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TLIK107C

Use  information  technology  


devices  and  computer  
applications  in  the  workplace  

MC  
Armstrong’s  Driver  Education  
 
Learner  Guide  
TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Page 2 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1075 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Contents

Section 1............................................................................................. 7  
Identifying computer equipment and systems........................ 7  
Section outline........................................................................ 8  
How do I identify computer equipment and systems in my
workplace? ............................................................................. 9  
What common computer systems and software are in general
use? ..................................................................................... 13  
How are faults identified?..................................................... 15  
Where would I find information to correct computer faults? . 17  

Section 2........................................................................................... 19  
Setting up and shutting down computer equipment ............. 19  
Section outline...................................................................... 20  
What should I consider when setting up my computer
workstation? ......................................................................... 21  
How do I starting up my computer? ..................................... 24  
Why should I check for viruses on my computer?................ 26  
When do I need to use operating manuals and help screens?28  
How do I access software applications and data? ............... 30  
Why do I need to save my files? .......................................... 34  
Why do I need to log off and shut down my computer? ....... 36  

Section 3........................................................................................... 39  
Entering and storing data ..................................................... 39  
Section outline...................................................................... 40  
How do I enter data accurately? .......................................... 41  
How do I create and save files on my computer? ................ 46  
How do I store information on my computer? ...................... 50  

Section 4........................................................................................... 53  
Retrieving and presenting files............................................. 53  
Section outline...................................................................... 54  
How do I access files on my computer?............................... 55  
How are files transferred from drive to drive? ...................... 57  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 3


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1075
TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Why is it important to preview my files before printing them?60  


When should I use computerised projection equipment? .... 63  

Section 5........................................................................................... 65  
Implementing workplace procedures for the management and
security of data..................................................................... 65  
Section outline...................................................................... 66  
How do I implement workplace procedures for the management
and security of my data? ...................................................... 67  

Additional resources....................................................................... 69  

Feedback on activities .................................................................... 71  

Page 4 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1075 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

What this Learner’s Guide is about

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  about  the  skills  and  knowledge  required  to  use  
infotechnology  devices  and  computer  applications  in  the  workplace.  
This  includes  identifying  computer  equipment  and  systems,  setting  up  
and  shutting  down  equipment  for  use,  and  entering,  retrieving  and  
presenting  data  in  accordance  with  work  requirements.  

The  unit  of  competency  TLIK107C  Use  infotechnology  devices  and  


computer  applications  in  the  workplace  is  from  the  Transport  and  
Logistics  Training  Package  (TLI07).  It  has  a  number  of  elements  of  
competency  that  are  covered  in  this  guide.  These  are:  
• Identifying  computer  equipment,  systems  and  
applications.  
• Setting  up  and  shutting  down  applications  and  computer  
equipment.  
• Entering  and  storing  data.  
• Retrieving  and  presenting  data.  
• Implementing  workplace  procedures  for  management  and  
security  of  data.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 1


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1075
TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Plan your learning

It  is  important  to  plan  your  learning  before  you  start  because  you  may  
already  have  some  of  the  knowledge  and  skills  that  are  covered  in  this  
Learner’s  Guide.  This  might  be  because:  
• you  have  been  working  in  the  industry  for  some  time,  
and/or  
• you  have  already  completed  training  in  this  area.  

Together  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer,  use  the  checklist  on  the  
following  pages  to  help  you  plan  your  study  program.  Your  answers  to  
the  questions  in  the  checklist  will  help  you  work  out  which  sections  of  
this  Learner’s  Guide  you  need  to  complete.  

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  written  with  the  idea  that  learning  is  made  
more  relevant  when  you,  the  learner,  are  actually  working  in  the  
industry.  This  means  that  you  will  have  people  within  your  enterprise  
that  can  show  you  things,  discuss  how  things  are  done  and  answer  any  
questions  you  have.  Also  you  can  practise  what  you  learn  and  see  how  
what  you  learn  is  applied  in  the  enterprise.  

If  you  are  working  through  this  Learner’s  Guide  and  have  not  yet  found  
a  job  in  the  industry,  you  will  need  to  talk  to  your  trainer  about  doing  
work  experience  or  working  and  learning  in  some  sort  of  simulated  
workplace.      

Page 2 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1075 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Section 1: Identifying your computer equipment


and systems

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. Identify  the  computerised  equipment  
used  in  your  work  area?          
2. Identify  all  component  parts,  accessories  
and  functions  of  this  equipment?          
3. Show  how  different  computer  systems  and  
software  apply  to  your  workplace  
activities?          
4. Identify  routine  faults  in  operating  systems  
and  software  applications?          
5. Find  information  to  fix  faults,  equipment,  
systems  and  applications?          

Section 2: Setting up and shutting down your


computer equipment

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. Adjust  your  workstation  to  make  it  
comfortable  for  use?          
2. Set  up  your  computer  to  suit  workplace  
procedures  and  manufacturer’s  
guidelines?          
3. Set  up  your  computer  according  to  
manufacturer’s  guidelines?          
4. Turn  on  your  computer  and  log  onto  the  
operating  system?          
5. Check  for  viruses  on  computer  software  
and  email?          
6. Select  and  use  the  correct  software  and  
applications  for  your  work?          
7. Select  the  correct  file  or  data  needed  for  
your  work?          
8. Use  operating  manuals  and  help  screens  to  
assist  you  with  work  practices?          

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 3


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1075
TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

9. Save  your  files  and  data?          


10. Shutdown  your  computer  equipment?          

Section 3: Entering and storing data

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. Enter  data  with  a  keyboard  and  mouse,  a  
barcode  reader  or  by  other  means?          
2. Check  the  data  entered  is  correct?          
3. Create  and  save  files  as  required  by  
workplace  procedures?          
4. Manage  data  to  suit  work  requirements  
and  check  it  for  accuracy?          
5. Correctly  store  information  and  disk(s)?          

Section 4: Retrieving and presenting data

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. Print-­‐preview  your  document  and  access  
the  printer?          
2. Transfer  files  from  one  area  of  the  
computer  to  another?          
3. Open  saved  files  from  relevant  directories?          
4. Use  a  computerised  projector  to  present  
information?          

Section 5: Implement workplace procedures for


the management and security of your data

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. Follow  security  procedures  as  required  in  
your  workplace?          
2. Manage  your  information  systems  in  
accordance  with  workplace  procedures  
and  the  manufacturer’s  guidelines?          
3. To  take  the  necessary  precautions  to  stop  
the  loss  or  corruption  of  data?          

Page 4 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1075 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

How will you be assessed?

Assessment  of  this  unit  of  competency  will  include  observation  of  real  
or  simulated  work  processes  using  workplace  procedures  and  
questioning  on  underpinning  knowledge  and  skills.  It  must  be  
demonstrated  in  an  actual  or  simulated  work  situation  under  
supervision.  

You  will  be  required  to  demonstrate  that  you  can:  


• identify  computer  component  parts  and  accessories  
• identify  different  computer  systems  and  software  that  
apply  to  your  workplace  activities  
• set  up  and  shutdown  computer  equipment  as  required  by  
your  workplace  procedures  and  the  manufacturer’s  
guidelines  
• identify  computer  and  software  faults  and  effectively  
correct  and  overcome  them  
• find  and  use  relevant  information  on  the  computer  
• maintain  computer  files  and  records  
• enter  and  store  files  and  data  
• retrieve  and  present  files  and  data  
• use  computerised  projection  equipment  to  present  
information.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 5


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1075
TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Section 1

Identifying computer equipment


and systems

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 7


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1075
TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  are:  


• identifying  the  types  of  computer  equipment  and  
accessories  used  in  your  workplace  
• computer  systems  and  software  that  apply  to  your  
workplace  activities  
• routine  faults  that  may  occur  in  operating  systems  and  
software  applications  
• finding  information  to  correct  faults  and  errors.  

Page 8 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1075 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

How do I identify computer equipment and


systems in my workplace?

Computers  are  in  common  use  across  many  industries  in  Australia.  
Computers  may  be  set  up  as  individual  units  on  a  desk,  often  called  
workstations.  Many  computers,  connected  together,  are  able  to  share  
information.  This  is  referred  to  as  a  network  and  provides  access  for  
many  users  to  carry  out  their  daily  tasks  at  the  same  time.  

 
Figure  1:  Workstation  set-­‐up  

 
Figure  2:  Networked  computer  set-­‐up  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 9


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1075
TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Computer  systems  are  made  up  of  ‘hardware’  and  ‘software’.  

Hardware  contains  the  central  processing  unit,  generally  contained  


within  a  rectangular  box.  Hardware  includes  all  the  physical  items,  
such  as  electrical  components,  circuit  boards  and  power  supply  unit  
and  includes  the  computer  screen,  the  keyboard  and  mouse.  The  
central  processing  unit  (CPU)  includes  a  hard  drive,  to  store  
information,  as  well  as  external  components  such  as,  a  floppy  disk  
drive  and  a  CD-­‐ROM  drive.  CD-­‐ROM  stands  for  ‘compact  disc  read  only  
memory’  and  is  used  to  access  information  from  discs.  

Software  is  the  programming  language  that  allows  your  computer  to  
operate.  Software  is  not  seen.  It  is  installed  on  your  computer  and  runs  
the  operating  system  and  the  applications  for  you  to  perform  your  
work.  

Connected  to  the  CPU  is  a  computer  screen,  a  keyboard  and  a  mouse,  
also  a  floppy  disk  drive  and  a  CD-­‐ROM  are  included.  

 
Figure  3:  Workstation  computer  components  

A  common  accessory  attached  to  your  computer  is  a  printer.    

 
Figure  4:  Computer  printer  

Page 10 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1075 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Computerised  projection  equipment  is  sometimes  referred  to  as  a  data  


projector.  When  connected  to  your  computer  and  projected  onto  a  
screen  you  will  be  able  to  display  information  to  a  large  audience.    

 
Figure  5:  Data  projector  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 11


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1075
TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Activity 1: Identify the computerised equipment in your work


area

Look around your work area and see what types of computerised
equipment are in operation. Discuss computer operation with your
work mates, supervisor and trainer. Use the questions below to
improve your knowledge of this equipment.

In your workplace what computer equipment and accessories are


available? List the equipment.

Using the diagrams of computer equipment shown earlier, identify


computer equipment and accessories in your workplace.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 12 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1075 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

What common computer systems and software


are in general use?

Some  common  operating  systems  are:  


• Microsoft  Windows.  This  operating  system  is  the  most  
common  in  use  for  personal  computers  and  workstations.  
• Macintosh  Mac  OS  X.  This  operating  system  is  used  for  
Apple  computers.  
• Linux  which  is  an  operating  system  used  by  the  IT  industry  
and  also  used  for  desktop  computers.  
• Unix  which  is  a  multi-­‐tasking  and  multi-­‐user  computer  
operating  system.  

Some  common  software  applications  include:  


• Microsoft  Word.  This  is  a  word  processor  for  creating  
typed  documents.  
• Adobe  FrameMaker.  This  is  a  desktop  publishing  
application  similar  to  Microsoft  Word.  
• Microsoft  PowerPoint.  This  software  program  is  designed  
for  presenting  information  and  can  be  used  with  great  
affect  with  a  digital  projector.  
• SAP  is  a  data  management  and  inventory  system  for  
businesses.  
• Database  programs  such  as  Filemaker  Pro,  Microsoft  
Access  and  Microsoft  Excel  are  used  for  storing  and  
organising  large  quantities  of  data.  
• There  are  many  other  software  applications  in  use.  Some  
systems  have  been  specifically  designed  for  a    particular  
purpose  and  organisation  and  may  appear  different  than  
more  common  applications.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 13


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1075
TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Activity 2: Identify the computer systems and software in your


workplace

Go around your work area and talk to some of the computer


operators. Find out what computer systems and software they use
to do their daily tasks.

List the computer systems and software applications that are


available in your workplace?

Place a mark against the systems and software applications that


are most relevant to your job?

On your computer identify the operating system and find all the
software applications you need to do your job.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 14 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1075 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

How are faults identified?

Faults  appear  on  the  computer  operating  system  or  in  software  
applications  from  time  to  time.  It  is  important  that  you  understand  
how  to  identify  and  interpret  these  faults.  This  will  quickly  allow  you  to  
correct  the  problem.  If  the  fault  is  beyond  your  abilities  to  correct  you  
should  seek  the  assistance  from  work  mates,  your  supervisor  or  the  
help  desk.  

Some  general  faults  that  occur  include:  


• the  computer  failing  to  start  
• software  applications  not  opening  up  
• receiving  error  messages  on  the  computer  screen  
• unable  to  save  your  file.  

Other  faults  occur  as  well  and  these  will  need  to  be  sorted  out  before  
you  can  do  your  work.  Always  seek  advice  if  you  are  not  sure  how  to  
fix  a  problem.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 15


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TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Activity 3: Identifying faults with operating systems and


software applications

Faults may occur for a variety of reasons, some of which may be hard to
identify.

Faults with your operating system or applications cause you delays


in performing your work.

List two faults you have encountered.

What sources did you use to find out about these faults?

Did these sources help you solve the problem?

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 16 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1075 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Where would I find information to correct


computer faults?

Information  is  always  available  to  help  you  correct  faults  and  to  find  
out  more  about  your  operating  systems,  equipment,  systems  and  
applications.  

You  can  source  this  information  from  your  workmates,  your  supervisor  
and  instructors,  from  manuals  and  disks  provided  by  the  manufacturer  
and  from  the  Help  facilities  in  applications.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 17


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1075
TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Activity 4: Sources of information

Walk around your work area and talk to the computer operators.
Find out where they get information to solve faults and find our
more about their computer equipment.

What are some of the sources that operators may use to solve their
computer problems? List three.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 18 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1075 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Section 2

Setting up and shutting down


computer equipment

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 19


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1075
TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  are:  


• making  your  work  station  comfortable  for  use  
• correctly  setting  up  your  computer  
• turning  on,  logging  on  and  doing  virus  checks  
• selecting  the  applications  and  files  you  require  
• operating  manuals  and  help  screens    
• saving  your  data  
• shutting  down  your  computer.  

Page 20 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


ADELG1075 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009
TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

What should I consider when setting up my


computer workstation?

Your  computer  must  be  set  up  so  that  it  is  comfortable  to  use.  See  
your  OHS  and  workplace  regulations  for  more  details  and  explanations  
of  how  best  to  do  this.  Stress  and  fatigue  will  be  reduced  by  correctly  
setting  up  your  computer  workstation.  You  will  work  more  effectively.  
Some  items  to  consider  include:  
• computer  characteristics  
− monitor  height  
− ability  to  read  the  screen  contents  
− keyboard  and  mouse  height  
− mouse  placement  and  shape  
− placement  of  documents  when  entering  data  
• chair  characteristics  
− chair  adjustments  
− chair  stability  
− arm  rests  
− improper  use  of  the  chair  
• office  lighting  
− illumination  level  
− dazzle  
− glare  
− flicker  
− reflections  
• office  electrical  safety  
− spilling  liquids  over  electrical  equipment  
− condition  of  electrical  equipment  
− extension  leads  
− overloading  the  electrical  power  supply.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 21


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Figure  6:  Suggested  computer  set-­‐up  and  operator  posture    

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Activity 5: Setting up and adjusting your workstation

To be comfortable at your workstation you may need to


‘personalise’ it.

Explain how you would go about setting up and adjusting your


workstation to suit your requirements?

From the diagram showing the suggested position of equipment,


check if you’re workstation is set up is the same. If not explain why
you have set it up differently. You may have good reason.

What policies, procedures and guidelines exist at your workplace to


ensure you set up your computer correctly?

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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How do I starting up my computer?

To  start  work  you  will  need  to  turn  on  your  computer  and  log  onto  the  
computer  system.  This  process  is  required  to  access  the  directories,  
software  applications  and  files  you  need  to  perform  your  work.  
Logging  on  is  simply  entering  your  identification  codes  into  the  
computer.  These  codes  are  usually  in  the  form  of  a  username  and  a  
password.  By  following  this  procedure  you  will  protect  your  computer  
against  unauthorised  use.  Logging  on  also  stops  security  breaches  off  
sensitive  data.  

The  steps  to  starting  up  are:  


• turn  on  the  computer  
• wait  to  be  asked  for  your  username  and  password  
• type  in  your  username  and  password  
• press  the  Enter  key  or  click  OK  to  start.  

 
Figure  7:  Username  and  password  dialog  box  

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Activity 6: Starting your computer

List the steps you would take to turn on your computer and log on
to the operating system.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Why should I check for viruses on my


computer?

One  of  the  most  important  things  that  you  must  guard  against  is  virus  
software  getting  onto  your  computer.  Viruses  are  programs  that  cause  
severe  problems  with  computer  software  and  hardware  and  can  enter  
your  computer  through  emails  and  Internet  connections.  

Viruses  that  have  found  their  way  into  the  operating  systems  have  
disabled  many  computers  and  destroyed  data.  As  the  name  suggests  a  
computer  virus  is  exactly  that,  it  makes  your  computer  ‘sick’  and  not  
function  correctly.  A  virus  could  destroy  the  operating  system  of  your  
computer  or  allow  sensitive  information  to  be  sent  off  your  computer  
through  an  Internet  connection  or  via  email.  

If  your  computer  detects  a  virus,  an  alert  will  be  displayed  on  your  
monitor.  The  virus  protection  software  may  automatically  delete  the  
virus  for  you,  however  you  may  be  required  to  delete  it  manually.  In  
this  case  you  will  be  told,  through  a  message  on  your  computer  
monitor,  to  delete  the  virus  software  when  it  is  detected.  Always  
notify  your  supervisor  and  the  systems  administrator  is  a  virus  is  
detected  on  your  computer.  If  a  virus  is  not  removed  from  your  
computer  it  has  the  potential  to  spread,  just  like  a  real  virus,  
throughout  the  whole  computer  network  and  cause  serious  damage  
to  your  computer  files.  

Virus  protection  software  is  readily  available,  from  a  number  of  


suppliers,  and  should  be  installed  on  your  computer.  When  installed  
the  virus  protection  software  will  run  in  the  background  while  you  
work.  This  means  the  virus  protection  software  will  be  constantly  
checking  for  viruses  but  you  will  be  unaware  that  it  is  running,  and  
your  work  will  not  be  interrupted.  Virus  protection  software  needs  to  
be  updated  regularly.  Usually  once  per  week,  since  new  viruses  are  
being  created  continually.  

As  a  precaution  you  can  manually  check  your  computer  for  viruses  by  
selecting  the  virus  protection  software  and  scanning  your  computer  
hard  drive.  

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Activity 7: Checking for viruses

If you were asked to check your computer for viruses, what would
you do? List the steps you would take.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 27


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When do I need to use operating manuals and


help screens?

Most  common  computer  applications  are  intuitive.  That  means  that  


you  can  work  through  them  with  little  or  no  instruction.  However,  
computer  applications  that  have  been  written  for  a  specific  purpose  
may  not  be  as  intuitive  and  therefore  require  you  to  use  operating  
manuals  or  help  screens  to  do  your  work.  

Help,  for  software  applications,  is  found  on  the  ‘toolbar’  which  is  in  
your  software  menu  list  at  the  top  of  the  computer  screen.  This  is  the  
same  for  many  software  applications.  

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Activity 8: Help screens and software manuals

Think about a time when you encountered a problem with a


computer operating system.

If there were no one around to help you where would you look for
assistance?

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 29


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How do I access software applications and


data?

After  logging  onto  your  computer,  you  need  to  select  an  application  to  
work  with  and  then  the  files  you  will  need  to  work  on.  With  practice  
this  will  become  second  nature  for  you.  There  are  a  number  of  ways  of  
selecting  your  application.  One  method  is  by  selecting  an  application  
icon  from  the  computer  desktop  screen.  An  icon  is  a  small  picture  that  
represents  the  application.  See  below.  

 
Figure  8:  Selecting  an  application  with  an  icon  

Another  method  is  to  select  an  application  through  the  Start  menu  and  
All  Programs  option.  

 
Figure  9:  Selecting  an  application  from  the  Start  menu  

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A  further  method  is  by  opening  the  file  directory  on  your  computer  
and  selecting  the  file  you  require  from  a  list.  This  action  will  
automatically  open  the  application  at  the  same  time.  

 
Figure  10:  Selecting  the  file  and  application  from  a  directory  

Application  icons  and  files  may  be  selected  by  clicking  on  the  file  icon  
once  with  the  left  mouse  button  and  then  pressing  the  Enter  button  or  
by  double  clicking  the  left  mouse  button.  

Now  that  you  have  opened  your  application  you  need  to  select  your  
data  files.  These  can  be  selected  with  the  File  Open  option  from  the  
toolbar  and  then  select  a  file  from  the  dialog  box  that  appears.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 31


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Figure  11:  The  File  Open  option  from  MS  Word  

 
Figure  12:  Dialog  box  with  a  list  of  files  to  choose  from  

Opening  the  file  directory  on  your  computer  and  selecting  the  file  you  
require  is  another  method  for  accessing  files.  This  action  will  
automatically  open  the  application  at  the  same  time  (see  Figure  10).  

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Activity 9: Accessing applications and data

Once you have found the application you need, what steps would
you take to open it?

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 33


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Why do I need to save my files?

Whenever  changes  and  updates  have  been  made  to  your  files  you  
should  save  the  changes  to  keep  your  files  up  to  date.  Saving  files  is  
very  important  and  may  be  automatic  with  some  applications  but  in  
general  it  is  up  to  you  to  make  sure  this  is  done.  

Files  are  saved  when  you  instruct  the  computer,  through  menu  options  
or  keystrokes,  and  then  naming  them.  To  make  accessing  your  files  
easy,  save  the  files  to  a  sensible,  easy  to  remember  name  and  save  
them  to  a  directory  or  folder  that  is  relevant  to  the  task  you  are  
working  on.  

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Activity 10: Saving your files

As a general rule, the data in your files is more important than the
computer hardware or software that you use. Lost data is difficult to
replace, so always make sure you save your files.

As part of office housekeeping activities you should close your


applications prior to shutting down your computer.

Before closing down your application what important step must you
take?

Each computer has a series of steps, for saving files that need to
be followed to save your files. List the steps involved on your
computer.

What are the consequences of not saving your computer files?

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 35


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Why do I need to log off and shut down my


computer?

As part of office housekeeping activities your computer will need to


be shut down at the end of your shift. This involves saving your
files, closing software applications and turning off equipment such
as computers, printers and scanners.

If someone else takes over from you at the end of your shift, the
process is similar, however you will need to log off after you close
your applications rather than turning off the equipment.

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Activity 11: Shutting down your computer

Always save your data and close all your files and applications to
avoid data loss or data corruption.

Before shutting down your computer what important steps must


you take?

Each computer has a series of steps that need to be followed. List


the steps involved to correctly shut it down your computer.

What are the consequences of not shutting down your computer?


Give some examples.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 37


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Section 3

Entering and storing data

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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  are:  


• data  entry  methods  
• creating  and  saving  files  according  to  workplace  
procedures  
• managing  data  to  suit  workplace  requirements  and  
checking  for  accuracy  
• storing  information.  

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How do I enter data accurately?

Now  that  you  have  correctly  set  up  your  computer,  turned  it  on  and  
selected  your  applications  and  files,  you  are  ready  to  start  entering  
data.  

The  most  common  method  of  data  entry  is  through  the  keyboard  and  
mouse.  The  mouse  is  used  to  select  an  item  for  change,  and  data  is  
entered  via  the  keyboard.  Moving  the  mouse  moves  a  screen  image  
called  the  cursor.  The  cursor  is  seen  as  a  small  object  on  the  computer  
screen  and  has  a  variety  of  shapes.  The  shape  of  the  cursor  depends  
on  the  application  you  are  using  and  may  change  in  appearance  as  you  
use  different  functions  of  the  software.  

Moving  the  cursor  over  the  item  you  want  and  clicking  the  left  mouse  
button  selects  that  item.  You  are  now  able  to  type  in  the  data  you  
want  to  add.  Depending  on  the  application  you  are  using,  pressing  
Enter,  Tab  or  clicking  the  left  mouse  button  for  the  next  data  item,  
finishes  the  step  you  are  working  on  and  moves  you  to  the  next  data  
entry  point.  Please  take  the  time  to  find  out  the  correct  method  for  
data  entry  before  you  start.  

Failure  to  enter  data  accurately  will  cause  errors  to  build  up  and  
increase  your  workload  when  you  find  you  need  to  go  back  over  your  
work  to  correct  errors.  

Always  check  the  accuracy  of  your  data.    

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Alternate  methods  for  entering  data  include:  


• barcode  readers  which  scan    a  code  of  thick  and  thin  black  
bars  marked  on  the  and  interpret  this  as  information  

You  have  come  across  these  devices  before,  when  you  have  gone  
shopping  at  the  Supermarket.  Bar  code  readers  offer  a  simple  and  very  
fast  method  of  entering  data  with  little  chance  of  error.  They  may  be  
hand  held  and  portable  or  fixed.  

 
Figure  13:  Hand  held  barcode  reader  
• floppy  disks  store  small  amounts  of  information  and  are  
portable  

 
Figure  14:  Floppy  disks  

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• CD-­‐ROMs  which  store  very  large  amounts  of  information  


and  are  portable  
 
 

 
Figure  15:  CD  ROM  
 
 
 
• USB  keys,  also  called  memory  sticks  and  flash  drives,  come  
in  various  large  storage  sizes  
 

 
Figure  16:  USB  key  for  data  storage  

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• radio  frequency  devices,  such  as  wireless  Internet  


transmitters  are  used  to  send  and  receive  data  
 
 

 
 

Figure  17:  Radio  frequency  device  


 
 
 
• electronic  data  interchange,  as  in  the  case  of  networked  
computers.  
 

 
Figure  18:  Electronic  data  interchange  between  two  computers  

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Activity 12: Data entry

Computers are designed to accept data through various means.


List four ways in which you can add data to your data files.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 45


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How do I create and save files on my computer?

Always  follow  your  workplace  procedures  for  creating  and  saving  your  
files.  Once  everyone  follows  the  same  process,  then  data  entry  and  file  
creation  become  standard,  and  the  possibilities  of  errors  are  reduced.  
Observe  computer  users  in  your  area  and  note  how  they  go  about  
creating  and  saving  files.  Check  with  your  work  mates  and  your  
supervisor  to  find  out  if  there  are  other  ways  of  saving  and  creating  
files.  

Creating  files,  for  data  storage,  is  easy  to  do.  If  you  are  using  Microsoft  
products  you  will  most  likely  use  the  File,  New  option  from  within  your  
application  to  create  a  new  file.  Another  method  of  creating  a  new  file  
is  to  go  to  your  file  directory  and  creating  a  new  file  there.  This  method  
is  a  little  more  complicated  and  you  may  want  to  seek  help  to  get  
started.  

Save  your  files  regularly.  This  is  a  good  habit  to  get  into.  The  chance  of  
losing  large  volumes  of  data  and  having  to  repeat  the  data  entry  will  
be  reduced  if  files  are  saved  regularly.  The  most  common  way  of  
saving  your  files  is  to  use  the  Save  icon  from  your  toolbar.  Files  are  
automatically  saved  to  the  directory  from  which  you  retrieved  them.  
Alternatively  you  can  use  the  File,  Save  option  from  your  toolbar  to  do  
this.  

Below  are  three  screen  captures  demonstrating  how  files  are  created  
and  saved.  

 
Figure  19:  Save  icon  

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Figure  20:  Creating  a  new  file  with  the  File,  New  option  

 
Figure  21:  Saving  an  existing  file  

If  you  require  to  save  files  to  a  different  directory  or  if  the  file  is  new,  
use  the  File,  Save  As  option  (step  1)  and  navigate  to  the  directory  you  
require  (step  2).  

 
Figure  22:  Saving  a  new  file  (step  1)  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 47


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Figure  23:  Saving  a  new  file  (step  2)  

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Activity 13: Creating and saving your files

Explain why you would need to create a new file?

Give two reasons why you should follow workplace procedures


when you create or save your files?

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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How do I store information on my computer?

Storing  information  correctly  is  important  for  all  computer  users.  Most  
times  information  will  be  stored  directly  on  your  computer  hard  drive  
or  accessed  via  the  network  on  another  computer.  The  following  
devices  are  specifically  designed  for  storing  information  independent  
of  your  computer  hard  drive:  
• a  floppy  disk  

 
Figure  24:  Floppy  disks  for  data  storage  
• a  CD  ROM  disc  
 

 
Figure  25:  CD  ROM  for  data  storage  
• a  USB  memory  stick  

 
Figure  26:  USB  memory  stick  for  data  storage  

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• a  separate  hard  drive  to  that  of  your  computer  

 
Figure  27:  Mini  hard  drive  for  data  storage  

Information  stored  outside  of  your  computer  should  be  stored  in  
secure  locations  in  your  workplace  and  under  lock  and  key.  Unsecured  
data  runs  the  risk  of  being  lost  or  stolen.  There  are  reasons  for  storing  
information  separately.  They  include:  
• backing  up  of  information  in  case  the  original  data  is  lost  
• where  the  amount  of  information  is  large  and  unable  to  be  
stored  on  your  own  computer  or  slows  down  the  
operation  of  your  computer  
• where  the  amount  of  information  is  large  and  there  is  not  
enough  space  on  the  computer  network.  

All  information  on  your  computer  is  the  property  of  your  employer.  
This  information  may  be  of  a  sensitive  nature  and  should  remain  
private,  therefore  it  should  be  stored  securely,  especially  when  this  
information  is  stored  on  devices  independent  of  your  computer  hard  
drive.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 51


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Activity 14: Correctly storing information and disks

What must you take into account when storing information within
the computer network and when storing information independently
of your computer?

Where in your workplace are disks and other information storage


devices located?

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Section 4

Retrieving and presenting files

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 53


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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  are:  


• how  saved  files  can  be  accessed  through  relevant  
directories  
• file  transfer  in  accordance  with  workplace  polices,  
procedures  and  guidelines  
• printing  and  print-­‐previewing  information  
• presenting  information  with  a  computerised  projector.  

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How do I access files on my computer?

Always  access  saved  files  through  the  relevant  directories.  

A  directory  is  a  location  on  the  computer  hard  drive  in  which  files  are  
stored.  Each  directory  can  be  divided  into  smaller  sub  directories  if  
required;  these  are  sometimes  called  folders.  Files  are  stored  within  
these  directories.  Directories  should  be  sensibly  named  to  help  you  in  
finding  specific  information.  An  example  of  this  could  be  a  directory  
set  up  for  Sales  Figures  or  Inventory.  

If  you  always  store  your  files  in  the  correct  directory  they  will  always  
be  available  when  require  them.  This  simple  amount  of  housekeeping  
will  provide  you  with  an  efficient  work  ethic  and  give  you  confidence  
to  repeat  your  tasks  without  problem.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 55


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Activity 15: Accessing your files

Demonstrate your understanding of accessing files by navigating to your


working directory and opening a file for data entry.

List some of the ways you can access your files.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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How are files transferred from drive to drive?

Software  applications  have  simplified  the  process  of  transferring  


information.  

With  applications  such  as  Microsoft  Windows,  file  transfer  has  been  
made  very  easy.  In  most  cases  to  transfer  your  files  from  directory  to  
directory  or  from  hard  drive  to  hard  drive  is  done  by  clicking  on  the  file  
icon  with  the  left  mouse  button,  holding  down  the  left  mouse  button  
and  dragging  the  icon  to  its  new  location.  Once  there  you  just  release  
the  left  mouse  button  and  the  transfer  is  complete.  

 
Figure  28:  Basic  steps  for  transferring  files  

A  note  of  caution  regarding  file  transfer:  there  is  a  chance  that  you  
may  accidentally  move  your  files  incorrectly  and  not  realise  that  you  
have  done  so.  If  files  are  lost  or  misplaced,  running  the  search  facility  
of  your  computer  operating  system  will  most  likely  find  them  again.  
Once  found,  you  can  move  them  back  to  where  they  belong.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 57


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Figure  29:  The  basic  steps  for  searching  using  Microsoft  Explore  

All  data  and  information  on  your  work  computer  is  the  property  of  
your  employer.  Care  must  be  taken  when  moving  files  on  your  
computer  so  that  information  is  not  misplaced,  lost  or  sent  off  site  
without  the  permission  of  your  employer.    

Page 58 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


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Activity 16: File transfer

Open the working directory on your computer, select a file, and


transfer it to a new directory of your choice. Once you have done
this, return the file back to its original location.

Explain how you can transfer files.

Was there a chance that you could have moved the file to an
incorrect directory?

What would you do, if the file you were transferring, were placed in
the wrong directory?

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 59


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Why is it important to preview my files before


printing them?

During  the  course  of  your  work,  files  may  be  required  to  be  printed  out  
for  reports  or  to  be  used  in  presentations.  

A  good  practice  to  get  into  is  to  preview  your  files  before  to  printing.  
This  allows  you  to  check  over  your  file  for  layout  and  appearance.  
Once  you  are  satisfied  you  can  print  off  the  file.  Print-­‐preview  is  
generally  accessed  through  an  icon  in  the  toolbar  at  the  top  of  your  
screen.  Also  print-­‐preview  can  be  accessed  through  the  File,  Print  
Preview  option  on  your  toolbar.  

Your  computer  will  either  be  directly  connected  to  a  printer  or  
networked  along  with  other  computers  to  a  shared  printer.  Depending  
on  the  type  of  printer  at  your  disposal  you  will  be  able  to  print  black  &  
white  or  colour  prints.  Printing  your  file  is  accessed  through  the  Print  
icon  in  the  toolbar  of  your  screen.  Also  printing  can  be  accessed  
through  the  File,  Print  option  on  your  toolbar.  This  option  allows  you  
greater  flexibility  in  printing  by  providing  options  to  alter  the  way  your  
print  is  carried  out.  

 
Figure  30:  Printing  and  print  previewing  through  the    
menu  options  

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Figure  31:  Printing  and  print  previewing  through  the    
toolbar  icons  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 61


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Activity 17: Previewing and printing options

Go through the directory structure to find a particular file. List the steps
you took to get there.

Open the files, select ‘Print Preview’ and after checking the file,
change the paper alignment to print two different versions.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 62 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


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When should I use computerised projection


equipment?

As  well  as  printing  off  your  files  you  can  present  your  information  to  a  
large  group  of  people  with  computerised  projection  equipment.  
Computerised  projection  equipment  is  commonly  referred  to  as  data  
projectors.  

Data  projectors  are  taking  place  of  overhead  projectors  and  allow  you  
to  display  information  directly  from  your  computer  onto  a  large  
screen.  The  information  you  are  displaying  is  now  interactive.  Your  
audience  will  see  changes  as  you  make  them  to  your  file.  Data  
projectors  are  useful  as  a  teaching  tool.  

 
Figure  32:  Data  projector  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 63


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1075
TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Activity 18: Computerised projection equipment

List some situations where you would use computerised projection


equipment (data projector).

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 64 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


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TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Section 5

Implementing workplace
procedures for the management
and security of data

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 65


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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  are:  


• workplace  security  procedures  
• managing  information  systems  in  accordance  with  
workplace  procedures  
• precautions  against  the  loss  or  corruption  of  data.  

Page 66 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


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How do I implement workplace procedures for


the management and security of my data?

It  is  important  to  understand  that  there  are  procedures  for  the  
management  and  security  of  data  in  your  workplace.  The  processes  
that  have  been  established  are  designed  to  keep  your  data  and  
computer  work  organised  and  secure  from  loss  or  damage  especially  
in  situations  where  you  are  privy  to  sensitive  information.  If  you  are  
not  clear  on  these  procedures  it  is  in  your  interest  to  speak  to  your  
work  mates  and  your  supervisor  to  have  this  clarified.  

As  well  as  managing  and  securing  your  data,  there  are  also  procedures  
in  place  to  maintain  the  efficient  working  of  information  systems.  
These  procedures  will  be  made  up  of  workplace  procedures  and  
manufacturer’s  guidelines  for  equipment  operation.  Check  that  you  
understand  what  is  required  in  your  workplace  and  seek  assistance  if  
you  are  not  sure.  

Data  can  be  lost  or  corrupted  easily  through  poor  work  practices  and  
therefore  it  is  up  to  you  to  follow  workplace  guidelines  and  procedures  
to  keep  this  to  a  minimum.  Make  sure  you  are  familiar  with  your  
workplace  procedures  for  managing  files.  

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 67


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Activity 19: Management and security of data

Speak to your supervisor or trainer and find out what workplace


procedures govern the management and security of your data.

Why is it important to correctly manage and secure your data?

Discuss what precautions you would take to stop the loss or


corruption of data at your workplace.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 68 © Department of Education, Science and Training 2005


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Additional
resources

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 69


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The  websites,  organisations  and  resources  listed  below  provide  more  


information  on  topics  relevant  to  unit  TDTK197B  Use  of  infotechnology  
devices  and  computer  applications  in  the  workplace.  

Web  sites:  
• Organisations  
− Australian  Government  Comcare  
http://www.comcare.gov.au/ohs.html  
− Australian  Radiation  Protection  and  Nuclear  Safety  Agency  
http://www.arpansa.gov.au/  
− The  Office  of  the  Federal  Privacy  Commissioner  
http://www.privacy.gov.au  
• Antivirus  
− Symantec  
http://www.symantec.com/index.htm  
− Computer  Associates  VET  
http://www.vet.com.au/  
− McAfee  
http://us.mcafee.com/  
• Help  assistance  
− Microsoft  Corporation  
http://www.microsoft.com/  

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Feedback on
activities
The responses provided in this section are suggested responses.
Because every workplace is different, your responses may vary
according to your specific workplace procedures, the equipment
available and the nature of the business.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 71


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Activity 1: Identify the computerised equipment in your work


area

Your computer set up will most likely consist of:


• a central processing unit
• a monitor
• a keyboard and a mouse.

Accessories may include:


• a printer
• a data projector.

As well as entering data with the keyboard and mouse your


computer may have a barcode reader connected, be able to
receive data through a radio frequency device or be networked with
other computers to receive data by electronic data interchange
(EDI).

Whichever system is used to enter data you must always make


sure that the data is accurate securely stored.

Once your computer has been set up to suit your work


requirements all your computer systems and software application
should be easy to hand. Since you will be performing the same
daily tasks, grouping all your necessary applications together will
help you perform your task efficiently.

Activity 2: Identify the computer systems and software in your


workplace

Information technology systems and related software applications


vary greatly across Australian workplaces.

In general infotechnology systems will be set up to handle the job


requirements of your workplace. The type of software may be off-
the-shelf applications that cover your work requirements or they
may have been written and tailored to your organisation’s needs.

The best way to find out what systems and applications are in use
is to look around your organisation.

Some common operating systems include:


• Microsoft Windows
• Macintosh Mac OS X

Page 72 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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• Linux
• Unix.

Some common software applications include:


• Microsoft Word
• Microsoft PowerPoint
• Microsoft Access
• Adobe Frame Maker
• SAP.

Activity 3: Identifying faults with operating systems and


software applications

When things go wrong with your computer or software applications,


assistance is not usually far away. Probably the first person you
should ask for help is the person working next to you. The problem
may be simple and can be easily fixed. Accessing information from
the Help menu can also assist you solve your problem.

Your supervisor will most likely be experienced enough to deal with


any concern you have with your computer or software. You should
explain and demonstrate the problem to them so that they
understand what is going wrong and can work out a way of fixing it.

If the previous suggestions have not helped, then contacting the


computer systems manager may be your next step. Any problems
encountered should be easily fixed.

Some fault types include:


• operating system not functioning correctly
• software applications failing to work
• access to files is denied
• hardware malfunctions.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 73


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Activity 4: Sources of information

Information to rectify faults or to find out more about operating


equipment, systems and applications can be found from:
• manufacturer’s instructions
• operator manuals
• help screens
• speaking to work mates.

This information may be stored in your workplace, accessed


through the Internet or through help options within software
applications.

Activity 5: Setting up and adjusting your workstation

To work comfortably you need to set up your workstation


equipment to meet ergonomic requirements and suit your posture.
Failure to do this may cause strain injuries.

There are four main areas to consider when setting up your


workstation:
• computer characteristics
• chair characteristics
• office lighting
• office electrical safety.

For more detail about workstation set up requirements consult the


manufacturer’s set up guidelines and the OHS legislation related to
office conditions.

Speak to your supervisor or trainer and find out which policies,


procedures and guidelines you need to consult to effectively set up
your workstation.

Page 74 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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TLIK107C Use infotechnology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Activity 6: Starting your computer

The following steps are required to get your computer running and
ready for use. At this stage virus protection checks can be carried
out.

1. Press the Power button and wait while the computer boots up
and starts the operating system.

2. Type in your username and password when prompted.

3. Select the virus protection software to scan for viruses.

By default the virus protection software should start running when


you have logged onto the system.

There are a number of ways to access your software applications:


• select a software icon from the desktop view
• select the application from the program list
• select the data file from Windows Explorer (this will
automatically open the correct application).

Activity 7: Checking for viruses

With the computer turned on and booted up:

1. Close all software applications

2. Open the anti-virus application on your computer

3. Start the scanning operation.

When the scanning is complete the anti-virus program will indicate


if any viruses were found and suggest ways of dealing with them.

If there are no viruses, close this application, and resume your


work.

Activity 8: Help screens and software manuals

Help assistance is available through:


• the Help option on the application tool bar
• the manual provided by the software manufacturer
• the Online Help that can be accessed through the Internet.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 75


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TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

Activity 9: Accessing applications and data

Accessing applications and data is simply to do. As is by:


• selecting the application from the computer desktop screen
and then opening the data file through that application
• selecting the application through the Start menu and All
Programs option and then opening the data file through that
application
• selecting the data file from the computer file directory, this in
turn opens the corresponding application for that file.

Activity 10: Saving your files

For security and housekeeping requirements it is important that you


save all your files, close down your applications and shutdown the
computer before you finish your work.

The single most important step you must take, before finishing your
work for the day, is to save your files to the correct directory on
your computer.

Saving your files is simply a matter of saving the working file


through the Save option of your computer application and then
closing the application. If you do not save your files then all the
work you have done will have been in vain and your data will be
lost.

Activity 11: Shutting down your computer

To correctly shut down your computer the following steps must be


taken:

1. Save the files that you have been working on by either selecting
the Save icon or through the File, Save option on the toolbar.

2. Close the application you have been using. This can be done by
selecting the Cross icon in the top right hand corner of your
screen or through the File, Exit option on the toolbar.

3. Close down any other applications you have open.

4. Turn off your computer by following the prompts from the


operating system that are displayed on your computer screen.
Do not turn off your computer at the power switch.

Page 76 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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By not shutting down your computer you leave your data files open to use
by unauthorised people and the possibility of these files being corrupted or
deleted and lost.

Activity 12: Data entry

Computers allow data to be entered in a variety of ways. Four


common ways include:
• keyboard and mouse
• barcode reader
• electronic data interchange (EDI)
• radio frequency devices (for example, wireless connections).

Data should be entered accurately so that useful information can


be accumulated. Methods vary, however by following a logical
procedure, the risk of entering data wrongly will be reduced. Some
examples of entering data include:
• logically entering data, either column by column or row by
row
• reviewing the entered data and comparing it to the original
data source
• scanning the entered data for inconsistencies (for example,
numbers out of place).

Activity 13: Creating and saving your files

Every now and then work obligations will require you to create a
new file. The reasons for creating new files include:
• a new file is required to record each daily operation or
individual operation
• file sizes becoming too large to handle efficiently
• starting a new record
• starting a new process.

By following a procedure to create and save your files you are:


• providing structure and repeatability to your work
• staying organised while creating and saving files
• reducing the possibility of errors.

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 77


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Activity 14: Correctly storing information and disks

Storing information on a computer or across a computer network


requires the information to be:
• password protected so that unauthorised access to the
information is denied
• restricted to those persons who need to access this
information by having limited access the directories where
this information is located.

When information is stored on disk it is usually done so that space


can be freed up on computer drives and to act as backup
information should the original information be lost or corrupted.
Therefore disks should be locked away in a secure place when not
required.

Activity 15: Accessing your files

There are a number of ways of accessing your files. They include:


• navigating to the correct directory through the computer
database system
• opening the file through the software application
• using the search facility on the computer.

Activity 16: File transfer

Files can be transferred by:


• saving the file to a new directory
• physically moving the file from one directory to another by
clicking and dragging the file with the mouse.

Care must always be taken when transferring files, there is always


the chance of placing the file into the wrong directory and not
realising the error.

If a file was placed in the wrong directory, it should be immediately


removed and placed into the correct directory.

Page 78 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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Activity 17: Previewing and printing options

It is always good practice to preview your document before printing.


This allows you to judge whether all the information you require has
been selected and whether the page format suits your
requirements.

Previewing your document is done by:


• selecting the Print Preview icon
• using the File, Print Preview option from the toolbar.

Printing your document is carried out by:


• selecting the Print icon
• using the File, Print option from the toolbar.

You also have the option to alter the appearance of your


documents for paper size, colour or black & white and whether you
require your documents in portrait or landscape layout. These
options are available from File, Page Setup and File, Print options
on the toolbar.

Activity 18: Computerised projection equipment

Common situations where you would use computerised projection


equipment (for example digital projector) include:
• presenting information to your audience
• providing an enlarged view of your information
• when you need to demonstrate a process in real time to your
audience.

The digital projector is connected to your computer as is your


monitor and becomes part of your computer hardware.

Activity 19: Management and security of data

Your data is valuable to you to perform your work and to your


organisation for business reasons. Data lost is the same as
business lost.

Data should always be secured to protect your business clients.

With all data, security of information is probably the most important


aspect to be considered by any computer user. For data to remain

© Department of Education, Science and Training 2005 Page 79


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009 ADELG1075
TLIK107C Use info technology devices and computer applications in the workplace

secure it is best to password protect your files and limit the access
to those files.

To prevent the loss or corruption of your files always save them to


the correct directory and log off and shutdown your computer after
use. Make sure that the directories you use can be backed up with
the rest of the computer system.

Files that are stored separately on disks should be locked away in


a secure place when not required and must not be copied.

Page 80 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1074 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd July 2009