 MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT


Throughout the community there should be a concentrated focus on mixed-use
developments along the Shouldice road corridor, a small podium style development above the
already existing Safeway, and the potential for the development of off campus housing in
Shouldice Terrace.

The goal of mixed-use development is to encourage medium-density residential


development that is street-friendly, and is designed to integrate well into the pedestrian-street
frontage (Montgomery ARP).The previous Montgomery Area Redevelopment Plan encourages
a sensitive increase in residential density near the Bowness Road/46 Street Commercial Core.
This would extend the range of housing types available in the community and increase the local
customer base for nearby businesses. Policies and design guidelines are proposed to ensure
new buildings are pedestrian orientated and integrate well with nearby low density residential
areas (City of Calgary, 2008).

Mixed-use developments have a positive effect on vendor diversity and aid in creating a
more attractive street scape. Accessibility to local shopping helps to minimize the need to travel
further distances to obtain household goods and necessities. In comparison to single-detached
homes, mixed use developments help to lower household expenditures, because the uses are
being shared, making the buildings themselves more sustainable.
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FIGURE 36: RENDERING OF A MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT

SECTION 13.0 CONCLUSION


With the help of the community through the visioning process, and in partnership with
the city we were able to create a vision for the future of Montgomery for the year 2050. One of
the key elements to the plan was to incorporate sustainability of environmental, social and
economic aspects. It was also an important factor to preserve the small town feel of
Montgomery with its rich history, heritage and culture. Therefore the main vision was to create
an Urban Village situated within the greater context of Calgary.

Through the use of smart planning techniques and development, Montgomery will become a
diverse accessible community that is a mix of the past, the success of the present and an
example of the future.

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Section 14.0 References


Broady, M., Clarke, R., Marks, H., Mills, R., Sims, E., Smith, M. & White, L. (Ed. Clarke,
R.) (1990) Enterprising Neighbours. The development of the community association in
Britain, London: National Federation of Community Organisations
Calgary Heritage Strategy (2008), Land Use Planning and Policy Planning,
Development and Assessment. City of Calgaryhttp://www.calgary.ca/PDA/LUPP/Documents/Publications/heritage-calg-heritagestrategy.pdf
Charles R. McClure, Bruce T. Fraser, Timothy W. Nelson, Jane B. Robbins (2000).
ECONOMIC BENEFITS AND IMPACTS FROM PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN THE STATE
OF FLORIDA. Information Use Management and Policy Institute School of Information
Studies, Florida State University.
Chorney, R.. (2010). The Power of Farmers' Markets. Municipal World, 120(12), 56. Retrieved April 15, 2012, from CBCA Reference and Current Events.
City of Calgary, 2009. Calgary Transportation Plan 2009.
http://www.calgary.ca/Transportation/TP/Documents/CTP2009/calgary_transportation_p
lan_2009.pdf
City of Calgary, 2011. Cycling strategy 2011.
http://www.calgary.ca/Transportation/TP/Pages/Cycling/Cycling-Strategy/CyclingStrategy.aspx.
City of Calgary 2002. City of Calgary: Corporate Affordable Housing
Strategy. Approved 2002 July 17
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By Group 2

Rayner DSouza
Nancy Mai Pham
Rebecca Arabsky
Caitlyn Bidochka
Phil Yuk Choi
Bronwyn Culham
Stephen Deglow
Adam Ferris
Fiona Hamilton
Evan Rafuse
Adam Zendel

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