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TLIL107C Complete

workplace orientation/
induction procedures
Learner Guide
Contents
What this Learner’s Guide is about ........................................ 3  
Planning your learning ........................................................... 4  
How you will be assessed ...................................................... 7  

Section 1............................................................................................. 9  
How do you identify major zones of the workplace, in terms of
functions, organisational structures and occupation? ............ 9  

Section 2........................................................................................... 35  
How do you plan, organise and accept responsibility for own
workload?............................................................................. 35  

Section 3........................................................................................... 57  
How do you apply ethical practices?.................................... 57  

Section 4........................................................................................... 63  
How do you participate in identifying and meeting your own
learning needs?.................................................................... 63  

Additional resources ..................................................................... 103  

Feedback on activities .................................................................. 105  


TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

What this Learner’s Guide is about

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  about  the  skills  and  knowledge  required  to  
complete  workplace  orientation  and  induction  procedures  when  
commencing  a  new  work  role,  including  identifying  major  areas  of  the  
workplace  in  terms  of  functions,  organisational  structures  and  
occupations,  and  organising  and  accepting  responsibility  for  own  
workload.  It  also  includes  the  application  of  ethical  practices  in  work  
activities,  receiving  and  acting  constructively  on  personal  feedback,  
participating  in  the  identification  and  meeting  of  one's  own  learning  
needs,  and  planning  and  organising  a  personal  daily  routine.  

The  Elements  of  Competency  from  the  unit  TLIL107C  Complete  


workplace  orientation/induction  procedures  covered  in  this  Learner’s  
Guide  are  listed  below.  
Identify  major  areas  of  the  workplace  in  terms  of  functions,  
organisational  structures  and  occupations  
Organise  and  accept  responsibility  for  own  workload  
Apply  ethical  practices  
Receive  and  act  constructively  on  personal  feedback  
Participate  in  identifying  and  meeting  own  learning  needs  
Plan  and  organise  a  personal  daily  routine  
This  unit  of  competency  is  from  the  Transport  and  Logistics  
Training  Package  (TLI07).  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 3


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Planning your learning

It  is  important  to  plan  your  learning  before  you  start  because  you  may  
already  have  some  of  the  knowledge  and  skills  that  are  covered  in  this  
Learner’s  Guide.  This  might  be  because:  
• you  have  been  working  in  the  industry  for  some  time,  
and/or  
• you  have  already  completed  training  in  this  area.  

Together  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer  use  the  checklists  on  the  
following  pages  to  help  you  plan  your  study  program.  Your  answers  to  
the  questions  in  the  checklist  will  help  you  work  out  which  sections  of  
this  Learner’s  Guide  you  need  to  complete.  

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  written  with  the  idea  that  learning  is  made  more  
relevant  when  you,  the  learner,  are  actually  working  in  the  industry.  
This  means  that  you  will  have  people  within  the  enterprise  who  can  
show  you  things,  discuss  how  things  are  done  and  answer  any  
questions  you  have.  Also  you  can  practise  what  you  learn  and  see  how  
what  you  learn  is  applied  in  the  enterprise.  

If  you  are  working  through  this  Learner’s  Guide  and  have  not  yet  found  
a  job  in  the  industry,  you  will  need  to  talk  to  your  trainer  about  doing  
work  experience  or  working  and  learning  in  some  sort  of  simulated  
workplace.    

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ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Section 1: How do you identify major zones of


the workplace, in terms of functions,
organisational structures and
occupation?

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. name  each  area  of  the  workplace,  the  
personnel  employed  there  and  their  job  
functions?          
2. describe  the  organisational  structure  of  
your  workplace?        
3. show  the  storage  areas  on  a  site  map  and  
describe  the  purpose  of  the  area  and  any  
risks  or  hazards  associated  with  that  area?        
4. list  the  equipment  and  technology  that  you  
use  in  the  workplace  and  describe  its  
function?        
5. describe  the  responsibilities  of  your  job  
according  to  your  job  description  and  the  
relevant  industrial  employment  
agreements?        

Section 2: How do you plan, organise and


accept responsibility for your own
workload?

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. work  out  the  targets,  goals  and  
performance  standards  for  your  work  
tasks?        
2. prioritise  your  work  and  schedule  tasks  on  
a  daily  work  plan?        
3. take  steps  to  ensure  that  work  is  
completed  on  time?          
4. review  your  work  performance  against  
performance  standards?        
5. get  feedback  and  support  and  use  these  to  
improve  your  work  performance?        

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 5


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Section 3: How do you apply ethical practices?

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. name  all  the  relevant  codes  of  practice,  
workplace  policies  and  procedures,  
regulations  and  legislation  relevant  to  the  
performance  of  your  work?        
2. describe  the  commitments  that  you  
undertake  as  part  of  your  job?        

Section 4: How do you participate in identifying


and meeting your own learning
needs?

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. explain  how  you  will  receive  training  in  
your  workplace?        
2. outline  possible  career  paths  in  the  road  
transport  industry?        
3. identify  your  training  needs?        
4. learn  from  colleagues  in  the  workplace  by  
networking,  questioning  and  observing?        

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ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

How you will be assessed

Assessment  of  this  Unit  of  Competency  will  include  observation  of  real  
or  simulated  work  processes  using  workplace  procedures  and  
questioning  on  underpinning  knowledge  and  skills.  It  must  be  
demonstrated  in  an  actual  or  simulated  work  situation  under  
supervision.  

You  will  be  required  to:  


• identify  the  different  sections  of  your  workplace  and  the  
functions  performed  in  these  sections  
• describe  the  industrial  relations  framework  in  the  road  
transport  industry  
• demonstrate  that  you  can  plan  your  daily  work  routine  
• explain  laws  regarding  to  the  road  transport  industry  
• prepare  a  report  on  work  function  sin  the  road  transport  
industry.    

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 7


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Page 8 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Section 1

How do you identify major zones


of the workplace, in terms of
functions, organisational
structures and occupation?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 9


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Workplace  layout  

Workplace  organisational  structure  

Workplace  storage  facilities  

Equipment  and  technology  used  in  the  workplace  

Job  responsibilities  including  agreements  and  awards  

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ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

What is the layout of your workplace?

Some  organisations  will  have  a  site  map  which  show  the  locations  of  
every  department  making  up  the  workplace.  

The  site  map  could  include:    


• gatehouse    
• administration  building    
• loading  bay    
• vehicle  maintenance  and  cleaning  area.  

You  will  need  to  familiarise  yourself  with  every  aspect  of  the  worksite,  
not  just  the  area  you  work  in.  You  will  need  to  know  where  paperwork  
is  kept  so  that  you  can  find  workplace  documents  and  legislation  
relevant  to  your  job.  You  need  to  know  who  the  other  staff  are,  where  
they  are  located  and  what  their  job  role  is  so  that  you  can  answer  
customer  enquiries  and  transfer  calls,  or  so  that  you  can  find  out  
information  relevant  to  your  job.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 11


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 1: Workplace layout

Ask your trainer for a site map.

Mark each area with a number.

Part 1

Select an item, a piece of paperwork or delivered goods and show


on your site map how the item moves around your work site. Draw
a line showing the progress of the item around the site.

Part 2

Fill in the table below.


Area Name of area Personnel in the Job function of each
No. area person

1 Reception Ann Smith Receptionist

David Jones Office Trainee

10

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ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

What is the organisational structure of your


workplace?

All  organisations  need  to  have  good  communication  systems  so  that  
information  can  flow  from  each  section  of  each  work  site  through  to  
the  group  that  makes  decisions  on  a  local  level  and  on  to  the  groups  
that  make  company  decisions  on  a  regional,  state/territory,  national  or  
international  level.    

If  you  have  a  brilliant  idea  of  how  to  save  money,  the  information  can  
be  passed  on  quickly  so  that  every  work  site  can  put  your  idea  into  
practice.  If  a  problem  has  occurred  at  a  site  in  another  state/territory  
your  workplace  may  be  required  to  take  on  some  of  the  other  sites’  
load.  There  has  to  be  an  organisational  structure  which  can  
communicate  plans,  policies  and  ideas  across  the  whole  company  very  
quickly  and  effectively.  

In  each  organisation  there  are  people  with  different  roles  and  


responsibilities.  Most  workplaces  are  organised  into  teams  with  team  
leaders  and  the  team  leaders  will  report  regularly  to  a  management  
group  and  give  feedback  and  new  information  to  their  teams.  A  
representative  from  the  management  group  will  probably  be  involved  
in  regional  or  state/territory  company  discussion  and  the  
state/territory  manager  will  be  involved  in  national  and  international  
company  business.  

Organisational  charts  show  how:    


• information  and  knowledge  is  transferred    
• responsibility  is  delegated    
• decision  making  is  performed.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 13


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 2: Organisational structure

Find out if the workplace has an organisational chart. If there is no


chart ask your trainer to work with you to make one.

Discuss the chart with your trainer. Take notes about how each
section relates to each of the other sections. How does the chart
show classifications of job types and job levels?

Write your notes here:

How do departments or sections relate to each other?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

How does the chart show job levels?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

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ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

How does the chart show job types?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 15


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

What storage facilities are there in your


workplace?

A  variety  of  equipment  is  used  in  the  road  transport  industry.  In  your  
workplace  you  may  have  equipment  for:  
• loading  and  unloading  goods    
• restraining  loads  on  trucks    
• weighing  and  measuring  loads    
• checking  and  maintaining  vehicles    
• cleaning  vehicles  and  the  worksite    
• managing  emergency  and  First  Aid  incidents    
• storing  and  printing  information.  

You  need  to  know  what  equipment  there  is,  where  it  is  stored  and  
what  it  is  used  for,  and  in  some  cases  who  is  authorised  to  use  it.  

Page 16 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 3: Storage facilities in the workplace

Please list all the storage facilities in your workplace. What is


stored there? Are there any safety hazards associated with the
store?

Name of storage Purpose of storage Associated risks


area area

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 17


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

What equipment and technology is used in your


workplace?

Every  workplace  keeps  and  inventory  or  assets  register  of  all  
equipment.  This  is  required  for  insurance  purposes  and  for  arranging  
regular  maintenance.  In  the  road  transport  industry  the  workplace  will  
have  many  vehicles  and  load  handling  machinery  as  well  as  tools  and  
other  equipment.  Most  workplaces  also  have  computers  and  printers.  

You  will  need  to  be  able  to  recognise  each  piece  of  equipment  by  it’s  
physical  characteristics  and  name  the  equipment  that  you  come  into  
contact  with  through  your  work.  

Page 18 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 4: What equipment and technology is used in the


workplace?

Make a list of all the equipment and technology that you will be
using and the functions that you will be using it for.

Item of equipment or technology Function

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 19


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

What are the responsibilities of your job?

The  responsibilities  of  your  job  are  defined  by:  


• the  position  description,  job  description  or  duty  statement    
• industrial  employment  agreements.  

Job  description:  

Your  job  description  should  list  the  following  items.  


• transport  industry  specific  duties,  which  could  include:    
− drive  the  vehicle  in  position  for  loading/unloading    
− assist  with  loading/unloading  to  make  sure  that  goods  are  
correctly  stowed    
− check  loading  documents    
− plan  the  shortest  and  safest  delivery  route    
− arrange  unloading    
− obtain  a  receipt  for  goods  delivered  
• safety  and  vehicle  maintenance  duties,  which  could  
include:    
− check  brakes,  oil,  tyres  and  electrical  system    
− check  restraints  and  mass  against  regulations    
− check  emergency  procedure  guides  and  emergency  equipment  
• communication,  writing  and  reporting  duties,  which  could  
include:    
− accident,  incident  and  damage  reports    
− on  board  computer  operations    
− radio  communication    
− telephone  communication  with  customers  
• other  duties  specific  to  your  workplace,  including  who  you  
report  to.  

As  you  perform  the  duties  of  your  job  description  you  need  to  take  
into  account  your  responsibilities  under  the  industrial  employment  
agreements  which  apply  to  your  workplace.  

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ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Employment agreements and awards

The  Employee  Relations  Act  1992  provides  for  employment  


agreements  to  be  negotiated  between  an  employer  and  individual  
employees  and  employer(s)  and  groups  of  employees.  The  
employment  agreement  is  a  written  legal  and  binding  confirmation  of  
the  relationship  between  employer  and  employee  and  under  the  Act  
can  be  a  collective  agreement  or  an  individual  agreement.  

The  Employment  Agreement  will  cover  an  employee’s  rates  of  pay,  
working  conditions,  leave  entitlements,  other  provisions  such  as  
maternity  leave  and  dispute  settling  procedures.  The  agreement  can,  
in  fact,  set  out  in  detail  all  the  rights  and  responsibilities  of  employers  
and  employees  that  can  be  agreed  upon  including  superannuation  etc.,  
but  must  contain  stand-­‐down  and  a  settlement  of  dispute  procedure  
provisions  and  provide  the  minimum  standards  of  annual  leave,  sick  
leave,  parental  leave  and  rates  of  pay.  

This  example  talks  about  the  Victorian  Act,  your  state/territory  may  
have  different  legislative  requirements.  

Preparation  

Each  employment  agreement  should  be  customised/designed  to  meet  


the  requirements  and  particular  needs  of  the  employer  and  employee  
at  the  worksite.  

When  preparing  an  employment  agreement  it  is  essential  that  a  review  
of  the  following  take  place:  
• existing  custom  and  practice  at  the  workplace  
• the  existing  award  
• any  current  agreements  
• any  local  level  arrangements.  

The  best  elements  of  the  above  should  then  form  the  basis  of  the  
employment  agreement.  Added  to  this  should  be  further  specific  
requirements/needs  of  the  employer  and/or  the  employee.  

Remember  that  the  agreement  is  a  negotiated  document,  and  


therefore  may  contain  everything  that  an  employer  or  employee  may  
wish.  

If  agreement  cannot  be  reached  on  a  specific  item,  unless  it  is  of  
fundamental  importance,  it  may  be  better  to  either  omit  the  item  or  
place  it  on  a  list  of  matters  to  be  further  negotiated  during  the  life  of  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 21


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

the  agreement  or  a  list  of  issues  to  be  considered  for  the  next  
agreement.  

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ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

When  drafting  an  employment  agreement  remember:  


• to  keep  it  simple,  unambiguous  and  easy  to  read  and  
understand  (previous  award  conditions  included  should  be  
simplified)  
• to  be  precise  in  the  language  used  
• to  ensure  that  the  provisions  of  other  legislation  are  not  
being  contravened,  e.g.  in  areas  such  as  Work  Cover  and  
superannuation  
• employment  agreements  can  be  individual  or  collective  for  
a  group  of  employees  
• agreements  must  contain  a  grievance/dispute  settling  
clause  and  a  stand  down  clause  
• under  the  Employee  Relations  Act,  1992,  employers  are  
entitled  to:  
− four  weeks  annual  leave  
− one  week’s  sick  leave  
− parenting  leave  
− long  service  of  13  weeks  after  15  years  
− a  prescribed  minimum  wage,  at  an  hourly  rate,  as  was  elected  
at  the  base  level  in  any  previous  award  
• an  employment  agreement  prevails  over  any  inconsistent  
term  of  an  award  and  the  terms  of  an  individual  
employment  prevail  over  a  collective  agreement  
• no  discriminatory  provisions,  giving  either  more  or  less  
favourable  preference,  can  be  placed  in  an  employment  
agreement  
• when  an  employment  agreement  expires  and  no  new  
agreement  is  made,  employees  are  engaged  on  an  
agreement  containing  terms  and  conditions  based  on  the  
expired  agreement.  

Contents  of  an  Employment  Agreement  (for  either  individual  or  


collective  agreement)  

N.B.  The  following  outline  is  for  indicative  purposes  only.  Because  of  
the  need  to  customise  each  individual  or  collective  employment  to  the  
needs  and  requirements  of  each  individual  employer  and  his/her  
employees  this  draft  should  only  be  used  as  a  guide.  Therefore  where  
there  is  little  or  no  point  in  filling  in  specific  detail  only  generic  heading  
and  pointers  have  been  used.  

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A  contents  page/index  should  be  prepared  as  part  of  the  employment  
agreement.  

Parties  to  Agreement  

This  employment  agreement  is  made  between  


   (name  of  employer)  and    
  (name  of/group  of  employees)    
herein  after  called  the  employer  and  employee(s).  

Introduction  

The  employer  and  employee(s)  have  determined  to  enter  into  an  
individual/collective  employment  agreement  under  the  Victorian  
Government’s  Employee  Relations  Act,  1992.  

This  agreement,  which  is  in  writing,  will  be  lodged  with  the  Employee  
Relations  Commission.  It  is  the  aim  of  both  parties  to  have  the  
agreement  in  place  such  that  it  will  replace  the  previous  award  (which  
expired  on  March  1,  1993),  any/all  previous  agreements  and  all  previous  
custom  and  practice  and  other  arrangements.  

The  agreement  is  binding  upon  both  parties  for  its  entire  term.  

Aim  

By  entering  into  this  agreement  both  parties  aim  to:  


• provide  a  safe,  harmonious  work  environment  which  
adheres  to  first  class  health,  and  safety  procedures  and  
which  is  conducive  to  a  high  level  of  work  output  from  
staff  
• ensure  that  all  aspects  of  the  organisation’s  operation  
reflect  the  quality  demanded  of  the  industry  
• encourage  the  achievement  of  best  practice  in  all  areas  of  
operation  
• provide  job  security  for  employees  by  ensuring  that  the  
organisation  operates  at  optimum  levels  of  efficiency  and  
effectiveness.  

Term  of  Agreement  

The  agreement  shall  operate  for  a  three  year  period  ending  March  1,  
1997  (example  date  only).  

The  parties  agree  that  during  the  agreement  a  review  of  wage  rates  
shall  occur  in  November  each  year  with  a  view  to  applying  any  agreed  
increases  from  the  first  of  January  the  following  year.  

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Negotiations  leading  to  a  new  agreement  shall  commence  no  later  


than  November,  1998  (example  date  only).  

Wage  rates  

The  parties  agree  that  for  the  life  of  this  agreement,  the  following  
wage  rates  shall  apply:  

Agreed  wage  rates  placed  here  (and  penalty  rates,  overtime,  shift  
work,  job  classification,  work  to  be  undertaken,  occupational  
requirements,  skills  required,  functions,  job  description,  geographic  
location,  potential  career  path,  equipment  and  materials,  method  of  
payment  -­‐  electronic  fund  transfer,  monthly,  fortnightly,  etc.)  

As  outlined  in  clause  Terms  of  Agreement,  the  parties  have  agreed  to  
review  wage  rates  on  an  annual  basis  in  November  each  year.  

Allowances  

During  the  course  of  the  agreement,  the  employee(s)  will  be  paid  the  
following  allowances:  

Agreed  allowances  (if  any)  to  be  included  here.  

____________________________________________________________  

____________________________________________________________  

____________________________________________________________  

As  with  wage  rates,  these  allowances  shall  be  the  subject  of  review  
each  November  whilst  the  agreement  is  in  operation.  

Terms  of  engagement  

• Each  employee  shall  be  engaged  on  a  month  trial  period.  During  
this  time  employment  can  be  terminated  at     day’s  
notice  (unless  circumstances  justify  summary  dismissal).  
• On  completion  of  the  trial  period  of  employment,  the  
employee  shall  be  appointed  to  an  ongoing  position.  
• As  the  organisation  is  open  for  business   hours  per  
week  (per  day),  it  is  agreed  that  the  employee  will  be  
ready,  willing  and  available  for  work  at  all  times  when  
rostered.  
• Clause  inserted  here  about  availability  of  work.  
• Clause  inserted  here  about  part-­‐time  and  casual  work.  

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Hours  of  work  

• The  ordinary  hours  of  wok  shall  be  an  average  of  38  hours  
per  week.    Such  hours  shall  be  worked  in  shifts  mutually  
agreed  to  by  the  employer  and  employee(s).  
• Clause  inserted  here  about  days  of  the  week  to  be  worked.  
• Clause  inserted  here  allowing  for  variation  of  hours.  
• Clause  inserted  here  about  time  off  in  lieu.  
• Standby  clause.  
• If  appropriate,  travelling  time  clause.  
• Meal,  morning  tea  and  rest  break  arrangements.  
• Clause  about  time  allowance  for  preparation,  cleaning  up,  
etc.  
• Clause  about  time  sheets.  

Leave  
• In  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the  Employee  
Relations  Act,  1992,  employee(s)  shall  be  entitled  to  4  
weeks  annual  leave.  
• Public  Holiday  clause.  
• Long  Service  Leave  clause  (13  weeks  after  15  years).  
• Sick  leave  clause-­‐minimum  of  one  week.  
• Parenting  leave  provisions-­‐maternity,  paternity  and  
adoption.  
• Bereavement  leave  arrangements.  
• Training  leave,  provisions  (cross  reference  with  clause  18).  
• Jury  duty,  etc.  
• Other  forms  of  leave  (e.g.  care  of  sick  children).  

Health  and  Safety:  appropriate  cluses  covering  safe  work  practices,  


lighting,  protective  clothing,  prevention  of  accidents,  safety  
equipment,  standards  and  measures,  provision  of  First  Aid  kits,  training  
etc.  

Accommodation/amenities:  areas  could  include  appropriate  heating,  


cooling,  seating,  sanitation,  toilet  facilities,  mealroom,  security,  
lighting,  etc.  

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Change  
• Introduction  of,  and  need  for  change  in  a  dynamic  
organisation.  
• Restructuring.  
• Technological  change.  
• Consultative  processes.  

Redundancy  
• If  management  makes  a  firm  decision  to  abolish  a  
position(s)  and  duties  performed  by  an  ongoing  
employee(s),  and  this  is  not  due  to  the  ordinary  turnover  
of  labour  or  the  natural  rate  of  attrition,  then  the  ongoing  
employee  may  be  made  redundant.  
• Persons/Positions  exempt  from  redundancy.  
• Severance  pay/benefits.  

Discipline  (outline  only)  


• Code  of  behaviour.  
• Counselling  procedures.  
• Steps  in  discipline  procedures.  
• Notice  of  termination  due  to  disciplinary  procedures.  
• Instant  dismissal.  

Grievance/Dispute  settling  procedures  (outline  only)  


• Introduction.  
• Grievance  procedures.  
• Local  level  resolution  -­‐  immediate  trainer.  
• Senior  staff  member  involvement.  
• Board  involvement  (management  and  employee  
representatives).  
• Independent  arbitrator.  

Stand  down  procedures  

Superannuation  (details  of  scheme):  

__________________________________________________________  

__________________________________________________________  

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__________________________________________________________  

__________________________________________________________  

__________________________________________________________  

__________________________________________________________  

__________________________________________________________

Training  
• Introduction.  
• Multi-­‐skilling.  
• Career  development.  
• Compulsory  attendance  at  training  programs  during  work  
time.  
• Encouragement  of  employee(s)  attending  training  in  own  
time.  
• External  training  opportunities.  
• Assistance  with  cost  of  training.  

Performance  Appraisal  
• Introduction  and  objectives.  
• Purpose-­‐to  set  future  targets/goals  based  on  past  
performance.  
• Feedback  to  employee(s).  
• Identification  of  training  and  development  needs  of  
employee(s).  
• Employee(s)  career  path.  
• Not  disciplinary  nor  to  replace  informal  daily  exchanges.  

No  extra  claims  -­‐  reaffirmation  that  collective  agreements  cannot  be  


carried,  except  to  remove  any  ambiguity  or  uncertainty.  In  the  case  of  
individual  agreements  ‘the  parties  acknowledge  that  no  extra  claims  
will  be  made  during  the  term  of  this  employment  agreement’.  

Retirement  age  -­‐  statement  about  compulsory  retirement,  if  


applicable.  

__________________________________________________________  

__________________________________________________________  

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__________________________________________________________  

Reserved  matters  -­‐  list  here  any  matters  which  need  to  be  further  
negotiated  or  settled,  probably  to  be  included  in  the  next  agreement.  

__________________________________________________________  

__________________________________________________________  

Signed  by  parties  -­‐  witnessed  and  dated.  

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Activity 5: Do you have a workplace agreement?

Does your workplace have a workplace agreement in place?

If so how does it compare with the example set out above. Write
below any variations between your agreement and the example
above.

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

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Activity 6: What are your reasons for working?

What are your reasons for working? You should be able to list at
least eight reasons. List these below.

1. __________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

2. __________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

3. __________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

4. __________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

5. __________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

6. __________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

7. __________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

8. __________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Definitions of workplace terms

Employee:  
• one  employed  by  another,  usually  for  wages  or  a  salary.  

Employer:  
• one  that  employs  others.  The  head  or  owner  of  a  business  
which  engages  others.  

Casual  employee:  
• casual  employee  is  a  person  who  is  hired  separately  on  
each  occasion  that  he/she  is  employed.  Therefore,  because  
a  casual  employee  is  engaged  separately  each  day,  such  
employees  may  not  automatically  carry  over  entitlements  
contained  in  an  award  which  previously  covered  his/her  
employment.  

Work:  
• the  use  of  strength  or  ability  to  get  something  done.  The  
activity  engaged  in  as  a  means  of  livelihood,  also  the  place  
of  one’s  employment,  something  that  needs  to  be  done.  

Work  ethic:  
• the  conduct  of  performing  what  is  good  and  bad  at  work  
with  moral  duty  and  conduct  governing  an  individual  or  a  
group.  

Voluntary  work:  
• work  done,  given,  or  made  in  accordance  with  one’s  one  
free  will  or  choice.  

Unpaid  work:  
• work  you  carry  out  without  being  paid.  

Contract  work:  
• work  carried  out  with  a  legal  binding  agreement  between  
two  or  more  persons  or  parties.  

Industrial  agreement:  
• is  the  outcome  of  negotiations  between  the  employee  and  
the  unions  setting  out  conditions  and  rates  of  pay.  

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Agreements  may  be  incorporated  into  the  arbitration  


system,  or  may  exist  outside  it  altogether.  Once  registered  
or  certified  by  a  tribunal,  they  have  the  same  legal  standing  
as  an  award  and  are  then  described  as  ‘registered  
agreements’.  

Shift  work:  
• a  workplace  that  operates  24  hours  a  day  and  seven  days  
per  week  would  probably  require  workers  to  work  varying  
8  hours  shifts  according  to  a  prepared  roster.  

Piece  work:  
• is  where  an  employee  gets  paid  for  what  they  produce,  not  
on  the  time  spent  at  work.  Piece  work  still  exists  in  some  
areas  of  the  manufacturing  industry  today  however,  its  
widespread  use  has  been  averted  through  sustained  union  
opposition.  

Award:  
• is  a  contract  of  agreement  between  workers  and  their  
employers.  An  award  covers  wage  rates,  hours  of  work,  
working  conditions,  holidays,  sick  leave,  sackings,  
overtime,  meal  breaks  and  so  on.  

Trade  unions:  
• is  generally  defined  as  an  organisation  of  employees  in  a  
similar  occupation.  The  principal  activities  of  which  include  
the  negotiations  of  rates  of  pay  and  conditions  of  
employment  for  its  members.  Trade  unions  are  registered  
under  the  provisions  of  the  various  federal  and  
state/territory  industrial  Arbitration  Acts.  

Employers  association:  
• is  an  organisation  of  employers  or  their  representatives,  
with  a  common  interest  representing  those  interests,  co-­‐
operate  to  act,  work  or  associate  with  others  especially  for  
mutual  benefit.  

Ask  your  trainer  to  arrange  for  you  to  meet  with  the  union  
representative  and  the  employer  representative  to  have  a  group  
discussion  on  the  industrial  framework  that  exists  in  the  road  transport  
industry.  Write  out  for  yourself  a  number  of  questions  that  you  can  
raise  at  this  meeting.    

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These  questions  could  possibly  cover  the  following  areas:  


• the  structure  of  the  Transport  Workers  Union,  for  
example:  
− federal  
− state/territory  
− local  
• key  personnel  in  each  of  the  above  positions  
• the  roles  and  responsibilities  of  the  union.  

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Section 2

How do you plan, organise and


accept responsibility for own
workload?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 35


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TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Identifying  a  daily  work  plan  

Effective  time  management  

Work  performance  review

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Improving work performance

What are your long term workload plans and


what relationship do they have to other people’s
or organisational plans?

Your  personal  workload  will  consist  of  long  term  and  daily  objectives.  
Before  you  can  set  any  daily  timetable  for  your  own  work  performance  
you  will  need  to  plan  your  work  requirements  in  the  long  term  in  
consultation  with  others  in  your  work  section  and  in  your  work  team.    

Your  organisation  may  have  targets  and  goals  which  are  set  to  be  
achieved  on  an  annual,  quarterly,  monthly,  fortnightly,  weekly  or  daily  
basis.  These  targets  will  be  set  and  you  will  need  to  set  your  own  
targets  in  consultation  with  your  trainer  so  that  you  contribute  to  the  
achievements  of  the  organisation  as  a  whole.  

The  speed  and  efficiency  with  which  you  complete  your  tasks  may  
have  an  effect  on  other  people  in  your  work  section  and  in  your  team.  
If  you  are  held  up  in  completing  a  task,  for  whatever  reason,  this  may  
have  an  impact  on  how  other  people  can  perform  their  work.  If  your  
work  is  inaccurate  this  may  also  have  an  effect  on  how  other  people  
can  progress  with  their  work.    

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Activity 7: Working to targets

What are your goals or targets? Do you have any tasks in your
workload which are set to organisational goals and are measured
over time? Over what timeframe are they measured?

Please fill in the table below with your work activities and the
targets and timelines which are set for them.

Task Performance measure Timeline

Example - check First Details entered into log Weekly


Aid and safety book
equipment

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Which of your work activities have any effect at all on other work
colleagues or teams and their ability to perform their work?

Please fill in the table below listing:


• each of your workplace tasks
• who will be effected if you complete the task late or
inaccurately.

Task Who is effected?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 39


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Daily work plan

When  you  have  set  your  goals  in  consultation  with  your  work  
colleagues  and  trainers  you  can  start  to  plan  your  daily  activities.  The  
most  important  skill  in  planning  these  daily  tasks  is  to  prioritise  the  
tasks  in  order  of  importance  and  in  the  order  of  work  flow.    

Work  out  what  you  need  to  do  and:  


• think  about  all  the  things  that  have  to  be  done    
• list  the  tasks  that  have  to  be  completed  before  another  
task  can  start    
• list  tasks  that  can  be  done  at  the  same  time    
• plan  the  sequence  of  completing  each  task    
• work  out  how  long  each  task  will  take.  

Plan  how  to  do  each  job  and:  


• think  about  all  the  steps  to  be  completed  for  each  task    
• check  that  you  have  all  the  information  and  equipment  you  
need    
• find  out  if  there  is  a  quality  or  performance  standard  for  
each  task    
• find  out  any  safety  precautions  you  need  to  take.  

Page 40 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 8: Checklist for daily work plan

Use this checklist to make sure you have considered all factors in
planning your daily workload:

Item 

Have you listed which tasks (or part of a task) needs to be


completed today?

Have you listed which tasks have to be completed before


another can start?

Have you listed which tasks can be done at the same time?

Have you prioritised tasks in order of importance?

Have you allocated a timeframe for each task?

Have you worked out the steps for each task?

Have you checked your plan against rosters, industrial


agreements and workplace procedures?

Do you have all the information you need?

Do you have all the materials and equipment you need?

Have you checked whether there are quality or performance


standards for any of the tasks?

Do you need to take any safety precautions?

Have you checked your plan through with your trainer?

Do you know who to notify if any of your tasks are delayed


or inaccurate?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 41


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 9: Daily work plan

Now that you have assessed and prioritised your daily workload
you can make your daily work plan.

Make a copy of this sheet and use it to plan out your tasks each
day.

TIME

Task Planned Actual Planned Actual Quality


start start finish finish checked

Make your task plans on this sheet by entering the planned start
and finish times. As you progress through the day make sure that
you carry a notebook and jot down the actual start and finish times
for each task. Enter these actual times onto your sheet at the end
of the day.

Ask your trainer or a work colleague to check the quality of your


work against workplace standards.

Page 42 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Why is it important for you to have good time


management skills?

Time  management  is  a  self-­‐management  tool.  It  enables  you  to  use  
time  well  so  that  you  complete  the  tasks  and  achieve  the  results  that  
you  decide  are  important.  

You  could  allow  time  to  control  you  so  that  you  are  pressured  by  it  and  
achieve  most  of  your  workload  in  a  haphazard  manner,  only  dealing  
with  tasks  and  people  as  they  become  urgent.  

Alternatively,  you  could  choose  to  manage  your  time  by:  


• establishing  priorities  
• scheduling  tasks  
• eliminating  bad  habits  that  slow  down  your  performance.  

Time  is  finite  and  once  used  cannot  be  replaced.  Time  is  always  there,  
you  cannot  stop  it.  However  you  can  decide  how  to  use  it.  

There  are  a  number  of  different  types  of  time  use.  For  example:  
• discretionary  time  is  under  your  control  
• response  time  is  your  contact  or  available  time  
• organisational  time  is  doing  what  the  organisation  expects  
you  to  do.  There  are  three  types  of  organisational  time,  
these  are:  
− ‘boss’  imposed  time  
− ‘system’  imposed  time  
− ‘self’  imposed  time.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 43


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 10: What are the consequences of poor time


management?

Think about situations at work when you have not managed to do


the jobs you were required to do well. What were the
consequences of not managing your time properly in those
situations? Write down your answer.

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

How well do you manage your time? Complete the following


questionnaire.
How well do you manage your time Very Success Unsuccess
I am able to: success – fully – fully
– fully

achieve my goals

share time between work, leisure and


other activities

maintain a clean and tidy work area

complete the necessary paperwork on


time

complete customer orders and meet


delivery deadlines

handle disruptions and interruptions

say no

combine tasks

set priorities

use a daily workplan

use a diary

review my daily work requirements.

Page 44 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

What are the common time wasters?

Most  effective  way  to  solve  the  cause  of  time  wasting  is  to  find  the  
solution  that  suits  you.  

Identifying  the  cause  and  finding  a  solution  is  easier  when  you  can  
recognise  the  three  main  categories  of  time  wasters.  

Categories  of  time  wasters:  


• Human  nature  -­‐  H  
• Environmental  factors  -­‐  E  
• Poor  management  skills  -­‐  P  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 45


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 11: Classify common time wasters?

Look at the list of common time wasters, then classify them into
one of the categories of time wasters.

Use the letters, H, E, P, to categorise your answers,

Tick your answer H E P


• lack of clear instructions
• answering the telephone (not necessarily your own)
• socialising
• going slow
• handling a piece of paper more than once
• procrastinating (putting task off till later)
• feeling stressed or pressured
• doing something else instead
• lack of team work or co-operation
• not asking for help when it is needed
• confused lines of reporting/authority

Add any other time wasters that occur in your workplace to the list
above.

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Do this part of the activity with another person or your trainer. For
each time waster talk about possible solutions to the time wasters.

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ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Make a list of time savers that you could use to improve the way
you do your job.

Some examples are:


• using action plans
• doing it now
• complete everything on the list.

Find at least six other time savers for your list.

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 47


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

How  to  deal  with  time  wasters  

Time  wasters  prevent  you  from  completing  your  specific  goals.  


Remove  time  wasters  and  free  up  time  to  do  the  things  that  are  
important.  Present  a  range  of  strategies  for  effectively  managing  time.    

For  example:  
• effective  housekeeping  to  maintain  clear  and  safe  work  
areas  
• controlling  the  telephone  
• effective  use  and  handling  of  paperwork  
• reducing  disruptions,  interruptions  and  other  problems  
• effective  delegation  
• setting  priorities  
• setting  goals  
• using  a  diary/time  audits  
• doing  the  little  tasks  
• saying  no  
• complete  everything.  

Management  skills  

A  number  of  methods  may  be  used  to  manage  your  time.  Developing  
methods  to  set  priorities  requires  skill  in:  
• evaluating  the  way  of  doing  things  
• making  a  list  of  your  tasks  
• sorting  tasks  into  categories  
• making  a  list  by  degree  of  importance  
• preparing  and  using  diaries  
• questioning  why  things  are  done  
• creating  an  action  plan  
• using  discretionary  time  to  think  and  plan.  

Page 48 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 12: What is your most productive part of the day?

What is the most productive part of your day?

From the list below, rate on a scale of one to five when you are
most productive.
• when I first get to work 
• mid-morning 
• midday 
• early in the afternoon 
• at the end of the working day 

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 49


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Life  changes  

On  entering  the  workforce  for  the  first  time  you  will  be  required  to  
make  some  drastic  changes  to  your  life  style.  You  will  be  required  to  
organise  and  change  your  daily  activities.    

For  example:  
• get  out  of  bed  earlier  in  the  morning  
• attend  to  personal  hygiene  and  dress  (you  may  be  required  
to  wear  a  uniform)  
• be  on  time  to  start  work  
• follow  rules  and  regulations  
• be  aware  of  workplace  hazards,  take  care  of  yourself  and  
others  in  the  workplace  
• work  with,  and  maintain  tools  and  equipment  
• gain  product  knowledge  
• adopt  a  professional  respect  and  attitude  to  working  with  
other  people  
• be  aware  of  ethical  and  confidential  responsibilities  
required  by  your  employer  
• work  individually  or  in  a  group  (mutual  co-­‐operation)  
• understand  your  wage  structure  and  the  conditions  of  
employment.  

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ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Your  employer  also  has  responsibilities  towards  you.    Some  of  these  
responsibilities  are:  
• safe  workplace  
• wages  and  conditions  of  work  
• non  discrimination  
• mutual  co-­‐operation  
• ethical  behaviour/confidentiality/respect.  

Starting  work  

As  a  new  employee  it  is  important  to:  


• make  a  good  impression  
• show  enthusiasm  
• create  positive  impressions  
• pay  attention  to  clothing  and  personal  appearance  
• ask  questions  
• familiarise  yourself  with  work  areas  
• as  you  are  being  shown  around  ask  questions  and  take  
notes  (don’t  rely  on  your  memory)  
• familiarise  your  self  with  the  other  workers  and  their  role  
in  the  workplace  
• learn  to  use  equipment  (specific  to  your  job)  
• don’t  be  frightened  of  making  mistakes.  

Your  trainer  however,  should  outline  what  is  excepted  of  you.  

Change  from  school  to  work  is  hard  but  you  have  to  meet  work  
deadlines.  Work  gives  you  a  new  status  and  with  this  comes  
responsibilities.    

Such  as:  
• longer  hours  
• a  positive  attitude  
• rewards  other  than  money  
• satisfaction  
• learning  new  skills  
• gaining  new  experiences  
• gaining  confidence  in  yourself.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 51


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Reviewing your work performance

Every  workplace  is  involved  with  continuous  improvement  as  part  of  
quality  assurance.  Each  individual  in  the  workplace  can  contribute  to  
quality  assurance  by  making  sure  that  they  are  performing  their  job  
well  and  making  improvements  as  they  gain  skills  and  experience.  
When  you  start  a  new  job  you  take  longer  to  get  it  done.  As  you  get  
more  practice  you  will  shorten  the  time  that  you  take  to  do  the  job.  
Your  work  plan  can  be  adjusted  as  the  job  will  be  finished  sooner.  

You  can  review  your  own  performance  by  timing  your  work  and  by  
checking  that  the  work  is  performed  to  the  required  standard.  

Page 52 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 13: Reviewing daily work plan

Answer the following questions when you have used the daily
planning sheet at least three times.

Do you need to make any adjustments in the time estimates you


are making for how long your tasks are taking?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Which tasks take less time than you estimated?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Which tasks take more time than you estimated?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Have any tasks started more than 30 minutes later than you
planned?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

What was the reason for the delay?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Do you need to take any action about the delay?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Did you need to report the delay to anyone else in the workplace?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 53


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

How can you improve your work performance?

You  can  improve  your  work  performance  by:  


• clarifying  instructions    
• asking  for  demonstrations  and  assistance    
• asking  for  suggestions.  

Your  work  performance  will  depend  on  the  skills  you  have  but  also  on  
your  ability  to  receive,  interpret  and  act  on  instructions.  You  will  need  
to  listen  carefully  and  check  instructions  to  make  sure  that  you  
understand  all  the  requirements  of  the  job.  

Asking  questions  is  a  good  way  to  learn.  It  also  shows  that  you  are  
interested  and  keen  to  make  sure  that  work  is  of  the  best  standard.  
Questions  you  can  ask  include:  
• Are  there  any  performance  standards  for  the  job?    
• How  can  I  tell  if  I  have  completed  the  job  correctly?    
• What  is  the  best  way  to  do  this  job?    
• Could  you  show  me  an  example  of  the  completed  job?    
• Could  you  check  my  work  for  me,  as  I  go  along?    
• Could  you  tell  me  where  I  am  going  wrong?    
• Can  you  suggest  any  improvements  in  how  I  am  doing  this  
job?  

Page 54 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 14: Asking for suggestions for improvement and


acting on them

Select one of your workplace tasks that you feel quite confident in,
but where you know you could improve a little. Ask your trainer to
observe your performance of this task and make suggestions for
improvement.

Write the task and the suggestions for improvement here:

Task

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Suggestions for improvement

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Discuss the suggestions with your trainer.

Repeat the task a few times over a period of time, try to incorporate
the suggestions. After a week or two, ask your trainer to observe
you performing the same task again.

Discuss the effects of incorporating the suggestions with your


trainer.

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 55


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Page 56 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Section 3

How do you apply ethical


practices?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 57


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Identify  and  follow  workplace  procedures  

Ethical  work  practices  

Page 58 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

How do you identify and follow workplace


procedures, regulations and legislation?

Ethical  work  practices  involve  acting  with  integrity,  honesty  and  


fairness  in  all  your  dealings  with  customers  and  work  colleagues.  It  
also  involves  abiding  by  any  rules  or  regulations  imposed  either  by  the  
workplace  or  by  other  authorities  and  governments.  

You  need  to  read  through  these  documents  and  ask  someone  to  
explain  how  they  relate  to  you.  Sometimes  legal  documents  are  
written  in  very  difficult  English  and  could  be  set  out  in  a  much  simpler  
form.  If  you  have  any  difficulty  at  all  in  understanding  regulations  or  
workplace  policies  ask  your  trainer  to  explain  them.  The  consequences  
of  not  applying  ethical  work  practices  can  be  dangerous  and  could  
result  in  injury  or  damage  as  well  as  disciplinary  proceedings.    

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 59


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 15: Codes of practice

Does your workplace have a code of practice? Yes No

What regulations and legislation cover your area of the workplace?

Write the names of the relevant documents here:

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

How do these documents relate to your daily work?

Write down the essential parts of the documents which relate to


your performance of your daily work:

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Page 60 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

How do you apply ethical work practices

Ethical  work  practices  also  include:  


• honouring  your  commitments  to  your  work  colleagues  and  
customers.  

Your  commitments  may  involve  


− finishing  a  task  before  a  certain  time    
− making  sure  that  messages  are  passed  on    
− checking  up  on  information    
− calling  people  back    
− altering  arrangements  and  making  sure  everyone  is  informed.  
• maintaining  confidentiality.    
If  you  are  in  any  doubt  at  all  as  to  whether  a  piece  of  
information  is  confidential,  do  not  say  anything  until  you  
have  checked  with  your  trainer.    
− some  company  information  will  be  confidential  and  you  will  be  
asked  not  to  discuss  information  which  may  be  of  use  to  
competitors    
− workplace  colleagues  may  take  you  into  their  confidence  and  
discuss  personal  matters  with  you  which  you  will  be  expected  
to  keep  confidential    
− you  may  hear  information  about  a  customer  which  should  not  
be  passed  on  to  another  customer.  
• security  of  information  and  equipment    
− your  workplace  will  have  security  policies  and  procedures  
which  must  always  be  followed  to  the  letter.  Ask  for  a  copy  of  
security  procedures  from  your  trainer    
− if  you  neglect  to  follow  security  procedures  you  may  endanger  
the  health  and  well-­‐being  of  other  people  or  the  safety  of  
equipment.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 61


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 16: Applying ethical work practices

Part 1

What commitments do you make to other people in your daily


workload?

Please write a list of your commitments here:

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Part 2

Find a copy of your workplace security policies.

How do these policies relate to your job?

Please write down all the tasks you are required to perform as a
part of workplace security:

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Page 62 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Section 4

How do you participate in


identifying and meeting your own
learning needs?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 63


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Relevance  of  training  in  the  road  transport  industry  

Competency  based  training  

Recognition  of  prior  learning  (RPL)/Recognition  of  Current  


Competence  (RCC)  

Workplace  functions  and  structure  

Career  paths  and  training  opportunities  

Other  jobs  in  road  transport  

Training  needs  for  your  work  tasks  

Learning  through  networks  

Page 64 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Describe the relevance of training in the road


transport industry

Why  train  

Planned  training  can  be  an  extremely  effective  means  of  having  people  
perform  better  in  their  jobs,  of  helping  groups  work  better  together,  
and  of  helping  make  work  safe.  It  takes  time  and  effort,  but  it  is  well  
worth  it.  

Effective  training  will:  


• reduce  learning  costs  
• reduce  training  costs  
• increase  output  
• increase  quality  
• standardise  correction  methods  
• reduce  accidents  due  to  ignorance  or  carelessness  
• make  sure  you  take  better  care  of  tools,  equipment  and  
materials  
• increase  work  satisfaction  and  pride  in  the  job  
• engender  team  spirit  and  pride  
• reduce  labour  turnover  
• reduce  material  wastage  and  scrap.  

Training  will  allow  you  to:  


• improve  your  workskills  
• learn  new  skills  
• multi  skill  yourself  
• broaden  your  career  opportunities.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 65


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Activity 17: Why will training make you be a more valuable


employee?

Why will training make you a more valuable employee?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Training  in  this  course  has  been  designed  in  unit  or  modular  form.  You  
will  be  provided  with  access  to:  
• an  environment  appropriate  to  the  assessment  task  
• appropriate  learners  handouts  detailing  the  course  
• Training  Record  Book  
• self  paced  learning  materials  (if  relevant)  
• tools  and  equipment  
• a  range  of  specific  trucks  
• union  representatives  
• employer  representatives.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 67


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Activity 18: What other things may help you with this training?

Can you think of other things you may need to assist you in this
training? Discuss this question with your trainer.

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

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What is competency based training?

Competency  focuses  on  what  is  expected  of  an  employee  in  the  
workplace  rather  than  on  the  learning  process,  and  it  embodies  the  
ability  to  transfer  and  apply  skills  and  knowledge  to  new  situations  and  
environments.  Competency  is  a  broad  concept  that  includes  all  aspects  
of  work  performance  and  not  only  task  skills.  

Competency  encompasses:  

• the  requirement  to  perform  individual  tasks  (task  skills)  

• the  requirement  to  manage  a  number  of  different  tasks  within  the  
job  (task  management  skills)  

• the  requirement  to  respond  to  irregularities  and  break  downs  in  
routine  (contingency  management  skills)  

• the  requirement  to  deal  with  the  responsibilities  and  expectations  


of  the  work  environment  (job/role  environment  skills),  including  
working  with  others.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 69


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Activity 19: Definition of terms

What is the meaning of the following words.

Use a dictionary to look up these words and write down their


meaning:
• encompass

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________
• management

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________
• contingency

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Competency  in  a  job  is  developed.  It  does  not  suddenly  happen  with  a  
flash  of  insight.  Nor  does  a  person  achieve  competency  by  knowing  
what  to  do  and  being  able  to  talk  about  it.  Ultimately  the  gaining  of  
competency  requires  practice  in  the  work.    

Gaining  competency  can  usually  be  achieved  through  a  sequence  of  


training  which  requires:  
• demonstration  
• explanation  
• practice  
• review  
• application.  

In  recent  years,  government  and  industry  have  undertaken  a  major  


program  of  reforms  to  Australian  Vocational  Education  and  Training.  
These  reforms  aim  to  provide:  

• training  which  integrates  industry,  an  enterprise  and  individual  


needs  and  supports  life-­‐long  learning  

• competency  based  training  that  achieves  national  industry  and  


enterprise  standards  

• more  flexible  pathways  and  delivery  

• increased  access  and  improved  outcomes  for  groups  of  people  


who  have  missed  out  on  training  opportunities  in  the  past  

• complementary  roles  for  on-­‐the-­‐job  and  off-­‐the-­‐job  training  

• nationally  recognised  qualifications  which  are  portable  across  


industries  and  states/territories  

• a  broader  range  of  providers  who  both  co-­‐operate  and  compete  to  
meet  national  and  international  training  demands.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 71


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Recognition of Prior Learning


(RPL)/Recognition of Current Competence
(RCC)

Recognition  refers  to  the  acknowledgement  of  skills  and  knowledge  


held  as  a  result  of  formal  training,  work  experience  and/or  life  
experience.  

Recognition  for  individuals  should  be  based  on  the  following  five  
principles:  

Principle  1:  Competence  

Recognition  should  focus  on  the  competencies  held  as  a  result  of  
formal  and  informal  training,  not  how,  when  or  where  the  learning  
occurred.  

Recognition  of  competence  of  individuals  makes  the  distinction  


between  formal  and  informal  training  unnecessary.  

Principle  2:  Commitment  

Recognition  underpins  a  system  of  competency  based  training.  It  is  


essential  that  training  providers  have  a  demonstrable  commitment  to  
recognising  the  competence  of  individuals.  

A  commitment  by  training  provider  to  recognise  competencies  held  


will  ensure  that  access  to  competency  assessments  are  improved  and  
not  restricted  to  those  who  are  articulate  and  determined.  It  will  also  
mean  that  individuals  will  not  be  required  to  duplicate  their  training.  

Principle  3:  Access  

Recognition  should  be  available  to  all  potential  applicants.  

Mechanisms  and  practices  for  recognising  competence  should  


facilitate  entry  to  the  process  rather  than  present  barriers.  

Principle  4:  Fairness  

Recognition  should  involve  processes  that  are  fair  to  all  parties  
involved.  

Processes  utilised  must  be  verifiable,  credible  and  just.  All  participants  
must  be  confident  that  the  recognition  process  and  its  outcomes  are  
fair.  

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The  way  in  which  all  decisions,  criteria  and  processes  are  determined,  
must  be  governed  by  this  principle.  The  processes  used  must  enable  
the  person  being  assessed  to  make  a  contribution.  

Principle  5:  Support  

Recognition  should  involve  the  provision  of  adequate  support  to  


potential  applicants.  

Potential  applicants  may  require  support  when  accessing  systems  for  


recognition.  Personnel  involved  in  implementing  the  system  also  
require  adequate  support  including  training  in  order  to  maintain  a  
quality  assessment  service.  

Process for RLP/RCC

The  process  for  recognising  prior  learning  will  provide  for:  

• assessment  or  evidence  of  the  accumulated  learning  experiences  


of  an  individual  in  relation  to  the  required  competency  

• potential  applicants  to  provide  evidence  as  to  how  their  prior  
experiences  relate  to  the  required  competencies  of  the  selected  
course  

• a  range  of  techniques  to  accurately  assess  the  competencies  held  

• support,  mechanisms  to  encourage  and  facilitate  applicants  use  of  


the  process  

• clear  criteria  for  deciding  whether  or  not  to  grant  recognition  

• an  appeals  mechanism  

• a  review  phase.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 73


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Assessment

Assessment  refers  to  the  process  of  judging  competency  against  


prescribed  standards  of  performance.  

Assessment  is  critical  to  competency  based  training  and  as  such  is  
integral  to  providing  award  courses  or  training  programs  or  
recognising  the  prior  learning  of  individuals.  It  is  highlighted  in  this  
report  as  a  quality  measure  for  training  systems.  

Assessment  should  be  based  on  the  following  principles:  

Principle  1:  Competency-­‐based  training  

Assessment  approaches  should  measure  the  range  of  knowledge  and  


skills  and  their  application  against  the  competency  standards  
developed  by  industrial  parties  and  endorsed  by  Australian  National  
Training  Authority  (ANTA).  

Principle  2:  Flexibility  in  approach  

Assessment  approaches  should  be  flexible.  

The  approaches  used  to  assess  competence  may  need  to  incorporate  
demonstration  or  observation,  interviews,  portfolios,  employer  
references  or  reports,  written  assignments.  

Principle  3:  Validity  

Assessment  approaches  used  should  be  appropriate  i.e.  the  


techniques  used  must  actually  assess  what  they  claim  to  assess.  

Principle  4:  Reliability  

Assessment  approaches  should  be  able  to  be  relied  upon.  

In  the  context  of  competence,  reliability  means  that  the  same  


judgement  about  a  particular  performance  would  be  made  by  another  
assessor,  or  if  it  were  made  by  the  same  assessor  on  another  occasion.  

Principle  5:  Recognition    

Assessment  approaches  should  provide  for  the  recognition  of  


competencies  held,  no  matter  where  they  have  been  acquired.  

Assessment  processes  should  provide  for:  

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• confidentiality  
• assessments  to  be  made  by  persons  who  are  competent  in  
the  skills  being  assessed  and  in  appropriate  assessment  
techniques  
• an  on-­‐going  validation  of  an  individual’s  skills  
• counselling  and  advisory  service  
• available  to  any  individual  participating  in  or  seeking  to  
participate  in  an  accredited  course  or  training  program.  

Assessment  methods  

Assessment  methods  used  in  these  Learner’s  Guides  will  be  by:  
• verbal  and/or  written  short  answers  
• practical  exercises,  such  as:  
− checklists  
− surveys  
− role  playing  
− discussions  
− demonstrations  and  observation  
− collecting  evidence  
− recording  
• completing  specific  tasks  
• carrying  out  your  normal  routine.  

The  training  developed  for  the  road  transport  industry  is  competency  
based.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 75


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
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Activity 20: What are your training requirements?

Test your training requirements

Tick True or False True False

You can’t do the job correctly because you


don’t know how to do the job.  

You can’t do the job correctly because you


don’t have the right equipment.  

Nobody has shown you how to do the job


correctly.  

You don’t do the job correctly because you


don’t have enough authority.  

The job is too hard for one person to do


properly.  

Show your answers to your trainer, ask him/her how to correct


these situations.

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Training record book

Your  training  record  book  is  an  important  part  of  your  training  tools.  
The  training  record  book  records  your:  
• name  
• position  
• commencement  date  
• training  completed  (activities)  
• training  validated  by  your  trainer  (progress)  
• training  validated  by  your  off-­‐the-­‐job  trainer  
(achievements  during  your  training)  
• future  training.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 77


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Activity 21: What information does your training book


contain?

Does your training record book contain information other than that
listed above? If it does write brief details of this information below.

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

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The  record  book  will  list  the  units  you  are  required  to  complete.    When  
each  competency  and  associated  assessment  requirements  have  been  
satisfied  it  will  be  signed  by  your  trainer  or  your  workplace  assessor.  

You  are  responsible  for  the  following:  


• the  trainee  record  book  
• taking  the  record  book  to  all  of  your  training  sessions  
• keeping  your  record  book  up-­‐to-­‐date    
• keeping  your  record  book  in  a  secure  place.  

If  you  cannot  complete  a  unit  or  you  change  training  providers,  the  
record  book  will  show  what  you  have  completed  and  where  your  
training  should  recommence.  

All  assessments  should  be  signed  and  dated  by  your  trainer/workplace  
assessor.  

If  you  do  not  achieve  a  learning  outcome  then  you  will  be  reassessed  
at  a  later  date.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 79


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Example of a work book


Elements  of   Assessment  criteria   RPL/RCC  if   Competency   Assessor’s  
competency   granted   achieved   signature  and  
date  
()  

1.     Explain  the   1.1  Identify  and        


Occupational   describe  the  OHS  
Health  and   laws  and  practices  
Safety  laws  and   relevant  to  your  
practices   workplace.    
relevant  to  the  
road  transport   1.2  Explain  the  
industry  and  the   legislative  
implementation   responsibilities  
of  these  in  the   regarding  OHS  of  
workplace   the  following  
people:  
 
• employers  
• trainers  
• employees  
• health  and  
  safety  
  representatives  
• customers.  

1.3  Discuss  the  


procedures  
involved  in  
implementing  
relevant  OHS  
Legislation  in  the  
workplace.  

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Workplace trainer

When  you  first  start  to  work  in  the  road  transport  industry  it  is  likely  
that  someone  will  help  you  during  your  first  couple  of  weeks.  This  
person  is  usually  called  your  trainer.  

The  trainer  will  assist  your  learning  in  the  workplace  by:  
• job  rotation  
• secondment  
• worksharing  
• project  work  
• coaching  
• mentoring  
• work  schedules  
• supervised  projects  
• assigning  you  to  a  variety  of  workteams.  

Your  trainer  has  a  number  of  responsibilities,  some  of  these  are  to:  
• train  you  
• directly  supervise  you  
• organise  opportunities  for  you  to  learn  a  range  of  skills  
• arrange  other  employees  to  demonstrate  skills  to  you  
• check  or  assess  whether  you  have  mastered  those  skills  
• support  you  in  your  learning  where  self-­‐paced  materials  
are  used  
• motivate  you  
• encourage  you  
• provide  leadership  
• increase  your  self-­‐esteem  
• help  you  think  for  yourself.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 81


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
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Training providers

The  bulk  of  training  for  road  transport  occurs  through  private  
providers,  state/territory  Skill  Centres,  or  in  the  case  of  large  
companies,  through  in-­‐house  training.  

Public  training  through  the  TAFE  system  plays  only  a  minor  role  at  this  
stage.  

In-­‐house  training  is  offered  by  large  road  transport  enterprises,  while  
smaller  companies  seek  training  from  external  providers.  

Public  and  private  training  providers  in  most  cases  cover  the  theory  
and  other  training  that  might  not  be  able  to  be  delivered  in  your  
workplace.  This  provider  trainer  may  be  from  a  government  (TAFE)  or  
private  industry  based  organisation.  

Provider  trainers  have  the  same  responsibilities  as  workplace  trainers.  

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Activity 22: What are the names of other people in your


workplace?

Who is your trainer? Write the details below.

Name:

Job title:

Telephone number:

Who is your provider trainer? Write the details below.

Name:

Job title:

Organisation:

Telephone number:

You will also have dealings with other people in your workplace.
List their details below for future reference.

Name Position Telephone number

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 83


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Your trainer and other workmates will have certain responsibilities


towards you during your training period. Their job will be to guide
you through the various job tasks that you will be required to do.
For example:
• help you by answering all of your questions related to workplace
• offering advice and feedback on your progress.

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Activity 23: What is your trainer’s role in your training?

List five important things that your trainer will do for you during your
training period.

1.___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________

2.___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________

3.___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________

4.___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________

5.___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 85


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Workplace  procedures  that  impact  on  your  lifestyle  are:  


• hours  of  work/breaks  
• routines  
• personnel  hierarchy  and  supervising  system  
• schedules,  timetables  and  deadlines  
• rules,  policies  and  regulations  
• documentation  systems  
• reporting  procedures  
• safety  and  emergency  procedures  
• maintenance  procedures.  

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Activity 24: What lifestyle changes have you made because of


your workplace?

What changes have the workplace procedures had on your


lifestyle? Write these changes below.

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

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Workplace functions and structure

It  is  important  that  you  fully  understand  your  role  in  your  workplace.  
Before  you  work  out  exactly  where  you  fit  in  and  where  you  could  go  
in  the  future  you  need  to  understand  the  workplace  itself.  Your  
company  may  be  a  small  family  owned  business  or  a  large  multi-­‐
national  corporation.  In  the  road  transport  industry  the  employment  
opportunities  are  many  and  various.  There  is  a  lot  of  scope  for  
promotion  and  there  is  never  much  shortage  of  work.  Spending  time  
on  working  out  where  you  are  and  where  you  would  like  to  go  in  this  
crucial  infrastructure  industry  is  your  first  step  to  a  brilliant  career.  

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Activity 25: Company information

Gather together as much company information as you can and find


out the answers to the following questions from the material you
have found. If you cannot find the answer ask your trainer.

How many people are employed by the company in total (this


includes national and international employees where relevant)?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

How many people are employed at your site?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

What different types of jobs are there at your site?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

What types of vehicles, machinery and other equipment does the


company use at your site?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

What is the main purpose of your work area?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

What is the main purpose of the whole work site?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 89


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 26: Career paths in your workplace

Who is in your work team?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Who is your trainer or team leader?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Who does your trainer or team leader report to?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Who has the responsibility for your section of the work site?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Who has the responsibility for the whole work site (if different)?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Who is the State Manager?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Who is the National Manager?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Page 90 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Career paths and training opportunities

Vehicle operator jobs

In  the  road  transport  industry  there  are  many  different  types  of  work,  
which  include  driving.  
• interstate  semitrailer  driver    
• local  bus  driver    
• furniture  removalist    
• quarry  tiptruck  driver    
• tour  coach  driver    
• tanker  driver    
• courier    
• taxi  driver    
• road  train  driver.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 91


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 27: Vehicle operator jobs

Which vehicles are used in your company?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Which vehicles would you like to drive?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Page 92 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Other jobs in road transport

At  one  of  the  largest  transport  companies,  there  are  2,500  people  
employed.  2,000  of  these  are  vehicle  operators.  The  other  500  people  
are  trainers,  managers  and  administrative  staff.  

The  career  structure  is:  


• vehicle  operator    
• trainer    
• site  manager    
• regional  manager    
• general  manager.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 93


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TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 28: Other jobs in the road transport industry

Take a look at all the people working in your company. If you are
not working or working in a very small company, you can:
• refer to the published job guides, newspapers, industry
publications for a list of jobs in the road transport industry
• look in the newspapers for all the types of jobs listed in the
vacancies section to do with road transport (local,
state/territory).

What jobs are there that do not involve much driving?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Which jobs appeal to you?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

What career paths are there within your organisation?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Page 94 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Talk to your trainer or team leader about the jobs you are interested
in.

What training would you need in order to apply for these jobs?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

What training opportunities are there within the company for you to
acquire these skills?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 95


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

How will you work out your training needs for


performing your work tasks?

When  you  are  beginning  a  new  job  no-­‐one  will  expect  you  to  be  
immediately  proficient  in  all  aspects  of  the  job.  You  will  need  to  plan  
how  you  can  become  more  skilled  in  each  area  of  expertise  and  how  to  
gain  any  knowledge  or  skills  that  you  do  not  already  have.  

You  will  need  to  work  from  your  job  description  or  position  
specification.  Break  down  all  the  elements  of  the  job  into  task  areas.    

If  you  spend  some  time  thinking  about  all  that  is  involved  in  your  work,  
you  will  come  up  with  a  list  of  activities.    

For  example,  you  may  have  to:  


• back  the  truck  up  to  the  loading  bay    
• operate  a  hand-­‐held  fork-­‐lift    
• work  out  the  load  placement    
• refer  to  the  delivery  route    
• make  sure  cartons  are  labelled  correctly    
• check  the  load  off  against  a  list    
• secure  the  load    
• speak  to  the  customer  when  you  unload    
• get  the  customer  to  sign  a  delivery  note.  

When  you  break  your  job  down  you  will  get  a  list  that  gives  a  lot  of  
information  about  the  skills  you  have.  

In  the  list  above,  the  person  would  have  skills  in  the  following  areas:  
• customer  service    
• health  and  safety    
• clerical    
• driving    
• fork  lift  operation    
• planning.  

Page 96 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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Other skills and abilities


You  may  have  skills  that  you  used  in  other  jobs,  or  that  you  use  in  your  
personal  life  that  you  would  like  to  be  using  in  your  next  job.  
• Can  you  speak  in  public?    
• Can  you  teach  other  people  how  to  do  things?  What  
things?    
• Can  you  use  a  computer?  How  well?    
• Are  you  good  at  getting  people  to  work  together?    
• Are  you  full  of  bright  ideas?    
• Do  you  solve  problems  quickly?    
• Are  you  steady  and  unflappable?    
• What  equipment  and  machinery  can  you  use?  
Your  company  will  have  procedures  for  tracking  training  needs  and  
assessing  professional  development  and  training  of  employees.  You  
will  be  required  to  participate  in  this  procedure.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 97


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 29: Skills and abilities

Think of all the work that you do, or have done, in as much detail as
possible. The following questions may help you to list your tasks:

What happens when you arrive at work?

What do people rely on you for?

Do you have to read written instructions or lists?

Do you have to write anything down?

Do you make any decisions at work?

Do you have any responsibility for health and safety?

Do you talk to customers or people from outside your company as


part of your work?

What equipment do you use?

What knowledge is necessary for you to do your job?

List the tasks that you perform in your job:

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Page 98 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Which tasks do you enjoy most?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Which tasks do you need additional training in?

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 99


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Discuss with your trainer or training manager how you can plan to
get the training you need.

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

Page 100 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Learning through networks and work


relationships
In  addition  to  your  formal  training  you  will  be  able  to  learn  from  
observation  and  discussion  with  work  colleagues.  As  you  observe  
people  using  skills  and  competencies  that  you  are  not  yet  using  
yourself,  you  will  gain  background  knowledge  which  will  help  you  when  
it  is  time  for  you  to  pick  up  these  skills.  Always  take  advantage  of  the  
opportunities  you  have  for  increasing  your  knowledge  and  
understanding  of  workplace  procedures.  Follow  up  on  your  own  
interests  by  asking  questions  and  taking  notes.  If  you  see  or  hear  about  
something  which  sparks  your  interest  ask  the  person  to  explain  the  
process  to  you.  Ask  where  you  can  get  written  information.  As  you  
establish  networks  and  supports  in  the  workplace,  your  knowledge  will  
grow  and  you  will  feel  more  comfortable  in  your  learning.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 101


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 30: Learning through workplace networks

List the workplace contacts that you have and the skills or
competencies that you can learn by observing or questioning them.
Add to this list as you progress.

Workplace contact Skills/Competencies

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

_______________________ ________________________

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Additional
resources

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 103


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Print  based:  
• newspapers  
• industry  publications  
• brochures  and  information  supplied  by  the  training  provider  
involved  in  your  training  
• Transport  and  Distribution  Training  Australia  (see  cover  of  this  
resource)  
• Transport  Workers  Union  (see  your  site  representative)  
• a  range  of  web  sites  is  available  for  career’s  information  (use  local,  
state  newspaper  to  find  relevant  addresses).  

Page 104 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Feedback on
activities
The responses provided in this section are suggested responses.
Because every workplace is different, your responses may vary
according to your specific workplace procedures, the equipment
available and the nature of the business.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 105


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 2: Organisational structure

Examples:

The administration department relates to the freight department


through the manager.

The payroll department and the training department are both in the
human resources department.

There is a safety officer in each department. The OHS coordinator


works in the human resources department.

Activity 3: Storage facilities in the workplace

Examples:

Name of storage Purpose of storage Associated risks


area area

Flammable Goods Storage of oil, Fire hazard.


diesel, etc

Restraining ropes and Keep restraining


tarps. equipment in good
condition - out of
rain, sunlight.

Activity 6: What are your reasons for working?

What are your reasons for working?


• commitment to a career
• economic independence
• social contact
• self fulfilment
• financial well being of self and family
• success and achievement
• job satisfaction
• status.

Page 106 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 11: Classify common time wasters

Tick your answer H E P

• lack of clear instructions 

• answering the telephone (not necessarily your


own)

• socialising

• going slow

• handling a piece of paper more than once

• procrastinating (putting task off till later)

• feeling stressed or pressured
 
• doing something else instead

• lack of team work or co-operation
 
• not asking for help when it is needed

• confused lines of reporting/ authority.

Activity 17: Why will training make you be a more valuable


employee?

It will allow me do other jobs in the organisation, and broaden my


chances of promotion.

It will lessen the possibility of having an accident by training me in


the correct way of doing things.

It will show me how to work with others.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 107


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd ADELG1050
TLIL107C Complete workplace orientation/induction procedures

Activity 19: Definition of terms

To encircle or enclose, to include.


The act or art of managing: control, direction. Skilfulness in
managing. Those who manage an enterprise.
A chance happening or event. A possible event or one foreseen as
possible if another occurs.

Activity 23: What is your trainer’s role in your training?

They will show me the correct way to carry out my duties.

Demonstrate (or have someone else demonstrate) the correct way


to use hand tools and equipment.

Explain my role in the workplace.

Initially set out work priorities for me to follow.

Assist me if I should have a problem.

Page 108 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1050 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd October 2008