You are on page 1of 16

$1

UCCMM
MAAMWI
NAADAMADAA

INTEGRATED SERVICE

NIIBIN / SUMMER
UMMER
MMER
R2
20
2015
015
015
01

Why Canadas Education History Matters:


What is Important in my Communitys Education System?

of education-related responsibilities is known internationally (and paradoxi- people and Nations of Canada? As a
over a hundred years ago, we now have cally) as having one of the highest levels member of the Aboriginal Institutes in
what is largely a decentralized and rel- of educational attainment within a rea- the higher education circles in Ontario,
atively uncoordinated Post Secondary sonably highly accessible post-secondary KTEI remains keenly interested in shapEducation(PSE) system that varies from system?
ing and contributing to what the future
NOT KNOWING WHETHER THIS is province to province. And furthermore,
While these may be interesting ques- may hold for our Anishinabek learners as
already a well-known fact in Indigenous despite this decentralized system in higher tions to ponder by themselves, how and a community-based PSE learning orgahigher education circles, how many of us education, did you also know that Canada what do they mean for the Indigenous nization. But first, lets go back in time
in Indigenous post-secondary
to briefly reflect on the history
education are really aware of
of post-secondary education in
Canadas history and context
Canada.
in the formulation and creThe history of higher educaation of its past and current
tion and the complex Constitusystems? And why should
tional arrangements surroundthis matter in the 21st centuing higher education in Canada
begins with the French (Cathry to us as Indigenous people
olic francophone) and British
living in Canada?
In the field of higher edu(English Protestant) colonial
cation specifically, did you
influence and impact in Canada.
know that there is actually no
In these early systems, higher
formalized system of higher
education became part of the
education in Canada: meanbroader agenda as a means of
ing no national policy, no
strengthening culture and values
national ministry, no national
during these early years of coloquality assessment or accrednization. (First point of interest
itation system? This does not
here: use of the phrase strengthmean nor is it intended to
ening culture). Then, with the
say that the higher education
British North America Act of
sector (college and university)
1867, the federal and provincial
itself does not have these elelevels of government were crements. Of course, they have
ated, and it was at this critical
relevant policies and minpoint in time that the relative
importance of education was
istries to report to. Instead,
this is to highlight the fact
deemed a less important politithat as a result of Canadas Aboriginal protesters march through downtown Ottawa to Parliament Hill in January, 2013
EDUCATION continued on page 2
Constitutional devolution (Photograph by: JULIE OLIVER/Postmedia News , Postmedia News)
BY BEVERLEY
ROY-CARTER
KENJGEWIN TEG
EDUCATION

Inside Maamwi
MAAMWINews
News- -NIIBIN
Niibin/Summer
2015
2015
NEW ART, OJIBWE
SHOWS
CONSTELLATIONS
TO HEAT UP OCF
WITH
ISAAC
THIS
SUMMER
MURDOCH

SEE PAGE 5
SEE PAGE 5

I N T E G R A T E D

CONTACT
A LOOK
NORTH:
AT
GETTING
THE SOCIAL
YOUR
TRAINING
NAVIGATOR
ONLINE
INITIATIVE
SEE PAGE 6

HEALTHY
FNSSP SCIENCE
EATING:
FAIR A- EVERYONE
FOCUS ON
IS
LOCAL
A WINNER!
FISH!
SEE PAGE 17
13

SEE PAGE 9

S E R V I C E

E X C E L L E N C E

I N

A C T I O N

Page 2

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS

Education History Matters


...continued from page 1
cal concern, and responsibility for education was delegated to the new provinces to
govern and administer. (Second point of
interest here: the origins of debates of who
is responsible for Indigenous education in
Canada).
After Confederation in 1867, the Roman
Catholic Church continued to play a major
role in education, especially in Quebec
(Third point of interest here: the origins of
Indian residential schools). In response to
growing disputes occurring in denominational institutions, together with the reality
of provincial jurisdiction as supported by
public funds, Ontario began introducing
secular structures of higher education. It
was these actions which eventually led to
the current legacies in higher education
we see today. We see these legacies in current PSE governance structures in which
academic policy is led by the academic
senate and the administrative functions are
delegated to a board. During these early
times in higher education development, a
university education was predominantly
for children of political elites, and, for a
period of time up until pre-World War II
(WWII), there were no major confrontations in this realm of higher education for
the most part, as groups in this era tended
to share the same social values. (Fourth
point of interest here: cultural identity
viewed as non-important and policy goals
of assimilation of First Nation population).
However, the post WWII period saw
the start of massification of higher education in Canada as enrolment in Canadian
universities increased by 46%. Through
paid tuition and living costs, and direct
federal operating grants, these federal
actions were beginning to cause Constitutional concerns for some of the provinces, and the shift began towards grants,
transfers, and equalization components
for provinces to individually administer.
By the early 1970s, each of the provinces, including Ontario, began to form and
create their own distinct and expanded
university systems (which largely operated with full autonomy) and the college
sector (which were not as autonomous,
but were rather viewed as instruments of
public policy). This would then be the
structure in higher education for the next
two decades. (Fifth point of interest here:
Aboriginal institutes in education begin to
emerge and assert their roles).
Then, the economic recession of the
1990s brought reductions in provincial

transfers and the deregulation of tuition


fees in PSE; but once the federal budget
deficit was eliminated, federal influence
in higher education shifted to new areas
of investment which included student
financial assistance and research and
development, instead of direct transfers.
What does this all mean for an Aboriginal
Institute in Ontario like KTEI that offers
post-secondary programs including all of
the other First Nation elementary and
secondary schools across Turtle Island?
Working within the discipline of education, and higher education, first requires we
have a clear understanding of the historical
influences, such as those described above,
which have lead up to and affect our ability
to understand and problem solve current
issues. The good news is that Indigenous
Nations are so very fortunate across Turtle
Island to have so many great community
organizations in the field of education and
post-secondary education that are sincerely and genuinely dedicated to helping our
students succeed with pride in their cultural identity. But, unfortunately, sincerity
may not be enough action and implementation is needed the most.
While this article barely skims the surface in an attempt to understand a long
history, and posits that we are in the midst
of working through the effects of being
within a colonized education system and
finding our way towards our own systems
(not just schools), the intention of this
article is really quite simple: to provoke a
conversation that really needs to happen
at the grassroots level of our Nation with
parents, aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents and everyone. What is the worldview,
philosophy and purpose of my communitys education system? Do we actually have
a system or do we just have the start of a
system which includes a school? And, am
I okay with that?
By taking the time and effort to learn
and understand with compassion and
integrity, the chronology of education
systems development in Canada, and our
individual and collective Aboriginal experiences in it, we will then begin to fully
understand and recognize why change
needs to happen to help our future generations succeed in the world. As weve
seen in the recent past, this is so critically
important especially in todays federal
climate which supports legislated governance in Aboriginal education.
Now, some may say that this historical
and colonial education experience is now
our past, and that we must charge in to the

future and ensure our future generations


are provided an education that will get
them jobs and a future in Canadian society.
Certainly, there is merit to the objective of
getting an education in order to get a job
or career as an outcome no one would
disagree with this - but we must also ask
ourselves whether the reality in our First
Nation schools and communities today
is that we are still seeing and living the
results and remnants of this colonial education experience. We see this articulated
far too often in the current issues expressed
many times over as access issues in education, participation rates in education, and
graduation success rates in education at
the various transition points. But once
we begin to understand this history, and
place it within a current context of what
we are doing or not doing well, we will all
be in a better position to articulate clear,
concise perspectives on influencing meaningful change. We need to articulate our

own purpose(s) for Indigenous lifelong


learning (aka education), and build the
components and pillars of a strong system.
And so here is the question again: what is
the worldview, philosophy and purpose of
my community and my Nations education
system?
Note: This article uses the work of Glen
Jones (2014) describing Canadas higher education history in An Introduction to Higher
Education in Canada. In K.M. Joshi and
Saee Paivandi (eds.), Higher Education
Across Nations (vol. 1, pp. 1-38) Delhi: B.
R. Publishing.
The reflective and inquiry pieces relating
this history to Indigenous peoples has been
added by B. Roy-Carter of KTEI, a current
post-graduate student at the University of
Toronto/OISE.

KTEI AGM

Thurs Aug. 20th


Presentation of 2014-2015 Annual Report and
Financial Statements
Board and staff award presentations
Questions, comments and ideas for KTEI events and
programming welcomed!
Light lunch served, everyone welcome, open to public
KTEI is an eco-certified school - please remember to bring
your feast bag

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

Page 3

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS

Quill Workshop Experience with Mina and Theodore Toulouse

giggled every time someone said it.


yourself. Now picture trying to get that quill boxes. I also want to say that now I
This was my first time doing quill work. sucker through a piece of tree! It was hard. understand why quill work is so expensive.
Ive always marveled at quill boxes and The group got through it like champs with The amount of time and work it takes to
the amount of detail that is put into them. no tears or band aids, and tons of laughs! put them together is totally worth it. I
To say the least, I was excited to try it out Mina and Theodore are great storytellers, hope to see these two again. We had a
myself. Since I am the summer student, they made the workshop very enjoyable great time learning and laughing. This
MINA AND THEODORE ARE from here at the OCF, I tried a smaller project; with their easygoing attitudes and conta- workshop was very much appreciated by
Sagamok, and they made the trip down earrings. After only a day I had made my gious laughs. We learned a lot from them everyone who participated. We are all very
here to MChigeeng to teach us how to very first pair out of quills, birch bark and in three days. We even had a few visitors happy with our new creations.
do quill work. Mina says it is a dying art. sweet grass! I was so proud. Then Mina come join us, all the way from Germany!
Chi Miigwetch Mina and Theodore
I couldnt help but feel proud of what they suggested I make a necklace to match.
Everyone did amazing work on their
were doing here; teaching others their art Alright I said wheres my mcgoo?! and projects, making medallions, earrings, or
a few hours later
and passion.
I had the pleasure of sitting in on this I had a whole set
workshop and oh boy, did I ever enjoy with minimal
myself ! The group was awesome, and damage to my
the teachers were incredible. They spoke fingers!
mostly in Ojibwe and I was able to pick up
If you have
a few words, along with learning a few new ever worked
ones. Mcgoos is my favorite. Throughout with a leaththe whole workshop we heard I need a er needle, you
mcgoos! or wheres my mcgoos! (the know how much
awl, used to poke holes in the birch bark). it hurts to acciI think its a fun word to say, and we always dentally poke
BY JORDON
PANAMICK
OCF SUMMER STUDENT

Mina Toulouse (facilitator) & Jordon Panamick (OCF summer


student)

UNITED CHIEFS AND COUNCILS


OF MNIDOO MNISING

on the
WEB

WWW.UCCMM.CA/

Page 4

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS

FNSSP School Success Story

feasting, Spring ceremonies, and he also


performed at major events.
Outside of his busy school schedule,
Mckenzie enjoys various hobbies and
interests, such as regalia making, various
sports, hunting, drumming, and assisting elders
whenever he can.
This school has a lot
of great teachers and
staff. I would not be
where I am today without all the support and
encouragement that I
have received recalls
Mckenzie, when asked
about his high school
experience at Nbisiing.
In the fall of 2015,
Mckenzie will be heading to Canadore College
to complete his dream of
becoming a youth worker.
Congratulations to
Mckenzie Ottereyes-Eagle,
Mckenzie Ottereyes-Eain his traditional regalia,
celebrating his native culture
gle a true success!
during the school pow wow

FNSSP
KENJGEWIN TEG
EDUCATION
M C K E N Z I E OT T E REYES-EAGLE IS CREE
from the Waswanipi First
Nation and is graduating
from Nbisiing Secondary
School (KTEI-FNSSP
member school).
During his time at Nbisiing Secondary School,
Mckenzie was involved in
a variety of extracurricular activities: he travelled
to New Brunswick on a
youth exchange, met a
famous singer, and had
the opportunity to celebrate his native culture
to name a few. Mckenzie participated in the
school drum group, local
pow wows, regular sweats,
water ceremonies, drum

NOOJMOWIN TEG HEALTH


CENTRE AGING AT HOME VAN
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
Did you know that there is transportation services available?
If you are 55 years and/or older and are a Manitoulin Island resident, then you are
eligible to access this transportation service. Transportation can be booked for
medical appointments, home management activities (such as banking /shopping) as
well as group outings. However, priority will be given for medical appointments.
The Aging at Home Vans are available 5 days a week (Monday to Friday) and
available on a FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED basis and as per the Aging at Home
Van guidelines. Please note that the service provides pick-up and drop-off
transportation services only and is not intended to provide medical escort
assistance.

UCCMM
MAAMWI
NAADAMADAA

INTEGRATED SERVICE

INTEGRATED SERVICE / EXELLENCE IN ACTION

Our mission is to be the leading provider of information, services and


tools to inspire and support First Nations organizations and individuals
on Mnidoo Mnising.
Maamwi News is published quarterly by The United Chiefs and Councils
of Mnidoo Mnising through Kenjgewin Educational Institutes (KTEI)
Graphics Department.
Inquiries can be delivered to the
UCCMM office C/O Peggy Simon: psimon@uccmm.ca
Submissions directed to the KTEI Graphics Dept.:
graphicdesigner@ktei.net
Printers: Sunmedia / North Bay
678

Staff:
Editor/Layout & Design: Patrick Kiley
Editors: Beverley Roy-Carter, Connie Freeman
Contributors: Maamwi Naadamadaa Partners
UCCMM TRIBAL COUNCIL: 1110 Hwy 551, P.O. Box 275,
MChigeeng, ON, P0P 1G0, Tel: (705) 377-5307 Fax : (705) 377-5309
KENJGEWIN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE: 374 Highway 551, P.O. Box 328
MChigeeng, ON, P0P 1G0, Tel: (705) 377-4342, Fax: (705) 377-4379
UCCM ANISHINAABE POLICE: 5926 Highway #540, P.O. Box 332
MChigeeng, ON, P0P 1G0, Tel: (705) 377-7135, Fax: (705) 377-5583
KINA GBEZHGOMI CHILD SERVICES: 98 Pottowatomi St.,
Wikwemikong, Ontario P0P 2J0, Tel: (705) 859-2100, Fax: (705) 859-2195
NOOJMOWIN TEG HEALTH CENTRE: 48 Hillside Rd., AOK First Nation,
Little Current, Ontario P0P 1K0, Tel: (705) 368-2182
MNAADMODZAWIN HEALTH SERVICES: 48 Hillside Rd., Postal Bag
2002, Little Current, ON, P0P 1K0, Tel: (705) 368-2182, Fax: (705) 368-2229
OJIBWE CULTURAL FOUNDATION: 15 Highway 551, P.O. Box 278
MChigeeng, ON, P0P 1G0, Tel: (705) 377- 4902, Fax: (705) 377- 5460

There is also a 24 hour cancellation notice requirement so the van can be made
available to other clients in need.
Please note: The Aging at Home Van Transportation services are not intended to be
used when other means of transportation are available and when other
transportation costs are available (ie. FNIHB medical transportation, Northern Travel
grants, etc.)

If you would like to book the Aging at Home Van or to find


out more information, please contact:
Melissa Biedermann at (705) 368-2182 ext. 201
www.noojmowin-teg.ca

FIRST NATION STUDENT SUCCESS PROGRAM

F N S S P
on the web

WWW.FNSSP.COM

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

Page 5

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS

Teach In Ojibwe Constellations with Isaac Murdoch


BY RACHEL LEWIS
KENJGEWIN TEG
EDUCATION

because we wont protect the land. The


answer isnt in going to meetings. So what
is the answer? Its in getting to know the
land inside and out, relearning the history
of that land and our language. I believe

linx and otter.


Beneath a night sky of stars and broken
cloud cover, with the tree frogs singing,
Isaac told stories of the Ojiiganung (Big
Dipper) The creation of seasons, Bgo-

sons. The stories held the audience spellbound, evoked strong sentiments and left
listeners grateful for the teachings received.
Isaac shared, My grandmother told me
if you ever want to know something, just
look up. That knowledge just hangs
right above us every single night; it
blankets us during the night. The evening with Isaac was filled with teachings upon teachings. In speaking about
the Milky Way, he shared that, Our
ancestors are travelling down that road,
the more we look at it (the Milky Way)
the more knowledge were going to get.
Fittingly, Isaac encouraged the audience by telling them, Whatever we do
will be part of the sacred story were in
right now. So whatever we do lets do
it together. Lets start by grabbing the
strength of our children, our elders, and
the strength our people and move forward with that. For far too long, weve
been looking at each other and saying
this is whats wrong with you. We have
to look at peoples strengths, look at
the good things.
Strengths
come from our
language, our
elders, and our
women.
And most
beautifully
Isaac reminds
us, I want
everybody to
look up. Thank
the stars for
always being
there, hanging
over our heads
and for giving
us that good
medicine.

TAKE TIME TO SIT in your favourite


folding chair, cover up with a cozy fleece
blanket, look to the night sky and listen
to the teachings shared by Isaac Murdoch. Many gathered from as far away
as Toronto, and Science North Sudbury,
and as close by as Mindemoya. Whether
from near or far, Kenjgewin Teg Educational Institute (KTEI) was happy
to host over 100 guests on a cool May
evening, underneath the stars.
The evening was idyllic, with Dave
Southwind entertaining the crowd with
his singing and guitar playing around
the campfire. Teach In organizer Debbie
Debassige was roasting wieners, while
teach in team member Patrick Kiley was
managing the audio and PowerPoint,
and Rachel Lewis was acting as MC.
Although, the Teach In organizing team
was comprised of three staff members,
other KTEI staff pitched in to ensure
the success of the event.
KTEI was pleased to have Isaac
Murdoch as the traditional knowledge
keeper for the evening. Isaac, whose Isaac Murdoch adresses the crowd at the Spring KTEI Teach-In.
Anishinaabe nooswin is Manzinapkinegegoanaabe, is a member of the Fish
Clan and is from Serpent River First
Nation. Isaac was quite fortunate to grow thats the part of the road were supposed negiizhik (Small
Dipper) The origin
up in a traditional setting of hunting, fish- to follow.
Isaacs teachings were mesmerizing with of the Shaking
ing and trapping. Many years were spent
learning from Elders in Northern Ontario. a smattering of humour. He tied in nicely Tent, Jiibiy Miikan
Isaac is well respected as a storyteller and the teachings of the Constellations and (Milky Way) The
traditional knowledge holder. For several how each of the actions of the four legged legend of how the
years, he has led various cultural camps contributed to a happy ending for us, the spirit world was
and gatherings that focus on the transfer two legged. He connected how the seem- made, Zhowaingly small and insignificant actions of the nung (South Star)
of knowledge to youth.
Young and old were delighted to hear porcupine, linx and otter were important, the creation story
the teachings that Isaac learned from his as odjig was only able to save the day for Pahiinsug
grandparents and his great grandparents. because of all of the other animals previ- (Little People)
He emphasized a passionate message ous efforts. Isaac encouraged each one of and Giwaydinung
about how we need to be caring for the us to start by going out on the land, saying (North Star) How
waters. We are in a sacred story right now, prayers for the water and making our offer- to find your way
we have to start getting our young people ings. Although you may think that you are home. These stoback to the land, and Ive heard that all my only one person, what we need to realize ries, as most stolife. Today we are so disconnected from is that all of our small actions will make a ries do, imparted
KTEI music instructor, Dave Southwood
the land; the government likes it that way, difference in the end, just like porcupine, important life les- entertains the crowd to open the Teach-in.

MIIGWEWIN CONFERENCE
NOV 26-27TH, 2015

Page 6

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS

More works arriving at OCF


Ann Beam is presenting new work at
the OCF gallery in August! Team LIFT
is the name of her exhibition and if youve
not seen her work, think modern. Were
not talking woodland with this one! So,
AANII. NEW WORKS OF art and shows I for one am excited to see what she has
are arriving at the OCF through the for us. You can get a sneak preview if you
summer. Our Star Otter, Paul Whittam visit her gallery, Neon Raven, right here in
(originally from Sheshegwaning and now MChigeeng. Opening night to view her
residing in the Midland area) show went work is Wednesday, August 12th, which
well in June with a great story attached. It is MUSIC NIGHT as well! So come on
was good enough for the folks at CBC to out, see some new work by a local artist,
and hear some great live music at the same
give him a call!
Local artist Duncan Pheasant is show- time.
We are always looking for new and
ing new work through July and our Manitoulin Art Tour ( July 17, 18, and 19th) upcoming artists. If you know someone
went very well. We also had a great turn who has artistic talent, a few pieces of
out for our music night in July featuring work, and an interest in showing in a galisland artist and musician Leland Bell. He lery, tell them to call us at 705 377 4902.
played a great coffee house style show We have the space!
right here in the main room. The house
was packed to the rafters and folks enjoyed
a night of live music.
Duncan Pheasants Thunderbirds Changing, 36x58 inches, acrylic on canvas
BY MARK SEABROOK
OJIBWE CULTURAL
FOUNDATION

LIVE MUSIC

@ the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation


Wednesday, May 27th
Doors open at 6:30
Music at 7 p.m.
Local musicians on the
open mic!
Coffee and snacks
available.
50/50 draw.
Painting (Original
Anishnabe artwork)
raffle!
Art Gallery will be open.
Adults: $2 Kids FREE!
For more info call Mark
at the OCF
377 4902

Liv

May

Liv

May

LIV

May

LIV

May

Liv

May

Liv

May

Liv

May

LIV

May

LIV

May

LIV

May

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

Page 7

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS

Family fun at KGCFS Spring Cultural Days

original visionaries of Kina Gbezhgomi Archery Demonstrations. We were of Life by Dr. Edna Manitowabi, Two
Child and Family Services. All those who pleased that a few service collateral Spirit Identity and Traditional Teachings
KINA GBEZHGOMI
have contributed to the growth and devel- agencies were in attendance and set up by Fallon Andy, Niimeh Workshop (Lets
opment of the agency (past and present) educational booths including Manito- Dance) by Sophie Pheasant and Paskwe
were acknowledged with an Honour Song ulin Family Resources and the Sudbury Lightning, Quill Workshop by Gmiwan
KINA GBEZHGOMI CHILD AND Family provided by Bissinai Drum Group.
District Health Unit.
Migwans, Hand Drum Teachings, Songs
Services (KGCFS) would like to thank
In addition, a vast number of workshops and Techniques by Craig Fox, Native
Each morning was greeted with a sunall the volunteers, participants, and fami- rise ceremony offered by Craig Abotos- were also offered to focus and support Language Conversation by Georgina
lies for a successful Spring Cultural Days saway which allowed an opportunity to individual wellness in areas involving Nahwegahbow and Nancy Debassige,
Event entitled Nepaap
Traditional Gifts by Ron and
Gloria McGregor, TikinaJi-Nsastaming Edming
gan Teachings by Michael
Bimadaadzawin held on
June 12 and 13, 2015. This
Bisson, 7 Grandfather
event was hosted by the
Teachings and Life ExpeAundeck Omni Kaning
riences by Joseph Laford,
First Nation at their pris8 Point Star Teachings by
tine pow-wow grounds.
Harvey Bell Jr., Traditional
The event started off with
Healing and Mental Health
Mother Nature cleansing
by Linda Kaboni, Raindance
Teachings by Gerry Kaboni,
the grounds with a brief
rain shower. This did not
and Grieving and Spiritusway activities as the event
ality by Carrianne Agawa.
was temporarily relocated
An opportunity to receive
to the new Home Run
teachings, and construct and
Centre in Aundeck Omni
participate in a sweat lodge
Kaning First Nation. The
was also offered by Michael
event began with a DesigBisson.
nation Celebration which
A tremendous amount of
included the welcoming of
positive feedback was received.
Kina Gbezhgomi Child and
Eagle Staffs from member First Nations
followed by thanksgiving, welcome, and
Family Services is extremely
introductions.
happy to hear that particiGuest speakers included Georgina
pants appreciated this opportunity to receive Anishinaabe
Nahwegahbow, Elder from Aundeck
Omni Kaning First Nation who offered
teachings, some for the first
the opening invocation in which she
time. This contributed to a
sense of spiritual connection
shared her knowledge of how child
care has changed from when she was a
to their own being.
young kwezenhs. Diane Abotossaway,
As part of the agencys
Kina Gbezhgomi Board Member from
mission statement, Kina
Aundeck Omni Kaning First Nation
Gbezhgomi Child and
welcomed guests to her community, and Chief Shining Turtle, at the beading craft session for children (top , left). Brannon Wassengeso (top right)
Family Services will assure
Ogimaa Duke Peltier from Wikwe- had his face painted at the event. Dan Garcia (Bottom left) provided Bundle Teaching. Paper mache crafts that our services will ensure
mikong Unceded Indian Reserve spoke on with Lorraine Bebamikawe (bottom, right). Spring Cultural Days Event Nepaap Ji-Nsastaming Edming
that children are protected
behalf of First Nations leadership in their Bimadaadzawin held on June 12 and 13, 2015.
and stay connected to their
supportive political roles. Special guest,
culture, language and comMichael Miller, President of the Native
munities. The Cultural Day
Association of Child and Family Services welcome each day and to provide thanks- emotional, mental, physical and spiritual Events will continue to be offered on a
Agencies of Ontario provided congratula- giving.
wellbeing within a cultural context. We bi-annual basis and planning for the next
tory words to the agency. Denise Morrow,
This was a two day event and a number acknowledge and thank the following event is currently underway. Stay tuned
Kina Gbezhgomi Executive Director of sessions were offered which were geared individuals who delivered the following for future posts to attend our next Cultural
highlighted how the agency had achieved towards children and youth. Those in workshops: Big Drum Teachings by Craig Day Event.
designation, followed by Gail Assiniwe, attendance participated in water safety Abotossaway, Mindfulness by Jenny Jacko,
Kina Gbezhgomi Executive Assistant who delivered by the UCCM Police, Shaker Story Telling by Alan Corbiere, Cedar
spoke briefly about the agencys history, Maker, Beading, Paper Mache sessions, Bath Teachings by Kina Gbezhgomi
original intent, and how it honours the guided canoe rides, Yoga Sessions, and Staff, Rites of Passage / Seven Stages

GET TO KNOW US ON THE WEB: WWW.KGCFS.ORG

Page 8

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS

KTEI Celebrates its 2015 Graduates

Welcoming messages were delivered by and proud Raven White, of the Anishi- students asking, what program can I sign
MChigeeng First Nation Chief Joe Hare, nabemowin program, shared her speech up for next?
who also serves as Chairperson of the entirely in the Ojibwe language. Secondly,
United Chiefs and Council of MNidoo Elizabeth Edgar-Webkamigad, Aborigi- STUDENT AWARDS
WITH THE SOUND OF the traditional MNissing, also present was Ms. Steph- nal Teacher Education Program, expressed
KTEI Board of Directors Award Ann
drum in the background, thirty seven anie Roy, Executive Director, KTEI. As how proud she was of her Aboriginal cul- Marie Assinewe (ATEP former HBSW
graduates of Kenjgewin Teg Educational part of his remarks, Chief Hare noted it ture. She attributes her connection to the grad 2014)
KTEI Educational Excellence Award
Institute strode proudly from the school is always a good feeling to attend this kind culture to her parents. As her parents told
to the nearby MChiher, always acknowledge your past, but do Plaque in Memoriam of Sara M. Peltier
geeng Pow Wow
not get stuck in the past because you will Sheldon Shogga HS
KTEI Embracing your Educational
grounds where the
miss what is right in front of you.
Students of the following programs Journey Award Plaque in Memoriam of
giant graduation ceremony tent was locatreceived their certificates/diplomas/ Glen Crawford Montana Migwans HS
ed. It is the second
degrees at this years celebration: Ontario
KTEI School Award Donated by
year that KTEI has
Secondary School , General Education Martin Bayer Christine Esquimaux
opted to stage the grad
Diploma, Food Service Worker, Anishi- FSW
ceremony outside with
nabemowin Immersion Program, and
Executive Directors Award Julie
organizers noting that
Aboriginal Teacher Education program.
Pegahmegabow AIP
an outside ceremony
Following the presentation of the
KTEI Educational Leadership Award
diplomas were the presentations of many Plaque in Honour of Lewis Debassige
presents a different,
more comfortable and
individual student awards. The hard work- Elizabeth Edgar Webkamigad (ATEP &
natural atmosphere
ing, deserving winners were rewarded for Council Member OCT)
Aboriginal Institutes Consortium
than being in an
various accomplishments. As many of us
enclosed building.
recall, being a student and making that Award Student Lynn Migwans (AIP)
The grey, threatencommitment to studies can be a very & Amy Debassige (KTSS teacher)
draining and yet joyful experience. There
7 Grandfathers Award Donated by
ing skies could not
are many highs and lows during a students Charles Shawanda to a deserving seconddampen the spirits
of the graduates, staff, Elder in Residence, Josh Eshkawkogan, leads the 2015 KTEI
academic journey. Many times a person ary school student. (Cindy McMaster)
family, or friends on Graduation procession.
may feel ready to throw in the towel, but
Congratulations to the class of 2015!
this memorable day.
it is through the
Cameras were flashing and smiling
assistance of
faces were abundant as graduates
family, friends,
KTEI Secondary School
20. Christine Esquimaux
-Diploma
circled the drum and then took their
instructors, and
21. Jeremy McGregor
staff that the
seats of honor. Many students opted
1. Cheyenne Migwans
22. Roy Madahbee
to wear traditional dress/clothing in
fading light is
2. Montana Migwans
23. Natalie Osawamick
lieu of customary scholastic gowns
rekindled, and
3. Sheldon Shogga
24. Marcellina Peltier
as a means of showing pride in their
the student finds
25. Connie Taylor
General Educational
26. Linda Trudeau
the inspiration
heritage and accomplishments.
Development - Diploma
The day started off with a tradito continue. It
4. Nicholas McGraw
Aboriginal Teacher Education
tional pipe ceremony led by KTEI
is Graduation
Program Diploma in
5. Sunset Sagutch
Elder-in-Residence Josh EshkawkDay when stuEducation or Bachelor of
6. Jennifer Streuble
Education Degree
ogan at 7:00 a.m. Many KTEI staff,
dents can cele7. Elaine Trudeau
KTEI
Secondary
School
Teacher
Amy
27. Brendan Abitong - Diploma
students, and visiting partner school
brate and reflect
Debassige
(left)
with
KTEI
Graduate
Sunset
28. Bonnie Akiwenzie - Degree
staff participated in the ceremony.
on the trials and
Anishinabemowin Immersion
Sagutch (centre) and secondary teacher
29. Ann Marie Assiniwe - Degree
Program
Certificate
The talented and humorous Mr.
tribulations they
Andrew Moggy.
30. Stephanie Constant - Diploma
8.
Steven
Antoine
went through to
Chris Pheasant kept the crowd
31. Elizabeth Edgar Webkamigad 9.
Sophie
Corbiere
entertained and the speakers in check in of ceremony and extend congratulations reach this aweDegree
10.
Connie Manitowabi
his role as Master of Ceremonies for the to the graduates, staff, and extended sup- some day. It is at
32. Shannon Kimewon - Degree
11. Julia Pegahmagabow
graduation event. The drum group for porting staff.
this point they
33. Rachel Lewis - Degree
12. Maajiiwan (Charles) Petahtegoose
the event was Daawemaagenag Dewegan
Ms. Roy congratulated the students, can throw their
34. Juliet Ozawanimiki - Degree
13. Christine Migwans
from Sheguiandah First Nation. Josh staff, Elders, and families. In her remarks grad cap in the
35. Julia Pegahmagabow - Degree
14. Lynn Migwans
Eshkawkogan led the opening prayer and she noted, This has been a journey worth air and yell, I
36. Judy Perry - Degree
15. Raven White
traditional smudging of the area. Special the effort. It is very important to know did it.
37. Keelan Staats - Degree
guests Mnidoo Mnissing Anishnabek who you are and most important, take a
As per the
Food Service Worker
Graduate With Distinction in
Program - Certificate
Kinoomaage students recited the open- holistic approach to learning. It is import- usual KTEI
Anishinaabe Odziiwin
16.
Carol
Aguonie
ing prayer Ngo Dwe Waangizid Anish- ant at KTEI that you walk in to your new custom, our
17. Amber Armstrong
nabe. These young, 4-6 year old KTEI life with pride.
celebration was
18. John Cooper
Ojibwe speaking students may be KTEI
Two graduates had the opportunity to followed by an
19. Kim Eadie
graduates themselves someday when the express their joy, gratitude and thanks awesome meal,
graduation ceremony will be held entirely to those who assisted them during their laughter, words
2015 KTEI Graduates
scholastic journey. Firstly, a beaming of thanks, and
in the Ojibwe language.
BY BRIAN BISSON
KENJGEWIN TEG
EDUCATION

Congratulations! Class of 2014-2015

Page 17

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

KENJGEWIN TEG EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Page 9

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS

Social 2015-2016
Navigator
Initiative
S AVE THE
DATES !

A look at the program designed to help those in contact with the law
At KTEI, we believe lifelong learning happens for everyone!

We employ a multi-sectorial approach


to

Throughout the year, we offer learning opportunities open to


public, many
of which FREE!
We are access
inthethese
responses,
ensuring
DAUGHNESS
an eco -certified school and so we
ask our guests to help us practice earth sustainability. We hope to
the
right
care
at
the
right
time
see you soon at our next event!
MIGWANS

through referral and


case management. The
goal is to reduce an
individuals exposure to continued
or repeated harms
thereby increasing
their overall wellness.
The UCCM Anishnaabe Police Services Social Navigator Initiative is also
responsible for the coordination of Gchi
Mino Naadmaadwin Teg. Gchi Mino
Naadmaadwin Teg is a service of Maamwi
Naadamadaa that creates an opportunity

UCCM POLICE

THE UCCMM ANISHNAABE POLICE


Service launched the Social Navigator
initiative in February 2015. The purpose
of the Social Navigator initiative is to
connect and support at-risk individuals
or repeat offenders to appropriate services
in the community. This is accomplished
through early intervention, outreach and
rapid responses.
Contact may start with police officer
contact, but it doesnt end there.

for employees from all UCCMM service


sectors and community resources to collaborate and work together to
meet the needs of those
at highest risk. Our
partners include Kina
Gbezhgomi Child
and Family Services, Noojmowin
Teg Health, Mnaamodzawin Health, MChigeeng Health, Kenjgewin Teg Educational Institute, UCCMM Justice Program,

the Ojibway Cultural Foundation and the


6 UCCMM Communities.
The Social Navigator is a civilian
employee of the police service with direct
supervision by the Chief of Police. For
more information please contact Daughness Migwans at 705-377-7135 or by
email at Daughness.migwans@uccmpolice.com
Partners in Community Wellness

KENJGEWIN TEG EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE


2015-2016 Post-Secondary Programs

KENJGEWIN TEG EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE


2015-2016 S AVE THE DATES !

WHY STUDY AT KTEI?

At KTEI, we believe lifelong learning happens for everyone!

Throughout the year, we offer learning opportunities open to the public, many of which FREE! We are
an eco -certified school and so we ask our guests to help us practice earth sustainability. We hope to
see you soon at our next event!

We recommend all prospective First


Nation students meet their funding
application deadlines to receive eligible Post-Secondary funding support.

1-888 -536 -5439 or 705.377.4342


Email: info @ktei.net
WWW.KTEI.NET

August 20, 2015


Sept 8, 2015
Programs
September 24, 20157th Annual Fall Harvest
Open to Public
Sept 25, 2015
October 6, 2015 KTEI and Partners: Annual Career Fair
October 26, 2015
October 29, 2015 - Fall Teach-in Event IX topic TBC
Open to Public
November 25, 2015
November 26 & 27, 2015 Miigwewin 2015 KTEI Annual Educators Conference
December 5, 2015 - 8th Annual Snowake Gala
- Open to Public
December 10, 2015
December 15, 2015 3rd Annual Christmas Concert -Open to Public
Open to Public
January 25, 2016
Open to Public)
January 28, 2016
February 3, 2016 FNSSP Annual Heritage Fair
- Open to Public
February 16, 2016
February 18, 2016 - Winter Teach-in Event Xtopic TBC
-Open to Public
February 25, 2016
March 3, 2016
March 14-18, 2016March Break for K-12
Open to Public
March 25, 2016

Open Community-Based Learning Environment


Anishinabek Cultural Learning: Your Choice, Your Pace!
Convenient Location: Close to Home, Work, Family
Access to Student Support Services
Access to Elder in Residence Support

NOW RECRUITING! 2015-2016 Post-Secondary Programs*

2015-2016
S AVE THE
DATES !
Dates are subject to
change. We encourage
you to visit our website
for any changes.

Pre-Trades Program - Certificate

Anishinabemowin Immersion Program - Certificate

Community Economic and Social Development - Certificate (selected program courses)

Entrepreneurship Training - Certificate (Continuing Education4 accredited courses)

Police Foundations - Diploma

*programs subject to final enrollment and funding

1-888 -536 -5439 or


705.377.4342

VIEW ALL
EVENT
UPDATES
WWW.KTEI.NET

1-888-536-5439 or 705.377.4342
Email: RecruitmentOfficer@ktei.net
WWW.KTEI.NET

1-888 -536 -5439 or 705.377.4342


Email: info @ktei.net

MMAK FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL AUG 17, 2015


WWW.KTEI.NET

August 20, 2015


Sept 8, 2015
Programs

2015-2016

Page 10

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS


Sabrina Legault, Registered Dietitian & Certified Diabetes Educator
Sabrina will be covering for Crystal demoya with her boyfriend, Kyle, who
Morra while she is away enjoying her runs a fitness centre beside their home,
maternity leave and new addition to and their dog, AJ. Her experience in the
her family. Sabrina will be
field of dietetics consists of
servicing the communities
clinical nutrition, oncology,
of Wikwemikong, Zhiibaadiabetes, long-term care, as
haasing, Whitefish River
well as eating disorders. She
and Aundeck Omni Kaning.
is presently attaining addiShe has previously worked
tional education in the field of
as a Locum Dietitian for
sports nutrition and physical
the Noojmowin Teg Health
activity.
Sabrina is pleased to have reunited with
Centre and is happy to be working with
this team again. Moving to Little Cur- the team at the Noojmowin Teg Health
rent in 2013 from Barrie, Ontario, Sabrina Centre and will be working hard to make
has lived on Manitoulin Island for a little a meaningful contribution to the health
over 2 years now. She now resides in Min- of our communities.

Gerrilynn Manitowabi, Data Program Support

I am from Wikwemikong First Nation since moving away at the age of 12.
and was raised there until I was 12 years
I am very excited to be returning to
old. From then, I moved to various places Western this coming fall to obtain a Masin Ontario. After I graduated high
ters in Public Health.
school, I moved to London to
This summer I am returning
attend the University of Western
to Noojmowin Teg to work
Ontario. I have since graduated
with Data Program Support. I
from Western with a Bachelor
worked here as a summer stuof Health Science degree with a
dent in 2011 as an E-Health
Assistant. I am happy to be back
minor in First Nations Studies. I
at Noojmowin Teg to continue
have always known that I wanted
to return to Manitoulin Island
my learning and to contribute
to work, therefore I decided that
new knowledge I have gained
obtaining a minor in First Nations Stud- since my last summer here.
Miigwetch!
ies would bridge the gap of knowledge of
my culture that I may have missed out on

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

Page 11

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS


Debbie King, Aboriginal Youth Mental Health & Addictions Worker

Aanii, Boozho! My name is Debbie


King, and I am pleased to introduce myself
as the new Aboriginal Child and Youth
Mental Health and Addictions Worker with Noojmowin Teg Health Centre!
I have been working in the
field of mental health and
wellness for twenty years. I
have my Honors Bachelor of
Arts in psychology/sociology,
my Bachelor of Education
and my Honors Bachelor of
Social Work. I am a registered Band member of Aundeck Omni

Kaning First Nation and enjoy living and


working on Manitoulin Island. My office
will be located at the Mchigeeng First
Nation Health Centre. I
am very excited and humbled to be part of both the
Noojmowin Teg Health
team and the Mchigeeng
Health team. I look forward
to meeting new people and
re-connecting with those
who I have already had the
pleasure of meeting! See
you soon! Baa maa!
Regards

Branka Gladanac, Community Health Worker


Aanii! My name is Branka
Gladanac. I live in Toronto
and I was born in the former
Yugoslavia (Eastern Europe). I
am studying to become a registered dietitian at the University
of Toronto. I look forward to
visiting the communities and
working with the team at Noojmowin Teg Health Centre
during my summer placement

( June 1 August 21, 2015). I am


excited to learn from all of you!
My hobbies include painting
and hiking, and I hear Manitoulin Island is perfect for both.
Miigwech for this opportunity!

KENJGEWIN TEG EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Open Call for Fall 2015 College Program


Instructors*

Kenjgewin Teg Educational Institute is an Anishnaabe controlled and directed education organization that strives to
provide a comprehensive, qualitative, cultural and holistic approach to First Nations based education, training and
services. Our vision is to inspire students to find their gifts to further succeed in the world. Our management and
program services teams in the various fields are 110% dedicated to student success outcomes.
We are currently recruiting instructors and practitioners who are interested in joining KTEIs team of college
instructional faculty for the following courses offered below in conjunction with our Post-Secondary education
partners. If you are a practicing or retired professional in one of these areas, we encourage you to consider joining
our KTEI network of higher education instructors. We will design instructional schedules to meet the mutual interests
of both students and instructors in support of community based higher education program delivery on Mnidoo
Mnising. If you do not see your teaching interest(s) listed below, but are interested in becoming a part of our
instructional team, we still encourage you to submit required documents to be considered for future opportunities as
they arise.
*Program courses are subject to sufficient student enrollment

Pre-Trades Program:
College Certificate (Year 1)
September 2015 December 2015

Mental Health and Addictions:


College Diploma Program (Year 2)
September 2015 December 2015

CMM149-3 Practical Communications 1

HSP170 Evaluating Information

ELR130-3 Electrical Fundamentals

HSP294 Placement Preparation

ENV102-3 Industrial Health and Safety

MHA232 Recovery Strategies for Addiction

HDG122-3 Personal and Academic Success Strategies

MHA233 Recovery Strategies for Mental Health

MOT100-3 Introduction to Motive Power

MHA234 Crisis Intervention

MTH162-3 Pre-Trades/Technology Mathematics 1

MHA235 Pharmacology for Mental Health and


Addiction Workers
ELECT - Elective

Police Foundations:
College Diploma (Year 1)
September 2015 December 2015

Entrepreneurship Training Program:


College Certificate (Year 1)
September 2015 December 2015

SLJ101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

ACC135 Applied Accounting I

SLJ102 Criminology I
SOC100 Foundations in Sociology
SLJ104 Careers in Criminal Justice
PFP106 Ethics in Law Enforcement
PFP108 Fitness and Lifestyle Management I
RESPONSIBILITIES AND JOB REQUIREMENTS
For complete job descriptions and qualifications required for any of the instructional positions available, please
contact the Director of Operations.
SALARY
Average Remuneration for College level faculty is $53 per instructional hour. Preparation time with pay is provided
based on actual instructional day and hours.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS
Please note that complete application packages will only be accepted by either hand-delivered, sent by fax or mail. If
you do not see your teaching interest(s) listed above, we still encourage you to submit required documents for future
opportunities as they may arise after the deadline date. To further explore these exciting instructional opportunities
please contact the Director of Operations at 705-377-4342 or by email at HumanResources@ktei.net.
Please direct additional inquiries and send cover letter, a detailed resume identified your teaching interests and
preferred course codes/names, and contact information for three (3) individuals for reference, two of which must be or
have been an immediate supervisor to:
College Instructor Positions MARKED CONFIDENTIAL
c/o Director of Operations
Kenjgewin Teg Educational Institute
P.O. Box 328, MChigeeng First Nation, ON P0P 1G0
Please note that instructors will be required to provide a current (dated within one year) Vulnerable Sector Check.
Please Note: Late applications will not be considered. While we thank all applicants, only those selected for an interview will be
contacted. Personal information contained in applications will be used for recruitment purposes and collected as per Freedom of
Information (F.O.I.) And Protection Of Privacy Act, 1987

Page 12

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS

Mnaamodzawin Health Services Community Health Program


MNAAMODZAWIN
HEALTH SERVICES
The Mnaamodzawin Community
Health Program includes Community
Health Nurses (CHN), an Aboriginal
Healthy Baby Healthy Child Worker
(AHBHC), and an Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative Health Promotion Worker
(ADI). They provide services to AOK,
Sheguiandah, Sheshegwaning, Whitefish
River and Zhiibaahaasing.
Mnaamodzawin Community Health
Team is in these communities to service
community members and visitors with
health promotion and disease prevention activities, immunization, Aboriginal
Hypertension Management Program,
diabetes checks, pre and post-natal care,

home visits for a variety of concerns and


health teachings, daycare and school visits,
etc.
Team Members are in the 5 communities on the following days:
SANDRA POPE, CHN
Sheguiandah Health Centre every
Tuesday & Wednesday
Aundeck Omni Kaning Health
Centre every Thursday & Friday
Helen Risteen, CHN
Sheshegwaning Health Centre
every Tuesday
Whitefish River Health Centre
every Wednesday & Friday
Zhiibaahaasing Health Center
every Thursday
DAN CHARETTE, CHN MANAGER
Whitefish River Health Centre

every Tuesday
And covers the other communities
as needed.

CINDY TRUDEAU, AHBHC


Is in all 5 communities on a monthly basis. Please see her monthly
calendar posted in each community
or call 368-2182.
ELEANOR DEBASSIGE, ADI
Is in all 5 communities on a monthly basis. Please see her monthly calendar posted in each community for
her health promotion/prevention
activities or call 368-2182.
MNAAMODZAWIN COMMUNITY
MONTHLY BLOOD CLINICS:
(Breakfast is provided; please bring your
Requisition along with your health card)

AOK bloodwork clinic occurs every


2nd Thursday of the month.
Sheguiandah blood work clinic
occurs every 2nd Wednesday of
the month.
Sheshegwaning bloodwork clinic
occurs every 3rd Tuesday of the
month.
Whitefish River bloodwork clinic
occurs every 3rd Wednesday of the
month.
Zhiibaahaasing bloodwork clinic
occurs every 1st Thursday of the
month.
If you require any information on health
promotion and prevention please do not
hesitate to contact your community health
nurse at the health centre or call Dan
Charette at 705-348-0511.

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

Page 13

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS

Healthy Eating: A Focus on Local Fish!


FISH ARE HEALTHY AND
delicious traditional foods.
Knowing the environmental toxins in fish from lakes
and rivers on Manitoulin
Island is important so you
and your family can safely enjoy fish!

BY BRANKA
GLADANAC
NOOJMOWIN TEG
HEALTH CENTRE

HEALTH RISKS OF FISH


Fish may have environmental toxins like mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). When we eat polluted fish, the toxins
build up in our bodies which can cause health concerns.
HOW DO I CHOOSE LESS TOXIC FISH?
Large fish that live a long time and eat other fish are the most
toxic. In general, choose smaller and leaner fish.
CLEANING AND COOKING TIPS TO REDUCE
TOXINS IN FISH
1. Remove skin and organs.
2. Trim off fatty parts and flesh around belly (toxins are high
in fatty flesh).
3. Let fat drip away when cooking (e.g. grilling, baking). If
deep-frying, do not re-use oil.
FISH ADVISORIES FOR MANITOULIN ISLAND FOR 20152016*
The fish listed in the legend to the left (for some only certain
sizes) are high in toxins and it is advised to eat no more than 2
meals of these fish per month. For women who are or may become
pregnant and children under 15 years of age, the fish listed below
should not be eaten.

1. NORTH CHANNEL: Channel Catfish, Chinook Salmon (> 60cm), Lake Trout (> 60cm), Lake Whitefish (>
45cm), Pink Salmon (> 55cm), Rainbow Trout (> 70cm), Walleye (> 65cm for SP), Northern Pike (> 75cm
for SP). 2. NORTH CHANNEL: Chinook Salmon (> 65cm), Common Carp (> 70cm), Lake Whitefish (>
40cm). 3. SILVER LAKE: Walleye (> 40cm for SP). 4. LAKE HURON: Common Carp (> 50cm), Yellow Perch
(> 35cm for SP), Channel Catfish, Chinook Salmon (> 55cm), Lake Trout (> 40cm), Ling (> 65cm for SP).
5. KAGAWONG LAKE: Smallmouth Bass (> 50cm for SP). 6. MINDEMOYA LAKE: Walleye (> 55cm for SP).
7. WINDFALL LAKE: Walleye (> 45cm for SP). 8. SUCKER LAKE: Smallmouth Bass (> 45cm for SP), Walleye
(> 60cm for GP, > 40cm for SP). 9. LAKE MANITOU: Lake Trout (> 70cm), Ling (> 75cm for SP), Walleye
(> 70cm for SP). 10. GEORGIAN BAY: Chinook Salmon (> 30cm), Lake Herring (> 45cm), Lake Trout (>
55cm), Longnose Sucker
LEGEND: > means bigger than, Sensitive population (SP)= women who are or may become pregnant &
children under 15 years of age, General Population (GP)
For a size reference, the length and width of a sheet of letter sized paper is about 28cm x 22cm.
*Information from: http://www.ontario.ca/environment-and-energy/eating-ontario-fish

Traditional Healing Services


with
Josh & Tina Eshkawkogan
August 18 & 19, 2015 from 9:00 am4:00 pm
September 22 & 23, 2015 from 9:00 am 4:00 pm
October 20 & 21, 2015 from 9:00 am 4:00 pm
Where: Noojmowin Teg Health Centre
To book an appointment, please contact:
Melanie Stephens, Mental Health Liaison
(705) 368-2182 ext. 222
For more information regarding traditional services,
please contact:
Roberta Oshkawbewisens, Traditional Coordinator
(705) 368-2182 ext. 209

Frances Pine, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) Coordinator

My name is Frances (Fran) Pine and I indamin Family & Community Services
have been recently hired on as the Fetal in Event Planning, Alternative Youth JusAlcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) tice, Community & Family Support, and
Alternative Care DepartCoordinator at Noojmowments. Lastly, I have been
in Teg Health Centre. I
mentored at The North
received my diploma as a
Shore Tribal Council with
Social Service Worker at
their FASD/Child NutriNorthern College in 2010.
tion Coordinator, Priscilla
After completing my college diploma, I was one
Southwind.
of the graduates from the
On a personal note, I
am a Band Member of the
2014 FASD Post-DiploSerpent River First Nation
ma Certificate program at
with paternal family ties on
Anishnawbek Educational
Institute through Sault ColManitoulin Island. I am
lege. I have worked in a wide
excited to come and work
range of fields throughout
in the communities that I
my career. I have worked over 15 years have visited my entire life and to meet
in the fields of Finance, Education, and and work with those that I may have the
Administration with the Serpent River opportunity to. My husband Ian, our two
First Nation, Mississauga First Nation, children Layne and Willow, along with
The North Shore Tribal Council, and the our puppy Gotham and fish Goldie &
Blind River District Health Centre. I Diddy are looking forward to this new
have worked in the area of Event Planning chapter in our lives to begin.
for 5 years as the Genaabaajing Powwow
Coordinator. I have worked for Nogdaw-

Page 14

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS

Kanawayhitowin Taking care of each others spirit


Everyone in the community has a role
the intergenerational impacts we wit- unreported and unpunished. It affects
ness today (pg.49, Aboriginal Domes- Aboriginal women from all age groups, to play in helping to prevent woman abuse.
tic Violence in Canada, The Aborigi- religions and socio-economic classes.
The UCCM Anishnaabe Police Service
nal Healing Foundation, 2005)
If you are in immediate danger, call would like to acknowledge their part911
nership with the Ontario Federation of
Aboriginal children are also subject
to a culture in which violence has If you are in a potentially danger- Indigenous Friendship Centres to deliver
KANAWAYHITOWIN IS A CREE word,
ous situation and need support for community based facilitator training.
been normalized, through popular
which in English translates to taking care
entertainment, media and prevailing
you (and your children) to be in a
We are pleased to report that on Mnidoo
of each others spirit. Kanawayhitowin is
community attitudes and behaviours.
safe place, call Manitoulin Family Mnising we now have 24 fully trained
an Aboriginal campaign to raise awareness Young Aboriginal men are disproporResources at 705-377-5160 or 1-800- Kanawayhitowin Facilitators. Miigwech
about the signs of woman abuse in our
tionately incarcerated, and learn to
465-6788 Crisis line available 24/7.
to the men and women who work in our
communities, so that people who are close
identify with the beliefs and
communities for joining the
to an at-risk woman or abusive man can
values of prison gangs and
circle to end all forms of
abuse.
provide support.
criminal network beliefs
Aboriginal women have been left
they then introduce into their
For more information or
extremely vulnerable through both hiscommunity. (pg.49, Aborigto bring a Kanawayhitowin
torical social and economic factors.
inal Domestic Violence in
workshop or information
session to your community,
The Indian Act of 1876 put AborigCanada, The Aboriginal
inal women to a lower class within
Healing Foundation, 2003)
please contact the Social
their community, and removed their
The result has been far too
Navigator at the UCCM
status should they chose to marry a many women and girls are placed
Anishnaabe Police Service
non-Aboriginal man.
in harms way, denied adequate
705-377-7135 or email:
Daughness.migwans@uccm Residential schools eroded the sense protection of the law, and marginpolice.com. Service requests
of identity between the children who alized in a way that allows some
will be forwarded to the most
attended and their parents. Children men to get away with carrying out
raised with violence are much more violent crimes against them. Vio- Island Service Providers newly minted program facilitators for
appropriate facilitator.
inclined to become violent, leading to lence against women often goes Kanawayhitowin Violence Prevention Program!
DAUGHNESS
MIGWANS
UCCM POLICE

World Suicide Prevention Day (WSPD)

PREVENTING SUICIDE: REACHING them know you care, can all have a significant
OUT & Saving Lives is the theme of impact. Isolation increases the risk of suicide,
the 2015 World Suicide Prevention Day. and, conversely, having strong social connecSince 2003, WSPD has taken place on tions is protective against it, so being there
September 10th each
for someone who has
year. It serves as a call
become disconnected can
to action to individuals
be life-saving. (https://
and organizations to
www.iasp.info/wspd)
How will you reach
prevent suicide. This
year, the theme encourout?
ages us all to consider
Do you have an idea
the role that offering
for an activity or event
support may play in combating suicide.
you would like to be part of on September
THE ACT OF SHOWING care and concern to 10th?
someone who may be vulnerable to suicide
Share it with us on our FB page UCCM
can be a game-changer. Asking them whether Anishnaabe Police Service Your partner
they are OK, listening to what they have to in community wellness.
say in a non-judgmental way, and letting

UCCM Anishnaabe Police Service



Quarterly Calls for Service
Year
2013

Jan Mar

Apr Jun

# of
Year
Reported 2014
Incidents
509

Jan Mar

Apr Jun

Jul - Sep

572

Oct Dec

TOTAL

439

# of
Year
Reported 2015
Incidents
495

# of
Reported
Incidents

651

Jan Mar

Apr Jun

Jul - Sep

814

Jul - Sep

563

Oct Dec

482

Oct Dec

2,083

TOTAL

2,442

TOTAL

410
561

971

SEPT 28 TH FULL MOON SWEAT AT KTEI


Quarterly Community Patrol Hours
Year
2013

# of Patrol Year
Hours 2014

# of Patrol Year
Hours 2015

# of Patrol
Hours

NIIBIN/SUMMER 2015

Page 15

MAAMWI NAADAMADAA NEWS

UCCM Police Showcases New Display

On June 12th, 2015, UCCM Anish- the bumper and activate the flashing red
naabe Police officially opened its new and blue lights. This display is a work in
display for members of the public to view progress and UCCM Police hope to add a
while visiting the UCCM Police Office. variety of audio police sounds to this new
Chief of Police Rodney Nahwegahbow stated The idea was
taken from an article in the Blue
Line Police Magazine in which
the Mariachi Police Service had
created a display using the front
cowl of a police cruiser and TV
Monitor. It seems like a great fit
for us here at the UCCM Police
because we do get a lot of visitors.
Being able to view some of
the activities that the UCCM
Police participate in within the
community on a full size 36
monitor is helpful for the visiting public. It also helps make a
visit to the police station a little UCCM Anishinabe Police Chief of Police Rodney
more interesting and informative. Nahwegahbow shows the new display case.
The greatest thing is having the
kids to press the emergency button on display in the future.

UCCM Anishnaabe Police Service


Community Services Update
MURRAY STILL
UCCM POLICE

Other programs promoted were Swimming/Boating Water Safety at Kina Gbezhgomi and Cultural Days in Aundek
Omni Kaning. I also attended the Aundek
Omni Kaning Pow Wow and Sheguiandah 25th Traditional Pow Wow. As well
various workshops allowed me to attend
and have our UCCM Anishnaabe Police
Booth.
I will continue to work with the Water
Safety and Boat Safety program throughout
and attend the Pow
# the
of summer
Year
# of Wows
to
represent
the
UCCM
Anishnaabe
Reported 2015
Reported
Police Service,
flag staff.
Incidents
and carry ourIncidents
Upcoming events will include attending
495
Jan Mar
410
the MChigeeng Youth Camp and Niigaan

Mosewak Program.
651
Jun
561 each
In
the fall Apr
I will
be approaching
First Nation to Promote the Positive
814 Campaign.
Jul - Sep

Ticket
I look forward to working with all of our
482
Dec

First
Nation Oct
Communities.
Please be aware that I require ample
notice
for any community
2,442 in writing
TOTAL
971 service that you may seek.
Miigwetch!

UCCM Anishnaabe Police Service


Community Ser vices Officer:


Aanii, Boozhoo Murray Still dizhinikaaz.
I have worked as a UCCM Police Officer
for nearly 20 years. I began my Community Service Officer duties in mid-February
ofYear
this year and am#
very
about
of excited
Year
the
position.
It
is
a
learning
curve
from
2013
Reported 2014 regular law enforcement,
and I am learning
Incidents
a lot of new and interesting things about
Jan Mar
439
Jan Mar
community service.
Since February, I have been
very busy
Apr Jun myself
509
Apr commu Jun
introducing
to the six
nities we serve. I have visited the local
Jul - Sep and
have held
572 someJul
- Sep
schools,
workshops
and information sessions on Bullying. I
Oct also
Dec
Oct
D
ec
have
helped in563
promoting
the
Social


Navigator
position in cooperation
with
Maamwi
Naadamadaa,
maintained
TOTAL
2,083
TOTAL the
AN INDIVIDUAL CAN LAWFULLY
Licenced Producers under the Mari- Positive
Ticket
Campaign,
and
handed

access marijuana for medical purposes, huana for Medical Purposes Regulations out Positive Ticket prizes to the winners.

once prescribed by health care practi- (MMPR) clients registered with a licence
tioners under the Supreme
producer, authorized indiCourt of Canada decision
viduals can obtain marijuana for medical purposes.
in R. v. Smith dated June
Year
# of Patrol Year
# of Patrol
Licenced producers will
11, 2015.
2013
Hours 2014
Hours
need to comply with the
Health Canada has put
in place measures that
relevant provisions of the
Jan Mar
1,826.75 Jan Mar
2,143.5
allow authorized persons
MMPR.


to possess and produce
Please see the following
Apr Jun
1,773.25 Apr Jun
1,809.75
their own medical use
for more information with
products containing canregards to Medical use of
Jul - Sep
1,534
Jul - Sep
1,708.25
nabis. Individuals who
Marijuana
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ Oct Dec
produce for themselves
1,981
Oct Dec
1,831.5
under the Allard injunction, their proof dhp-mps/marihuana/info/licencedpro

of possession continues to be their Autho- ducer-producteurautorise/decision-r-vTOTAL
7,115
TOTAL
7,493
rized to Possess.
smith-eng.php

Quarterly Calls for Service

Policing the Medicinal Use of Marijuana

Quarterly Community Patrol Hours

Year
2015

Jan Mar

Apr Jun

# of Patrol
Hours
1771.33

1484.75

Jul - Sep

Oct Dec

TOTAL

3,256

W W W . K T E I . N E T

KTEI and Olthuis Kleer Townshend (OKT) are pleased to present the first seminar in our 2015-2016 Indigenous Professional Skills Development Series
designed to enhance practical and relevant learning experiences for First Nation communities in Northern Ontario:

Human Resources and Employment Law for Managers

Date: Tuesday, September 29th, 2015, 9:00 AM 4:00 PM


Location: 374 Hwy 551, Kenjgewin Teg Educational Institute
To Register: $250 per person; (limited to 25 registrations)
Please goto www.ktei.net and follow the link
Who Should Attend: Chief Administrative Officers, Chief Executive Officers in First Nation communities, Band Managers, Directors, Department Managers
Human resource personnel, Chief and Council members, any staff with supervisory responsibilities and decision-making
Key Seminar Topics: Overview of workplace law (employment standards, occupational health & safety, human rights, common law), Recruitment and hiring, Personnel
policies and statutory minimum standards, Performance management, discipline & termination, Human rights and the duty to accommodate
LIMITED SEATS AVAILABLE!
To register, contact KTEI at 705-377-4342 or directorofbusiness@ktei.net

L I V I N G ,

L E A R N I N G I N V I T I N G

O P P O R T U N I T I E S !

6th Annual

Fall Harvest 2015


**All day Harvesting Stations & Teaching Tents**
*Preserving Vegetables
*Harvesting Wild Game
*Trapping Bits and Tips *Medicine Walks
*Hands-on Learning *Fish Harvesting
*Anishnaabemowin Learning Opportunities
*Linking Math & Science with Nature Games
*Dried Fruit and Medicines *Jams & Jellies
*Traditional Teachings * & MUCH MORE!!!

Thursday,
September 24th
2015
at the
MChigeeng Pow-wow
Grounds
(rain or shine)

Bring your bagged lunch. Traditional food samples will be available.


OPEN TO ALL ~ FREE PUBLIC EVENT ~ VENDOR FREE EVENT

KTEIS FALL TEACH-IN TRUTH RECONCILIATION


F R I D A Y, O C T 2 3 , 2 0 1 5