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Program overview

02-Sep-2015 10:14
Year
Organization
Education

2011/2012
Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Master Offshore and Dredging Engineering

Code
Master ODE 2011
MSc ODE 1st year
AES1730
CIE4130
CIE4325OE
CIE5317
OE4604
OE4610
OE4611
OE4630
OE4630 D1
OE4630 D2
OE4630 D3
OE4630 D4
WB2601OE

Omschrijving
Master Offshore & Dredging Engineering 2011
MSc Offshore & Dredging Engineering 1st year

ECTS

Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering


Probabilistic Design
Ocean Waves for Offshore
Physical Oceanography
Exploring Offshore & Dredging Engineering
Survey of Offshore Engineering Projects
Experimental Engineering Exercise
Offshore Hydromechanics
Offshore Hydromechanics, Part 1
Offshore Hydromechanics, Part 2
Offshore Hydromechanics, Part 3
Offshore Hydromechanics, Part 4
Strenght of Materials

3
4
3
3
6
8
8
8

p1

p2

p3

p4

p5

1,5
2
3
1,5
1

MSc ODE Bottom Founded Structures


CIE4140
OE4624
OE4651

Structural Dynamics
Offshore Soil Mechanics
Bottom Founded Structures

4
3
6

MSc ODE Dredging Engineering


OE4623
OE4625
OE4626
OE5671

Drive System Design Principles


Dredge Pumps and Slurry Transport
Dredging Processes
Dredging Equipment Design

3
4
4
4

MSc ODE Floating Offshore Structures


CIE4140
OE4623
OE4652
OE5663
OE5664

Structural Dynamics
Drive System Design Principles
Floating Structures
Dynamic Positioning
Offshore Moorings

4
3
4
3
3

MSc ODE Ship & Offshore Structures


CIE4140
MT523
MT830
OE4652
OE5664

Structural Dynamics
Numerical Methods for MT
Applications of the Finite Element Method
Floating Structures
Offshore Moorings

4
4
3
4
3

Introduction to Wind Energy


Arctic Offshore Engineering
Safety in Offshore Engineering
Marine Pipelines
Sub Sea Engineering
Arctic Engineering
Offshore Wind Farm Design
Offshore Wind Support Structures

4
7,5
2
4
4
3
4
3

MSc ODE Elective Courses


AE3W02TU
AT327
OE4640
OE4653
OE4654
OE4680
OE5662
OE5665

MSc ODE 2nd year


OE5680-15
OE5685-15
OE5690-30

MSc Offshore & Dredging Engineering 2nd year


Industrial Practice
Problem Analysis Thesis
Thesis

15
15
30

Page 1 of 45

1.

Year
Organization
Education

2011/2012
Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Master Offshore and Dredging Engineering

Page 2 of 45

Master ODE 2011


Director of Education
Program Coordinator
Program Title
Director of Education

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema
MSc Offshore & Dredging Engineering
Since 1926 Dredging Engineering and since 1975 Offshore Engineering courses are given at the Delft University of Technology.
Offshore Engineering covers nearly everything what happens at the sea except for transport. In 2004 these two specialisations
merged into the new MSc program Offshore & Dredging Engineering, a two-year (120 ECTS) curriculum leading to the MSc
degree in Offshore & Dredging Engineering (ODE).
Offshore & Dredging Engineering is a multidisciplinary cooperation between Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and
Maritime Technology. Students with a those BSc degrees and BSc degrees in Aerospace Engineering and Applied Physics can
directly enroll in this program. Students with a different background should first consult the staff of Offshore & Dredging
Engineering to explore the possibilities of enrollment. An appointment can be made by sending an email to the staffs secretary:
M.C.Dunant@tudelft.nl.
This study guide is written as a guideline for students already enrolled in the MSc program Offshore & Dredging Engineering
and for students who consider choosing Offshore & Dredging Engineering to obtain their masters degree. It concentrates on the
academic content of the curriculum and it presents practical information regarding the organization of the curriculum.
Since information, in particular the class schedules, may change, the latest information can be found on our website:
http://www.offshore.tudelft.nl.
We wish you a very successful stay in our Offshore group and with your study. Your success will depend to a large extent on
how much energy you are willing to put in being an active participant in Offshore & Dredging Engineering.
Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema,
Director of Education

Program Goals

The Delft Offshore Curiculum Objectives


All TU Delft MSc curricula last nominally two academic years. Within these two years - by building upon a participants BSc
background the overall Offshore & Dredging Engineering curriculum objective is to prepare successful participants for an active
role in society that is related in some way to the offshore or dredging equipment industry - especially when this latter equipment
is to be used in exposed or deep water locations.
After completion of the curriculum one can now work with new and more complex problems (probably only within ones
specialty area) and develop, evaluate and document solutions for them. This defines the objective for the Offshore & Dredging
Engineering MSc Degree curriculum.

Exit Qualifications

Designing ones Individual Program


Many beginning MSc participants are concerned and insecure about what seems like a myriad of decisions that they feel they
have to make about their own specific program choices (which courses to include) without sufficient information. Indeed, nearly
everyone arrives at the doors of the Offshore & Dredging Engineering curriculum without bringing any specific preparation from
their BSc program experience.
It will be refreshing for these new arrivals to know that most of their program decisions can be delayed at least until they
(individually) have had a few weeks to become orientated within Offshore & Dredging Engineering; this reduces the pressure
and gives time to develop a better motivation for making choices for the individual study program.
One will find, for example, that only one OE course taught in the first quarter of the first MSc year is associated with a specific
specialisation. Feel free as well to consult with the OE curriculum leader about professional objectives and program choices. He
can be reached with a question or for an appointment via an e-mail to M.C.Dunant@tudelft.nl.

Program Structure 1

Curriculum Structure
Now that the curriculum has been described in very general terms and the requirements for admission have been defined as well,
attention in this chapter can switch to the more detailed description of the courses which make up the Offshore & Dredging
Engineering MSc curriculum. One is reminded that the entire MSc curriculum lasts two academic years, which amounts to a total
of 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) of work.
Generally speaking, each participant is expected to include the following in their personal study program:
- The core curriculum of courses of Offshore & Dredging Engineering
- One specialisation as a major
- Complemented with electives to at least 120 ECTS credits.
As mentioned one of the four specialisations have to be chosen as a major:
- Bottom Founded Structures
- Dredging Engineering
- Floating Offshore Structures
- Ship & Offshore Structures
The next section highlights how one should design his or her own program. The remainder of this chapter provides more details
about Offshore & Dredging Engineering curriculum elements. More details about individual courses can be found in the
appendix of this booklet. The most up-to-date information - such as the exact day-to-day teaching schedule - can be found via
blackboard.tudelft.nl.

Fail or Pass Regulation

1. Students may be said to have gained their masters degree when they have met the following requirements:
- if the student in question has been admitted to the course,
- once the marks list is complete, that is to say, when a mark has been given for each subject, the work has been graded as a
pass or when the student has been exempted,
- once the core components and the thesis have been completed with a mark no lower than 6.0.
2. It must be clear to the student how the examiners arrived at the examination result.

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3. In special cases the board of examiners may accept deviations from the points mentioned in subsection above. If necessary,
alternative arrangements may even be laid down.
With Honours Regulation

At the discretion of the Board of Examiners, a candidate for the Masters degree can receive the designation cum laude if he or
she meets the following conditions:
a)the mark awarded to the components specified in the Master's examination implementation procedures shall average no less
than 8,0 excluding the Masters Thesis in a list that contains no marks below 6;
b)the mark awarded for the thesis project shall be no less than 9;
c)the examiner of the graduation assignment shall have submitted a proposal for the award of cum laude.

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Year
Organization
Education

2011/2012
Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Master Offshore and Dredging Engineering

MSc ODE 1st year


Director of Education
Introduction 1

Introduction 2

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


This section outlines course requirements that are more or less universal - independent of ones further choices. The knowledge
and skill conveyed by these activities forms the heart of the offshore engineering curriculum; nearly all of the subsequent
offshore engineering courses build upon these.
These courses are coloured green on the Offshore Engineering MSc Curriculum Diagram which may be downloaded from the
website www.offshore.tudelft.nl.
Detailed information on the core and specialisation courses is provided in the overview of courses. Also contact details of the
teachers are given there.
In below mentioned table all courses are mandatory with the following exeption:
* AES1730 is mandatory for students with a BSc Mechanical Engineering background
* WB2601OE is mandatory for students with a BSc Civil Engineering background

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AES1730
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Required for
Summary
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Prerequisites
Assessment

Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering


7.0.0.0

1
1
1
2
English
CT4360, material modeling for soils and rocks (CT4360), offshore soil mechanics (OE4624) and all courses focussing on
geotechnical applications
Stresses and strains in soils, deformation and strength, ground water flow, settlement, bearing capacity, earth pressures, slope
stability, soft ground tunnelling, ground improvement, consolidation tests.
The course reviews basic aspects of soil mechanics such as stresses and strains, deformation and strength and ground water flow.
It covers a wide range of applications of soil mechanics in construction: prediction of settlements due to consolidation,
calculation of bearing capacity of shallow and deep foundations, calculation of earth pressure for retaining structures (dikes,
sheet pile wall, quay wall), analysis of slope stability, principles of soft ground tunnelling and ground improvement techniques.
Practical laboratory work supports the theory of consolidation. Permeability and oedometer tests are conducted and results are
interpreted using the Kopjan, Bjerrum and a, b, c methods.
This course is tailored for (engineering) geology students, road and railway and offshore engineering students who have no
knowledge of soil mechanics and geotechnical engineering. It is organized at the start of the MSc to ensure all students are
optimally prepared to follow the courses of their core programme and select electives focussing on geotechnical engineering.
3 practicals (laboratory and test data interpretation) of 3 hours each and 19 hours lectures and exercises.
- Hand-outs Introduction to Geo-Engineering by Frans Barends
- Soil tests manual
- Soil mechanics by A. Verruijt, 2001
All available in digital format on blackboard.
Basic mechanics, knowledge of the concept of stress and strain and elasticity as introduced in BSc course TA3700
Practical and oral or writen examination, depending on the number of students joining the course

CIE4130
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals
Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests
Judgement

Ir. J. Dijkstra

Probabilistic Design

Prof.dr.ir. P.H.A.J.M. van Gelder


0/6/0/0
2
2
2
3
English
Objectives of probabilistic design of civil structures.
Probability Calculus; Steps in a Risk Analysis; Inventory of possible unwanted events, effects and consequences; Determining
and evaluating the risk.
Decision-making based on risk analysis; Decision-making under uncertainties; Probabilistic analysis of the decision problem;
Frame of reference concerning safety; Current dutch safety standards; Generally applicable safety standards.
Reliability of an element; Limit state functions, strength and load; Ultimate and serviceability limit states; Strength of concrete,
steel, timber, soil, etc; Loads of traffic, wind, waves, water, earthquakes, precipitation, ice, etc; Time dependence.
Reliability calculation methods; Level III methods; Numerical integration; Monte carlo method; Level II methods; Non-linear
limit state functions; Non-normally distributed variables; Dependent random variables; Comparison of different calculation
methods.
Failure probability and life span; Deterioration processes; Risk calculation of systems with a variable rate of failure; Non
availability; Markov processes; Load combinations.
Strength calculation with level I method; Linking the level I method to the failure probability calculation; Standardisation of
lpha-values; Load combinations for level I strength calculations.
Reliability of systems; Probability of failure of the serial system; Probability of failure of the parallel system; FMEA (Failure
Modes and Effects Analysis); FMECA (Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis); Event tree; Fault tree; Cause
consequence chart; Reliability of correctable systems.
Scheduling the realisation of activities; Introduction to scheduling uncertainties; Influence of corrective measures on duration
and costs; Maintenance; Introduction to maintenance strategies; Effect of maintenance on risk; Influence of inspections.
Application areas; Structural safety of buildings, dikes, offshore platforms, bridges, etc; Maintenance and management; Quality
assurance; Safety management; Geostatistics; Reliability of software.
After the course, the student has to be able to do Level I, II and III calculations, risk-based optimisations and system probability
calculations.
Lectures
Obligatory lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):
Probabilistic Design
Recommended other materials:
Tentamenbundel, available on blackboard.
Written exam: three questions, they refer mainly to different parts of the course
No restrictions
One mark, based on written exam.

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CIE4325OE
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals
Education Method
Assessment

Ocean Waves for Offshore


6/0/0/0

1
1
1
2
English
The lectures start with observation techniques, before continuing with the question of how to describe these seemingly random
motions of the sea, which we call waves. Then the lectures present a truly theoretical concept. It is the variance density spectrum
of the waves that is used to describe the waves. Two techniques are introduced: a statistical description (short-term and longterm) and a spectral technique. This, in its turn, is followed by the linear theory of surface gravity waves (as they are formally
called). This theory gives the interrelation between such physical characteristics as the surface motion, the wave-induced
pressure in the water and the motion of water particles. It beautifully supplements the concept of the spectrum. Initially, the
lectures treat only open-water aspects of the linear theory, in other words, deep-water conditions without currents or a coast. This
provides, together with the spectral description of the waves, the introduction to the energy balance of waves in oceanic waters.
Sources and sinks are added to this balance, to represent the generation (by wind), the interactions amongst the waves themselves
(wave-wave interactions) and the dissipation of the waves (by white-capping). Although several theories for these processes have
been developed, the actual formulations in numerical wave models are still very much empirical and therefore relatively simple
and descriptive. These model formulations are used so that the student will quickly become familiar with the basic ideas and
results of these theories. This will satisfy many students of waves in oceanic waters. For those interested in waves in coastal
waters, the lectures proceed with adding the effects of sea bottom topography, currents and a coast (shoaling, refraction,
diffraction and reflection). The corresponding formulations of the generation, wave-wave interactions and dissipation in coastal
waters are more diverse and empirical than in oceanic waters and the presentation is consequently even more descriptive.
Be able to assess marine environmental wave-related issues for design and manitenance for civil engineers.
Lectures
written exam

CIE5317
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period

Dr.ir. L.H. Holthuijsen

Physical Oceanography

Prof.dr. J.D. Pietrzak


4/0/0/0

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

1
1
1
2
English
CIE5317 uses CT2100 and CT3310
Properties of sea water, equations of motion with Coriolis Force, wind driven circulation, thermohaline effects, waves, tides.
1. Properties of sea water relevant to Physical Oceanography;
2. Equations of motion with Coriolis Force;
3. Currents without friction: Geostrophic currents, thermal wind relationship, Taylor-Proudman, Inertial oscillations, Potential
Vorticity;
4. Currents with friction; Ekman layer; Ekman transport, Wind driven circulation;
5. Themohaline effects;
6. Waves, Tides.
1. Insight into the basic physics governing flow in the oceans;
2. Derivation of the equations of motion with Coriolis force;
3. Understanding the wind driven circulation and the thermohaline circulation;
4. Knowledge of tides and waves.
Lectures and exercise
Obligatory lecture note(s)/textbook(s):
"An introduction to Physical Oceanography", available at the Blackboard website.

Assessment
Judgement

Obligatory and recommended other materials: available at the Blackboard website.


Written exam (open questions)
Bonus, assignment

Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Summary
Course Contents

Study Goals

Calculation: exam grade

Page 7 of 45

OE4604
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Study Goals

Department

Exploring Offshore & Dredging Engineering

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


8/0/0/0
1
1
1
2
English
Participants successfully completing this course are expected to be aware of the diversity and range of building blocks
potentially applicable in the offshore field development of hydrocarbon reservoirs and the facets involved in the (preliminary)
design of structures for offshore production. This includes key parameters and other essential criteria applicable to dredging
engineering and renewable energy developments as well.
Additionally, students will know how and where to find more information on any of the topics covered and will able to make
motivated choices for additional relevant courses necessary to collate their course requirements in support of their industrial
practice phase and thesis selection.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

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OE4610
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Survey of Offshore Engineering Projects

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


Ir. G. Tol
0/0/0/x
4
4
Exam by appointment
English
The course OE4610 is applying the knowledge of most preceeding courses; in order to join / sign-up, it is mandatory to have
followed the lectures for OE 4601 and OE 4603 including participation of at least one (written) examination.
This course in its full form is divided into a number of elements that are fully integrated with the Project work.
These elements include the following:
-A series of classroom sessions (mandatory attendance for all participants).
-Frequent project team plenary meetings, virtually daily.
Team meetings with the coach held (often) at weekly intervals.
- Occasional methodology activities in conjunction with the lectures..
-Project Team presentations.
The participating student population is divided into teams of 4 5 people max, consisting of a mix of various disciplines,
backgrounds and cultures. Each team will be assigned with a senior university staff member or PhD student, who will act as their
coach for the duration of the Project. Each team works with the same general information and each serves as a design consultant
to the same external company on the same project. A bit of good-natured competition between the teams makes their activities
even more interesting!
The Project is designed into 3 phases during which the teams have to transfer a hydrocarbon discovery somewhere in the world
into a field development plan defined by a number of technical and economical parameters.
The teams will work with the same general information during this process which is provided in a number of lectures delivered
by the Curriculum Leader on the topics of Project Management and Field Development, spiced up by talks on effective meetings,
communication and working as a team in addition to dedicated lectures including a training session on oil & gas economics.
The immediate overall objective of these sessions is to increase the effectiveness of each participants project work activity and
to paint the big picture thereby assisting the student in putting more specific material from the informational classes in a proper
perspective for adaption into their project.
Specific field data is provided by an external company from the oil & gas industry.

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Each Project team (as a group) is required to hold scheduled meetings with the coach, usually no more than once per week
starting. These sessions serve as fixed point in the Project teams activities. It is here that subgroups within a team can
exchange information and the coach can discuss activities and progress with the team. An occasional session can be devoted to a
methodology topic; additionally, students are free to use any source for data, expertise and / or experience gathering.
Participants successfully completing this course can expect to:
-Be aware of the diversity of facets involved in the development of an offshore
hydrocarbon discovery, the wide range of issues governing decision making including a focus on the major building blocks
requiring design of structures for offshore oil and gas production.
-Know how and where to find more information on any of the topics involved.
-Be able to make a motivated choice for future career including the graduation specialism and for additional relevant (elective)
courses prior to graduation.
-Have experienced how conflicting requirements must be accommodated in an offshore design environment.
-Be somewhat skilled with the use and integration of knowledge gained from this and companion OE curriculum courses.
-Be a more affective worker in teams and individually.
-Be able to utilize simple project analysis and management techniques.
-Be more actively involved in one's own learning process.
-Be aware of the economic constrains imposed on industrial projects.
Classroom lectures, exercises, training and preparing & delivering presentations.
recommended other materials:
A PC or laptop running a recent, Englisch Language version of EXCEL will be needed for QUE$TOR computations at home - if
so desired.
Much project background material will have to obtained from the university library system and internet.
recommended lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):

Assessment
Remarks

Department
Judgement

Software: QUE$TOR - All of this information is or will be made available when needed via the Curriculum Leader.
Team reports including presentations (3 off) followed by an individual oral exam.
Summary: Application of a variety of topics from Petroleum Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Civil
Engineering, Geodesy and Marine Technology for the conceptual development and evaluation of an offshore hydrocarbon (oil
and gas) discovery. Participants work in multi-background teams.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Each phase of the Project is concluded by a team report which in its turn is defended by a (team) presentation. Grades are
assigned to both components by a panel, resulting in one team grade for such a phase.
While for the first 2 phases one single reward for each phase is determined, for the third and final report & presentation two
separate grades will be established.
By applying a predetermined weight distribution to the 4 obtained grades, an average grade is established for each team
reflecting some 90% of the final grade.
The final individual grade will be established by the Curriculum Leader after an oral exam rounding off the obtained team grade.
This grade is assigned to the entire 8 credits.

Page 9 of 45

OE4611
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Experimental Engineering Exercise

Prof.dr.ir. C. van Rhee


Prof.dr.ir. M.L. Kaminski
Prof.dr.ir. R.H.M. Huijsmans
Prof.dr. A. Metrikine
0/0/0/x
4
4
Exam by appointment
English
The course content may be different for each of the specialisations in the MSc Offshore Engineering, Dredging Engineering,
Floating Structures (Ship Hydromechanics) or Offshore Engineering (including Arctic Engineering, Fixed Structures and
Renewables)
Dredging Engineering
In Dredging Engineering both the design and the operations of the equipment is strongly dependent on the physical processes
involved. These processes are, the excavation of soil, mixture forming of soil and water, (hydraulic) transport, sedimentation,
erosion and finally deposition.
In all the processes the behavior is determined by a combination of the physics of the soil (the solid phase) and the water (the
liquid phase) and sometimes also the gas phase.
Dredging processes distinguish from many other multiphase processes by their very high concentrations. In the past a lot of
research has been carried out leading to many empirical equations describing a quasi static behavior.
From the more recent research it is known that the processes involved often have a more dynamic behavior which can only be
modelled by more fundamental relations.
To participate in this, students can carry out this research assignment in three possible ways.
A laboratory assignment.
The student will participate in ongoing laboratory research, usually as part of a PhD project.
This may involve the design and planning of the test stand, including data acquisition, carrying out the actual tests and
interpretation and reporting.
A literature study.
Carrying out a literature survey on specific aspects of one of the above mentioned dredging processes.
In general with the purpose to get a state of the art overview.

Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment

A software feasibility or useability study.


The student will carry out an assesment to determine whether (new) software is feasible and useable for modelling specific
(dredging) processes.
The study goals of this assignment are:
Prepare students in general and students with interest for fundamental research in particular in the art of experimental research.
Since PhD's need 4 years to prove they can carry out research independently, this 8 ECTS (about 240 hours) assignment can only
cover some limited aspects of experimental research.
These aspects are:
A literature survey
A software feasability or useability study
Design of an experimental test stand
Planning of experimental research
The use of different measurement techniques and transducers
The use of data acquisition systems
Carrying out the experimental research
Interpretation of results and data
Reporting
Project
Appointment

OE4630
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period

Course Language
Course Contents
Study Goals
Education Method
Assessment

Department

Offshore Hydromechanics

Prof.dr.ir. R.H.M. Huijsmans


Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema
Ir. P. Naaijen
Dr.ir. P. de Jong
8/4/4/0
2
3
2
2
3
4
English
See respectivily modules D1 - D4
See respectivily modules D1 - D4
See respectivily modules D1 - D4
See respectivily modules D1 - D4
Module D1 is not required for students with a Maritime background (BSc).
All modules D1-D4 have to be scored with a grade >= 5.0 in order to get a final mark of OE4630 through a weighted average of
the modules D1-D4. The final mark has to be scored with a grade >=6.0
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

Page 10 of 45

OE4630 D1
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Summary

Offshore Hydromechanics, Part 1

1.5

Dr.ir. P. de Jong
2/0/0/0
1
1
1
2
English
CT4320, CT5316 and basic fluid mechanics
Summary
Offshore Hydromechanics includes the following modules - all of which are normally required for OE MSc Degree participants:
Hydrostatics, static floating stability, constant 2-D potential flow of ideal fluids, and flows in real fluids. Introduction to
resistance and propulsion of ships.
Review of linear regular and irregular wave theory. One lab session accompanies this module in combination with module 4.
Analytical and numerical means to determine the flow around, forces on, and motions of floating bodies in waves. One lab
session and a few exercises accompany this module.
Higher order potential theory and inclusion of non-linear effects in ship motions. Applications to motion of moored ships and to
the determination of workability. One exercise accompanies this module.

Course Contents

Interaction between the sea and sea bottom as well as the hydrodynamic forces and especially survival loads on slender
structures. One lab session accompanies this module along with module 1. One exercise is also involved.
Basic principles: Hydrostatics, constant flow phenomena and waves
The treated theory includes :
Stability computations for all sorts of floating structures - including those with partially filled water ballast tanks, etc.
Bending of a free-hanging drill strings
Constant 2-D potential as well as real flows and the forces which they can exert on structures

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Wave theory and wave statistics


Module 1 (text chapters 1 trough 5) provides basis knowledge for all the succeeding modules. Classes on this module are held
during the first three weeks of the course; this is usually soon followed by a quiz covering this module
Course Objectives:
Participants who have successfully completed the course will be able to carry out computations at a superior knowledge level
involving:
Module 1 (1,5 EC): Hydrostatics, floating stability and 2-D potential flows, as well as regular and irregular waves and their
spectra.
Module 2 (2 EC): Computations relevant for first order forces on and resulting motions of ships.
Module 3 (3 EC): Nonlinear forces on and resulting ships motions; workability prediction.
Module 4 (1,5 EC): Hydrodynamic forces on slender structures including marine pipelines.
In addition, successful participants completing module 1 will have a basic awareness of ship propulsion systems and their
computations. Those completing module 4 will have an advanced knowledge of sea bed morphology.
Lectures, exercise
obligatory lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):
"Offshore Hydromechanics" by Journee and Massie
"Offshore Hydromechanics" Exercises by Journee
Both are available by P.W. de Heer (3mE room 7-0-117, besides towing tank) or may be downloaded off the internet address:
www.shipmotions.nl

Prerequisites

Assessment

Remarks
Department

"SEAWAY" by Journee available at teacher and the internet address: www.shipmotions.nl


Prerequisite
All participants are required to have succesfully completed a basic university-level course in Fluid Mechanics before starting on
Offshore Hydro-mechanics
Written exam (open questions)
Written assignments
Practice(s)
Quizzes
Offshore Hydromechanics Module 1 is not required for students with a Maritime Engineering Bachelor. However, these students
need to compensate the ECTS with (an)other subject(s).
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

Page 11 of 45

OE4630 D2
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Summary

Course Contents

Offshore Hydromechanics, Part 2

Ir. P. Naaijen
0/4/0/0
2
2
2
3
English
Summary
part 2 of offshore hydromechanics (OE4630) involves the linear theory of calculating 1st order motions of floating structures in
waves and all relevant subjects such as the concept of RAOs, response spectra and downtime/workability analysis.
Floating Structures 1: Wave forces & motions
Upon completion of this segment participants will have superior knowledge of:
Application of linear (wave) potential theory to ships and other floating structures for the computation of external and internal
forces as well as ship motions.
Module 2 covers chapters 6, 7 and parts of chapter 8. It prepares the student for the further development of this project in module
3.

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Prerequisites

Assessment
Department

A few computational exercises as well as a lab session complement this module.


Course Objectives:
Participants who have successfully completed the course will be able to carry out computations at a superior knowledge level
involving computations relevant for first order forces on and resulting motions of floating strucures.
knowledge / know-how is obtained on:
-definitions of ship motions in 6 DOF
-RAO's and phase angles of harmonic properties (motions, forces, wave elevations, etc)
-General motion equation: how to determine all the terms in the equation, how to solve the equation in order to obtain
RAOs/phase angles
-potential flow due to undisturbed wave
-numerical potential flow due to wave radiation and diffraction
-combine motion RAOs and derive RAOs of related properties
-calculate probability of exceedence
-carry out downtime/workability analysis
Lectures, exercise
obligatory lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):
"Offshore Hydromechanics" by Journe and Massie
Both are available by the teachers or may be downloaded off the internet address: www.shipmotions.nl
Prerequisite
All participants are required to have succesfully completed a basic university-level course in Fluid Mechanics before starting on
Offshore Hydro-mechanics
Knowledge obtained in module 1, especially on hydrostatics (ch 2) and wave theory (ch 5) is frequently used in module 2
Written exam (open questions)
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

Page 12 of 45

OE4630 D3
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Summary

Offshore Hydromechanics, Part 3

Prof.dr.ir. R.H.M. Huijsmans


0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English
Summary
Offshore Hydromechanics includes the following modules - all of which are normally required for OE MSc Degree participants:
Hydrostatics, static floating stability, constant 2-D potential flow of ideal fluids, and flows in real fluids. Introduction to
resistance and propulsion of ships.
Review of linear regular and irregular wave theory. One lab session accompanies this module in combination with module 4.
Analytical and numerical means to determine the flow around, forces on, and motions of floating bodies in waves. One lab
session and a few exercises accompany this module.
Higher order potential theory and inclusion of non-linear effects in ship motions. Applications to motion of moored ships and to
the determination of workability. One exercise accompanies this module.
Introduction to the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for the determination of extreme loads on moored FPSO in
extreme seas.

Course Contents

Interaction between the sea and sea bottom as well as the hydrodynamic forces and especially survival loads on slender
structures. One lab session accompanies this module along with module 1. One exercise is also involved.
Floating Structures II: wave forces & motions, nonlinear problems, applications
Participants completing this segment succesfully will have a superior knowledge of and be able to predict the motion of floating
bodies in the sea. They will be familiar with first order ship motions in irregular waves as well as drift forces, resulting from
nonlinear phenomena. They can also apply this to applications such as station keeping and the determination of offshore
workability.
Module 3 (text chapers 9 through 11) builds upon knowledge gained in modules 1 and 2.

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

One computational exercise is related to this module.


Course Objectives:
Participants who have successfully completed the course will be able to carry out computations at a superior knowledge level
involving:
Module 1 (1,5 EC): Hydrostatics, floating stability and 2-D potential flows, as well as regular and irregular waves and their
spectra.
Module 2 (2 EC): Computations relevant for first order forces on and resulting motions of ships.
Module 3 (3 EC): Nonlinear forces on and resulting ships motions; workability prediction.
Module 4 (1,5 EC): Hydrodynamic forces on slender structures including marine pipelines.
In addition, successful participants completing module 1 will have a basic awareness of ship propulsion systems and their
computations. Those completing module 4 will have an advanced knowledge of sea bed morphology.
lectures, exercise
obligatory lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):
"Offshore Hydromechanics" by Journe and Massie
"Offshore Hydromechanics" Exercises by Journe
Both may be downloaded off the internet address: www.shipmotions.nl

Prerequisites

Assessment

Department

"SEAWAY" by Journe available on the internet address: www.shipmotions.nl


Prerequisite
All participants are required to have succesfully completed a basic university-level course in Fluid Mechanics before starting on
Offshore Hydro-mechanics
Written exam (open questions)
Written assignments
Practice(s)
Quizzes
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

Page 13 of 45

OE4630 D4
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Summary

Offshore Hydromechanics, Part 4

1.5

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


0/2/0/0
2
2
2
3
English
Summary
Offshore Hydromechanics includes the following modules - all of which are normally required for OE MSc Degree participants:
Hydrostatics, static floating stability, constant 2-D potential flow of ideal fluids, and flows in real fluids. Introduction to
resistance and propulsion of ships.
Review of linear regular and irregular wave theory. One lab session accompanies this module in combination with module 4.
Analytical and numerical means to determine the flow around, forces on, and motions of floating bodies in waves. One lab
session and a few exercises accompany this module.
Higher order potential theory and inclusion of non-linear effects in ship motions. Applications to motion of moored ships and to
the determination of workability. One exercise accompanies this module.

Course Contents

Interaction between the sea and sea bottom as well as the hydrodynamic forces and especially survival loads on slender
structures.
Slender Cylinder Hydrodynamics and Sea Bed Morphology
This module gives succesful participants a superior knowledge of:
The Morison equation and its extensions as well as with methods to determine its coefficients and approximate methods for
predicting the survival loads on an offshore tower structure.
The computation of hydrodynamic forces on pipelines.
In addition, these persons will also have an advanced knowledge of the morphology interaction between the sea bed and
pipelines and other small objects. The erosion process of particles at the sea floor is covered extensively.
Module 4 covers text chapters 12 through 14; module 1 provides the necessary prerequisite knowledge for this.

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Course Objectives:
Participants who have successfully completed the course will be able to carry out computations at a superior knowledge level
involving:
Module 1 (1,5 EC): Hydrostatics, floating stability and 2-D potential flows, as well as regular and irregular waves and their
spectra.
Module 2 (2 EC): Computations relevant for first order forces on and resulting motions of ships.
Module 3 (3 EC): Nonlinear forces on and resulting ships motions; workability prediction.
Module 4 (1,5 EC): Hydrodynamic forces on slender structures including marine pipelines. An advanced knowledge of sea bed
morphology.
In addition, successful participants completing module 1 will have a basic awareness of ship propulsion systems and their
computations.
lectures
obligatory lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):
"Offshore Hydromechanics" by Journee and Massie
"Offshore Hydromechanics" Exercises by Journe
Both are available by the teachers or may be downloaded off the internet address: www.shipmotions.nl
"SEAWAY" by Journee available at teacher and the internet address: www.shipmotions.nl

Prerequisites

Assessment
Department

Additional lecture notes by Miedema on the erosion processes.


Prerequisite
All participants are required to have succesfully completed a basic university-level course in Fluid Mechanics before starting on
Offshore Hydro-mechanics
Written exam (open questions)
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

Page 14 of 45

WB2601OE
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment
Department

Strenght of Materials

Ir. M.G. van de Ruijtenbeek


x/0/0/0
1
1
none
English
Structural Analysis integrates mechanics of materials and finite element method (FEM) in order to predict the behavior of
structures. In the course the emphasis is on correct application and interpretation of FEM.
Special attention is given to verification, interpretation and accuracy of results, based on FEM theory and the way of modeling.
The course is limited to linear elastic and static behavior of structures.
Student is able to:
1. describe the basics of FEM, as well as the importance of the method as an analysis tool for design and design verification
processes
2. use a commercial FEM system by means of a graphical interface
3. plan, perform, verify and interpret basic (static, linear-elastic) numerical analyses for 2-D trusses
4. plan, perform, verify and interpret basic (static, linear-elastic) numerical analyses for 2-D solid models
5. interpret strains, stress components and principal stresses as known from continuum mechanics and describe the limitations of
linear continuum mechanics theory
6. describe the limitations of a discrete finite element model and argue the choices for mesh densities
7. interpret a linear finite element analysis with respect to correctness of results and the objective of the analys
Computer exercises
The grade will be based on written reports of the computer exercises
3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 15 of 45

Year
Organization
Education

2011/2012
Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Master Offshore and Dredging Engineering

MSc ODE Bottom Founded Structures


Director of Education
Introduction 1

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


Fixed, Bottom-Founded Structures include the fixed tower structures with a piled foundation, but also other structures such as
jack-up structures in their elevated operating position or even monopole structures now being used for offshore wind energy
applications. Of the roughly 9000 offshore structures in place around the world, a majority is of the fixed type, and even today
the majority of new offshore structures being built is of this type.

Page 16 of 45

CIE4140
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Structural Dynamics

Prof.dr. A. Metrikine
0/0/6/0
3
3
3
4
English
Introduction.
Challenging dynamic problems of modern civil engineering; Types and sources of dynamic loading on structures; Dynamic
behavior of systems with 1 and 2 degrees of freedom revisited: main phenomena, introduction to the Fourier Analysis, aeroelastic instabilities (galloping and flutter).
Vibrations of discrete systems with N degrees of freedom (N DOF).
Derivation of equations of motion; Free vibrations of undamped N DOF systems: natural frequencies and normal modes, modal
mass matrix and modal stiffness matrix, the Rayleigh method; Forced vibrations of undamped N DOF systems: Modal Analysis,
the steady-state response to a harmonic load, the frequency-response function. Modal Analysis, Fourier Analysis, the steady-state
response to a harmonic load of N DOF systems with viscous damping.
Vibrations of one-dimensional (1D) continuous systems of finite length.
Derivation of equations of motion for beam in bending, beam in shear, rod in axial motion, rod in torsion and taut cable; The
boundary and interface conditions for continuous systems; Free vibrations of undamped 1D continuous systems: the method of
separation of variables, natural frequencies and normal modes; Forced vibrations of 1D continuous systems (both with and
without viscous damping): Modal Analysis, Fourier Analysis, the steady-state response to a harmonic load.

Study Goals
Education Method
Course Relations
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests
Judgement

Waves of one-dimensional (1D) continuous systems.


Excitation, propagation, reflection and transmission of pulses in cables and rods; Harmonic waves and representation of traveling
pulses as the superposition of the harmonic waves; Dispersion Analysis; The steady-state response of piles and rails to harmonic
loads.
The goal of this course is to introduce various dynamic models of structures and to acquaint the students with the main ideas and
methods of structural dynamics.
Lectures
CT 4140 is strongly based upon CT2022
Mandatory Material:
1. Spijkers J.M.J., Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M., Klaver E.C., Structural Dynamics; Part 1: Structural Vibrations. Lecture Notes
CT 4140.
2. Metrikine, A.V., Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M., Structural Dynamics; Part 2: Wave Dynamics. Lecture Notes CT 4140.
3. Lecture Slides (available on Blackboard)
Written open book exam.
Consulting any written text brought in by the students is permitted during the exam; although texting (as well as talking) by
mobile phone is prohibited.
Based on the result of the written exam.

Page 17 of 45

OE4624
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Offshore Soil Mechanics

Ir. J. Dijkstra
0/4/0/0
2
2
2
3
English
OE4624 uses CT2090
OE4624 uses CT4399
This course brings successful participants to a superior knowledge level in the following geomechanics areas for application to
offshore structures:
Soil investigations:
All kind of site observation as well as soil investigationsmethods to support the topics below are discussed.
Pore pressure enhancement:
The build-up of pore pressures under large foundations subject to cyclic loads as well as in the sea bed as a response to ocean
surface waves is derived.
Lateral and vertical support of pipelines:
Bedding of pipelines and their protection are discussed.
Axially loaded piles:
The behavior of piles under alternating tension and compression. Non-linear responses as well as numerical solutions are
handled.
Laterally loaded piles:
The behavior of piles under alternating horizontal forces is handled. Non-linear responses as well as numerical solutions are
provided.
Large spread footings:
The behavior of spread footings using the Brinch Hansen theory are discussed.
Suction achorage:
The behavior of suction anchorages are discussed based on the theory.

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment
Remarks

Department
Judgement

Offshore Soil Mechanics extends ones basic knowledge of soil mechanics so that successful participants are prepared to design
offshore foundations for fixed offshore structures at a superior knowledge level. They also become aware of the geotechnical
problems associated with pipelines and other seabed structures.
lectures
exercise
obligatory lecture note(s)/textbook(s):
Offshore Soil Mechanics by prof.dr.ir. A. Verruijt.
Also avialable on the internet: geo.verruijt.net
Available at BookShop Civil Engineering.
recommended other materials:
Lecture notes will be provided.
Written exam
Summary
Successful participants can design offshore foundations at a superior knowledge level. This course makes this possible by
extending ones basic knowledge of soil mechanics to include a number of typical offshore applications. Topics include:
Axially and laterally loaded piles: linear and nonlinear behavior and computations,
Shallow spread footings for large structures: linear and nonlinear behavior and computations,
Influences resulting from cyclic pore pressure in the sea bed.
Field (at sea) and lab studies.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
grade is determined on the basis of a written examination.
The exercises must be finished before this can take place

Page 18 of 45

OE4651
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Bottom Founded Structures

Ir. J.S. Hoving


0/0/6/0
3
3
3
4
English
OE4651 requires CT4130, OE4604 and OE4624
The course covers the entire range of the life cycle from concept evaluation, design and construction through decommissioning
of bottom founded offshore structures, although the primary focus is on those factors most important to the structure's design.
Required design analysis steps applicable to fixed steel platforms in the sea will be discussed.
At first, a general introduction and a summary of general design considerations is given, followed by considerations of material
choice in relation to design, loads and relevant load combinations, construction and inspection, as well as decommissioning of
structures at the end of their economic life.
Subsequently, the quantitative design of steel structures is covered, including the dimensioning of individual members for
strength as well as stability and the design analysis of joints in such structures. Participants will become familiar with
construction, transport and installation aspects that dictate the design of the structure. Additionally, some attention is given to
inspection and repair of existing structures. An important issue with steel structures is fatigue; to increase the understanding of
what potentially causes fatigue problems, the dynamics of bottom founded structures are discussed in some detail.
Furthermore, the specific design characteristics of jack-ups and compliant towers are also discussed. Here, the structural design
aspects of decks to provide space for drilling, production, power generation and life-support systems are important. The analysis
modeling of elevated jack-up rigs is discussed in relation to that for fixed steel tower structures. The lecture of compliant towers
will address dynamic behaviour of the structure in relation to the time varying (wave-) load. The failure modes and design codes
for fixed steel offshore structures are discussed briefly. Finally, key aspects of platform decommissioning and removal will be
addressed.

Study Goals
Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment
Department
Judgement
Contact

As part of the course, an exercise is given in order to reinforce the understanding and skills with regards to the structural
concepts that are discussed. To increase the practical content of this course, various lectures will be given by invited guest
lecturers from the industry. Additionally, the program also includes a visit to a fabrication yard.
The objective of this course is to integrate knowledge from hydromechanics, probabilistic design, dynamics and structural design
so that participants are able to carry out the design and related analysis of fixed offshore structures.
Lectures, guest lectures, exercise and an excursion to a fabrication yard.
obligatory lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):
Book: "Handbook of Bottom Founded Offshore Structures" by prof.dr.ir. J.H. Vugts is available via the OE secretariat.
Furthermore, the slides of all lectures will be posted on Blackboard.
As a part of the course there is an exercise to be done by the students that will partly determine the final grade.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
The final grade is composed of a grade for the written examination, as well as a grade earned for the exercise.
Jeroen Hoving: J.S.Hoving@tudelft.nl CEG 2.88
Wybren de Vries: W.E.DeVries@tudelft.nl
CEG 2.84

Page 19 of 45

Year
Organization
Education

2011/2012
Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Master Offshore and Dredging Engineering

MSc ODE Dredging Engineering


Director of Education
Introduction 1

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


The dredging engineering specialisation involves the design of equipment for moving solids from, to, or over the bottom of the
sea in water depths where offshore engineers normally work. The design of more conventional dredging equipment is discussed
more or less along the way. This specialization will always be included in any programme focused on deep sea
dredging.

Page 20 of 45

OE4623
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Required for
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Drive System Design Principles

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


4/0/0/0 (in 2nd master year)
1
1
Exam by appointment
English
MSc Offshore Engineering
None
An overview of possible drive systems:
Diesel, gas-turbine, electromotors, generators, nuclear energy, fuel cells, transmissions, etc.
An overview of drive systems used in offshore & dredging applications.
The Multi Criteria Analysis
Assignment in groups of 2 or 3.
Learn to choose the optimal drive system for an offshore application based on arguments
Make a global design of a drive system
Learn to use the Multi Criteria Analysis

Study Goals

Education Method
Computer Use
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment
Percentage of Design
Design Content
Department
Contact

A Powerpoint presentation showing the results of the assignment


Get an overview of possible drive systems
Learn to choose the optimal drive system for an offshore application based on arguments
Make a global design of a drive system
Learn to use the Multi Criteria Analysis
Lectures/Assignment
Powerpoint
H. Klein Woud & D. Stapersma, Design of Propulsion & Electric Power Generation Systems
K. v/d Werf, Aandrijfsystemen
Powerpoint presentation of a global drive system design
The Powerpoint presentations will be converted to websites and published on www.drivesystemsdesign.org.
60%
Global design of a drive system
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema

Page 21 of 45

OE4625
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Dredge Pumps and Slurry Transport

Dr.ir. A.M. Talmon


0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English
The purpose of this course is to convey knowledge of the various physical processes associated with slurry handling and
transport during dredging. This knowledge is needed for the design of dredging equipment and for planning efficient equipment
operations. The various processes are discussed and theories and simulation models that describe the processes are presented and
compared during the course.
The course can be broken down into four elements:

Study Goals
Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

1. Pumps and engines


a. Pump characteristics and cavitation
b. Influence of particles on pump characteristics.
2. Hydraulic transport in pipelines
a. Two-phase (solid-liquid) flow through pipelines
b. Newtonian slurries
c. Non Newtonian slurries
d. Inclined and long pipelines.
3. Pump and pipeline systems
a. Operation point and areas
b. Production factors.
4. Case studies
To gain knowledge about the two-phase flow, pipeline transport and pumping of sand water mixtures.
lectures
obligatory lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):
Dredge Pumps and Slurry Transport by V. Matousek, edited by Dr.ir. A.M. Talmon.
Blackboard (downloads)
recommended other materials:

Assessment
Remarks

book Slurry Transport Using Centrifugal Pumps by K.C. Wilson et al, ISBN 0 7514 0408, 1997
written exam (open book)
Summary

Department
Contact

After a short overview of dredging as a whole, this course concentrates on principles of pipeline transport of slurries and on the
design of a transportation system comprised of pipelines and slurry pumps.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Dr.ir. A.M. Talmon

Page 22 of 45

OE4626
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment
Remarks

Department
Contact

Dredging Processes
0/4/0/0
2
2
2
English
OE4626 uses CT4399
The course focuses on 3 main dredging processes:
The cutting of sand, clay and rock;
The sedimentation process in hopper dredges;
The breaching process.
These are explained in detail. Exercises allow participants to apply the knowledge gained in practical situations.
Understand and reproduce the Mohr circle;
Understand and reproduce the theory of passive and active soil failure;
Understanding the soil mechanical parameters important for cutting processes;
Understanding and make calculations regarding the 2-D cutting theory in water-saturated sand;
Understanding and make calculations regarding the 2-D theory in clay;
Understanding and reproduce the settling of grains in water;
Understanding and reproduce the loading cycle of a hopper dredge;
Being able to determine the loading cycle of a hopper dredge, base on the modified Camp model by Miedema and Vlasblom;
Understanding and reproduce the basic cutting theory of rock cutting;
Understanding and reproduce the breaching process.
lectures
obligatory lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):
The course material is downloadable from:
http://www.dredgingengineering.com and from Blackboard
Available at as download from blackboard .
Written exam (open book)
Summary
The course focuses on 3 main dredging processes:
The cutting of sand, clay and rock;
The sedimentation process in hopper dredges;
The breaching process.
Participants succesfully completing this course will be equipped to make predictive quantitative determinations related to these
processes.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema

OE5671
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema

Dredging Equipment Design

Prof.dr.ir. C. van Rhee


0/0/0/4
4
4
4
5
English
dredging equipment, mechanical dredgers, hydraulic dredgers, boundary conditions, design criteria, instrumentation and
automotion
Problem definition
Boundary conditions
Processes of excavating, transport and deposities
Energy consumption and power requirement
Technical design
Special subject. Wear, instrumentation and automation
The goal of the lecture is to get insight in the procedure for designing dredging equipment based on the knowledge of the
dredging processes.
Special aspects during design and use of dredging equipment.
Study Goals The goal of the lecture is to get insight in the procedure for designing dredging equipment based on the knowledge
of the dredging processes.
Special aspects during design and use of dredging equipment.

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment
Design Content
Department
Contact

Study Goals The goal of the lecture is to get insight in the procedure for designing dredging equipment based on the knowledge
of the dredging processes.
Special aspects during design and use of dredging equipment.
Project
Lecture notes Prof.ir. W.J. Vlasblom and Prof. Dr. ir. C. van Rhee
Report + Oral Exam
60%
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema

Page 23 of 45

Year
Organization
Education

2011/2012
Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Master Offshore and Dredging Engineering

MSc ODE Floating Offshore Structures


Director of Education
Introduction 1

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


There are many types of floating offshore structures. Ship-type vessels are used commonly to support drilling rigs in deeper
water - often at more remote locations. Semi-submersible platforms are used for this purpose as well and to support many other
activities for which a relatively stable operating base is needed. More recent developments include tension leg platforms - a sort
of tethered semi-submersible - and spar platforms.
Another relatively recent development is the Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel.

Page 24 of 45

CIE4140
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Structural Dynamics

Prof.dr. A. Metrikine
0/0/6/0
3
3
3
4
English
Introduction.
Challenging dynamic problems of modern civil engineering; Types and sources of dynamic loading on structures; Dynamic
behavior of systems with 1 and 2 degrees of freedom revisited: main phenomena, introduction to the Fourier Analysis, aeroelastic instabilities (galloping and flutter).
Vibrations of discrete systems with N degrees of freedom (N DOF).
Derivation of equations of motion; Free vibrations of undamped N DOF systems: natural frequencies and normal modes, modal
mass matrix and modal stiffness matrix, the Rayleigh method; Forced vibrations of undamped N DOF systems: Modal Analysis,
the steady-state response to a harmonic load, the frequency-response function. Modal Analysis, Fourier Analysis, the steady-state
response to a harmonic load of N DOF systems with viscous damping.
Vibrations of one-dimensional (1D) continuous systems of finite length.
Derivation of equations of motion for beam in bending, beam in shear, rod in axial motion, rod in torsion and taut cable; The
boundary and interface conditions for continuous systems; Free vibrations of undamped 1D continuous systems: the method of
separation of variables, natural frequencies and normal modes; Forced vibrations of 1D continuous systems (both with and
without viscous damping): Modal Analysis, Fourier Analysis, the steady-state response to a harmonic load.

Study Goals
Education Method
Course Relations
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests
Judgement

Waves of one-dimensional (1D) continuous systems.


Excitation, propagation, reflection and transmission of pulses in cables and rods; Harmonic waves and representation of traveling
pulses as the superposition of the harmonic waves; Dispersion Analysis; The steady-state response of piles and rails to harmonic
loads.
The goal of this course is to introduce various dynamic models of structures and to acquaint the students with the main ideas and
methods of structural dynamics.
Lectures
CT 4140 is strongly based upon CT2022
Mandatory Material:
1. Spijkers J.M.J., Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M., Klaver E.C., Structural Dynamics; Part 1: Structural Vibrations. Lecture Notes
CT 4140.
2. Metrikine, A.V., Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M., Structural Dynamics; Part 2: Wave Dynamics. Lecture Notes CT 4140.
3. Lecture Slides (available on Blackboard)
Written open book exam.
Consulting any written text brought in by the students is permitted during the exam; although texting (as well as talking) by
mobile phone is prohibited.
Based on the result of the written exam.

Page 25 of 45

OE4623
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Required for
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Drive System Design Principles

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


4/0/0/0 (in 2nd master year)
1
1
Exam by appointment
English
MSc Offshore Engineering
None
An overview of possible drive systems:
Diesel, gas-turbine, electromotors, generators, nuclear energy, fuel cells, transmissions, etc.
An overview of drive systems used in offshore & dredging applications.
The Multi Criteria Analysis
Assignment in groups of 2 or 3.
Learn to choose the optimal drive system for an offshore application based on arguments
Make a global design of a drive system
Learn to use the Multi Criteria Analysis

Study Goals

Education Method
Computer Use
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment
Percentage of Design
Design Content
Department
Contact

A Powerpoint presentation showing the results of the assignment


Get an overview of possible drive systems
Learn to choose the optimal drive system for an offshore application based on arguments
Make a global design of a drive system
Learn to use the Multi Criteria Analysis
Lectures/Assignment
Powerpoint
H. Klein Woud & D. Stapersma, Design of Propulsion & Electric Power Generation Systems
K. v/d Werf, Aandrijfsystemen
Powerpoint presentation of a global drive system design
The Powerpoint presentations will be converted to websites and published on www.drivesystemsdesign.org.
60%
Global design of a drive system
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema

Page 26 of 45

OE4652
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment
Remarks

Department
Judgement

Contact

Floating Structures

Ir. A.M. van Wijngaarden


Prof.dr.ir. M.L. Kaminski
Prof.dr.ir. R.H.M. Huijsmans
0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English
OE4652 uses OE4601
OE4652 uses OE4603
OE4652 uses OE4630
This course first surveys the various hull forms and types of floating structures in relation to the functional requirements placed
upon them.
A major portion of the course focuses on a specific type of floating structure - such as a FPSO production platform for deep
water - and its design. This design is then discussed in some detail in such a way that the classroom sessions augment the series
of steps within the design exercises.
Participants in this course will become capable - at an advanced knowledge level - of leading the design of a floating offshore
structure. They will be familiar with the (potentially) conflicting requirements resulting from safety, topside processes,
deadweight capacity, floating stability, response to waves, structural strength and fatigue, positioning as well the available
margins for compromise needed to achieve a feasible and responsible design.
The exercises integrate the course topics and reinforce the concepts learned.
Lectures in theme blocks including industry guest lectures.
Integrated exercises
Recommended textbook:
Floating Structures, a Guide for Design and Analysis, ISBN: 1-870553-357
Opportunity will be given to acquire the textbook at student discount through ODE staff.
5 individual excercises and written exam (open questions)
Summary
Design - at an advanced knowledge level - of floating offshore structures and elements thereof: ships, semi-submersibles,
FPSOs, spar platforms, hybrid jack-up structures and elements such as mooring sytems and risers. Importance of functional
design parameters and adaption of these over the lifetime of a floating offshore structure. Application of methods of analysis and
criteria in design: wave loading and motion in waves, floating stability, (dynamic) positioning, structural strength and fatigue.
Safety assessment and codes in relation to design.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Student grades are determined on the basis of the exercise work and a written examination. The exercises contribute 50% of the
grade.
Total course grade is only valid when both the exercises and the exam are undertaken in the same semester.
Secretariat of ODE, Mrs. M.C. Dunant

Page 27 of 45

OE5663
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Dynamic Positioning

Nabestaanden van H.T. Grimmelius


0/0/0/3
4
4
4
English
Dynamic Positioning System Design includes the following subjects, each to be dealt with in 3 hours of class:
Introduction: definition of Dynamic Positioning, short history of its development, areas of application, normal system
composition, special devices for special purposes. Physical options for position measurement and their inherent
strengths/weaknesses, equipment involved in position measurement, reliability of the position signal, redundancy in equipment
and principles, dead reckoning modes. The importance of measuring oscillatory ship motions. Design implications of the
selected measurement systems.
Design of the control algorithms: basic PID controls, signal/noise ratios and their effect on filter design, consequences of
applying digital computers, Kalman optimal control routines, redundancy on the control system side. Ergonomics in the operator
interface design. Systems available on the market. The 3-D case of ROV control.
Physical options for generating thrust on a floating vessel: Tunnel and azimuthing thrusters. Rudder/propeller interaction.
Available thruster sizes. Thruster efficiency. Response times of thrust changes. Mechanical limitations and reliability. Thrust
feed-back modes.
Hydromechanical aspects of DP: wave and current load characteristics. Aspects of thruster allocation. Thruster-hull interaction.
System performance analysis in the design phase and in operation.
Shipboard consequences of the installation of a DP system: Central or distributed controls. Interfaces with the power plant.
Placing the position reference sensors.

Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment
Remarks

An exercise in capability calculation, demonstration of DP interface and simulation, modelbasin demonstration.


The objective of this course is to prepare participants to understand (at a routine knowledge level) and to participate in teams
doing the design of dynamic positioning systems for a variety of offshore and subsea engineering applications. Successful
participants will also be able to work fruitfully with those more expert in supporting disciplines to come to an optimized dynamic
positioning system for a given application.
exercise
lectures
Written exam (open questions)
Summary:
This course unites the disciplines of:
Control theory and system design
Hydromechanics
Mechanical Engineering
Position monitoring

Department
Judgement
Contact

to present theory needed to design a dynamic positioning or tracking system for offshore applications such as work ships on the
sea surface and autonomous as well as towed underwater vehicles.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Written examination with open questions
dr.ir. H.T. Grimmelius

Page 28 of 45

OE5664
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Offshore Moorings

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


4/0/0/0
1
1
1
2
English
OE5664 uses CT4399 and OE4630
The classroom activities are structured around the following 8 elements each taking roughly 3 hours of classroom time:
Anchors:
Soil properties are reviewed to the extent that they are important to anchor behavior in the soil. (Note that a significant number of
participants usually come from Marine Technology - and outside the IOE MSc curriculum; they have no background in soil
mechanics.) Special attention is given to specific anchor-related soil properties such as dilatency. The behavior of a number of
different anchor types is demonstrated in a laboratory session.
Anchor Line Mechanics:
Catenary line theory is reviewed along with practical ways of solving the resulting equations in an effective way.
Anchor Line Materials and Components:
The materials and accessories that make up a mooring system are presented along with their relative merits.

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Exercise Introduction:
The exercise requirements are explained along with a suggested approach to achieving an optimum mooring design. The most
important economic evaluation steps are touched upon.
The classes are set up to give the student practical insight - supported by applied theory - in the design and optimization process
for an offshore mooring system. The exercise forces each student to integrate the knowledge gained and to make practical
engineering and economic compromises in a realistic engineering situation. Successfull completion prepares one to function
qualitatively and quantitatively at a superior knowledge level in a mooring design team.
lectures (to introduce the excersise)
exercise
obligatory lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):
Books:
Vrijhof Anchor Manual
Available at the section secretariat.
recommended other materials:
Handy background information comes from:
OE4652 Design of Floating Structures
OE5663 Dynamic Positioning System Design
recommended lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):
Deep Water Fiber Moorings
Barge Mooring

Assessment

Remarks

Design Content
Department
Judgement
Contact

The website www.offshoremoorings.org


The students have to create a website on a specific topic in groups of 4. In the last lecture planned these websites will be
presented to all the students, the lecturer and guests. After making corrections, the websites will be published on the internet on
www.offshoremoorings.org
Summary
The course treats the design of offshore mooring systems literally from the ground up: Starting with the anchor and its soils
mechanics in the sea bed, via the mechanics of a single mooring line and system of lines. The course concludes by touching on
other mooring concepts and the dynamic behavior of the moored object as a non-linear mechanical system.
40%
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Grades are assigned based on the contents of the website created, based on the presentation, but also based on the technology
used to create the website, such as easy navigation, user interface, etc.
Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema

Page 29 of 45

Year
Organization
Education

2011/2012
Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Master Offshore and Dredging Engineering

MSc ODE Ship & Offshore Structures


Director of Education
Introduction 1

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


edit text

Page 30 of 45

CIE4140
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Structural Dynamics

Prof.dr. A. Metrikine
0/0/6/0
3
3
3
4
English
Introduction.
Challenging dynamic problems of modern civil engineering; Types and sources of dynamic loading on structures; Dynamic
behavior of systems with 1 and 2 degrees of freedom revisited: main phenomena, introduction to the Fourier Analysis, aeroelastic instabilities (galloping and flutter).
Vibrations of discrete systems with N degrees of freedom (N DOF).
Derivation of equations of motion; Free vibrations of undamped N DOF systems: natural frequencies and normal modes, modal
mass matrix and modal stiffness matrix, the Rayleigh method; Forced vibrations of undamped N DOF systems: Modal Analysis,
the steady-state response to a harmonic load, the frequency-response function. Modal Analysis, Fourier Analysis, the steady-state
response to a harmonic load of N DOF systems with viscous damping.
Vibrations of one-dimensional (1D) continuous systems of finite length.
Derivation of equations of motion for beam in bending, beam in shear, rod in axial motion, rod in torsion and taut cable; The
boundary and interface conditions for continuous systems; Free vibrations of undamped 1D continuous systems: the method of
separation of variables, natural frequencies and normal modes; Forced vibrations of 1D continuous systems (both with and
without viscous damping): Modal Analysis, Fourier Analysis, the steady-state response to a harmonic load.

Study Goals
Education Method
Course Relations
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests
Judgement

Waves of one-dimensional (1D) continuous systems.


Excitation, propagation, reflection and transmission of pulses in cables and rods; Harmonic waves and representation of traveling
pulses as the superposition of the harmonic waves; Dispersion Analysis; The steady-state response of piles and rails to harmonic
loads.
The goal of this course is to introduce various dynamic models of structures and to acquaint the students with the main ideas and
methods of structural dynamics.
Lectures
CT 4140 is strongly based upon CT2022
Mandatory Material:
1. Spijkers J.M.J., Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M., Klaver E.C., Structural Dynamics; Part 1: Structural Vibrations. Lecture Notes
CT 4140.
2. Metrikine, A.V., Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M., Structural Dynamics; Part 2: Wave Dynamics. Lecture Notes CT 4140.
3. Lecture Slides (available on Blackboard)
Written open book exam.
Consulting any written text brought in by the students is permitted during the exam; although texting (as well as talking) by
mobile phone is prohibited.
Based on the result of the written exam.

Page 31 of 45

MT523
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Numerical Methods for MT

Dr.ir. H.J. de Koning Gans


Ir. T.N. Bosman
Prof.dr.ir. M.L. Kaminski
0/4/0/0
2
2
Exam by appointment
English
Requirements: all BSc-courses Analysis, Linear Algebra and Differential Equations plus mt518, mt519 and mt3405
Explanation of several flow models and their fluid mechanics properties (pressure, velocity, mass and volume flow, momentum,
energy flow etc.) and fluid domain in contrast with aerodynamics
Translations of flow models into numerical flow models.
Elementary solutions for potential flows and how to use them for panel codes which used these elementary solutions. Greens'
function theory.
Grid generation techniques and how to use them. Several numerical error in the developing stage, design and applications stage.

Study Goals

Education Method
Computer Use
Literature and Study
Materials

Books

Assessment
Remarks
Percentage of Design
Design Content
Department

Application for numerical method: Non viscous flow Diffraction, Wave making pattern.
The student must be able to:
1.explain the description of a mesh of a ship hull and to produce a file which is readable for computational tools
2.describe different type of griding techniques and several spacing distributions
3.describe the Greens function and the Greens identity
4.use elementary solutions for potential flow in the Green function and how to use the elementary solutions to transform the
Greens identity to a Fredholm equation of the second kind
5.use the Fredholm equation for a potential flow model and to discretise it into panel codes
6.define which numerical application has to be used for a specific problem (e.g. a given flow around ships with or without free
surface flow (pressure distribution, constant velocity, area's etc.)
7.define which simplifications or linearization have to be used and which physic phenomena is used
8.define which boundary conditions have to be used
9.explain the numerical models based on potential flow with or without free surface flow and it's linearization
10.indicate when a specific application is used, what kind of flow model it is based on
11.determine the range of the most important parameter(s), which for the method is used
12.determine the grid size for the specific problem
13.make a grid
14.analyse the output data which the specific program has generated
15.describe the higher order method and truncation error and the von Neumann condition
Lectures 0/4/0/0
Three different numerical tools (Navier-stokes, Delffrac and Delkelv) have to be used.
Course material:
Koning Gans, Dr. Ir. H.J. de "Numerical Methods in Ship Hydromechanics"
Koning Gans, Dr. Ir. H.J. de "Manual of Numerical Methods in Ship Hydromechanics"
References from literature:
Katz, J. & Plotkin, A."Low Speed Aerodynamics from Wing Theory to Panel Methods"
"Low Speed Aerodynamics From Wing Theory to Panel Methods", Katz, J. and Plotkin, A., ISBN 0-07-100876-4, McGraw-Hill
international editions, Singapore
"Practical Ship Hydrodynamics", Bertram, V., ISBN 0 7506 4851 1, Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford
Presentation
Entry requirements:
All courses mathimatics, fluid dynamics and Resistance and Propulsion of ships of MT01,MT02,MT03
10%
Optimalisatiom of hull forms.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

Page 32 of 45

MT830
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period

Applications of the Finite Element Method

X. Jiang
0/2/0/0

Education Method
Computer Use
Literature and Study
Materials

2
2
2
3
English
Structural Mechanics, Material Mechanics, Computational Methods or similar.
The course gives the theoretical framework for the finite element method, formulates elements for beams, plates, shells and
assembly structures. Element properties, symmetric and asymmetric issues, convergence requirements and modeling errors are
discussed. The course emphasizes rational modeling, choice of element type, discretization, introduction of loads and boundary
conditions and results control. Further, an introduction to geometric modeling of simple two- and three-dimensional structures
and typical structural details is given.
After successfully completing the course, students will be able to:
1.To identify different finite element types and properties
2.To explain structural behavior of finite elements
3.To establish and validate a FEM model
4.To analyze simple two- and three-dimensional real life structures
Lectures, in class exercises and discussions, homework assignments.
computer demonstrations and exercises during the course, assignment to be completed and reported
Course material:
Finite Element Modeling for Stress Analysis, Cook,R.D., ISBN 0-471-10774-3

Assessment
Percentage of Design
Design Content
Department

References from literature:


Concepts and Applications of Finite Element Analysis, Cook, R.D. et al, ISBN 0-471-50319-3
70% Assessment report and 30% homework assignment.
70%
finite element analysis of structures
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals

OE4652
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment
Remarks

Department
Judgement

Contact

Floating Structures

Ir. A.M. van Wijngaarden


Prof.dr.ir. M.L. Kaminski
Prof.dr.ir. R.H.M. Huijsmans
0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English
OE4652 uses OE4601
OE4652 uses OE4603
OE4652 uses OE4630
This course first surveys the various hull forms and types of floating structures in relation to the functional requirements placed
upon them.
A major portion of the course focuses on a specific type of floating structure - such as a FPSO production platform for deep
water - and its design. This design is then discussed in some detail in such a way that the classroom sessions augment the series
of steps within the design exercises.
Participants in this course will become capable - at an advanced knowledge level - of leading the design of a floating offshore
structure. They will be familiar with the (potentially) conflicting requirements resulting from safety, topside processes,
deadweight capacity, floating stability, response to waves, structural strength and fatigue, positioning as well the available
margins for compromise needed to achieve a feasible and responsible design.
The exercises integrate the course topics and reinforce the concepts learned.
Lectures in theme blocks including industry guest lectures.
Integrated exercises
Recommended textbook:
Floating Structures, a Guide for Design and Analysis, ISBN: 1-870553-357
Opportunity will be given to acquire the textbook at student discount through ODE staff.
5 individual excercises and written exam (open questions)
Summary
Design - at an advanced knowledge level - of floating offshore structures and elements thereof: ships, semi-submersibles,
FPSOs, spar platforms, hybrid jack-up structures and elements such as mooring sytems and risers. Importance of functional
design parameters and adaption of these over the lifetime of a floating offshore structure. Application of methods of analysis and
criteria in design: wave loading and motion in waves, floating stability, (dynamic) positioning, structural strength and fatigue.
Safety assessment and codes in relation to design.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Student grades are determined on the basis of the exercise work and a written examination. The exercises contribute 50% of the
grade.
Total course grade is only valid when both the exercises and the exam are undertaken in the same semester.
Secretariat of ODE, Mrs. M.C. Dunant
Page 33 of 45

OE5664
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Offshore Moorings

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


4/0/0/0
1
1
1
2
English
OE5664 uses CT4399 and OE4630
The classroom activities are structured around the following 8 elements each taking roughly 3 hours of classroom time:
Anchors:
Soil properties are reviewed to the extent that they are important to anchor behavior in the soil. (Note that a significant number of
participants usually come from Marine Technology - and outside the IOE MSc curriculum; they have no background in soil
mechanics.) Special attention is given to specific anchor-related soil properties such as dilatency. The behavior of a number of
different anchor types is demonstrated in a laboratory session.
Anchor Line Mechanics:
Catenary line theory is reviewed along with practical ways of solving the resulting equations in an effective way.
Anchor Line Materials and Components:
The materials and accessories that make up a mooring system are presented along with their relative merits.

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Exercise Introduction:
The exercise requirements are explained along with a suggested approach to achieving an optimum mooring design. The most
important economic evaluation steps are touched upon.
The classes are set up to give the student practical insight - supported by applied theory - in the design and optimization process
for an offshore mooring system. The exercise forces each student to integrate the knowledge gained and to make practical
engineering and economic compromises in a realistic engineering situation. Successfull completion prepares one to function
qualitatively and quantitatively at a superior knowledge level in a mooring design team.
lectures (to introduce the excersise)
exercise
obligatory lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):
Books:
Vrijhof Anchor Manual
Available at the section secretariat.
recommended other materials:
Handy background information comes from:
OE4652 Design of Floating Structures
OE5663 Dynamic Positioning System Design
recommended lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):
Deep Water Fiber Moorings
Barge Mooring

Assessment

Remarks

Design Content
Department
Judgement
Contact

The website www.offshoremoorings.org


The students have to create a website on a specific topic in groups of 4. In the last lecture planned these websites will be
presented to all the students, the lecturer and guests. After making corrections, the websites will be published on the internet on
www.offshoremoorings.org
Summary
The course treats the design of offshore mooring systems literally from the ground up: Starting with the anchor and its soils
mechanics in the sea bed, via the mechanics of a single mooring line and system of lines. The course concludes by touching on
other mooring concepts and the dynamic behavior of the moored object as a non-linear mechanical system.
40%
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Grades are assigned based on the contents of the website created, based on the presentation, but also based on the technology
used to create the website, such as easy navigation, user interface, etc.
Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema

Page 34 of 45

Year
Organization
Education

2011/2012
Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Master Offshore and Dredging Engineering

MSc ODE Elective Courses


Director of Education

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema

Page 35 of 45

AE3W02TU
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Required for

Expected prior knowledge


Parts

Course Contents
Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment
Remarks
Set-up

Introduction to Wind Energy

2/2/0/0
1
2
1
none
English
Follow up courses
AE4-W09 (Wind Turbine Design), AE4-W12 (Rotor aerodynamics), AE4-W13 (Wind and Site Conditions), OE5662 (Offshore
wind farm
design).
A proper engineering background in mechanics (Newton's laws of motion), dynamics (mass-spring-damper system) and
electricity and magnetism (a.o. Lorentz force) is assumed.
Lectures and assignments alternate. Presence during
explanation of the assignments and the presentation of the
results is mandatory: the assignments are the examination.
Introduction, wind climate, aerodynamic theory, energy production, control and safety, drive train, dynamic modelling,
Campbell diagram, strength and fatigue, design considerations, offshore wind energy, economic aspects
Introduction to wind energy and design of wind
energy conversion systems. Integration of knowledge from
various fields of engineering on wind turbine design.
Lecture + assignments
Wind energy Explained, Manwell, McGowan, Rogers (Recommended)
Windpower online reader (Blackboard)
Through assessment of the reports of the assignments
This course is an elective course for students from various faculties (LR, ITS, CITG, OCP). It is also part of the SET MSc
curriculum.
The course combines introductory lectures and application
and extension of knowledge-base by designing (components/
subsystems of) a wind energy converter in a multidisciplinary
team.

AT327
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Prof.dr. G.J.W. van Bussel


Dr.ir. W.A.A.M. Bierbooms
Ir. W.A. Timmer

Arctic Offshore Engineering

7.5

Ir. J.S. Hoving


x/x/0/0
1
2
1
1
2
English
Students who want to follow AT327 Arctic Offshore Engineering must have passed the course OE4680 Arctic Engineering.
If you have passed the course OE4680 Arctic Engineering and your urge for knowledge on Arctic Engineering has not yet been
satisfied, you can follow the course AT327 Arctic Offshore Engineering at UNIS, the University Centre on Svalbard. This
involves a 2 week stay in October (usually around weeks 41-42) on the Svalbard archipelago, also known as Spitsbergen, in the
city of Longyearbyen; the worlds most northerly settlement with a population over 1000 people.
As Norway is intensifying the exploration and development of the Western Barents Sea, a number of western oil companies take
a keen interest in the Russian part of the Barents and the Pechora Sea. In the light of these developments, the course AT327
considers all relevant aspects of employing hydrocarbon operations in these Arctic waters.

Study Goals
Education Method
Assessment
Enrolment / Application

The course addresses oil and gas resources and reserves in the Arctic, petroleum engineering aspects and offshore development
management for Arctic Offshore projects. Arctic Offshore facilities are discussed on the basis of characteristics of the physical
environment including geotechnical aspects.
Participants in this course will learn about the ins and outs of offshore hydrocarbon field development in the Arctic with
emphasis on design issues and technical aspects of operating in the Arctic.
The course consists of 40 hours of lectures by experts from Norway and Russia, as well as 10 hours of exercises.
The assessment for this course consists of a written exam (4 hours, 60% of the grade) and the delivery of a written report (40%
of the grade) on a relevant Arctic Offshore topic. The student must pass both the written exam and the report evaluation.
The number of available spots for this course is limited. Students will have to fill in an admission form and write a motivation
letter to apply for this course. For further information contact the responsible instructor for this course.

Page 36 of 45

OE4640
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment
Department

Safety in Offshore Engineering


0/0/0/4

4
4
4
5
English
Offshore projects are known for the challenging conditions, generally leading to high risks. Therefore no offshore project can go
without a continuous and extensive assessment on safety issues. This course deals with the entire scope of safety aspects that are
to be taken into account in the offshore industry. Next to general safety awareness, the analyses and verification methods of
safety aspects are presented throughout the different phases of offshore projects: design, production, installation, operation and
decommissioning. Focus points of this course are: tools for safety analyses (e.g. Hazid, FMEA, safety cases), provisions for
validation (e.g. guidelines, certification), communication and interfaces between disciplines.
Create awareness of safety topics in the offshore industry
Provide overview of different safety topics within disciplines
Provide tools for safety analyses
Provide knowledge on implementation and control
The course consists of a set of lectures and interactive case studies.
written exam
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

OE4653
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Dr.ir. D.J. Cerda Salzmann

Marine Pipelines

Ir. N.F.B. Diepeveen


0/0/4/0
4
3
3
4
English
Knowledge from the following courses is applied in this course (OE 4653):
CT 4130, OE 4601, OE 4630, OE 4654
Marine Pipelines concentrates on three aspects of subsea pipeline design:
Pipeline Design:
The internal and structural design of pipelines for oil, gas and multi-phase (liquid gas) flows. Pipelines are dimensioned based
upon flow in relation to properties of the transported material as well as capital expenditure and operating costs involved. The
need for and means of providing thermal insulation is discussed including the measures of assuring flow in pipelines.
Pipeline Route Selection:
Routing of pipelines through the sea as well as their shore approaches are covered. Special attention is given to sub-sea tie-ins,
pipeline and cable crossings, pipeline protection from fishing gear, shore approaches and pipeline trenching. The consequences
of pipeline temperature changes and upheaval buckling are integral aspects of this topic as well as the on-bottom stability
(pipelines on or in the sea bed).

Study Goals
Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Pipelines Installation / Construction:


This segment presents current and new technologies for the installation of pipelines in varying water depths, ranging from a few
meters to depths measured in kilometers coupled with the role which installation plays in the design of a pipeline. Special
attention is given to supporting finite element analysis (FEM) calculations, construction start-up, sea-bed lay-down, tie-ins and to
welding technology. A classroom exercise is included as an integral aspect of the knowledge gained.
Participants completing this course successfully will be able to function at an advanced to superior knowledge level productively
and quantitatively in marine pipeline design teams.
Classroom lectures.
recommended materials:
Lecture material will be made available through the lectures.
Students may want to use English language EXCEL for pipeline design computations.
recommended lecture note / textbook:

Assessment
Remarks

Department
Judgement
Contact

Subsea Pipeline Engineering, by Andrew C. Palmer and Roger A. King; 2nd edition ISBN 978-1-59370-133-8
Written exam (open questions)
Summary: Marine Pipelines includes three aspects of subsea pipeline design:
Flow assurance in pipelines, the internal design and dimensioning of pipelines for oil, gas and multi-phase flow, and the route
selection.
Pipeline route selection includes both deep sea and shore approach routing as well as design for on-bottom stability.
Pipeline installation / construction methods and their effect on pipeline design.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Participants are assigned one final grade based upon the results of a written examination that covers all three aspects of the
course.
Secretariat of OE, Mrs. M. C. Dunant.

Page 37 of 45

OE4654
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Sub Sea Engineering

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


0/6/0/0
2
2
2
3
English
Knowledge from OE 4601 and up to a certain extent from OE 4603, is applied in OE4654.
The course Subsea Engineering includes the following elements:
-Introduction and historical survey
-Engineering aspects of subsea wells
-Subsea oil and gas pumping
-Risers and subsea control
-Diver less methods of intervention and deep water systems
-Subsea installation, maintenance and repair
-Subsea exploration
-Reliability engineering in relation to subsea work

Study Goals
Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment
Remarks

Department
Judgement

These elements will be integrated and linked to a subsea field development scenario via a series of short in-class exercises
carried out by teams of participating students.
Participants completing this course successfully will be able to function at a advanced knowledge level productively and
quantitatively in subsea engineering / marine pipeline design teams.
Classroom lectures.
Specific notes:
"Subsea Engineering" by J. Preedy
Available at OE secretariat.
recommended other materials:
Some students may want to use a laptop computer with English language EXCEL for classroom design computations.
Written exam (open questions)
Summary: Subsea Engineering is concerned with how the need to work in or under the sea affects operations being carried out
there. Topics include drilling and hydrocarbon well maintenance activities as well as control systems, remotely operated vehicles
and their capabilities, installation of hardware on the sea bed, and how all of these are affected by concerns for safety and
reliability. A series of short exercises will be carried out during the classes. Because of the breadth of topics covered, only a
routine to advanced knowledge level will be achieved providing a solid base for further individual development.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Grades are assigned based on the results of a written examination.

OE4680
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Required for
Course Contents

Arctic Engineering

Ir. J.S. Hoving


0/0/0/4
4
4
4
5
English
AT327 Arctic Offshore Engineering at UNIS, the University Centre at Longyearbyen, Svalbard (Spitsbergen).
The course OE4680 Arctic engineering is divided into 3 parts; these 3 parts are: General introduction to Arctic engineering,
Dynamics of ice-structure interaction and Capita selecta.
First, the general basics of Arctic offshore engineering will be discussed during the general introduction to Arctic engineering.
This part of the course schedule includes a geographical and historical overview of offshore developments in the Arctic,
discusses the available ice features and ice regimes, considers the classification of offshore structures in the Arctic, as well as the
micro- and macro-properties of ice, ice morphology and ice mechanics. The general introduction to Arctic engineering is
concluded by an introduction to ice-structure interaction and the so-called ice actions and action effects. The calculation of static
ice-induced loads on structures are given using the Arctic engineering code ISO19906.
The theoretical core of the course OE4680 Arctic engineering consists of the dynamics of ice-structure interaction. Initially, an
overview of the available models for dynamic ice-structure interaction and ice-induced vibrations will be given. The
phenomenon of frequency lock-in will be considered, as well as beam and plate theories to model the ice during its interaction
with a structure. Additionally, we will touch upon the numerical application of dynamic processes within Arctic engineering and
discuss the industrial experience with ice-induced vibrations that occur at Sakhalin, Russia.

Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment
Department

In the last part of the course, referred to as Capita Selecta, we explore a number of related topics to broaden the perspective of
engineering in the Arctic. The capita selecta include climate change and its effect on the Arctic, escape, evacuation and rescue
(EER) in the Arctic, Arctic meteorology and oceanography.
basics of arctic engineering.
The participants should know about what ice features and ice conditions occur at viable Arctic engineering locations.
Furthermore, they should have an understanding about the available types of structures for the Arctic, the static and dynamic ice
loads on these structures and the design issues for offshore structures in Arctic conditions.
Lectures and guest lectures by experts from Norway, Russia and Canada.
Exercise and written exam.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

Page 38 of 45

OE5662
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment
Remarks

Department
Judgement

Offshore Wind Farm Design

0/0/6/0
3
3
Different, to be announced
English
This course makes students familiar with the design of offshore wind farms in general and focusses on the foundation design in
particular. The course is based on actual cases of real offshore wind farms that have been built recently or will be built in the
near future.
The course gives a general overview to make the student familiar with the different components, equipment and parties involved.
It focusses on general wind farm economics, environmental impact, permit acquisistion, layout, grid connection, installation
methodology and support structure design for a specific wind turbine for a specific offshore location.
Lectures plus exercise sessions
Presentation + exercise report + exam
Combining knowledge from the design of bottom founded structures and wind energy conversion systems, the course
concentrates on the design of an offshore wind farm. Installation and maintenance logistics are discussed as well as the
transportation of electric power to shore. Economics and environmental impact play deciding roles.
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology
Based on quality, pace and reporting of the exercise work and understanding of the subject

OE5665
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents
Study Goals
Education Method
Assessment
Remarks
Department

Dr.ir. D.J. Cerda Salzmann


Ir. N.F.B. Diepeveen
Dr.ir. D.J. Cerda Salzmann

Offshore Wind Support Structures

Ir. W.E. De Vries


Ir. W.E. De Vries
0/0/0/4
4
4
4
5
English
OE5662 Offshore Wind Farm Design
This course focuses on the design of support structures for offshore wind turbines. It deals with the entire process of design for
extreme and fatigue load, soil-structure interaction as well as fabrication and installation issues.
Understand the design process of support structures up to the detailed design. The student will be able to make an optimised
design of a structure using the current industry standard software and methodologies
The course consists of 10 lectures and an assignment in which the students will develop a complete support structure design in
teams of two.
Grading based on the process of the assignment, the assignment report and the final presentation of the assignment.
Prior knowledge of Structural Dynamics and Bottom Founded Structures is desirable
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

Page 39 of 45

Year
Organization
Education

2011/2012
Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Master Offshore and Dredging Engineering

MSc ODE 2nd year


Director of Education
Introduction 1

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


Industrial Practice - OE5680
Obviously industrial practice can be carried out at most any location as long as it brings the participant closer to (engineering)
practice. While some form of offshore engineering experience is valued, this is not a (formal) requirement. An occasional
participant has devoted his or her industrial practice period to a development aid project - sometimes in a very remote location.
On the other hand, one girl spent her practice period as member of the Dutch delegation to The United Nations! Some form of
appropriate practice site can be found in most any country. These are most often arranged via a Dutch company or organization,
however. Contacts for foreign positions also often result from study tours to foreign countries organized by the offshore
engineering society. Participation in these tours can be very valuable to ones further study and career.
Elective Courses
The next most popular foreign academic activity involves elective courses.
These can be done at most any academic institution of sufficient quality.
There is a maximum of flexibility with regard to these courses; they add a new specialisation or profile to ones OE programme
rather than contribute to its primary educational core.
Exercise Work - OE5670
Some participants have done exercise work at a foreign location often at a foreign university and sometimes in a laboratory,
there. Their task was then to help with an on-going experimental research project and of course - to report on their part in that
work and their results. One should not start on such an adventure unless one is sure that a result will be forthcoming. See section
7.2 for more about the risks involved.
Thesis Work - OE5690
Qualified participants can carry out thesis work in a foreign country. In such cases, these persons are usually temporarily adopted
into a local research team and carry out and report on a more-or-less independent (for reporting purposes) study as their
contribution to that team.
Required Courses
The inclusion of a generic required course such as advanced mechanics is usually possible. This is because all engineering
schools offer such courses; they are often really quite similar.
The equivalent of most of specifically required TU Delft OE courses are more difficult to find at other institutions. In general,
one can better not try to replace these in ones programme plan.

Page 40 of 45

OE5680-15
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Department

Industrial Practice
x/0/0/0
1
1
none
English
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

OE5685-15
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Department

Problem Analysis Thesis

Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Department

15

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


0/x/0/0
2
2
none
English
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

OE5690-30
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period

15

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema

Thesis

30

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


0/0/x/x
3
4
3
none
English
3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

Page 41 of 45

Dr.ir. W.A.A.M. Bierbooms


Unit
Department

Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn


Wind Energy

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 82097
5.21

Ir. T.N. Bosman


Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Ship Hydromech & Structures

Prof.dr. G.J.W. van Bussel


Unit
Department

Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn


Wind Energy

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85178
5.03

Dr. A.B. Cammaert


Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Offshore Technologie

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 88223
B23-HG 2.82

Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Offshore Technologie

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 88223
HG 2.82

Dr.ir. D.J. Cerda Salzmann


Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Offshore Technologie

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85077
B23-HG 2.86

Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Offshore Technologie

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85077
B23-HG 2.86

Unit
Department

Externenregistratie
Ampelmann Operations

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85077
B23-HG 2.86

Ir. N.F.B. Diepeveen


Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Offshore Technologie

Telephone
Room

+31 (0)15 27 88030


HG 2.84

Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Offshore Technologie

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 88030
HG 2.84

Ir. J. Dijkstra
Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Geo-engineering

Telephone
Room

+31 (0)15 27 83326


KG 00.510

Prof.dr.ir. P.H.A.J.M. van Gelder


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Safety and Security Science

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 86544
B31-c1.170

Page 42 of 45

Nabestaanden van H.T. Grimmelius


Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Ship Design, Prod & Operations

Telephone
Room

+31 (0)15 27 82746


D-1-220

Dr.ir. L.H. Holthuijsen


Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Vloeistofmechanica

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84803
B23-HG 2.96

Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Vloeistofmechanica

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84803
B23-HG 2.96

Ir. J.S. Hoving


Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Offshore Technologie

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85723
HG 2.88

Prof.dr.ir. R.H.M. Huijsmans


Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Ship Hydromechanics & Struc.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83598
B-1-340

Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Transport Eng & Logistics

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 88511
B34-B-3-320

X. Jiang

Dr.ir. P. de Jong
Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Ship Hydromech & Structures

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83876
D-0-320

Prof.dr.ir. M.L. Kaminski


Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Ship Hydromech & Structures

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 89250
B-1-330

Dr.ir. H.J. de Koning Gans


Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Ship Hydromech & Structures

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81852
B-1-300

Prof.dr. A. Metrikine
Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Offshore Technologie

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84749
B23-HG 6.59

Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Constructiemechanica

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84749
HG 6.59

Page 43 of 45

Dr.ir. S.A. Miedema


Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Offshore & Dredging Eng

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 88359
B-2-300

Ir. P. Naaijen
Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Ship Hydromech & Structures

Telephone

+31 15 27 81570

Prof.dr. J.D. Pietrzak


Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Vloeistofmechanica

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 89455
HG 2.97

Prof.dr.ir. C. van Rhee


Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Offshore & Dredging Eng

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83973
B34-B-2-340

Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Sectie Waterbouwkunde

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83973
B34-B-2-340

Ir. M.G. van de Ruijtenbeek


Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Onderwijs en Studentenzaken

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81278
B34-G-1-180

Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Onderwijs en Studentenzaken

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81278
B34-G-1-180

Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Onderwijs en Studentenzaken

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81278
B34-G-1-180

Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Struc Optimization & Mechanics

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81278
B34-G-1-180

Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Support Precision & Microsys E

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81278
B34-G-1-180

Dr.ir. A.M. Talmon


Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Offshore & Dredging Eng

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83717
B-2-310

Ir. W.A. Timmer


Unit
Department

Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn


Wind Energy

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 88279
HSL 0.40

Page 44 of 45

Ir. G. Tol
Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Offshore & Dredging Eng

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81181
B23-HG 2.88

Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Offshore Technologie

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81181
B23-HG 2.88

Unit
Department

Externenregistratie
Ampelmann Operations

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81181
B23-HG 2.88

Ir. W.E. De Vries


Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Offshore Technologie

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 87568
B23-HG 2.84

Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Offshore Technologie

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 87568
B23-HG 2.84

Prof.dr.ir. J. Wardenier
Unit
Department

Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Gebouwen en Civieltech Constr

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85072
S2 2.58

Ir. A.M. van Wijngaarden


Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Offshore & Dredging Eng

Telephone
Room

+31 (0)15 27 87643


7-1-139

Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Ship Hydromech & Structures

Room

Page 45 of 45