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NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL LIMITED

LIABILITY COMPANY

REPORT
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT
FOR NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL
COMPLEX PROJECT
(This report is revised and supplemented as MONREs appraisal
committee on May 27th 2010)

Ho Chi Minh City


June 2010

NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL LIMITED


LIABILITY COMPANY

REPORT
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT
FOR NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL
COMPLEX PROJECT
(This report is revised and supplemented as MONREs appraisal
committee on May 27th 2010)

Project owner:
NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (NSRP-LLC)

Consultant organization:
BRANCH OF VIETNAM PETROLEUM INSTITUTE (HANOI CITY)
RESEACH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER FOR
PETROLEUM SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT

Ho Chi Minh City


June 2010

CONTENTS

Page
0-1

0.

INTRODUCTION

0.1

PROJECT BACKGROUND

0-1

0.2

LEGAL AND TECHNICAL BASIS OF EIA PREPARATION

0-4

0.2.1
0.2.2
0.2.3

0.2.3

Scope of the EIA report


International Regulations
Vietnamese Laws and Standards
0.2.3.1 Vietnamese Law and Legislation
0.2.3.2 Environmental Standards
0.2.3.3 Project Standards
Technical basis and related documents

0-4
0-5
0-6
0-6
0-10
0-12
0-22

0.3

METHODOLOGY FOR EIA IMPLEMENTATION

0-23

0.4

EIA IMPLEMENTATION ORGANIZATION

0-24

1.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

1-1

1.1

PROJECT NAME

1-1

1.2

PROJECT OWNER

1-1

1.3

GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION

1.3.1
1.3.2
1.3.3
1.3.4
1.3.5

Plant location
Onshore Pipeline System
Harbour Location
SPM Location
Crude Oil Pipeline Location

1-4
1-4
1-5
1-6
1-6

1.4

MAIN CONTENTS OF NSRP PROJECT

1-6

1.4.1

Refinery and petrochemical capacity

1-9

1.4.2

1.4.1.1 Material Balance


1.4.1.2 Designed Capacities for Process Units
Feedstock and products

1-9
1-10
1-13

1.4.3

1.4.2.1 Feedstock
1.4.2.2 Project Products
Technology process

1-13
1-14
1-15

1.4.3.1

1-15
1-15
1-17
1-17
1-17
1-18
1-18
1-18
1-19
1-19
1-19
1-20
1-20
1-20
1-21
1-22
1-23

1-1

Refinery Process Units


1.4.3.1.1 Crude Distillation Unit (CDU)
1.4.3.1.2 LPG Recovery Unit (LRU)
1.4.3.1.3 Saturated LPG Treater Unit (LTU)
1.4.3.1.4 Kerosene Hydrodesulphuriser Unit (KHDS)
1.4.3.1.5 Gas Oil Hydrodesulphuriser (GOHDS)
1.4.3.1.6 Residue Hydrodesulphuriser Unit (RHDS)
1.4.3.1.7 Residue Fluid Catalytic Cracker Unit (RFCC)
1.4.3.1.8 RFCC LPG Treater
1.4.3.1.9 RFCC light Naphtha Treater
1.4.3.1.10 Propylene Recovery Unit (PRU)
1.4.3.1.11 Indirect Alkylation Units (InAlk)
1.4.3.1.12 Hydrogen Manufacturing Unit (HMU)
1.4.3.1.13 Hydrogen Compression and Distribution system (HCDS)
1.4.3.1.14 Sour Water Stripper unit (SWS)
1.4.3.1.15 Amine Regeneration Unit (ARU)
1.4.3.1.16 Sulphur Recovery Unit (SRU) and Tail Gas Treating Unit (TGTU)

1.4.3.2

1.4.4

1-25
1-25
1-26

Plant utilities

1-26

1.4.4.1
1.4.4.2

1-26
1-27
1-27
1-27
1-28
1-28
1-28
1-28
1-29
1-29
1-29
1-31
1-31
1-31
1-32
1-33
1-33
1-33
1-34
1-35
1-36
1-39
1-39
1-39
1-39
1-41
1-41
1-41

1.4.4.3

1.4.4.4
1.4.4.5
1.4.4.6
1.4.4.7
1.4.4.8
1.4.4.9
1.4.4.10
1.4.4.11
1.4.4.12
1.4.4.13
1.4.4.14
1.4.4.15

1.4.4.16
1.4.5

Petrochemical Process Units


1.4.3.2.1 Naphtha and Aromatics Complex (NAC)
1.4.3.2.2 Polypropylene Unit

Crude Oil Storage Tanks


Product Tankage Farm
1.4.4.2.1 Product storage tank
1.4.4.2.2 Product blending component storage tanks
1.4.4.2.3 Intermediate Storage tanks
Other Receiving and Storage
1.4.4.3.1 Catalyst and chemical storage
1.4.4.3.2 Slop storage tanks
1.4.4.3.3 Sulphur forming and storage unit (SFSU)
Gas Recovery System
Fuel System
Flushing Oil System
Waste oil recovery, storage and pump systems
Power and Steam Generation System
Nitrogen Supply System
Water Supply System
Intake system
1.4.4.11.1 Structure
1.4.4.11.2 Cooling Water
Chemicals, Catalysts, and Packing
Flare System
Fire and Gas Detection and Protection System
Waste treatment system
1.4.4.15.1 Off gas treatment system
1.4.4.15.2 Effluent Treatment Plant
1.4.4.15.3 Incinerator
1.4.4.15.4 Waste storage area
List of main equipments of the Refinery

Offsite facilities

1-41

1.4.5.1

1-41
1-43
1-43
1-44
1-44
1-44
1-45
1-46
1-46
1-47
1-47

1.4.5.2
1.4.5.3
1.4.5.4
1.4.5.5
1.4.5.6

Marine Facilities
1.4.5.1.1 Access channel
1.4.5.1.2 Turning basin
1.4.5.1.3 North breakwater
1.4.5.1.4 Harbour revetments
1.4.5.1.5 Berth pockets
Single Point Mooring (SPM)
Crude oil pipeline
Product Pipeline
Ship Loading System
Product Truck Loading System

1.4.6

Refinery layout

1-48

1.4.7

Project construction

1-50

1.4.8

1.4.7.1 Onshore Constructions


1.4.7.2 Offshore Construction
1.4.7.3 Supply source of constructional materials
1.4.7.4 Accommodation Facilities for Construction and Operation Workers
Construction schedule

1-50
1-52
1-54
1-54
1-55

1.4.9

Total capital and estimated cost for environmental treatment and monitoring facilities

1-55

ii

2.

NATURAL ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONDITION

2-1

2.1

NATURAL ENVIRONMENT CONDITION

2-1

2.1.1

Offshore

2-1

2.1.2

2.1.1.1 Marine Topography and Geology


2.1.1.2 Bathymetric condition
2.1.1.3 Extreme climatic conditions
2.1.1.4 Existing Natural Environment
2.1.1.5 Marine Resources
Onshore environmental baseline

2-1
2-3
2-8
2-11
2-29
2-36

2.1.2.1
2.1.2.2
2.1.2.3
2.1.2.4
2.1.2.5

2-36
2-42
2-48
2-50
2-50
2-50
2-55
2-60
2-63
2-68
2-69

2.1.3

Topographic, geological and seismic conditions


Meteorological conditions
Water Resources
River system and flooding situation in project area
Existing Environmental Conditions of Onshore and Coastal Area
2.1.2.5.1 Air quality
2.1.2.5.2 Water quality
2.1.2.5.3 Groundwater quality
2.1.2.5.4 Sediment Quality
2.1.2.4.5 Soil quality
2.1.2.5.6 Biological Ecosystem

Preliminary assessment on environmental loading capacity

2-94

2.1.3.1 Assessment on Environmental Sensitivity of the Project Area


2.1.3.2 Preliminary Assessment on Environmental Loading Capacity

2-94
2-96

2.2

EXISTING SOCIAL CONDITIONS

2-97

2.2.1

Economic Condition

2-97

2.2.2

2.2.1.1 Agriculture
2.2.1.2 Industry
2.2.1.3 Forestry
2.2.1.4 Aquaculture and Fisheries
2.2.1.5 Salt industry
2.2.1.6 Tourist
Social Condition

2-97
2-97
2-99
2-101
2-102
2-102
2-102

2.2.2.1 Population
2.2.2.2 Transportation and Infrastructure
2.2.2.3 Power system
2.2.2.4 Telecommunications
2.2.2.5 Land use status in NSEZ
2.2.2.6 Affected area
2.2.2.7 Affected graves
2.2.2.8 Existing Potable Water Drainage and System
2.2.2.9 Drainage system and waste water treatment plant in NSEZ
2.2.2.10 Solid waste collection and treatment system in NSEZ
2.2.2.11 Culture, Health and Education
2.2.2.12 Cultural Resources and Archaeology

2-102
2-103
2-106
2-106
2-107
2-109
2-109
2-109
2-112
2-114
2-114
2-115

3.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT

3-1

3.1

SOURCE OF IMPACT TO THE ENVIRONMENT

3-2

3.1.1

Impact Source Relating to Wastes

3-2

3.1.1.1 In construction phase


3.1.1.2 Source of impact in operation phase

3-2
3-6

iii

3.1.2

3.1.1.2.1 Emission gas


3.1.1.2.2 Wastewater
3.1.1.2.3 Solid waste
3.1.1.2.4 Accidental impact sources
Impact source not related to wastes

3-6
3-9
3-10
3-11
3-11

3.2

IMPACTED OBJECTS

3-13

3.2.1

Construction, installation and commissioning phase

3-13

3.2.2

3.2.1.1 Environmental impacts for construction of onshore facilities


(refinery and supported facilities)
3.2.1.1.1 Air quality
3.2.1.1.2 Surface water
3.2.1.1.3 Groundwater
3.2.1.1.4 Soil environment
3.2.1.1.5 Biological environment
3.2.1.2 Offshore Construction (Harbor, Breakwater, Pipeline and SPM)
3.2.1.2.1 Air environment
3.2.1.2.2 Surface water
3.2.1.2.3 Land and Terrestrial Ecology
3.2.1.2.4 Marine ecosystem
Operation phase

3-13
3-14
3-17
3-18
3-19
3-20
3-21
3-21
3-25
3-35
3-36
3-37

3.2.2.1 Operation of Onshore Facilities (the Plant and support facilities)


3.2.2.1.1 Air environment
3.2.2.1.2 Water Quality
3.2.2.1.3 Groundwater environment
3.2.2.1.4 Soil environment
3.2.2.1.5 Marine ecosystem
3.2.2.2 Operation of the offsite facilities (harbor, breakwater, crude pipeline and SPM)
3.2.2.2.1 Air environment
3.2.2.2.2 Water environment
3.2.2.2.3 Soil and groundwater environment
3.2.2.2.4 Marine Environment
Cumulative impact during operation phase of onshore and offshore constructions
on other projects in the local area

3-37
3-37
3-49
3-60
3-61
3-62
3-64
3-64
3-65
3-75
3-75

3.2.4

Socio-economic impact assessment

3-78

3.2.5

3.2.4.1 Impacts caused by land acquisition


3.2.4.2 Impact caused by graves relocation
3.2.4.3 Impact caused by compensation and resettlement
3.2.4.4 Impact on training and recruitment plan of NSEZ
3.2.4.5 Land and natural resources
3.2.4.6 Loss of agricultural lands to other uses
3.2.4.7 Loss of forestry land
3.2.4.8 Loss of residential land
3.2.4.9 Livelihood activities
3.2.4.10 Education
3.2.4.11 Disruption/Damage to Infrastructure and Services
3.2.4.12 Gender
3.2.4.13 Indirect employment and local procurement opportunities
3.2.4.14 Fisheries
3.2.4.15 Access restrictions and diversions
3.2.4.16 Impact on health
3.2.4.17 Impact on poverty
3.2.4.18 Economic activities
3.2.4.19 Infrastructure and Service
Potential environmental accidents caused by project implementation

3-78
3-79
3-80
3-87
3-90
3-91
3-92
3-92
3-93
3-93
3-94
3-94
3-95
3-96
3-97
3-98
3-99
3-99
3-100
3-101

3.2.3

iv

3-76

3.2.5.1
3.2.5.2
3.2.5.3
3.2.5.4
3.2.5.5
3.2.5.6

Fire and Explosion


Toxic gas leakage
Hydrocarbon Spills
Ship Collision
Pipeline Rupture or Leakage
Radioactivity

3-101
3-103
3-104
3-107
3-107
3-108

3.3

EVALUATION OF DETAILED AND CONFIDENCE LEVEL OF THE ASSESSMENT

3-108

3.3.1

Determination of impact significance

3-108

3.3.2

Assessment method

3-109

4.

MITIGATION MEASURES FOR NEGATIVE IMPACTS, PREVENTION & RESPONSE


ENVIRONMENTAL INCIDENTS
MITIGATION MEASURES IN FEED DESIGN PHASE

4-1
4-1

4.2

MITIGATION MEASURES FOR ONSHORE FACILITIES


(REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX AND SUPPORTED FACILITIES)

4-2

4.2.1

Construction Phase

4-2

4.2.2

4.2.1.1 Air Quality


4.2.1.2 Noise and vibration
4.2.1.3 Soil quality
4.2.1.4 Surface water
4.2.1.5 Groundwater
4.2.1.6 Ecosystem
4.2.1.7 Safety for the workers
4.2.1.8 Water way and road traffic
4.2.1.9 Mitigation measures for natural calamity
Operation Phase

4-2
4-3
4-4
4-10
4-11
4-11
4-13
4-14
4-14
4-15

4.2.2.1
4.2.2.2
4.2.2.3
4.2.2.4
4.2.2.5
4.2.2.6
4.2.2.7

4-15
4-20
4-20
4-26
4-26
4-33
4-33

4.1

Air Quality
Noise control
Water quality
Groundwater
Soil quality
Marine ecosystem
Road traffic

4.3

MITIGATION MEASURES FOR OFFSITE FACILITIES (HARBOUR, BREAKWATER,


CRUDE PIPELINE AND SPM)

4-34

4.3.1

Construction Phase

4-34

4.3.2

4.3.1.1 Air Quality


4.3.1.2 Noise and Vibration
4.3.1.3 Soil Environment
4.3.1.4 Water environment
4.3.1.5 Biological environment
Operation Phase

4-34
4-34
4-35
4-35
4-36
4-37

4.3.2.1
4.3.2.2
4.3.2.3
4.3.2.4
4.3.2.5
4.3.2.6

4-37
4-38
4-38
4-38
4-42
4-42

Air quality
Noise and Vibration
Soil environment
Water Resources
Onshore biological environment
Ecosystem

4.4

MITIGATION MEASURES FOR ACCIDENTS AND ABNORMAL EVENTS

4-43

4.4.1

Fire and Explosions

4-43

4.4.2
4.4.3
4.4.4

Toxic Gas Release


Shipping collision
Emergency Response Planning for oil spills

4-43
4-44
4-44

4.5

MITIGATION MEASURES FOR SOCIAL COMMUNITY IMPACTS

4-46

4.5.1
4.5.2
4.5.3

Pre-construction phase
Construction Phase
Operation Phase

4-46
4-48
4-48

5.

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING PROGRAM

5-1

5.1

OBJECTIVES

5-1

5.2

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

5-2

5.2.1

Construction Phase

5-3

5.2.1.1 Air Quality Management Plan (Onshore and Offshore Facilities)


5.2.1.2 Noise Management Plan (Onshore and Offshore Facilities)
5.2.1.3 Soil Contamination Management Plan
5.2.1.4 Surface Water Management Plan (Onshore Facilities)
5.2.1.5 Surface Water Management Plan (Offshore Facilities)
5.2.1.6 Groundwater Management Plan
5.2.1.7 Terrestrial Flora Management Plan
5.2.1.8 Waste Management Plan
5.2.1.9 Employment and Training Management Plan
5.2.1.10 Health and Safety Management Plan
5.2.1.11 Social Impact Management Plan
5.2.1.12 Capital expenditure for constructing main treatment and monitoring works

5-3
5-4
5-4
5-5
5-7
5-8
5-8
5-9
5-10
5-11
5-12
5-14

Operation Phase

5-15

5.2.2.1 Air Quality Management Plan


5.2.2.2 Noise Management Plan
5.2.2.3 Soil Contamination Management Plan
5.2.2.4 Surface Water Management Plan (Onshore Facilities)
5.2.2.5 Surface Water Management Plan (Offshore Facilities)
5.2.2.6 Groundwater Management Plan
5.2.2.7 Marine Habitat Management Plan
5.2.2.8 Waste Management Plan
5.2.2.9 Social and Community Management Plan
5.2.2.10 Employment and Training Management Plan
5.2.2.11 Health and Safety Management Plan
5.2.2.12 Emergency response plan

5-15
5-16
5-16
5-18
5-19
5-21
5-21
5-22
5-24
5-24
5-25
5-25

5.3

PROJECT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN

5-26

5.3.1

Monitoring Program for the Discharge Sources

5-27

5.3.2

Monitoring Program for the Surrounding Environment

5-30

5.3.3

5.3.2.1 Pre-construction phase


5.3.2.2 Construction phase
5.3.2.3 Operation phase
Additional Environmental Monitoring Surveys

5-30
5-34
5-35
5-39

5.3.4

Proposed budget for environmental monitoring program

5-39

6.

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

6-1

6.1

PUBLIC CONSULTATION AND DISCLOSURE

6-1

5.2.2

vi

6.1.1
6.1.2

Regulations and Requirements


Public Consultation and Disclosure Program

6-1
6-1

6.2

PUBLIC CONSULTATION RESULTS

6-3

6.2.1
6.2.2

The First Consultation (4 & 5 November 2008)


The Second Consultation (27th & 28th January 2010)

6-3
6-4

6.3

OPINIONS OF LOCAL COMMUNAL PEOPLE COMMITTEE


AND FRONT FARTHERLAND COMMITTEE

6-6

6.3.1
6.3.2
6.3.3

Consultation with Mai Lam Commune


Consultation with Tinh Hai Commune
Consultation with Hai Yen Commune

6-6
6-7
6-8

6.4

FEEDBACK AND COMMITMENT OF PROJECT OWNER

6-9

6.4.1
6.4.2

Feedback from Project Owner


Commitment of the Project Owner
6.4.2.1 Social Issues
6.4.2.2 Environmental Issues

6-9
6-10
6-10
6-11

7.

CONCLUSION, RECOMMENDATION AND COMMITMENT

7-1

7.1

CONCLUSION

7-1

7.2

RECOMMENDATION

7-4

7.3

COMMITMENT

7-4

vii

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Page 0-1
Final Report

Section
INTRODUCTION
0.1 PROJECT BACKGROUND
As proposal in Pre-Feasibility Study Report (PFS), the second Refinery and Petrochemical Complex
Project is selected in Nghi Sn, Tinh Gia District, Thanh Hoa Province based on natural condition,
infrastructure, products market, socio-economic activities and national security by comparison in four
(04) best locations in the North to establish the second refinery, including:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Dinh Vu, Hai Phong Province


Nghi Son, Thanh Hoa Province
Vung Ang, Ha Tinh Province
Hon La, Quang Binh Province

The site selection was carried out from August 1998 to March 1999 by Inter-ministrial Working Group including the
members from the Government Office, Ministry of Planning & Investment, Ministry of Construction, Ministry of
Transportation, Ministry of Industry, Ministry of Science, Technology & Environment and Vietnam Oil and Gas
Petroleum Cooperation presently Vietnam Oil and Gas Group (PetroVietnam). The criteria for site selection were
based on natural conditions, infrastructure, product market, socio-economic activities and national security. The most
important reasons for the selection of the site can be summarized as follows:

Close to the key economic triangle of Hanoi-Hai Phong-Quang Ninh, northern Delta and former Zone IV.

Suitable natural condition: large area, high topography and Bien Son Island can be used as natural
breakwater.

Available infrastructure system including transportation system, power supply, water supply and port

Suitable with strategic development orientation of PetroVietnam

Suitable with master social and economic plan development of the North Central Zone, Northern Zone and
the nation.

Suitable with master plan development of the Nghi Son area.

The Pre-FS Report was approved by the Vietnamese Prime Minister under Decision No.647/QD-TTg dated August 5,
2002 and according to this Decision, Nghi Son had formally been selected as the site for the Refinery and
Petrochemical Complex No. 2.
In 2003, Petrovietnam had carried out Detail Feasibility Study (DFS). However, since that time to 2007, there were
many changes in marketing situation. The different of light and heavy oil price is insignificant, so the heavy oil processing
have not brought much benefit than the light oil processing because of heavy oil processing uses complicated
technology and needs much investment capital. Since 2004, crude price was sharply increased and broke out refinery
investment that made investment capital was increased. And the consequence of project investment capital was
increased accordingly.

NSRP LLC - CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Page 0-2
Final Report

Therefore, it is necessary to reconsider project feasibility to propose Vietnam Government to issue


regime, priority policy for the project and re-optimize technological diagram based on DFS 2003 in order
to increase economic efficiency as well as upgrade information and suitable economic data with
existing marketing which is objective indispensable requirement. In 2007, PetroVietnam together with
foreigner partners including Idemitsu Kosan Co., Ltd. (IKC), Mitsui Chemicals Inc (MCI) and the Kuwait
Petroleum International (KPI) had signed project Joint Venture on 31st May 2007 (considered as initial
landmark of cooperation) and studied to revise DFS and propose priority policy for project. The DFS
has confirmed the project feasibility and economic efficiency if Vietnam Government approves these
project proposed priorities.
On 22 January 2008, Vietnam Prime Minister had signed official letter of 05/TTg-DK about priorities for
Nghi Son Refinery and Petrochemical Complex Project. Based on this letter, PetroVietnam, IKC, MCI
and KPI had decided to organize Joint Venture named Nghi Son Refinery and Petrochemical Limited
Liability Company (NSPR - LLC) dated 7th April 2008 in which Petrovietnam holds 25.1 percent of the
total paid-up capital, Idemitsu Kosan Co., Ltd. (IKC) 35.1%, Mitsui Chemicals Inc (MCI) 4.7% and the
Kuwait Petroleum International (KPI) 35.1%.
The project is located within the Nghi Son Economic Zone (NSEZ) at Tinh Gia district, Thanh Hoa
Province, approximately 200 km south of Ha Noi capital and 80km north of Vinh City, Nghe An province
(Figure 0-1). Total area in land is about 394 ha. The capital investment for the refinery is estimated to
be US$ 6 billion. The construction is expected to start in 2010 and the refinery and petrochemical
complex to become operational by 2013.

Figure 0-1 Project location

NSRP LLC - CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Page 0-3
Final Report

The Refinery and Petrochemical Complex Project is classified as new project - Class A and received
Investment License No.262022000036 dated 14th April 2008 and Adjusted Investment Certification
No.262022000036 dated 29th May 2008 from Nghi Son Economic Zone Management Board (Annex 1).
The Refinery and petrochemical complex is designed to process 200,000 BPSD of imported Kuwait
Export Crude (KEC) oil. The fuels section of the refinery includes Residue Hydrodesulphurisation and
Residue Catalytic Cracking as the main upgrading units. The refinery is integrated with petrochemical
production. The Aromatics plant produces Paraxylene and Benzene. A key product from the Residue
Cracker is Propylene which is used to produce Polypropylene product. The following products of the
refinery and petrochemical complex include:

LPG
Gasoline 92/ 95 RON
Kerosene / Jet A-1
Diesel Premium and Regular
Fuel oil
Paraxylene / Benzene
Polypropylene
Sulphur

The NSRP Project includes all process units and associated utility, offsite and infrastructure facilities to
support the Complex operation.

Complete utility facilities designed to meet demands of the Complex for cooling water, fuels,
power, steam, water, instrument and plant air, inert gas, etc.

Offsite facilities including tankage for feedstocks plus intermediate and final products as well as
systems for import and export of feed and products.

Other offsite facilities including flare, effluent treatment, firewater, interconnecting piping and
pipelines, etc.

General facilities, including Control System, Electrical and Telecommunication, Buildings.

Marine facilities including a Single Point Mooring (SPM)/ Crude import pipelines, product
loading jetties, and cooling water intake and outfall.

The NSRP will be the second major oil refinery in Vietnam after Dung Quat. This is one of the nations
key projects that will ensure an adequate supply of energy to the country said by Prime Minister
Nguyen Tan Dung at groundbreaking ceremony (VN Oil and Gas News on 3rd March 2009). It will not
only promote the socio-economic development of the provinces and cities in the central part of Viet
Nam and as a result the whole country in general but satisfy necessary of national energy safety in the
future as well.
The NSRP project implementation will bring many advantages as follows:

Contributing to the national energy security, by securing long-term imported crude supply of at
about 10 million tons per year, which will be processed by this Complex to produce voluminous
fuels and petrochemicals.

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Products of the Complex include Mogas (2.1 millions tons per year MTPY), Diesel (2.7 MTPY),
as well as jet LPG (1.4 MTPY), jet fuel/kerosene, fuel oils and petrochemicals. As the Project
comes into operation from 2013, the production of both the Project and Vietnamese first
refinery (Dung-Quat) can cover 50% local demand for fuel products.

Paving the way for the development of the petrochemical industries, associated industries and
other related services.

Robustly motivating the socio-economic development of the south Thanh Hoa and north Nghe
An province and vicinities.

Creating jobs for dozens of thousand people during construction phase, and thousands of
people during operation phase.

0.2

LEGAL AND TECHNICAL BASIS OF EIA PREPARATION

0.2.1

Scope of the EIA report

Based on Official letter of 1370/TTg-KTN dated 21st August 2008 of Prime Minister on approval of
building Nghi Son Refinery and Petrochemical Complex Project, the responsibilities of each related
parties in project implementation are classified as follows:

Telecom VNPT Post is responsible in telecom


EVN is responsible to supply electricity to boundary limit of Refinery for construction phase and
for operation phase of emergency case
PVN is responsible in mine-disarming, site leveling and initial dredging for Jetty, SPM and
access channel
Thanh Hoa Province Peoples Committee is responsible in compensation, resettlement, site
clearance, road, water and infrastructure for resettlement sites.

Then PVN assigned Nghi Son Project Management Board (NSPM) to take responsibility of minedisarming, basic site leveling and initial dredging for Jetty, SPM and access channel. Thanh Hoa
Peoples Committee assigned Tinh Gia District Peoples Committee to take responsibility of
compensation and site clearance and assigned Nghi Son Economic Zone Management Board
(NSEZMB) to take responsibility of road and water to Refinery boundary limit, resettlement and
infrastructure for resettlement site.
Hence, resettlement of plant site is the responsible of the Thanh Hoa People Committee/Tinh Gia
District People Committee and the site leveling is responsible of PVN/NSPM. The basic site leveling
and site leveling phase II have already been considered in a previous EIA report and environmental
commitment certification approved by NSEZ Management Board. Two following approved EIA decision
and certification will be attached of this report as Annex II.
1. EIA approved Decision No.195/Q-BQLKKTNS dated 4th September 2008 of NSEZMB for soil
exploitation for site leveling period at Chuot Chu mountain, Hai Yen and Hai Thuong commune,
NSEZ;

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2. Environmental commitment certification No.416/GXN-BQLKKTNS dated 16th April 2010 of


NSEZMB for project site leveling Phase 2 before infrastructure construction of Nghi Son
Refinery and Petrochemical Complex.
Moreover, resettlement of plant site and related area is the responsible of the Thanh Hoa Province,
Tinh Gia District and Nghi Son Economic Zone Management Board. Therefore the scope of this EIA
report includes 394ha for the onshore facilities and 259ha of offshore area during 25 years project
implementation in two following phases:

Construction and Installation phase: Define impact sources, detail impact assessment and
propose mitigation measures for: i) construction and installation of onshore facilities (Refinery
and Petrochemical Complex, tankage farm, product pipeline system, intake cooling water
system, effluent outfall system; ii) construction and installation of offshore facilities (harbour,
breakwater, crude pipeline and SPM).

Operation phase: detail impact assessment and propose mitigation measures for: i) operation
of onshore facilities (Refinery and Petrochemical Complex (Process units) and support facilities
(including tank farm system, steam recovery system, power and steam system, intake water
system, flare, etc.) in normal and abnormal operation, treatment and effluent discharge,
collect, treat and dispose solid wastes, environmental management and monitoring); ii)
operation of offshore facilities (crude import at SPM, crude pipeline transportation, product
loading at harbour, shipping activities, maintenance dredging, oil spill at offshore facilities..) and
iii) cumulative impact between project facilities and other facilities in the area.

In order to ensure that the project will be developed in a manner that is socially responsible and reflect
sound environmental management practices, the NSRP-LLC has committed to follow strictly
Vietnamese Laws, Regulations and Standards as well as International Financial Corporation (IFC)
Performance Standards on Social & Environmental Sustainability in April 30, 2007 and World Bank
Safeguard Policy.
0.2.2 International Regulations
The new facilities should fully comply with the following international regulations which are signed by
Vietnamese authorities:
Montreal Protocol 1987/90/92/95/97/99 on the Control of Substances that Deplete the Ozone
Layer (CFCs, HFCs)
Basel Convention 1989, Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of
Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal
The Protocol of 1978, Relating to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution
From Ships 1973 (MARPOL), Annexes I & II
Kyoto Protocol 97/05, on Reducing CO2 Emissions and other Greenhouse Gases (GHG) that
affect Climate Change
Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (2001)
The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOS) 1982/1994
The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 1992/1994
International Declaration on Cleaner Production 1989
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Vietnamese Laws and Standards

0.2.3.1 Vietnamese Law and Legislation


The Project will comply fully with the following Vietnamese Laws:
1. Investment Law No.59/2005/QH11 dated 29th November 2005 issued by National Assembly of
the Socialist Republic of Vietnam;
2. Construction Law No.16/2003/QH11 dated 26th November 2003 issued by National Assembly
of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam;
3. Law No.38/2009/QH12 dated 19th June 2009 issued by National Assembly of the Socialist
Republic of Vietnam on revising and supplementing some Articles of Construction Law
No.16/2003/QH11, Bidding Law No.61/2005/QH11, Business Law No.60/2005/QH11, Land
Law No.13/2003/QH11 and Housing Law No.56/2005/QH11;
4. Exported and Imported Tax Law No.04/1998/QH10 dated 20th May 1998 issued by National
Assembly of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam;
5. Environmental Protection Law No.52/2005/QH11 dated 29th November 2005 issued by National
Assembly of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam;
6. Governmental Decree No.80/2006/N-CP dated 9th August 2006 on Regulations and
Guidelines for Detailed Implementation of the Law on Environmental Protection;
7. Governmental Decree No.117/2009/N-CP dated 31st December 2009 on dealing with
infringing Environmental Protection Law;
8. Governmental Decree No.21/2008/N-CP dated 28th February 2008 of the Government on
revising and supplementing some Articles of Governmental Decree No.80/2006/N-CP;
9. Circular No. 05/2008/TT-BTNMT dated 8th December 2008 of the MONRE - Guidelines on
Strategic Environmental Impact Assessment, Environmental Impact Assessment and
Commitment to Environmental Protection;
10. Law on Water Resources No.08/1998/QH10 dated 20th May 1998 issued by National Assembly
of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam;
11. Governmental Decree No.179/1999/N-CP dated 30th December 1999 on implementing Water
Resource Law;
12. Governmental Decree No.149/2004/N-CP dated 27th July 2004 issued by the Government
on the regulation of permission of exploration, production, use of water resources and waste
water discharge to the water source
13. Circular No.02/2009/TT-BTNMT dated 19th March 2009 issued by MONRE on assessing
receiving capacity of water source;
14. Circular No.21/2009/TT-BTNMT dated 5th November 2009 issued by MONRE on norms of
economic technical investigation, wastewater status and receiving capacity of water source
assessment;
15. Land Law No.13/2003/QH11 dated 26th November 2003 issued by National Assembly of the
Socialist Republic of Vietnam;

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16. Governmental Decree No.181/2004/N-CP dated 29th October 2004 on implementing Land
Law;
17. Forest Protection and Development Law No.29/2004/QH11 dated December 2004 issued by
National Assembly of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam;
18. Dyke Law No.79/2006/QH11 dated 29th November 2006 issued by National Assembly of the
Socialist Republic of Vietnam;
19. Ordinance No.26/2000/PL-UBTVQH10 dated 24th August 2000 issued by Standing Committee
of the National Assembly;
20. Governmental Decree No.171/2003/ N-CP dated 26th December 2003 on implementing some
Articles of Dyke Law;
21. Mineral Law No.47-L/CTN dated 20th March 1996 issued by National Assembly of the Socialist
Republic of Vietnam;
22. Revising and Supplementing Law on some Articles of Mineral Law No.46/2005/QH11 dated
June 2010;
23. Governmental Decree No.07/2009/N-CP dated 2nd January 2009 on modifying Mineral Law
2009;
24. Petroleum Law No.19/2000/QH10 dated 9th June 2000 issued by National Assembly of the
Socialist Republic of Vietnam;
25. Governmental Decree No.48/2000/N-CP dated 12th September 2000 - Detail Regulations for
the Implementation of the Revised Petroleum Law
26. Decision No. 395/1998/Q-KHCNMT dated 10th April 1998 - Regulations on Environmental
Protection in Petroleum Exploration, Field Development, Production, Storage, Transportation,
Processing and Related Services, issued by MOSTE
27. Law No.10/2008/QH12 to modify and supplement of Petroleum Law, ratified by the national
assembly of 3 June 2008
28. Decision No. 41/1999/Q-TTg dated 8th March 1999 - Safety Management Regulation in Oil
and Gas Activities, issued by Prime Minister
29. Decision No.103/2005/Q-TTg dated 12th May 2005 on Regulations for Oil Spill Response
Plan, issued by the Prime Minister;
30. Decision No.129/2001/Q-TTg dated 29th August 2001 issued by Prime Minister - National Oil
Spill Response Plan for the Period 2001 2010;
31. Decision No.2469/Q-DKVN of Petrovietnam dated 5th May 2006 on Oil Spill Response Plan;
32. Marine Codes No.40/2005/QH11 dated 14th June 2005 issued by National Assembly of the
Socialist Republic of Vietnam;
33. Decree No. 71/2006/ND-CP dated 25th July 2006 about Seaports and Channel Management
Safety;
34. Governmental Decree No.25/2009/N-CP dated 6th March 2009 on integrated resources
management and marine and island environment protection;
35. Governmental Decree No.137/2004/N-CP dated 16th June 2004 on administrative fining on
sea regions and continental shelves of Vietnam;
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36. Governmental Decree No.26/2010/N-CP dated 22nd March 2010 on modifying and
supplementing Clause 2 Article 8 Governmental Decree No.67/2003/ N-CP dated 13th June
2003 on environmental protection fee to wastewater;
37. Ordinance No.15/2007/L-CTN dated 5th December 2007 of Government on issuing Chemicals
Law;
38. Governmental Decree No.108/2008/N-CP dated 7th October 2008 for detailing and guiding
the implementation of a number of articles of the Chemical Law 2007;
39. Governmental Decree No.68/2005/N-CP dated 20th May 2005 on Chemical Safety;
40. Governmental Decree No.02/CP dated 5th January 1995 on Toxic Chemicals and Radioactive
Substances;
41. Circular No.12/2006/TT-BCN dated 22nd December 2006 by Ministry of Industry on Guideline in
implementation of Decree No. 68/2005/ND-CP on Chemical Safety;
42. Circular No.01/2006/TT-BCN dated 11th April 2006 issued by Ministry of Industry - Guideline in
Management of Importation/Exportation of Toxicants and Products containing toxicant,
Predrugs and Chemicals with Technical Standards managed by Ministry of Industry and
Trading;
43. Biodiversity Law No.20/2008/QH12 dated 13th November 2008 by National Assembly of the
Socialist Republic of Vietnam;
44. Governmental Decree No.16/2005/N-CP dated 7th February 2005 on managing investment
capital and project constructions;
45. Governmental Decree No.29/2008/N-CP dated 14th March 2008 on Regulation of forming,
operating, policy and state management for industrial parks, export processing zone, economic
zone and border gate EZs;
46. Circular No.08/2009/TT-BTNMT dated 15th July 2009 by MONRE on environmental
management and protection in Economic Zone, Hi-tech Park, Industrial Park and Industrial
Group;
47. Governmental Decree No.50/1998/N-CP dated 25th June 1998 in Detailed regulations on
implementing Radiation Safe and Control Ordinance;
48. Governmental Decree No.59/2007/N-CP dated 9th April 2007 in Solid waste management;
49. Decision No.23/2006/Q-BTNMT dated 26th December 2006 by MONRE on List of hazardous
wastes;
50. Decision No.155/1999/Q-TTg dated 16th July 1999 issued by the Prime Minister on
Hazardous wastes management regulations;
51. Circular No.12/2006/TT-BTNMT dated 26th December 2006 issued by MONRE on Guidelines for
practice conditions of transporting and registering, licensing hazardous wastes management
practice and code;
52. Circular No.13/2007/TT-BXD dated 31st December 2007 issued by Ministry of Construction
Guidelines for implementing some Articles of Decree No.59/2007/N-CP dated 9th April 2007
on Solid waste management;

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53. Circular No.05/2006/TT-BKNCN dated 11th January 2006 issued by Ministry of Science,
Technology and Environment on Guidelines for declaring, licensing procedures and activities
concerned with radioactive substances;
54. Decision No.3733/2002/Q-BYT dated 10th October 2002 issued by the Ministry of Health 21
Standards for hygiene, 5 rules and 7 parameters for labour hygiene;
55. Decision 4613/Q-KHCNMT dated 15th November 2000 by Petrovietnam on Guidelines for
monitoring of the marine environment in the vicinity of offshore petroleum installations in
Vietnam;
56. Guidelines for Monitoring of onshore environment surrounding the Petroleum Installations were
issued in 2006 by Petrovietnam
57. Decision No.3044 /Q-ATSKMT dated 13th June 2005 by Petrovietnam on Guidelines for the
implementation of requirements on use and discharge of chemicals and drilling fluids in
petroleum operations offshore Vietnam;
58. Circular No.16/2009/TT-BTNMT dated 7th October 2009 issued by MONRE on Promulgating
National Technical Regulations of QCVN 05:2009/BTNMT Regulations on ambient air quality
and QCVN 06:2009/BTNMT Regulations on some toxic substances in ambient air
environment;
59. Circular No.25/2009/TT-BTNMT dated 16th November 2009 by MONRE Application of
National Technical Regulation of QCVN 19:2009/BTNMT National Technical Regulations on
industrial emission gases to dust and inorganic substances, QCVN 20:2009/BTNMT National
Technical Regulations on industrial emission gases to some organic substances, QCVN 22:
2009/BTNMT National Technical Regulations on industrial emission gases in thermoelectric
plant, QCVN 24:2009/BTNMT National Technical Regulations on industrial wastewater;
60. Decision No.16/2008/Q-BTNMT dated 31st December 2008 by MONRE Promulgating
National Technical Regulations on Environment, including QCVN 08:2008/BTNMT National
Technical Regulations on surface water quality; QCVN 09:2008/BTNMT National Technical
Regulations on ground water quality; QCVN 10:2008/BTNMT National Technical Regulations
on coastal water quality;
61. Decision No.3900/2007/Q-UBND dated 13th December 2007 of Thanh Hoa PPC on approval
of overall plan on compensation, clearance the site for Nghi Son Refinery and Petrochemical
Project in Tinh Gia District, Thanh Hoa Province.
62. Governmental Decree 69/2009/N-CP dated 13th August 2009 on Promulgating supplemental
regulations on land using, price, acquiring, compensating, assisting and resettlement plan.
63. Joint Circular No.14/2008/TTLT/BTC-BTNMT dated 31st January 2008 issued by MONRE on
Guidelines for implementing some Articles of Decree 84/2007/N-CP of 25th May 2007 on
Supplemental regulations on licensing Land Using Right Certification, Land Acquirement and
carrying out land using right, order, compensation procedure, assistance, resettlement in case
of land acquiring and complaint solving.
64. Decision No.1511/2007/Q-UBND dated 24th May 2007 issued by Thanh Hoa PPC on
compensation rates for properties on land in areas of Thanh Hoa Province;
65. Decision No.3931/2006/Q-UBND dated 31st December 2006 issued by Thanh Hoa PPC on
approval of price of land types in Thanh Hoa Province in 2007;

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66. Decision No.4238/2007/Q-UBND dated 31st December 2007 issued by Thanh Hoa PPC on
approval of price of land types in Thanh Hoa Province in 2008;
67. Decision No.1151/2008/Q-UBND dated 28 April 2008 issued by Thanh Hoa PPC on adjusting
price of agricultural land types in Nghi Son Economic Zone;
68. Letter No.1606/UBND-KTTC dated 18th April 2008 issued by Thanh Hoa PPC on compensation
rates for different roads in implementation of projects in Nghi Son Economic Zone (NSEZ) and
Tinh Gia District;
69. Decision No.1048/2008/Q-UBND dated 22nd April 2008 issued by Thanh Hoa PPC on
compensation rates for architectural objects;
70. Decision No.2531/2008/Q-UBND dated 18th August 2008 issued by Thanh Hoa PPC on
assistance policy for relocating, resettlement applied for NSEZ;
71. Resolution No.128/2009/NQ-HND dated 15th July 2009 issued by Thanh Hoa PPC on policy
of relocation assistance and resettlement applied for NSEZ.
72. Guideline No.2108/HD/STC dated 25th September 2009 issued by Financial Department of
Thanh Hoa Province on implementation policy of relocation assistance and resettlement
applied for NSEZ.
73. Decision 2622/2009/Q-UBND dated 7th August 2009 issued by Thanh Hoa PPC on policy of
relocation assistance and resettlement applied for NSEZ.
74. Decision 4366/Q-UBND dated 9th December 2009 issued by Thanh Hoa PPC on replacing
Decision 2622/2009/Q-UBND.
75. Investment License No.262022000036 dated 14th April 2008 and Adjustment License of
Investment No.262022000036 dated 29th May 2008 issued by NSEZ Management Board for
NSRP.
0.2.3.2 Environmental Standards
The following environmental standards have been developed by the Ministry of Natural Resource and
Environment (MONRE) in Vietnam and form the environmental framework for all industrial
developments:
Air Quality

QCVN 05:2009/BTNMT: National Technical Regulation on Hazardous substances in ambient


air;

QCVN 06:2009/BTNMT National Technical Regulation on ambient air quality;

QCVN 19:2009/BTNMT National Technical Regulation on Industrial Emission of Inorganic


Substances and Dusts;

QCVN 20:2009/BTNMT National Technical Regulation on Industrial Emission of Organic


Substances;

QCVN 22: 2009/BTNMT National Technical Regulation on Emission of Thermal Power industry

TCVN 6438:2005 Road Vehicles. Maximum permitted emission limits of exhaust gas.

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Water Quality

QCVN 08:2008/BTNMT National Technical Regulation on Surface Water Quality;


QCVN 09:2008/BTNMT National Technical Regulation on Groundwater Quality;
QCVN 10:2008/BTNMT National Technical Regulation on Coastal Water Quality.

Wastewater Quality

QCVN 24: 2009/BTNMT National Technical Regulation on Industrial Wastewater;


QCVN 14: 2008/BTNMT National technical regulation on domestic wastewater;
TCVN 5298:1995 General requirements for the use of wastewaters and their sludges for
watering and fertilizing purposes.

Hazardous Wastes

TCVN 7221:2002 General environmental requirements for central industrial wastewater


treatment plants;
QCVN 07:2009/BTNMT National Technical Regulation on Hazardous Waste Thresholds;
TCVN 6705:2000 National Standards on Classification Non-hazardous solid wastes;
TCVN 6706:2000 National Standards on Classification Hazardous waste;
TCVN 6707:2000 National Standards on Warning signal and prevention Hazardous waste;
TCVN 6868:2001 National Standards on Radiation Protection. Radioactive waste
management. Classification of radioactive waste.

Noise and Vibration

TCVN 3985:1999 National Standards on Acoustics. Allowable noise level at working place;

TCVN 5290:1990 System of standards for environmental protection. General requirements;

TCVN 5654:1992 National Standards on Regulations on environmental protection at offshore


mooring terminals for loading exploited raw petroleum;

TCVN 5948:1999 National Standards on Acoustics. Noise emitted by accelerating road


vehicles. Maximum Permitted Noise Level;

TCVN 5949:1998 National Standards on Acoustics. Noise in public and residential areas.
Maximum Permitted Noise Level;

TCVN 6436:1998 National Standards on Acoustics. Noise emitted by stationary road vehicles.
Maximum Permitted Noise Level;

TCVN 6962:2001 National Standards on Vibration and shock. Vibration emitted by construction
works and factories. Maximum permitted levels in the environment of public and residential
areas;

TCXDVN175:2005 Maximum permitted noise levels for public buildings Design Standard;

QCVN 01/2008/BXD National Technical Regulation on constructional planning

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0.2.3.3 Project Standards


The NSRP Project and associated facilities are designed according to the more stringent environmental
standards in order to minimize emissions to air, water and land. These requirements will be compliant
with Vietnamese legislation and international standards including World Bank /IFC (International
Finance Corporation) Guidelines and they will respect the international conventions ratified by the
Government of Vietnam.
The standards used for this Project will be current World Bank/IFC Standards, except for where the
Vietnamese Standards are the more stringent, or where there is no World Bank Standard for a
substance regulated by Vietnamese Standards.
The following International Financial Cooperation/ World Bank Guidelines are referenced for NSRP:

International Financial Cooperation/ World Bank (IFC/WB) General Environmental Health and
Safety (EHS) Guidelines (April 30, 2007)

IFC/WB Industry Sector Guidelines for Petroleum Refining (April 30, 2007)

IFC/WB Industry Sector Guidelines for Petroleum Based Polymer Manufacturing (April 30,
2007)

IFC/WB Industry Sector Guidelines for Large Volume Petroleum based Organic Chemicals
Manufacture (April 30, 2007)

IFC/WB Industry Sector Guidelines for Crude Oil and Petroleum Product Terminals (April 30,
2007)

IFC/WB Industry Sector Guidelines for Port, Harbours and Terminals (April 30, 2007).

IFC/WB Industry Sector Guidelines for Thermal power plants (December 19, 2008).

Air Quality
Ambient Air Quality Standards
Ambient Air Quality Standards (AAQS) for Vietnam are set out in QCVN 05:2009/BTNMT National
Technical Regulation on Hazardous substances in ambient air and QCVN 06:2009/BTNMT National
Technical Regulation on ambient air quality.
The IFC-World Bank Guidelines are based on the World Health Organisation (WHO) Air Quality
Guidelines (Global Update, 2005).
All emissions from the project will be limited in order to meet the requirements of the IFC and
Vietnamese Standards. IFC states in their General guideline that "Emissions do not result in pollutant
concentrations that reach or exceed relevant ambient quality guidelines and standards by applying
national legislated standards, or in their absence, apply WHO guidelines." So, Project applies the
Vietnamese Standards as Project Standards which are shown in Table 0.1

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Table 0.1 Ambient Air Quality Standards (g/m3)


Averaging Period

Vietnamese Ambient Air


Quality Standards 1

Sulphur Dioxide (SO2)

1 hour
24 hour
1year

350
125
50

Carbon Monoxide (CO)

1 hour
8 hour
24 hours

30,000
10,000
5,000

Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2)

1 hour
24 hours
1year

200
100
40

Ozone (O3)

1 hour
8 hour
24 hour

180
120
80

Suspended Dust (TSP)

1 hour
24 hour
1 year

300
200
140

24 hour
1 year

150
50

24 hour
1 year

1.5
0.5

Parameter

Dust 10m (PM10)

Lead (Pb)

Notes: 1: QCVN 05:2009/BTNMT National Technical Regulation on ambient air quality

Source Emissions Standards


The Vietnamese standards for the control of hazardous substances in the air are set out in QCVN
19:2009/BTNMT for inorganic gases, QCVN 20:2009/BTNMT for organic substances and QCVN
22:2009/BTNMT Emission standards for Thermal Power Industry.
Applicable World Bank Standards can be found in the Guidelines for Petroleum Refining, Petroleum
based Polymer manufacturing, Thermal Power Plants, and Large Volume Petroleum based Organic
Chemicals Manufacture.
World Bank Standards will take precedence, except for where the Vietnamese Standards are the more
stringent, or where there is no World Bank Standard for a substance which is regulated by Vietnamese
Standards. These limits are summarized in Table 0.2 along side the corresponding Vietnamese
standards. In case of variations between IFC and Vietnamese standards the more stringent level will be
applied.

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Table 0.2 Project Point Source Emission Standards 1


Pollutants

PM

NSRP process Units

Vietnamese Standard for


industrial Emissions 2
Max allowable concentration
in mg/Nm3

World Bank EHSGuideline Value 3


Applicable World
Bank Guideline
values in mg/Nm3

Project
standards 2
mg/Nm3

CO

1. For Refinery Boilers Considering Non Degraded Airshed


(a) Fuel-Natural gas/other gases
42.5
Not Applicable
42.5
(b) Fuel-Liquid> 50MWth to
127.5
50
50
<600MWth
(c) Fuel- Liquid & solid > 600MWth
127.5
50
50
2. For Gas Turbine Considering Non Degraded Airshed
(a) Fuel-Natural gas (NG)
42.5
Not Applicable
42.5
>50MWth
(b) Fuel-Other than NG>50MWth
127.5
50
50
3. For other process Heaters under Refinery Complex
(a) General Process
160 (dust in smoke)
50
50
Heaters/sources
40 (for dust containing silic)
(b) Sulphur recovery Units
160
50
50
4. For other Process Heaters under Large Volume Petroleum Based Organic Chemical Manufacturing
All Fuel
160 (dust in smoke)
20
20
40 (for dust containing silic)
1. For Refinery Boilers Considering Non Degraded Airshed
Not Applicable
(a) Fuel-Natural gas
255
255
(b) For other gaseous fuel
400
400
400
(c) Fuel-Liquid> 50MWth
400
900 (Lower value)
400
to<600MWth
(d) Fuel- Liquid > 600MWth
400
200 (Lower value)
200
2. For Gas Turbine Considering Non Degraded Airshed
(a) Fuel-Natural gas (NG)
255
Not Applicable
255
>50MWth
(b) Fuel-Other than NG>50MWth
425
Use of 1% or less
400
sulphur fuel
(Use of 1% or
less fuel)
3. For other process Heaters under Refinery Complex
(a) General Process
400
500
400
Heaters/sources
(b) Sulphur recovery Units
400
150
150
4. For other Process Heaters under Large Volume Petroleum Based Organic Chemical Manufacturing
All Fuel
400
100
100
1. For Refinery Boilers Considering Non Degraded Airshed
(a) Fuel-Natural gas/other gases
212.5
240
212.5
(b) Fuel-Liquid> 50MWth to
510
400
400
<600MWth
(c) Fuel- Liquid & solid > 600MWth
510
400
400
2. For Gas Turbine Considering Non Degraded Airshed
(a) Fuel-Natural gas (NG)
212.5
51
51
>50MWth
(Ref.QCVN22:2009/BTNMT)
(b) Fuel-Other than NG>50MWth
510
152
152
(Ref.QCVN22:2009/BTNMT)
3. For other process Heaters under Refinery Complex
(a) Solid fuels
680
450
450
(b) Liquid and gaseous fuels
680
450
450
4. For other Process Heaters under Large Volume Petroleum Based Organic Chemical Manufacturing
All Fuel
680
300
300
For all Emission sources
800
800

Vanadium
Nickel
H 2S

For all Emission sources


For all Emission sources
For Refinery Emission sources

5
1
10

5
1
6

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing

HCl

For Refinery Emission sources

50

50

50

10

10

Benzene

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing
For all Emission sources

SO2

NOx

NSRP LLC - CPSE/SNC Lavalin

Remarks

Dry gas@3% excess O2


Dry gas@3% excess O2
Dry gas@3% excess O2

Dry gas@15% excess O2


Dry gas@15% excess O2
Dry gas@3% excess O2
Dry gas@3% excess O2
Dry gas@3% excess O2

Dry gas@3% excess O2


Dry gas@3% excess O2
Dry gas@3% excess O2

Dry gas@15% excess O2


Dry gas@15% excess O2

Dry gas@3% excess O2


Dry gas@3% excess O2
Dry gas@3% excess O2
Dry gas@3% excess O2
Dry gas@3% excess O2
Dry gas@3% excess O2
Dry gas@3% excess O2
Dry gas@3% excess O2

Dry gas@6% excess O2


Dry gas@3% excess O2
Dry gas@3% excess O2
Maximum allowable
concentration
Dry gas@3% excess O2
Dry gas@3% excess O2
Maximum allowable
concentration
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa (1
atm), 6% O2 for Solid fuel &
3% for gas fuel
Maximum allowable
concentration
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa (1
atm), 6% O2 for Solid fuel &
3% for gas fuel
Maximum allowable
concentration

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ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


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Pollutants

World Bank EHSGuideline Value 3


Applicable World
Bank Guideline
values in mg/Nm3
5

For Refinery Emission sources

20

20

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing
For Refinery Emission sources

20

NSRP process Units

1,2
Dichloroethane

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing

Vinyl Chloride
(VCM)
Ammonia

Vietnamese Standard for


industrial Emissions 2
Max allowable concentration
in mg/Nm3

Page 0-15
Final Report

Project
standards 2
mg/Nm3
5

50

50

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing

50

15

15

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing
For Unit associated with Organic
Chemical manufacturing

20

20

1.5

1.5

Mercury &
Compounds

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing

0.2

0.2

Formaldehyde

For Refinery Emission sources

20

20

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing

20

0.15

0.15

Ethylene

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing

150

150

Ethylene Oxide

For Refinery Emission sources

20

20

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing

20

Hydrogen
Cyanide

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing

Organic
sulphide and
Mercaptans

For Refinery Emission sources

15

15

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing

15

Phenols, cresols
and xylos (as
phenol)

For Refinery Emission sources

19

19

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing

19

10

10

Dioxins/Furans
ng TEQ/Nm3

For Unit associated with Organic


Chemical manufacturing

0.1

0.1

VOCs
Heavy Metals

Remarks
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa (1
atm), 6% O2 for Solid fuel &
3% for gas fuel
Maximum allowable
concentration
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa (1
atm), 6% O2 for Solid fuel &
3% for gas fuel
Maximum allowable
concentration
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa (1
atm), 6% O2 for Solid fuel &
3% for gas fuel
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa (1
atm), 6% O2 for Solid fuel &
3% for gas fuel

Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa


(1 atm), 6% O2 for Solid
fuel & 3% for gas fuel
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa
(1 atm), 6% O2 for Solid
fuel & 3% for gas fuel
Maximum allowable
concentration
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa
(1 atm), 6% O2 for Solid
fuel & 3% for gas fuel
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa
(1 atm), 6% O2 for Solid
fuel & 3% for gas fuel
Maximum allowable
concentration
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa
(1 atm), 6% O2 for Solid
fuel & 3% for gas fuel
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa
(1 atm), 6% O2 for Solid
fuel & 3% for gas fuel
Maximum allowable
concentration
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa
(1 atm), 6% O2 for Solid
fuel & 3% for gas fuel
Maximum allowable
concentration
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa
(1 atm), 6% O2 for Solid
fuel & 3% for gas fuel
Dry gas@273K, 101Kpa
(1 atm), 6% O2 for Solid
fuel & 3% for gas fuel

Notes:
1. Emission standard at source is developed from following standards:
1. QCVN 19:2009/BTNMT with coefficient Kp of 0.8 as total emission is over 100.000 m3/h and value of Kv is 1
due to project is sited in industrial park
2. QCVN 20:2009/BTNMT
3. QCVN 22:2009/BTNMT with coefficient Kp of 0.85 as designed capacity of thermoelectric plant is less than
1.200MW and more than 300 MW and value of Kv is 1 due to project is located in industrial park.
4. From IFC Guidelines values for Petroleum Refining Facilities.
5. From IFC Guidelines values for Large Volume Petroleum-based Organic Chemical Manufacture
6. From IFC Guidelines values for Thermal Power Plants
7. From IFC Guidelines values for Petroleum-based polymers Manufacturing
2. Nm3 at condition of 1 atm and 0oC
3. Nm3 at condition of 1 atm and 25oC

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Page 0-16
Final Report

Effluent discharge to water source


Industrial wastewater discharged from the production process will be treated in an industrial wastewater
treatment plant and shall comply with the standards as outlined before discharge into the receiving
environment. Clean effluents with low levels of contamination such as storm water run-off from nonprocess units will be discharged directly to sea.
Industrial wastewater discharge standards
Vietnamese Standard QCVN 24:2009/BTNMT has been established to control industrial wastewater
discharge. However considering that the Project will follow the international standards, the IFC EHS
Guidelines will be applied, except for where the Vietnamese Standards are the more stringent, or where
there is no IFC EHS Guidelines available for a substance which is regulated by Vietnamese
Standards. The following table compares Vietnamese Standard to the IFC EHS Guidelines Values.
Process discharge water and sanitary water will be treated in ETP to meet Project standard in Table
0.3.
Table 0.3 Industrial wastewater discharge standard
Pollutants

Units

Vietnamese
Standards
QCVN Max
Limit Value 3

IFC EHS Guideline Values


Petroleum
Large Volume
based
Petroleum-based
polymer
Organic
Manufacturing
chemicals
Manufacturing
6-9
6-9
6-9
30
25
25
150
150
150
30
30
30
0.1
0.1
10 (oil and
10 (oil and
10 (oil and grease)
grease)
grease)
Petroleu
m
Refining
Facilities1

Project
Standards

pH
BOD5
COD5
TSS
Cadmium (Cd)
Hydrocarbons

S.U
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l

5.5-9
45
90
90
0.009
4.5 (mineral oil
and fat) or 18
(animal
vegetable oil)

Chromium (total)
Chromium
(Hexavalent)
Copper (Cu)
Zinc (Zn)
Iron (Fe)
Cyanide Total
(Free)
Cyanide (CN-)
Lead (Pb)
Nickel (Ni)
Mercury (Hg)
Vanadium
Phenol
Benzene
Benzo(a)pyrene
Vinyl Chloride

mg/l
mg/l

0.9
0.09

0.5
0.05

0.5
0.1

0.5
0.1

6-9
25
90
30
0.009
4.5 (mineral
oil and fat)
or 10 (animal
vegetable
oil)
0.5
0.05

mg/l
mg/l
mg/l

1.8
4.5

0.5
3

0.5
2
3

0.5
2
3

0.5
2
3

mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l

0.09
0.45
0.45
0.009
0.45
-

0.1
1
0.1
0.5
0.02
1
0.2
0.05
0.05
-

0.1
1
0.5
0.5
0.01
1
0.5
0.05
0.05
0.05

0.1
1
0.5
0.5
0.01
1
0.5
0.05
0.05
-

0.1
0.09
0.1
0.45
0.009
1
0.2
0.05
0.05
0.05

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ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


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(VCM)
Dicloroethane
Adsorbable
organic
halogens (AOX)
Sulphide
Total Nitrogen
Total
Phosphorus
Temperature

Page 0-17
Final Report

mg/l
mg/l

1
1

1
0.3

1
0.3

mg/l
mg/l
mg/l

0.45
27
5.4

1
102
2

1
10
2

1
10
2

0.45
10
2

oC

<404

Max
increase
<=3

Max increase
<=3

Max increase <=3

- <40oC at
final outfall
discharge
- Max
increase <=3
at the edge
of mixing
zone

Notes:
1.
2.
3.

4.
5.

Assumes an Integrated Petroleum Refinery;


The effluent concentration of nitrogen (total) is up to 40 mg/l in processes that include hydrogenation;
From Vietnamese Standard QCVN 24:2009/BTNMT, Limit Values from Column B, factor applied where
applicable. These limits are valid for discharges of industrial wastewater into water bodies used for
navigation, irrigation purposes or for bathing, aquatic breeding and cultivation, etc. Value of Output/capacity
coefficient (kq) is 1 as receiving source is coastal water used for aquacultural protection and sport. Value of
Kf is 0.9 as discharge flow of effluent is more than 5,000 m3/day except for some parameters as pH, colour,
Coliform, total radioactivity and ;
NSRP Project will comply with Vietnamese Standard 24:2009/BTNMT for discharge from sea water cooling
system;
COD as analyzed by Chrome method as specified on ISO 6060-1989.

Sanitary water discharge


IFC states in their General EHS Guidelines that if sewage from the industrial facility is to be discharged
to surface water, treatment has to meet national or local standards for sanitary wastewater discharges.
Considering this statement, projects wastewater will be treated to meet the National technical
regulation on sanitary wastewater QCVN 14:2008/BTNMTas described at Table 0.4.
Table 0.4 Sanitary water discharge standards
Pollutants

Units

Vietnamese requirement QCVN


14:2008/BTNMT- Max limit value

pH

S.U

5-9

BOD (20 Deg C.)

mg/l

50

Total Suspended Solids (TSS)

mg/l

100

Total Dissolved Solids (TDS)

mg/l

1,000

Total of surface active substances

mg/l

10

Hydrocarbon including fat and mineral oil

mg/l

20

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Page 0-18
Final Report

Pollutants

Units

Vietnamese requirement QCVN


14:2008/BTNMT- Max limit value

Ammonical Nitrogen

mg/l

10

Nitrate Nitrogen

mg/l

50

Sulphide (as H2S)

mg/l

Phosphates as P

mg/l

10

MPN/ 100 ml

5,000

Total Coliform bacteria

Dosmetic wastewater in Plant area and industrial wastewater will be treated in ETP to meet Vietnamese
Standard QCVN 24:2009/BTNMT.
Sanitary wastewater in Jetty area will be treated and meet QCVN 14:2008/BTNMT before being
combined with other effluents and discharged to the sea.
Seawater cooling discharge
Cooling water is not considered production wastewater, as the system is not used in a technological
process, only in thermal exchange.
Vietnamese standards do not regulate cooling water discharge temperature. However, the project will
strictly comply with Vietnamese Standard QCVN 24:2009/BTNMT which requires that the temperature
of cooling water discharged into a received environment is equal to or lower than 40C.
The IFC General EHS Guidelines specifies that cooling methods should be used to reduce the
temperature of wastewater from utilities operations, to ensure the discharge water temperature does
not result in a maximum temperature increase greater than 3C at the edge of a scientifically
established mixing zone, which takes into account ambient water quality, receiving water use, potential
receptors and assimilative capacity.
After cooling process, one part of seawater cooling is used for FGD system to treat flue gas. This water
will be treated to meet industrial water discharge standard in Table 0.3.
Coastal water quality
National standards on coastal water quality QCVN 10:2008 were promulgated under Decision
No.16/2008/QD-BTNMT on 31 December 2008 by MONRE. These national standards are applied to
evaluate and control coastal water quality for purposes of sport, aquatic entertainment, aquaculture and
others. Coastal water is defined as water at gulf/bay, port/harbor and areas in the range of 3 nautical
miles from the shore (5.5km). Allowable limits of parameters in coastal water are listed in Table 0.5.

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ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


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Page 0-19
Final Report

Table 0.5 Allowable limits of parameters in coastal water (QCVN 10:2008/BTNMT)


Unit

Aquaculture &
aquatic
reservation
area

Swimming &
aquatic sport
area

Others

Project
Standards

oC

30

30

30

ALLOWABLE LIMITS
No.

Parameter

Temp.

pH

6.5 8.5

6.5 8.5

6.5 8.5

6.5 - 8.5

TSS

mg/l

50

50

50

DO

mg/l

COD

mg/l

NH4+ as N

mg/l

0.1

0.5

0.5

0.5

Fluor (F-)

mg/l

1.5

1.5

1.5

1.5

Sulphide

(S2-)

mg/l

0.005

0.01

0.01

0.01

Cyanide

(CN-)

mg/l

0.005

0.005

0.01

0.005

10

Arsenic (As)

mg/l

0.01

0.04

0.05

0.04

11

Cadmium (Cd)

mg/l

0.005

0.005

0.005

0.005

12

Lead (Pb)

mg/l

0.05

0.02

0.1

0.02

13

Chromium III (Cr3+)

mg/l

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

14

Chromium VI (Cr6+)

mg/l

0.02

0.05

0.05

0.05

15

Copper (Cu)

mg/l

0.03

0.5

1.0

0.5

16

Zinc (Zn)

mg/l

0.5

17

Manganese (Mn)

mg/l

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

18

Iron (Fe)

mg/l

0.1

0.1

0.3

0.1

19

Mercury (Hg)

mg/l

0.001

0.002

0.005

0.002

20

Hydrocarbon

mg/l

N.D

0.1

0.2

0.1

21

Total Phenol

mg/l

0.001

0.001

0.002

0.001

22

Coliform

MPN/100ml

1000

1000

1000

1000

These coastal water quality standards will be used to assess the impact of effluents discharge.

Noise
NSRP noise limits are the most stringent of Vietnamese and IFC requirements (Table 0.6).

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ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


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Page 0-20
Final Report

Table 0.6 Noise limits (dBA)


Vietnamese Noise
Standards
TCVN 5949:1998
Time

IFC Noise
Level Guidelines

Project Noise Standards

One Hour LAeq


(dBA)
07:00
22:00
22:00
07:00

One Hour LAeq


(dBA)
06:00
18:00
22:00

18:00
22:00
06:00

Receptor

06:00

18:00

18:00

22:00

22:00

06:00

Quiet Areas, including


hospitals, libraries, schools

50

45

40

Residential Areas, hotels,


offices
Residential areas
intermingled with trade,
service and manufacturing
activities
Industrial, Commercial

60

55

50

55

45

55

45

75

70

50

70

70

70

50

70

70

50

45

40

70

Noise limits for different working environments are provided in Table 0.7.
Table 0.7 Noise limits for various working environments
Location / Activity

Equivalent Level LAeq


8 Hrs in dB(A)
(TCVN 3985:1999)
85
50 - 65

Maximum LAmax.
Fast in dB(A)

Open offices, control rooms, service counters or similar

45 - 50

Individual offices (no disturbing noise)


Classrooms, lecture halls
Hospitals

45 - 50
35 - 40
30 - 35

40

Heavy Industry (no demand for oral communication)


Light industry (decreasing demand for oral communication)

110
110

Vibration
Vibration caused by the construction and operation of the facility is regulated by TCVN 6962:2001.
The allowable limits for vibration generated by light industrial facilities in nearby residential areas are
shown in Table 0.8.
Table 0.8 Allowable vibration limits (TCVN 6962:2001)
Vibration limits in
construction activity (dB(A))
Receptor
Quiet Areas, including hospitals,
libraries, schools
Residential Areas, hotels, offices
Small industrial factories intermingled
with residential areas
Notes:

Vibration limits in
production activity (dB(A))

07:00 19:00

19:00 07:00

06:00 18:00

19:00 06 :00

75

Basic Level1

60

55

75

Basic Level1

65

60

75

Basic Level1

70

65

1: Basic level is vibration level measured when facilities are not working in assessed area

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Page 0-21
Final Report

Occupational exposure limits


Predicted ground level concentrations of pollutants can be compared against occupational exposure
limits for guidance as to their relative safety.

Vietnamese legislation provides limits for in plant pollution in Decision No.3733/2002/Q-BYT,


21 Standards for hygiene, 5 rules and 7 parameters for labour hygiene.

The IFC EHS Guidelines refer to the occupational exposure limits for inside the plant boundary
set by the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). There are
Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) for 8 hour and 15 minute exposure levels.

Threshold Limit Values for the main relevant pollutants are listed in Table 0.9.
Table 0.9 Occupational exposure limits

Pollutants

H2S
SO2
NO
NO2
Particulates
CO
O3
Benzene
Toluene
Xylene

Occupational exposure limits


based on Decision
No.3733/2002/Q-BYT -2002

Occupational exposure
limits based on World
Bank Guidelines-2008

Project standards

Maximum average
concentration
(mg/m3)
STEL1
TWA2
15
10
10
5
20
10
10
5
-

Maximum average
concentration
(ppm)
STEL1
TWA2
15
10
5
2
25
5
3
Respirable 3
Inhalable - 10
25
0.05-0.2
2.5
0.5
20
150
100

Maximum average
concentration

40
0.2
15
300
300

20
0.1
5
100
100

STEL1
TWA2
3
15 mg/m
10 mg/m3
10 mg/m3
5 mg/m3
20 mg/m3
10 mg/m3
3
10 mg/m
5 mg/m3
Respirable 3
Inhalable - 10
40 mg/m3
20 mg/m3
3
0.2 mg/m
0.1 mg/m3
2.5 ppm
0.5 ppm
3
300 mg/m
92 mg/m3
300 mg/m3
100 mg/m3

Notes: 1. Short Term Exposure Limit (STEL), usually 15 minutes


2. Time Weighted Average (TWA), the recommended limit a person can be exposed to over a period of time
without causing harm, usually 8 hours

World Bank standards will take precedence, except for where the Vietnamese Standards are the more
stringent, or where there is no World Bank Standards for a substance which is regulated by Vietnamese
Standards.
Emergency response planning guidelines
Ground level concentrations under emergency conditions should be compared to the Emergency
Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) values developed by the American Industrial Hygiene
Association (AIHA). Emergency Response Planning Guideline Values listed in Table 0.10.

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Page 0-22
Final Report

Table 0.10 Emergency response planning guideline values (2009)


Species
H2S
SO2
Benzene
NO2
CO

ERPG-1
ppm
0.1
0.3
50
1
200

ERPG-2
ppm
30
3
150
15
350

ERPG-3
ppm
100
15
1000
30
500

ERPG-1 is the maximum airborne concentration below which it is believed that nearly all individuals
could be exposed for up to 1 hr without experiencing other than mild transient adverse health effects or
perceiving a clearly defined, objectionable odour.
ERPG-2 is the maximum airborne concentration below which it is believed that nearly all individuals
could be exposed for up to 1 hr without experiencing or developing irreversible or other serious health
effects or symptoms which could impair an individual's ability to take protective action.
ERPG-3 is the maximum airborne concentration below which it is believed that nearly all individuals
could be exposed for up to 1 hour without experiencing or developing life-threatening health effects.
0.2.3

Technical basis and related documents

The technical documents used in this report are supplied mainly by NSRP-LLC and the FEED design
consultants. The environmental data is carried out, measured, analyzed and assessed by CPSE.
Specially, the economic and social data is collected from the local authorities and related departments.
Detail main used documents are summarized as follows:

FEED documents of NSRP project are provided by FWEL during December, 2008 - December,
2009.

Measured Meteorological data of Project area are provided by NSRP-LLC.

Measured Meteorological data in Tinh Gia Station are provided by Southern Hydrometeorological
Center.

Baseline environmental field surveys and analytical data in the dry season and rainy season (20082009) are conducted by CPSE.

Environmental vegetation cover surveys and biodiversity assessment for the project area and the
vicinity in the radius of 10km are carried out by CPSE in cooperation with national biological experts
in August 2008.

Coral reef field surveys and investigation for the Hon Me archipelagoes are carried out by CPSE in
cooperation with Institute of Marine Environment and Resources in Hai Phong in April 2009.

Social investigation and due diligence assessment are carried out by CPSE in cooperation with
national and international consultants from August 2008 to January 2010.

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Page 0-23
Final Report

0.3 METHODOLOGY FOR EIA IMPLEMENTATION


According to official letter No.321/TTg-DK dated 4 March 2008 of Vice Prime Minister about specializing
for refinery and petrochemical projects, this EIA report is established at the same time of FEED
preparation. The structure of EIA report is complied with Appendix IV of Circular No. 05/2008/TTBTNMT of MONRE on the Guidance on Strategic Environmental Impact Assessment, Environmental
Impact Assessment and Commitment of Environmental Protection.
The main methods used in the preparation of this EIA report are as follows:
1. Statistical method: is used to treat the environmental analytical data, and the meteohydrological and socio-economic data;
2. Modeling method: is used to calculate and simulate the air emission processes, oil drifting,
dumping material dispersion and wastewater dilution and dispersion caused by project
activities. Some mathematic models are used for preparing this report including:
- Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System (ADMS) from CERC (Cambridge Environmental
Research Consultants) with the United Kingdom Meteorological Office, National Power plc
and University of Surrey is used to calculate maximum ground concentration of CO, SOx,
NOx, PM, etc. from process stacks and flares.
- Oil Drift Model is used to calculate and simulate oil drifting in the case of oil spill occurred in
Nghi Son bay.
- COMIX model is used to stimulate thermal dispersion process on water column affected by
effluent discharge.
- Mud and fluid distribution model is used to stimulate distribution of dredged materials
3. Field survey and measurement method: is used to take samples, field measure and analyze in
the laboratories (air, water, soil, sediment and biology samples) at the project area. Moreover,
this method is used to survey the vegetation cover and determine biodiversity (fauna and flora)
of the project area;
4. Scuba diving method: is used to survey and take coral samples as well as undertake
underwater video and photograph survey;
5. Social investigation method: is used to interview the authorities, departments and local
residents at the project area.
6. Comparative method: is used to evaluate environmental quality of air, soil, water, sediment and
biology in comparison with existing current Vietnamese and International environmental
standards;
During preparation process this report, the project owner has co-operated closely with CPSE and FEED
Contractor (Foster Wheeler Energy Limited (FWEL) and Royal Haskoning (RH)) and Petrovietnam in
order to ensure the compliance to environmental standards and the accuracy and consistency from the
used information. Furthermore, the project owner has co-operated closely with the local authorities,
especially Nghi Son Economic Zone Management Board, Nghi Son Refinery Management Board,
Department of Natural Resource and Environment, Agricultural and Rural Development Department,
Thanh Hoa Port Authority, Construction Department, Tinh Gia People Committee and Commune
People Committee of Hai Yen, Mai lam and Tinh Hai in assessing social impacts of the NSRP project.

NSRP LLC - CPSE/SNC Lavalin

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NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

0.4

Page 0-24
Final Report

EIA IMPLEMENTATION ORGANIZATION

According to the signed contract for provision of Environmental impact assessment (EIA) and
Environmental Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) for Nghi Son Refinery and Petrochemical Complex
Project dated 16 July 2008 between Nghi Son Refinery & Petrochemical Limited Liability Company
(NSRP-LLC) and Research Development Center for Petroleum Safety and Environment (CPSE), CPSE
is given organization having responsibility to prepare EIA, ESIA and OSCP for NSRP.
CPSE was established in November, 1993. CPSE was given licensed No.256 for registration of the
scientific and technological activities by Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment (MOSTE),
dated March 16, 1994 and was licensed on constructional consultant no 150 (July 13, 1998) by Ministry
of Construction. Besides, CPSE is the first organization of Vietnam National Oil and Gas Group to
achieve ISO 9001 certificate of quality management system issued by AFAQ-ASCERT International
dated July 2, 1999 and accreditation certificate of NDT laboratory No. 157/00CN02 and 157/00CN03,
number of laboratory: VR LAB. 08, issued by Vietnam Register Bureau, dated December 4, 2000.
CPSE is one of expertise organization in safety and environment field. Up to present, CPSE has been
prepared hundreds of environmental impact assessment reports, oil spill response plan reports and risk
assessment for petroleum industry and other industrial branches.
The contact address of CPSE consulting service is as below:
Research Development Center for Petroleum Safety and Environment
G1, 2nd floor, Thanh Da Hotel, Ward 27, Binh Thanh District, HCMC
Tel: 3 55 66 075/ 3 55 66 077
Fax: 3 55 66 076
Director: Ph.D Vu Cong Thang
EIA process starts from August 2008 to March 2010 with co-operation of many national experts and international
consultants of CPSE. Two International Environmental Consult Companies participate in preparing this EIA report
including:
1. SNC LAVALIN INC at 455, Ren-Lvesque Blvd. West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2Z 1Z3;
2. EXPERCO INTERNATIONAL LTEE at 150 Marchand Street, Suite 600, Drummondville (Qubec) J2C
4N1 CANADA
Main task of SNC LAVALIN INC is to assess society and make a plan for environmental and social management
programs as well as environmental monitoring program. This company will also be responsible for reviewing and
checking completely EIA and ESIA reports as requirement of MONRE and IFC. While, main mission of EXPERCO
INTERNATIONAL LTEE is to conduct a social investigation and assess compensation, resettlement issues and public
consultation as requirement of IFC.
List of researchers taking part to prepare this EIA report is list in Table 0.11.

NSRP LLC - CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


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Page 0-25
Final Report

Table 0.11 List of participants taking part EIA preparation for NSRP
No

Name

Position/Specialty

Mr. Toshio Esumi

HSE Senior Engineer NSRP-LCC

Responsibilities
in the project
Review report

Ms. Do Thi Thu Ha

HSE Senior Engineer NSRP-LCC

Review report

Ph.D Vu Cong Thang

Director of CPSE

Chief editor

Group for EIA report preparation


Manager of Environmental Management - Organize human and
Dept., CPSE - Engineer of Petro- material resources
- OSCP review
chemistry
- Team Leader
5
Mrs. Pham Thi Dung
Deputy Manager of Environmental
- Organize preparation
Management Dept., CPSE - Master of
- Review and edit EIA report
Science Environmental Technical
Engineering
- Organize field survey, data
6
Mrs. Le Thi Ngoc Mai
Deputy Manager of Environmental
integrated
Management Dept., CPSE Master of
- Review and edit EIA report
Science Ecological Environment
- Field survey,
7
Mr. Nguyen Ngoc Son
Expert of Environmental Management
- Data collection
Dept., CPSE - Geology bachelor - Mapping
Engineer of IT
- Prepare partly report
8
Mr. Tran Phi Hung
Expert of Environmental Management
Dept., CPSE - Engineer Petrochemical
Engineer
9
Mrs. Tran Thi Tu Anh
Expert of Environmental Management
Dept., CPSE - Engineer environmental
chemistry
10
Mrs. Thai Cam Tu
Expert of Environmental Management
Dept., CPSE - Master of Environmental
Technical Engineering
11
Mrs. Dinh Thi Nguyet Expert of Environmental Management
Minh
Dept., CPSE - Geology bachelor
12
Nguyen Dinh Phong
Expert of Environmental Management
Dept., CPSE - Environmental Engineer
13
Mrs. Do Thi Son Huong Deputy Manager of Safety Management
Prepare risk assessment and
Dept., CPSE Master of Economic
working environment
14
Mrs. Nguyen Thi Thuy
Expert of Environmental Management
Data treatment and modeling
Dept., CPSE - Engineer of IT
15
Mr. Dinh Quang Bao
Expert of Environmental Management
Dept., CPSE - Engineer of IT
16
Mr. Duong Dinh Nam
Expert of Environmental Management Prepare OSRP
Dept., CPSE - Environmental Engineer
Group for Environmental Baseline Survey Field sampling and analysis (physio-chemical and
biological parameters) prepare baseline survey report
17
Mr. Tran Khanh Tung
Manager of Environmental Chemistry Organize human and material
Dept. CPSE - Petrochemical Engineer
resources in Envi. Chemistry
Dept.- Review baseline survey
report
4

Mr. Dao Duy Manh

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June, 2010

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No
18
19
20
21
22
23

24
25

Page 0-26
Final Report

Responsibilities
in the project
Mrs. Bui Hong Diem
Deputy Manager of Envi. Chemistry Dept. Review Baseline survey
CPSE - Petrochemical Engineer
report
Mr. Nguyen Van Mai
Deputy Manager of Envi. Chemistry Dept. Organize human and material
CPSE - Engineer Chemistry Engineer
resources in Environmental
Chemistry Dept.
Mr. Phan Nhu Dinh
Deputy Manager of Envi. Chemistry Dept Team leader baseline
CPSE - Petrochemical Engineer
surveys
Mr. Truong Thong
Expert of Environmental Chemistry Dept. Prepare partly Baseline
CPSE Biological Engineer
survey report
Mrs. Nguyen T.Van Anh Expert of Environmental Chemistry Dept Prepare partly Baseline
CPSE - Chemistry Engineer
survey report
Mrs. Hoang Minh Thao
Manager of Biology lab.
Organize human and material
resources in Biology Lab.
Review and check biological
result.
Mr. Doan Dang Phi
Deputy Manager of Biological Lab. Measure, sampling air,
water, sediment and biology.
Cong
Master of biology
Mr. Dinh Van Hai
Expert of Biological Lab. Bachelor of Analysis environmental
parameters in Lab.
biology
And many Engineers, experts carried out field sampling and analysis in lab.

Name

Position/Specialty

Consultant and Collaborator


26

Prof.Ph.D
Huynh

Dang

Huy National Biological Expert

27

Ph.D Tran Ngoc Ninh

National Biological Expert

28

Ph.D Le Tran Chan

National Biological Expert

29

M.Sc. Le Xuan Tuong

Biological Expert

30

Prof. Ph.D Pham Thuoc

National Biological Expert

31

Ph.D Do Cong Thung National Coral Expert


and others

Report review
32
Mr. Jean Noel Duff

NSRP LLC - CPSE/SNC Lavalin

International Consultant (EIA report) SNC Lavalin


-

Fauna Field survey


Review terrestrial fauna
biodiversity report
Flora Field survey
Evaluation of biodiversity
in term of terrestrial Flora
ecosystem
Flora Field survey
Evaluation of
biodiversity in term of
terrestrial ecosystem
(Flora)
Assessment of existing
biodiversity of terrestrial
fauna
Evaluation Marine
resources
Field survey and coral
investigation
Evaluation on coral in
Hon Me archipelago
Social assessment
Review EIA report

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

No

Name

Position/Specialty

33

Mr. Pierre Arnoux

34

Mr. Dang Huu Luu

International Consultant (compensation and resettlement) SNC Lavalin


National Resettlement Expert
-

NSRP LLC - CPSE/SNC Lavalin

Page 0-27
Final Report

Responsibilities
in the project
Compensation and
resettlement assessment
Public consultation
Review report
Carry out Social
investigation
Due diligence survey and
assessment
Public consultation

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Page 1-1
Final Report

1.

Section
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
1.1. PROJECT NAME

Nghi Son Refinery and Petrochemical Complex Project (NSRP)


1.2. PROJECT OWNER
Project Owner of the NSRP project is the Joint Venture among Petrovietnam (PVN), Idemitsu Kosan Co., Ltd.(IKC),
Mitsui Chemicals Inc (MCI) and the Kuwait Petroleum International (KPI). The Joint Venture was given the Investigation
Certificate No 262022000036.by the Nghi Son Economic Zone Management Board on 14 April 2008. The official name
and contact address of project Owner are listed as below:
Project Owner name:

NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL LIMITED LIABILITY


COMPANY (NSRP-LLC)

General Director:

Mr. HIDETO MURAKAMI

Address:

05 th floor PetroVietnam Building


18 Lang Ha Street., Ba Dinh District
Hanoi Vietnam

1.3

Tel. number:

+84 (43) 377 26 4 26

Fax. Number:

+84 (43) 377 26 4 27

GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION

The NSRP project is located in the Nghi Son Economic Zone, Tinh Gia District, Thanh Hoa Province. It
is 200 km south of from Hanoi and about 80 km north of Vinh City (Nghe An Province). Total onshore
area is about 394 ha and offshore area is about 259ha (Figure 1-1), including:
1. Onshore constructions:
Main Refinery Plant (Area B, 328ha)
Onshore Pipeline (Area E, 30ha)
Marine harbour (Area J, 36ha)
2. Offshore constructions:
Exported berths, access channel, breakwater and intake channel (193ha)
Crude oil pipeline (35ha)
SPM (31ha)
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Page 1-2
Final Report

Figure 1-1

NSRP LLC - CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

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NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Page 1-3
Final Report

Figure 1-2 Locations of areas in NSRP

Table 1-1 Locations of main area of NSRP


Area
Refinery Plant
(Area B)
Crude Oil Pipeline
(Area E)
Marine Harbour
(Area J)
SPM

Point
C
F
G
H
V
U
G
G
T
G
R
S

Latitude N
19o 21 17
19o 21 31
19o 22 18
19o 22 10
19o 22 07
19o 22 13
19o 22 24
19o 22 18
19o 21 38
19o 22 24
19o 22 25
19o 21 41
19o 21 59.48

Longitude E
105o 45 33
105o 46 49
105o 46 39
105o 45 53
105o 46 41
105o 47 11
105o 47 08
105o 46 39
105o 47 25
105o 47 08
105o 47 14
105o 47 33
106o 05 57.57

Detailed description of each area position and relationship to surrounding objects are presented in
below section.

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1.3.1

Page 1-4
Final Report

Plant location

Plant site is 328ha located in area of 3 communes: Mai Lam, Hai Yen and Tinh Hai. The elevation of
the existing ground varies from +0.5m to +3.5m (National Datum). A small section of the plant site is
separated by Coc Mountain which has a peak elevation of +83m. The majority of the land planned to be
occupied by the NSRP Complex is agricultural land and homesteads. Plant site is contiguous to:

In the North side, the plant is next to Tinh Hai and Mai Lam Communes;
In the South side, the plant is next to populated area of Hai Yen Commune;
In the East side, the plant is next to populated area of Hai Yen Commune (Area C);
In the West side, the plant is located next to Provincial Road 513 connecting from National
Highway 1A to Nghi Son integrated Port. Close to right side of 513 road is Cam and Chuot Chu
Mountains.

In general, plant site is near by residential areas of Hai Yen, Mai Lam and Tinh Hai Communes. When
project comes into operation, there still have local houses living close to plant boundary toward the
northern part. The NSRP-LLC has proposed to Vietnam Government to move all houses in the East
side of the plant before project entering operation phase. However, according to master plan of NSEZ
to 2025, all local houses living around plant will be allocated to farther area. At that time, the farthest
distance from plant to residential area will be about 1.7km toward to the North.
The North side of the Plant is 1.2 1.5km away from Lach Bang River system. Main aquacultural area
of Tinh Gia District locates along Lach Bang banks. There is a rivulet, namely Dap Ngoai starting from
Chuot Chu Mountain to Lach Bang River runs across Plant site, but it will be filled up. And 6-7km away
from the South side of the Plant, there is Yen Hoa River springs from Xuoc Mountain and Bang Me
Mountain belonging to Hai Thuong and Hai Ha Communes to Nghi Son harbour area (PTSC port now).
In project area, there is a Provincial Road namely 513 connecting PTSC Port to National Road 1A with
10km in length. Moreover, communal roads run nearly parallel with seashore from Hai Yen Commune
to Tinh Hai and Hai Binh Communes.
At present, in radius of 7.5km of project site, there is a Paper Powder Mill in the Northern part of Mai
Lam Commune, Nghi Son Cement Factory, PTSC Port and Vinashin Shipyard in the South which
belong to Hai Ha and Hai Thuong Communes. In the future, a 1,800MW Nghi Son Power Center will
also be established in the opposite of PTSC Port.
In order to secure the safety in the area during construction and operation phase and to get space
required for temporary site gathering equipment and materials in the construction phase, NSRP has
proposed to the Government and Peoples Committee of Thanh Hoa Province to make clearance of
area C (between area B the Plant site and area J the Harbour) for this Project.
1.3.2

Onshore Pipeline System

Coordinates of onshore pipeline system layout are presented in Table 1-1. A pipeline system (Figure 1-2, Area E) will be
installed to transfer crude oil to the Refinery and route products from the Plant to the Harbour. Total area of onshore
pipeline system is about 30ha and 1.5km in length, 350m in width. Topography of this area is very flat and mainly
residential land, product land (peanut, sesame, etc.) and small part of protective forest land of Hai Yen Commune.

NSRP LLC - CPSE/SNC Lavalin

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1.3.3

Page 1-5
Final Report

Harbour Location

The Nghi Son Harbour area will be located between the geographical coordinates:
N19 22' 12, E 105 46' 12, and
N 19 21' 18, E 105 48' 54.
Detailed coordinates of the Harbour layout are presented in Table 1-1. Harbour area is located in Trung
Hau Ward, Hai Yen Commune. This harbour is used to transport super size and super weight
equipments in construction phase and export products by seaway. This area is along the shore
consisting of protective forest to prevent erosion and without population.
The harbour location is sited at the Refinery Landfall to the east of plant site and north of an existing
Nghi Son Cement jetty (Figure 1-3). Total onshore area of the harbour is about 36 ha (area J in Figure
1-2).
The harbour access route will generally run in an east-northeast direction passing some kilometers
away from the offshore Hon Me Archipelagoes.

Figure 1-3 General Layout of Marine Facilities

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ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


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1.3.4

Page 1-6
Final Report

SPM Location

The offshore SPM is located at coordinates N19o 21 59.48; E 106o 05 57.57 and in a deeper natural water depth of
27m at the east side of Hon Me Island at about 33.5 km from the harbour site (Figure 1-3).
1.3.5

Crude Oil Pipeline Location

A pipeline system will be built to bring the crude oil import from SPM to the refinery.
Approx 35 km double crude oil pipeline links the crude oil tank farm and the SPM of which approx
33.5km is sub-sea and the 1.5 km rest onshore. The onshore crude pipeline route will go in the same
pipeline corridor of product pipeline system.
1.4

MAIN CONTENTS OF NSRP PROJECT

The Nghi Son Refinery and Petrochemical (NSRP) Project is designed to process 200,000 BPSD. A maximum of 0.5%
by volume water is assumed to be present in the crude. As designed configuration, NSRP can process of 100% Kuwait
Export Crude (KEC) oil or mixture of 85% Kuwait Export Crude Oil and 15% Murban Crude Oil.
The design will incorporate features for optimizing energy utilization and heat recovery consistent with product
fractionation.
All technologies applied for NSRP are state-of-art and worldwide application in refinery and
petrochemical industry. The project has been designed to comply with most stringent of Vietnamese
Standards and World Bank/IFC guidelines. The modern technology employed for pollution abatements
are as follows:

State of the art Flue Gas Desulphurisation for boiler flue gases (do not use chemicals and
produce pollutants);

RFCC CO Incinerator

RFCC Flue Gas Scrubber (De-SOx)

RFCC flue gas DeNOx

SCOT Tail Gas Treatment in the Sulphur Recovery Unit to attain sulphur recovery

Use of Low NOx and Ultra-Low NOx burners for process heaters and HMU

Tertiary treatment of aqueous effluent

Location of effluent discharge sea outfall pipeline based on computer modeling for thermal
plume

The Refinery capacity is based on an average of 8,320 hours operation per year giving an operating
factor of 0.95. The target operating factor will be 0.97. The design of NSRP includes all process units,
supported utilities, offsite facilities and infrastructure (Figure 1-4).

NSRP LLC - CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

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Page 1-7
Final Report

Figure 1.4 Nghi Son Refinery and Petrochemical Complex Plot Plant
NSRP LLC - CPSE/SNC Lavalin

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Page 1-8
Final Report

The refinery and petrochemical complex consists of 15 licensed process units by world-wide famous suppliers (Figure
1.5 and Table 1.2).

Figure 1.5 Licensed Process Units


Table 1.2 process units and designer/Licensor supplier
No.

Process unit

Refinery Process Units


1
Crude Distillation Unit (CDU)
2
LPG Recovery Unit (LRU)
3
LPG Treatment Unit (LTU)
4
Kerosene Hydrodesulphuriser (KHDS)
5
Gas Oil Hydrodesulphuriser (GOHDS)
6
Residue Hydrodesulphuriser (RHDS)
7
Residue Fluid Catalytic Cracker (RFCC)
8
RFCC Light Gasoline Treater Unit
9
RFCC LPG Treater Unit
10
Propylene Recovery Unit (PRU)
11
Indirect Alkylation Unit (InAlk)
Petrochemical Process Units
12
Polypropylene unit (PPU)
13
Naphtha and Aromatics Complex (NAC)
NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

Designer/Licensor
Foster Wheeler
Foster Wheeler
UOP
Axens
Axens
Chevron Lummus
Axens
UOP
UOP
Axens
UOP
Misui Chemicals
UOP
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No.

Process unit

Hydrogen Units
14
Hydrogen Manufacturing Unit (HMU)
15
Hydrogen Compression and Distribution system (HCDS)
Sulphur Processing Units
16
Sour Water Stripper unit (SWS)
17
Amine Regeneration Unit (ARU)
18
Sulphur Recovery Unit (SRU)
19
Tail Gas Treating Unit (TGT)

Page 1-9
Final Report

Designer/Licensor
Foster Wheeler
Foster Wheeler
Foster Wheeler
Foster Wheeler
JACOBS
JACOBS

The utility facilities include tanks system for feedstocks plus intermediate and final products. In addition, it is designed to
meet the refinerys demands for cooling water, fuels, power, steam, water, chemicals instrument and plant air, inert gas,
ETP, flare, etc.
Offsite facilities include SPM, pipelines, product jetties, road tanker for loading and unloading feedstock and products.
1.4.1

REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL CAPACITY

1.4.1.1 Material Balance


Overall material balance for Nghi Son refinery is based on processing of 100% Kuwait Export Crude (KEC) oil feedstock
with 200,000 barrels-per-stream-day (BPSD). Overall Refinery Mass Balance for Base Case RFCC Max Propylene
Operation Mode is shown in Table 1.3.
Table 1.3 Overall Refinery Mass Balance for Base Case RFCC Max Propylene Operation Mode
Parameters
Crude Oil
Fuel Gas to Process Unit Furnaces
LPG to Export
LPG to Gas Turbines
LPG to Heat Recovery Turbines
Benzene
Paraxylene
Gasoline 92 RON
Gasoline 95 RON
Kerosene / Jet
Polypropylene
Diesel Premium
Diesel Regular
Fuel Oil to boilers and RFCC CO boiler
Carbon on RFCC Catalyst
Sulphur Product
Loss

Output (Ton/day)
27,867
1,242
104
555
115
710
1,974
3,314
3,314
1,707
1,075
6,357
4,238
1,003
805
717
637

Source: Provided by NSRP LLC, June 2010.


NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

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Page 1-10
Final Report

1.4.1.2 Designed Capacities for Process Units


The designed capacities for individual process units have been determined based on:

The annual material balances presented above plus consideration of appropriate on-stream factors for
determination of stream-days

Design margins to allow for design uncertainties and flexible operation.

The refinery is required to operate continuously for a minimum period of four (04) years, between major turnarounds
albeit that some process units may require interim shutdowns for catalyst change-out, etc. Based on the turnaround
frequency and other factors, on-stream factor of plant is 0.95 (8,320 hours per year).
The design of the Nghi Son refinery and petrochemical project is based on established technologies whose
performances are both predictable and well proven in operation, meaning that no significant variations are expected to
be found between predicted performance and actual performance in the field. As a result, the operation of the refinery
and hence the generation of income is very unlikely to be constrained by an unexpected bottleneck in a part of the
process scheme. However, +10% margin on capacity is included for design purposes.
Operating flexibility is accounted for in two main ways:

The specification of alternative operating cases/modes for specific process units (e.g. gasoline and propylene
modes for the RFCC, and start-of-run and end-of-run cases for other catalytic units);

The incorporation of design margins in the design of specific items of equipment or sub-systems (e.g. pump
capacity) to provide sufficient flexibility for regulatory control and/or on-line maintenance.

Nameplate capacity is defined on the conventional basis of barrels-per-stream-day (BPSD) measured at 15C which
represents actual maximum unit throughput when the unit is in full operation under design conditions. The main unit
capacities are presented in Table 1.4.
Table 1.4 Main Unit Capacities of Nghi Son Refinery and Petrochemical Complex
UNITS

CAPACITY
Daily (BPSD)

REMARKS
Annual (KTA)

Crude Distillation Unit

200,000

9,660

LPG Recovery Unit

2,413

Saturated LPG Treater

6,500

201

Kerosene Hydrodesulphuriser

20,000

872

Gas Oil Hydrodesulphuriser

60,000

2,906

Residue Hydrodesulphuriser

105,000

5,695

Residue Fluid Catalytic Cracker

80,000

4,135

RFCC LPG Treater

43,000

1,326

RFCC Light Gasoline Treater

24,000

888

Indirect Alkylation

21,500

707

Based on FEED

Naphtha Hydrotreater

54,100

2,130

Incl. raffinate recycle

Isomerisation (Penex)

23,400

843

Incl. DIH recycle

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ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


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UNITS

CAPACITY
Daily (BPSD)

Catalytic Reformer

Page 1-11
Final Report

REMARKS
Annual (KTA)

39,700

1,615

Based on HN FEED

Aromatics (Benzene)

248

Benzene product

Aromatics (Paraxylene)

794

PX product

Polypropylene

1,154 TPD

400

PP product

Hydrogen Manufacturing Unit (Note A)

195.8 Nm/h

145

Hydrogen product (Note A)

Amine Regeneration Unit

789 m/h

Lean amine circulation (Note B)

Sour Water Stripper Train 1

184.4 m/h

Sour water FEED (Note B)

Sour Water Stripper Train 2

90.2 m/h

Sour water FEED (Note B)

Sulphur Recovery Unit

3 x 320 TPD

Sulphur product (Note C)

Tail Gas Treating Unit

2 x 640 TPD

Note D

Source: FEED Doc. 3550-8110-PD-0005 provided by FWL on 28 December 2009


Notes
A.
Expressed as 100% hydrogen. The centralised Hydrogen Compression and Distribution System (HCDS)
distribute hydrogen to consumers.
B.
Volumetric flow rate @ 15 C.
C.
SRU has 3 x 40% trains ( 120%).
D.
TGT is part of the SRU and is configured as 2 x 80% trains.

The design capacities of the main process units have been established as following:
1. Crude Distillation Unit (CDU)
The nameplate capacity of the Crude Distillation Unit is 200,000 BPSD which corresponds to the
nameplate capacity of the refinery. No additional design margin is included to cover, for instance,
handling of different feedstocks or rerunning of off-spec products.
2. LPG Recovery Unit
The LPG Recovery Unit processes feed streams from the CDU and several other units. The
nameplate capacity for the unit (2,404 KTA) is based on a summation of the various feed streams
on the assumption that all units are operating at their design capacity, and considering differences
between start-of-run and end-of-run.
3. Saturated LPG Treater Unit
The nameplate capacity of this unit (6,500 BPSD) corresponds to the mixed LPG yield from the
LPG Recovery Unit.
4. Kerosene Hydrodesulphuriser Unit
The nameplate capacity of the KHDS unit (20,000 BPSD) is based on processing all the straightrun kerosene produced by the CDU.
5. Gas Oil Hydrodesulphuriser Unit (GOHDS)
The nameplate capacity of the GOHDS unit (60,000 BPSD) is based on processing all the straightrun gas oil produced by the CDU plus all the light cycle oil (LCO) produced by the RFCC.
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6. Residue Hydrodesulphuriser Unit (RHDS)


The nameplate capacity of the RHDS unit (105,000 BPSD) is based on processing the entire
atmospheric residue produced in the CDU. However, since the RHDS unit has an annual catalyst
replacement cycle during which atmospheric residue feed is stored, the selected nameplate
capacity includes an adequate margin to permit drawdown of the stored feed over an extended
period for co-processing with direct feed from the CDU.
7. Residue Fluid Catalytic Cracker Unit (RFCC)
The nameplate capacity of the RFCC unit (80,000 BPSD) is set equivalent to the yield of
atmospheric residue from the CDU less the conversion loss in the RHDS based on start-of-run
conditions. Note that the nameplate capacity does not quite match the actual stream-day output of
the RHDS because the RHDS nameplate capacity is marginally increased to account for downtime
for catalyst regeneration.
8. RFCC LPG Treater
The nameplate capacity of the RFCC LPG Treater corresponds to the production rate of amine
treated mixed LPG from the RFCC gas plant when the RFCC is operating in maximum propylene
mode.
9. RFCC Light Gasoline Treater
The nameplate capacity of the RFCC Light Gasoline Treater corresponds to the production rate of
light gasoline from the gasoline splitter in the RFCC when the RFCC is operating in maximum
gasoline mode.
10. Polypropylene Unit (PPU)
The nameplate capacity of the PPU corresponds to the design production rate of propylene from
the propylene recovery section of the RFCC. The resultant polypropylene product output of 400
KTPA falls within the maximum capacity limit of a single train PPU.
11. Naphtha and Aromatics Complex (NAC)
The design throughput of the NAC is based on the yield of fresh full-range naphtha from the
naphtha stabiliser in the LPG Recovery Unit. This stream comprises straight-run naphtha from the
CDU plus naphtha from the GOHDS and the RHDS units. This stream is fed to the Naphtha
Hydrotreater (NHT) unit together with a raffinate stream recycled from the Aromatics Extraction
(Sulpholane) unit. The resultant nameplate capacity of the NHT is 54,100 BPSD.
12. Hydrogen Manufacturing Unit (HMU)
The determining case which establishes the nameplate capacity of the HMU is the upset scenario
when the Catalytic Reformer (and hence the whole of the Aromatics Complex) is shutdown while
the remainder of the refinery, including the KHDS, GOHDS and RHDS units, is operating at
minimum throughput of 50% under end-of-run conditions. In this case, the HMU is the only source
of hydrogen treat gas for the refinery and the requirement is 195.8 Nm/hr of hydrogen (on a 100%
purity basis). During normal refinery operation at 100% throughput, the Catalytic Reformer provides
a significant yield of hydrogen which allows the HMU to operate at approx. 75% of design capacity.
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13. Indirect Alkylation Unit (InAlk)


The nameplate capacity of the InAlk unit is set to match the yield of C4 from the C3/C4 Splitter in the
RFCC unit when the RFCC is operating in maximum propylene mode.
14. Amine Regeneration Unit (ARU)
The common ARU handles the circulating amine solvent demands of all amine
absorbers/extractors within the refinery with the exception of those located in the RFCC complex
(which are served by a separate RFCC amine system). The nameplate capacity is based on a
summation of solvent demands defined by the designers of each absorber/extractor.
15. Sour Water Stripper Unit (SWS)
The SWS is configured as two independent trains. The design feed rate of sour water to each train
is based on a summation of the various sour water feed component streams plus a +10% capacity
margin for SWS-1 and 30% margin for SWS-2 to allow for design uncertainty and to provide
operating flexibility.
16. Sulphur Recovery Unit (SRU)
The SRU is configured as three (03) parallel Claus trains. The overall sulphur production rate is
based on a calculation of the sulphur yield from processing 200,000 BPSD of fresh Kuwait Export
Crude Oil plus an allowance for the additional sulphur yield from the RHDS unit due to coprocessing of cold residue feed, less an allowance for sulphur lost in products. The estimated
theoretical yield of sulphur is 800 TPD. The SRU is configured as 3 x 40% trains (i.e. 320 tpd each).
The tail gas treating and incinerator section is configured as 2 x 80% trains (i.e. each train handles
tail gas equivalent to 640 TPD of sulphur production).
Sulphur feed to the SRU arrives in the form of acid gases from both the common ARU and the ARU
in the RFCC, plus acid gases from the SWS trains.
1.4.2

FEEDSTOCK AND PRODUCTS

1.4.2.1 Feedstock
The feedstock of Nghi Son refinery and petrochemical Complex is 100% Kuwait imported Crude Oil. The oil quality is
good for refining. The Kuwait Crude Oil specifications are presented in Table 1.5.
Table 1.5 Technical Characteristics of the Kuwait Crude
Parameters
Gravity
Specific gravity
Density
K Factor
Sulfur
Mercaptan Sulfur
H2S
Nitrogen
Basic Nitrogen
Con Carbon
NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

Unit

Crude

Balance*

API
60/60
Kg/dm3

29.9
0.8765
0.8760
11.84
2.65
135.0
<1
930.0
372.0
6.11

30.2
0.8752

WT%
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
WT%

2.64
956.2
394.6
6.21
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Parameters

Unit

Crude

Page 1-14
Final Report

Balance*

Ash
WT%
0.00
Asphaltenes
WT%
2.50
Wax Content
WT%
3.80
Iron
ppm
0.7
Nickel
ppm
10.1
Vanadium
ppm
31.1
Sodium
ppm
3.3
Pour Pt.
Deg C
<-36
Salt
PTB
10.5
Reid Vapor Pressure
kPa
26.2
TAN
mgKOH/g
0.18
Water
VOL%
0.000
Kin.Viscosity@
cSt
15.5oC
cSt
22.73
o
20 C
cSt
37.8oC
cSt
11.41
40oC
cSt
8.88
50oC
cSt
60oC
Source: FEED Doc. 3550-8110-PD-0003 REV D3 provided by FWL on 28 December 2009
Note: (*) Analytical values are gotten from phases after crude oil distillation process.

10.9
31.5

27.02
22.65
12.36
11.57
8.79
6.89

Feedstock chosen to process is Kuwait Export Crude Oil, mixing of many kinds of crude oil from many oil fields.
Furthermore, Kuwait is one of projects partner contributing financial to the Project. So, Kuwait ensures that the Complex
will be supplied enough crude oil to operate for 25 years. Hence, it may be affirmed that Kuwait Export Crude Oil is a
stable and long-term source of supply.
1.4.2.2 Project Products
Products of NSRP are as follows:
Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)
Gasoline RON 92 & 95
Kerosene and Jet Fuel
Diesel Premium and Regular
Fuel Oil
Benzene
Paraxylene
Polypropylene
Sulphur
In general, pollutants concentrations in products of the Project are lower than Vietnamese Fuel Standards in force.
Table 1.6 Products Quality Standard of the Project
Characteristic
LPG
Gasoline

S
RON
S

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

ppm weight
ppm weight

Project Standard

TCVN

100
92/95
50

140
90/92/95
500
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Characteristic
Kerosene
Diesel
Fuel Oil

Pb
Benzene
S
S
S

g/l
% volume
% weight
ppm weight
% weight

Page 1-15
Final Report

Project Standard

TCVN

0
1.0
0.1
50/350
1.0

0.013
2.5
0.3
500/2,500
2.0/3.5

Source: NSRP LLC, June 2010

1.4.3

TECHNOLOGY PROCESS

The overall diagram of Base case mass balance of NSRP project is showed in Figure 1.6.
1.4.3.1 Refinery Process Units
1.4.3.1.1 Crude Distillation Unit (CDU)
The design of the CDU is consistent with the overall refinery objective of maximising distillates and minimising residue.
The design incorporates flexibility in distillate production, will allow for minor variations in feed quality, and will enable
consequent flexibility in refinery blending operations.
Design case CDU feedstock is based on 100% Kuwait Export crude. A maximum of 0.5% by volume water is
assumed to be present in the crude. Design Cases is considered as follows:
Base Case: CDU will be designed for TBP cut points and products specifications.
Maximum Kerosene Case: CDU will be capable to produce a wider range of kerosene draw of acceptable
quality in order to take advantage of market changes. This corresponds to an increase in kerosene production
of 17%.
Minimum Kerosene Case: CDU will be able to increase wild naphtha production at the expense of kerosene
cut in order to maximise profits in the Aromatics Complex.
Cold Reflux Case: CDU will have the flexibility to operate with 5 wt% cold reflux ratio (cold naphtha/hot top
pumparound). This facility consists of wild naphtha stream from the column overhead receiver routed into the
top pumparound return.
CDU will operate under this scenario during start-up, cleaning and off-design operation.
Crude oil will be preheated against product and pumparound streams before being routed to a fired heater. Primary
fractionation will be carried out in the preflash vessel/ main crude column fractionator and associated side stream
strippers. Overhead naphtha will be further stabilised in the naphtha stabiliser column in the LPG Recovery Unit.
Products will be cooled and rundown to product blending, intermediate storage, or further processing as appropriate.
The CDU unit will produce the following streams:

A sour overheads gas stream routed to the LPG Recovery Unit.


A full-range unstabilised naphtha stream routed to the LPG Recovery Unit for further processing.
A kerosene stream routed to the Kerosene Hydrodesulphuriser Unit (KHDS) and to product blending.
A combined gas oil stream routed to the Gas Oil Hydrodesulphurisation Unit (GOHDS) or to GOHDS
intermediate tankage.
An atmospheric residue stream routed to the Residue Hydrodesulphurisation Unit (RHDS) or to RHDS
intermediate tanks.

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Figure 1.6 Overall Mass Balance Base case

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Page 1-17
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1.4.3.1.2 LPG Recovery Unit (LRU)


The LPG Recovery Unit is designed as a common saturated gas plant to collect and process saturated feed streams
(offgas, LPG and naphtha). These streams will be feeded by many sources such as CDU, Naphtha Hydrotreater, CCR,
Isomerisation Unit and three (03) Hydrodesulphuriser Units (KHDS, GOHDS & RHDS).
The LPG Recovery Unit is designed to:

Collect off-gas, LPG and Naphtha streams from the CDU and other Process Units;

Produce an Off-gas stream for use in the Refinery Fuel Gas System after hydrogen sulphide removal;

Produce a mixed LPG product stream, after removal of hydrogen sulphide and water washing, for routing to
the licensed Saturated LPG Treatment Unit which removes mercaptan sulphur components;

Receive the sweet mixed LPG stream from the above Treatment Unit for stabilisation in a Deethaniser and
subsequent separation in a Depropaniser to produce C3 and C4 LPG streams, which are routed to LPG
storage;

Produce stabilised full-range naphtha which is routed as feedstock to the Naphtha Hydrotreater Unit;

Produce a sour water stream which is routed to the Sour Water Stripper Unit;

Produce a rich amine stream which is routed to the Amine Regeneration Unit.

1.4.3.1.3 Saturated LPG Treater Unit (LTU)


The unit is designed to process mixed LPG feedstock from the amine extractor in the LPG Recovery Unit to produce
treated LPG with a maximum total mercaptans sulphur content of 5 ppm wt. The unit design includes facilities for spent
caustic treatment and recycle. The treated LPG product returns to the LPG Recovery Unit for C3 / C4 separation.
The following by-products are expected to be produced in the Saturated LPG Treater Unit:

Foul Air to the CDU Heaters or RFCC CO Boiler or Incinerators located at the Sulphur Recovery Unit or HC
Flare;
Disulphide Oil (DSO) to Naphtha Hydrotreating Unit (NHT) or Slop Tank;
Spent Caustic and Wastewater to the Effluent Treatment Plant.

1.4.3.1.4 Kerosene Hydrodesulphuriser Unit (KHDS)


The Kerosene Hydrodesulphuriser Unit (KHDS) processes the kerosene fraction from the Crude
Distillation Unit (CDU) and produces desulphurised Kerosene /Jet Fuel with max. 50 ppm wt sulphur
content and max. 0.003 %wt mercaptan sulphur content.
The Unit also produces a number of by-product streams:

Unstabilised Naphtha, which is sent to the Crude Distillation Unit


Sour off-gas sent to the LPG Recovery Unit.
Sour water sent to the Sour Water Stripping Unit (SWS-1).

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1.4.3.1.5 Gas Oil Hydrodesulphuriser (GOHDS)


The Gasoil Hydrodesulphuriser Unit (GOHDS) processes atmospheric Gas Oil from the Crude
Distillation Unit (CDU) and Light Cycle Oil from the RFCC. The unit desulphurises these feeds to
produce low sulphur (max 50 ppm wt) diesel blendstock.
The Unit also produces a number of by-product streams:

Unstabilised Naphtha sent to the Crude Distillation Unit;


Treated off- gas sent to the LPG Recovery Unit;
Sweet gas to the HCDS for hydrogen recovery in a PSA;
Sour water sent to the Sour Water Stripping Unit (SWS-1).

This unit will incorporate to amine absorber for removal of H2S from sour offgas and recycle gas. The amine solvent will
be MDEA. Lean amine will be supplied from a central Amine Regeneration unit.
1.4.3.1.6 Residue Hydrodesulphuriser Unit (RHDS)
The RHDS is designed to process atmospheric residue from the Crude Distillation Unit to produce a
feedstock suitable for processing in a downstream RFCC. The unit produces the following product
streams:

Desulphurised atmospheric residue to the RFCC


Unstabilised Naphtha to the LPG Recovery Unit
Desulphurised RHDS diesel to the diesel pool.

The Unit also produces the following by-products:


Off-gas from the product recovery section to the LPG Recovery Unit
Off-gas from the reactor section to HCDS for hydrogen recovery.
This unit will incorporate to amine absorber for removal of H2S from sour offgas and recycle gas. The amine solvent will
be MDEA. Lean amine will be supplied from a central Amine Regeneration unit.
1.4.3.1.7 Residue Fluid Catalytic Cracker Unit (RFCC)
The RFCC is designed to process the RHDS residue stream received from the Residue
Hydrodesulphuriser (RHDS). The RFCC is designed for two modes of operation: maximum olefin
(propylene) and maximum gasoline.
The Unit produces the following product streams:

An amine treated LPG stream. This LPG stream will be caustic treated (RFCC LPG Treater) to
remove Mercaptans. The mercaptan free LPG will be routed back to the RFCC C3/C4 splitter.

After mercaptan removal, the LPG stream will be split to produce a propylene stream to the
Polypropylene Unit, a mixed butane stream to Indirect Alkylation Unit, and a propane stream to
the LPG pool.

Light FCC gasoline (LFG) to the gasoline pool via caustic merox treating.

Heavy FCC gasoline (HFG) to the gasoline pool.

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Light cycle oil (LCO) product to the Gas Oil Hydrodesulphurisation Unit and/or fuel oil

Clarified Oil (CLO) product to refinery fuel oil

The Unit also produces the following by-products:

Treated off-gas sent to the refinery fuel gas system;


Sour water sent to Sour Water Stripping Unit (SWS-2);
Regenerator flue gas which is sent to atmosphere via a stack.

The RFCC unit includes dedicated amine absorber/extractor/regenerator facilities to serve the RFCC complex only.
1.4.3.1.8 RFCC LPG Treater
This Unit is designed to process LPG feedstock from the RFCC unit after amine scrubbing. The Unit
produces treated LPG with a maximum total mercaptans content of 3 ppm wt with maximum total
sulphur of 10 ppmw. Spent caustic treatment includes the spent caustic from RFCC Light Gasoline
Treater Unit for treatment.. Regenerated caustic shall be recycled back to the extraction section.
The following by-products are produced by the RFCC LPG Treater:

Foul Air to the CDU Heaters or RFCC CO Incinerator or Incinerators located at the Sulphur
Recovery Unit (SRU) or HC Flare.
Disulphide Oil (DSO) to Naphtha Hydrotreating Unit (NHT) or Slop Tank.
Spent Caustic & Waste water to the Effluent Treatment Plant.

1.4.3.1.9 RFCC light Naphtha Treater


The primary objective of the Residue Fluidised Catalytic Cracker (RFCC) Light Gasoline Treater Unit is
to reduce the Mercaptan and total sulphur content and remove H2S from the light gasoline obtained
from the RFCC.
The product will meet the quality requirement to produce treated light gasoline with a maximum total
sulphur specification of 35 ppmw (for feed containing 55 ppmw RSH-S) and 25 ppmw (for feed
containing 15 ppmw RSH-S).
The following by-products are expected to be produced the RFCC Light Gasoline Treater:

Spent Caustic & Waste Water to the Effluent Treatment Plant.

1.4.3.1.10 Propylene Recovery Unit (PRU)


The Propylene Recovery Unit (PRU) is designed to recover high-purity propylene from the mixed C3 feedstock received
from the RFCC.
The propylene product is fed forward to the Polypropylene Unit (PPU). The PRU also produces a propane by-product
stream which is routed to LPG product blending and storage.

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Page 1-20
Final Report

1.4.3.1.11 Indirect Alkylation Units (InAlk)


This Unit comprises three separate process units: a Selective Hydrogenation Process (SHP), a Nitrile Removal Unit
(NRU) and an Indirect Alkylation Unit (InAlk) designed to maximise the production of high octane alkylate suitable for
gasoline blending based on maximising octane-barrels.
The feed to the units is the mixed butane/butene product from the RFCC. This stream is first processed in the SHP to
remove dienes and then into the NRU to remove nitriles before passing to the InAlk unit where isobutylene is reacted
with light olefins to yield iso-octane rich alkylate product. The hydrogen requirement for the SHP and InAlk units is taken
from the Hydrogen Compression and Distribution System. The InAlk unit also produces a mixed C4s stream (unreacted
butanes) which is sent to the LPG pool.
The product of InAlk will meet the specifications of Alkylate and LPG (Butanes). The following by-products are expected
to be produced in the InAlk unit.

Off-gas to the LRU or RFCC Amine Absorber;


Waste water to Sour Water Stripper (Train 1);
Oil contaminated water to Effluent Treatment Plant.

1.4.3.1.12 Hydrogen Manufacturing Unit (HMU)


The objective of the Hydrogen Manufacturing Unit (HMU) is to produce high purity hydrogen for the
hydrodesulphurisation units; and for use in the Indirect Alkylation, Selective Hydrotreater, Polypropylene Unit, Tail Gas
Treatment Units, Isomer and Tatoray within the NSRP Complex.
The Hydrogen Manufacturing Unit (HMU) utilises steam-methane reforming of hydrocarbon feedstock (refinery fuel gas
and LPG) to produce a hydrogen-rich gas product which is purified in a Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) to yield
hydrogen with a minimum purity of 99.9 %vol hydrogen.
The hydrogen product is routed to the RHDS unit with the balance of production distributed throughout the complex via
the Hydrogen Compression and Distribution System (HCDS).
The HMU generates a substantial quantity of high pressure steam from waste heat and this steam makes a significant
contribution to the refinery steam balance.
1.4.3.1.13 Hydrogen Compression and Distribution system (HCDS)
The Hydrogen Compression and Distribution System (HCDS) receive high-purity hydrogen from two sources: the
Hydrogen Manufacturing Unit (HMU) and the PSA section within the Catalytic Reformer (CCR) in the Naphtha and
Aromatics Complex. In addition, a PSA unit shall be installed within HCDS which shall recover pure H2 from the RHDS
& GOHDS H2 rich off-gases.
The objective of the HCDS is to compress and distribute high purity hydrogen to the following units normally at the
required battery limit pressures:

Kerosene Hydrodesulphuriser
Gas Oil Hydrodesulphuriser
Selective Hydrogenation / Indirect Alkylation Units
Isomar
Tatoray

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Page 1-21
Final Report

Normally the Hydrogen requirement to the Polypropylene (PP) Unit shall be met by the H2 from the CCR Patforming
PSA Unit.
The hydrogen treat-gas requirements within the Naphtha & Aromatics Complex (i.e. the Naphtha Hydrotreater and
Isomerisation units) are fed directly by hydrogen-rich gas produced in the CCR, hence, these units are not normally
served by the HCDS.
1.4.3.1.14 Sour Water Stripper unit (SWS)
The objective of the SWS Unit is to treat refinery sour water streams such that the quality of stripped water enables it to
be reused as wash water within the refinery and/or discharged to the Effluent Treatment Plant for final clean-up. The
sour gases (H2S and NH3) stripped from the sour water in the SWS are routed to the Sulphur Recovery Unit for further
treatment.
Due to considerable difference in output and sources, the SWS is configured as two separated trains in order to prevent
contamination from products and towards an environmental friendly process; the routings of the most significant sour
water streams are indicated here:

SWS Train 1: Used to treat sour water production generated from CDU, LRU, NHDS, GOHDS, SRU/TGTU
SWS Train 2: Dedicated RFCC (Figure 1.7)
SWS Train 1

SWS Train 2

Sour gases to SRU


Sour water

Sour gases to SRU

Sour water
Steam

Steam

To user

Effluent Treatment Plant


Effluent Treatment Plant
Figure 1.7 Sour Water Stripper unit outline
Input constituents and loading of sour water are presented in Table 1.7.
Table 1.7 Feed Sour and loading in SWS unit
Train 1
Parameter
H2O
H2S
NH3
H2S ppm
NH3 ppm

Train 2

CDU
(kg/h)

LRU
(kg/h)

NHDS
(kg/h)

GOHDS
(kg/h)

RHDS
(kg/h)

SRU/TGTU
(kg/h)

Total
(kg/h)

RFCC
(kg/h)

27,404
6
4

786
14
6

10,727
3
0.2

24,696
349
175

72,411
3,012
1,391

24,127
3
2

160,151
3,387
1,578
20,513
9,560

58,896
50
74
850
1,250

Source: NSRP LLC, June 2010

Products standard: H2S 10ppm; NH3 50ppm.


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Page 1-22
Final Report

1.4.3.1.15 Amine Regeneration Unit (ARU)


Sour steam and LPG contain H2S and NH3 at high concentration will be treated in amine absorber by
methyldiethanolamin (MDEA) 40% of weight. There are 07 amine absorbers in the Complex. Each of GOHDS, RFCC
and TGTU units has 01 amine absorber; 02 absorbers in LRU unit and 02 absorbers in high pressure and low
atmospheric pressure RHDS.
Amine Regeneration Unit (ARU) is designed to strip hydrogen sulphide (H2S) from the contaminated amine steam
returned from amine absorbers/extractors located within the Refinery. Gases released from LTU tower and LPG are
treated in amine absorbers to extract H2S and contaminated amine steam mixed in LRU unit and routed to ARU to
treat.
Acid gas (containing H2S) is routed to Sulphur Plant for producing Sulphur element. High quality regenerated solvent is
returned to consumpt in the Refinery.
ARU treats contaminated amine steam from absorbers in following unit:
Gasoil Hydrodesulphuriser Unit (GOHDS);
Residue Hydrodesulphuriser Unit (RHDS);
LPG Recovery Unit;
Note that RFCC off-gas absorbers/treaters will be also treated in ARU with RFCC and shown in design basis of RFCC
designer/licensor. Tail gas will be also treated in Amine Absorber (Figure 1.8) with SRU and TGTU and shown in design
basic of designer/licensor.
Amine Absorber for treating
gases from GOHDS, RHDS
Amine Regeneration Unit

Treated
Off Gases

Off Gases

Acid Gas
to SRU

Steam

Contaminated Amine
Figure 1.8 Amine Absorber outline

Properties and loading of contaminated amine steam and quality of output off gas are presented in Table 1.8 and 1.9.
Table 1.8 Constituent and loading of contaminated amine steam in ARU
Parameter
Loading (kg/h)
H2S (kgmol/h)

Off Gas Absorber


109,953
122.88

LPG Absorber
14,757
12.03

GOHDS
77,915
98.98

RHDS
587,870
742.03

Source: NSRP LLC, June 2010

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Page 1-23
Final Report

Table 1.9 Quality of output off gas in ARU


Parameter
H2S
SO2
NH3
Loading (kg/h)

% Weight
90.53
0
0.06
35.144

Source: NSRP LLC, June 2010

1.4.3.1.16 Sulphur Recovery Unit (SRU) and Tail Gas Treating Unit (TGTU)
The objective of the Sulphur Recovery Unit (SRU) is to process acid and sour water stripper gases generated within the
refinery to produce elemental sulphur. SRU and TGTU have designed capacity of 800 tons of sulphur/day, with sulphur
recovery efficiency of 99.9%, SOx concentration in off gas of 150 mg/Nm3.
Molten sulphur product is sent to the Sulphur Forming and Storage Facility. The SRU is configured as follows:

3 x 40% Claus trains;


2 x 80% TGT trains;
2 x 100% incinerator trains.

The acid gas feed to the SRU is taken from the Amine Regeneration Units (ARU) of RFCC and desulphurisation
system in offgas, the sour water stripper gases from the Sour Water Strippers (SWS). Product sulphur will be stored in
an above ground tank and exported to the Sulphur Forming & Storage Unit.
The objective of TGTU is to recover the majority of the sulphur remaining in the SRU tail gas as H2S and return for
reprocessing in the SRU. The treated tail gas is then sent to an incinerator (thermal oxidizer) to convert any trace sulphur
remaining to sulphur dioxide before venting to atmosphere. Sulphur recovery and tail gas treater outline is shown in
Figure 1.9.

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Normal operation

33.3% for each SRU

80% for each TGTU

Design capacity

320 tons/day

640 tons/day
(SRU tail gas)

Acid gas from


SWS 1 & 2

Amine acid
from ARU &
RFCC

Acid gas from


FGD

SRU1

TGTU1

Page 1-24
Final Report

80% for each incinerators


640 tons/day
(TGTU tail gas)

Incinerator

SRU2

Incinerator

TGTU2

Stack

Sulphur tanks
A

SRU3

Sulphur liquid
to SFU
Sulphur tanks
B

Figure 1.9 Sulphur recovery and tail gas treater


Properties and loading of feedstock in SRU and TGTU are presented in Table 1.10.
Table 1.10 Properties and loading of feedstock in SRU and TGTU
Parameter

ARU

SWS

FGD

H2S (wt%)

90.53

50.55

SO2 (wt%)

98

NH3 (wt%)

0.06

26.43

Loading (kg/h)

35,114

6,077

1,000

Source: NSRP LLC, June 2010

Main chemical reactions (*) in SRU TGTU are as follows:


1) Pyrolysis phase:
H2S + 3/2O2 H2O + SO2
2) Catalyst transformation:
2H2S + SO2 3/2S2 + 2H2O (Claus Reaction)
N2 + 3H2
3) Gas separation:
2NH3
CH4 + 2O2 CO2 + 2H2O
4) TGTU: SO2 is transformed into H2S and absorbed by amine
5) Heater:
1/xSx + O2 SO2
H2S + 3/2O2 SO2 + H2O
Note: (*) Source: New Pollution Control Regulations and Technologies (Air Environment version 2008) published by Japanese Association of
Environmental Protection in Industry Field.

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1.4.3.2 Petrochemical Process Units


1.4.3.2.1 Naphtha and Aromatics Complex (NAC)
The Naphtha and Aromatics Complex (NAC) is designed to process a full-range naphtha feedstock to produce
Paraxylene and Benzene products at purity suitable for sale, plus aromatic gasoline and isomerate streams suitable for
gasoline blending. The design philosophy of the complex is to maximize economic Paraxylene production.
The Aromatics Complex consists of the following process units:

Naphtha Hydrotreater (including naphtha splitter)


CCR Platformer / CCR Regenerator section (incl. reformate splitter)
Sulfolane (Aromatics Extraction)
Benzene / Toluene Fractionation
Isomar (Xylenes Isomerisation)
Tatoray (Toluene Transalkylation)
Xylene Fractionation
Parex (Paraxylene Separation)
Penex (Isomerisation)

The NAC feedstock is full-range naphtha produced in the LPG Recovery Unit. Fresh naphtha feedstock (and recycled
raffinate from the Sulpholane Unit) is processed in the Naphtha Hydrotreater. Treated naphtha product is then sent to
the Naphtha Splitter where it is fractionated into two streams: light naphtha as feed to the Penex Unit and heavy
naphtha to the CCR Platformer. The latter is sent to the CCR Platformer and the resultant reformate is then routed to
the Aromatics units for production of Paraxylene, Benzene and gasoline blending components.
The primary products from the Naphtha and Aromatics Complex are:

Paraxylene sent to paraxylene product storage;


Benzene sent to benzene product storage;
An isomerate stream sent to gasoline blending.

By-products include:

A raffinate stream from the Sulpholane unit which is totally recycled to the Naphtha Hydrotreater;
A toluene stream can be produced, if required, for gasoline blending;
A C9/C10 aromatics stream (Aromatic Gasoline) from the Heavy Aromatic column overheads to gasoline
blending;
A heavy aromatics stream (C10+) from the Heavy Aromatic column bottoms to refinery fuel oil blending;
LPG from the CCR Platformer to the LPG Recovery Unit;
A hydrogen-rich gas stream from the CCR Platformer PSA unit part of which is consumed internally within
the NAC with the remainder routed to the refinerys Hydrogen Compression and Distribution System.

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1.4.3.2.2 Polypropylene Unit


The Polypropylene Unit is designed to produce Polypropylene from propylene feedstock and hydrogen.
Propylene feed is obtained from the Propylene Recovery Unit within the RFCC Unit. Normally hydrogen feed gas is
supplied from the CCR Platforming PSA Unit.
The main product from the PP is polypropylene homopolymer. A minor purge gas stream is recycled back to the
Propylene Recovery Unit.
Polypropylene product is bagged and loaded into containers on-plot for despatch by road to the dockside where
containers are transferred to ships.

1.4.4 PLANT UTILITIES


1.4.4.1 Crude Oil Storage Tanks
The Crude Oil will be loaded via 48 Sub-sea pipeline with flow rate of around 14,100m3/hr from the SPM to the
refinerys Crude Storage Area.
Crude oil storage capacity: 300,000 - ton tanker may have loading capacity of 342,276 m3. There are 08 Crude Oil
storage tanks with each capacity of 120,000m3 including 3.6 tanks for crude unloading, 3.4 tanks for CDU feedstock
and 1 tank for back-up for off-line maintenance and inspection (Table 1-11). The maximum height of the tank should be
restricted to 20 m and tank diameter is about 90 m. External Floating Roof Tanks will be used for the service.
Table 1-11 Total number of Crude Oil tanks Required for NSRP
Parameter
Number of Tanks (120,000 m3/tank)
Total Installed Capacity
Total Effective Capacity
Number of tanks for the parcel receipt
Number of crude oil supply tanks (for CDU)
Number of spare tanks
Frequency of visiting ship
Shipment window

Unit
Nos
m3
m3
Nos
Nos
Nos
Day/time
Day

Capacity (m3)
8
960,000
768,000
3.6
3.4
1
10.9
5.4

Source: FEED document provided by FW in October 2009

The Crude Storage facility provides capacity for 10 days operational demand plus capacity for simultaneous receipt of
one crude oil shipment parcel. The 10 days window includes 02 days for continuously crude oil pumping to tank area,
02 days for water depositing, 01 day for dewatering and testing crude oil quality and 05 days for any delays in ship
arrival (bad weather or operational delays).
Maximum liquid level is 90% of tank height and low liquid level (Dead Level) is 10% of tank height. So effective working
capacity is (90%-10%) of tank capacity. Total nominal capacity required for unloading crude oil from VLCC is 427,845
m3. It is required 4 tanks for operation.

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1.4.4.2 Product Tankage Farm


1.4.4.2.1 Product storage tank
Product tankage is based on storing the blended final product and exporting by means of Ship/Truck loading by
providing a sufficient storing volume which will not hamper the product off take / Intake.
Ship loading pumps are provided for all product tanks and in addition truck loading pumps are provided for gasoline and
diesel. The quantity and required capacity of product tanks are given in Table 1.12.
Table 1-12 Quantity and Capacity of Product Tanks
Storage tank
Gasoline 92
Gasoline 95
Jet fuel ship
GO (Prem) ship
GO (IND) ship
Benzene
PX (Para-Xylene)

Quantity of tank
2
2
3
3
2
2
2

Type of Tank
Floating roof tank
Floating roof tank
internal floating roof tank
Cone roof tank
Cone roof tank
internal floating roof tank
internal floating roof tank

Total Working Capacity (m3)


86,600
86,600
26,735
115,572
75,500
16,641
34,000

Source: FEED document provided by FW in October 2009

Provision is made to export fuel oil from the refinery Fuel Oil system when the FGD unit is shutdown or if fuel oil product
is accumulating.
Provision to import Gasoline will be provided. Import is achieved by using the export line with bypass around product
ship loading pump and will be routed to either 92 or 95 tanks depending on whichever is available. Facilities to send this
for reblending gasoline in blender will be provided.
1.4.4.2.2 Product blending component storage tanks
Product Blending Component tankage stores the product components that are required for blending to final products.
Table 1-13 Quantity and Capacity of Product Blending Component Tanks
Storage tank

Number of tank

Isomerate
Alkylate gasoline
Light FCC Gasoline
Heavy FCC Gasoline
Aromatics Gasoline

2
2
2
2
1

RHDS Diesel
Kerosene

2
1

Type of Tank
Dome roof tank
Floating roof tank
Dome roof tank
Floating roof tank
Cone roof tank with internal floating roof
tank
Cone roof tank
Cone roof tank with internal floating roof
tank

Total Working
Capacity (m3)
22,025
17,114
17,978
19,129
7,650
33,106
8,900

Source: FEED document provided by FWL in October 2009

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1.4.4.2.3 Intermediate Storage tanks


Inter-unit tankage stores intermediate products or supplies feedstock when downstream or upstream units are
corrupted. These storages supplies for the unscheduled and emergency shutdowns, except residue crude and
desulphurised residue crude tanks. The residue crude and desulphurised residue crude tanks provide ullage during
shutdown of RHDS for annual catalyst change over besides supporting unscheduled shutdowns.
The storage capacities for the intermediate products are based on anticipated unscheduled shutdown duration for the
associated units and the impact of shutdown of these units on the remainder of the refinery. Quantity and required inter
storage tanks are given in Table 1-14.
Table 1-14 Quantity and Capacity of Intermediate Storage Tanks
Storage tank

Number of tank

Type of Tank

Full range naphtha

GO HDS Feed
Reduced
crude/desulfurized
crude
Desulfurized Heavy Naphtha

4
6

Cone roof tank with internal


floating roof tank
Cone roof tank
Floating roof tank

Full Range Reformate, Light


Reformate and Heavy Reformate
Propylene
Butane/Butene
Propane/Butane

6
6
8

Cone roof tank with internal


floating roof tank
Cone roof tank with internal
floating roof tank
Sphere tank
Sphere tank
Sphere tank

Total Working
Capacity (m3)
29,960
34,275
244,800
12,032
31,000
15,873
23,345
21,464

Source: FEED document provided by FWL in October 2009

Tank levels are always maintained at about 50% level of working volume to provide ullage for upstream/downstream
process units. It is understood that any unscheduled shutdown spanning as per the anticipated number of days can
result in 50% turndown of the refinery.
1.4.4.3. Other Receiving and Storage
1.4.4.3.1 Catalyst and chemical storage
Chemical storage receives commercial caustic flakes/ beads, prepare and distribute (14.35 % weight) caustic solution to
various refinery process units and utility systems.
The Unit supplies Caustic solution which is a widely used chemical in the refinery and petrochemical complex. Other
chemicals and additives including but not limited to amines, inhibitors, hydrochloric acid, ammonia, sulphuric acid etc,
are also consumed in a few units and their storage would be part of the corresponding unit and are not covered here.
1.4.4.3.2 Slop storage tanks
Slop tanks are used to receive the off-spec product from Refinery and Offsite facilities. Separate tanks are provided for
straight run products and cracked products. Straight run product slop liquid is re-processed in the CDU (Crude
Distillation Unit) and cracked slops are sent to the RFCC Unit (Residue Fluid Catalytic Cracker Unit) for re-processing.
The type of slop tanks are floating roof tank. The number and capacity of the slop tanks are presented in Table 1-15.
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Table 1-15 Number and Capacity of Slop Tanks


Tank

Number of Tank

Type of Tank

1
1
1
1

floating roof tank


floating roof tank
floating roof tank
floating roof tank

Straight Run Slop Tank


Cracked Gasoline Slop Tank
Spare Tank
Sour Water Storage Tank
Total

Storage Capacity
m
12,000
12,000
12,000
12,000
48,000

Source: FEED document provided by FWL in October 2009

1.4.4.3.3 Sulphur forming and storage unit (SFSU)


The objective of SFSU is to solidify the molten sulphur from the Sulphur Recovery Unit (SRU) and to
stockpile, reclaim, transfer, weight and shipload the solidified sulphur.
All the facility under this Unit will be located in the Jetty area. The molten sulphur will be supplied from
the SRU located in the Refinery area. The product from this unit will be exported through a dedicated
sulphur loading berth at the solid products export jetty.
1.4.4.4 Gas Recovery System
There are 02 gas recovery system in the Complex. A system is designed to recover gas from tanks
containing Isomer, light Naphtha FCC, Benzene, Paraxylene and gas released from RON92 and
RON95 gasoline export process into tank trucks. Other similar gas recovery systems are designed to
serve for export process into tankers.
Operation of gas recovery system is based on physical absorption by activated carbon combined with
absorption process by solvent to recover hydrocarbon. Gas released from absorption tower will not
contain hydrocarbon and be emitted into atmosphere at safe location. At least 99.5% of hydrocarbon
gas will be recovered by this system.
1.4.4.5 Fuel System
Fuel gas generated from process units will be recovered by main fuel gas pipeline system and routed to
high and low pressure fuel gas extractors. Based on economy and need of process units, fuel system of
the Refinery will be divided into fuel gas system and fuel oil system. In normal operation, total volume of
used gas is much more than generated gas. The shortage will be supplemented with LPG.
Fuel oil system is designed to receive product flow of fuel oil, such as LCO from RFCC, Diesel from
RHDS, CLO from RFCC, Diesel from GOHDS, Kerosen, AGO and heavy Aromatics, these flows are
blended at different ratio to form specific fuel oil products, such as Refinery Fuel Oil (RFO), Ultra Fuel
Oil (UFO) and Export Fuel Oil (EFO).
Blending systems are installed to mix fuel oils. A seperated system used to blend RFO 0.24%S and
UFO/EFO 1%S is located near fuel oil tank to supply to demand units.
Fuel storage and distribution systems for each kinds of fuel are shown in Table 1.16.
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Table 1.16 Fuel storage and distribution systems


Fuel

Destination

LPG
GTG
HRSG
Process unit heater
Process unit heater
Process unit heater

Fuel gas
Fuel oil 0.24%S
Fuel oil 1%S

Ultra unit boiler


CO boiler
Total used fuel

Maximum
Polypropylen case
MW
ton/day
356
670
294
555
61
115
0
0
634
1,242
0
0
459
1,003
431
941
28
62
1,449
2,915

Maximum
Gasoline case
MW
ton/day
136
256
104
196
32
60
0
0
559
1,085
77
154
717
1,565
688
1,503
28
62
1,489
3,060

Source: NSRP-LLC, June 2010

It is envisaged that blenders will be provided, but separate blenders to be provided for low sulphur
(Refinery Fuel Oil) and for high sulphur fuel (Utility Fuel Oil) in the utility area near by corresponding
tanks to meet the requirement, the typical blenders are as follows:
1. RHDS Diesel + RFCC LCO from storage are blended and stored in tanks. This will supply oil to
GT and Refinery Heaters.
2. NAC Heavy Aromatics + RFCC CLO are blended and stored in tanks as Utility Fuel Oil. This will supply oil to
Utility Boilers.
Provision is made to export fuel oil via the jetty when the refinery has an excess of fuel oil or the FGD is
shutdown.
During start-up Refinery Oil products are not available from the refinery. In order to meet the start-up
demand, imported diesel (via Diesel Oil Line) is used for GT/Refinery Heaters and imported fuel oil (via
Black Oil Line) is used for Utility Boiler.
Fuel gas from various process unit sources is collected via fuel gas collection headers and fed to High Pressure Knockout drum and Low Pressure Knock-Out drum. Unsaturated high pressure gas is collected in the HP drum and saturated
low pressure gas is collected in LP drum. Any droplets of liquid condensation that form in the pipelines will be removed
from the gas in fuel gas-mixing / knock out drums. This liquid is flashed to the flare header.
Crude Distillation Unit (CDU), Xylenes Fractionation (Aromatics Complex) and BT Fractionation (Aromatics Complex)
will run normally on refinery fuel gas with provision for oil firing during Start up operations. Therefore, during Refinery
start-up, as there is no fuel gas production from process units, all the gas only fired refinery furnaces are supplied by
vaporizing LPG in to the Fuel Gas distribution system.
LPG Vaporiser system with LPG Superheaters have been provided in the fuel gas system to meet the requirements of
normal fuel gas demand and start up requirements.

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1.4.4.6 Flushing Oil System


The flushing oil system will supply of flushing oil (typically Straight Run Gas Oil) to the Refinery Process Units and Utility
Systems handling fluids with viscosity > 43 cSt @ 40 C.
Flushing Oil is required for the following main purposes:

Flushing of equipment under maintenance


Start up/ Shut down Unit Circulation

Flushing Oil for pump seal flushing systems and Instruments flushing would be provided by independent systems in
respective units and are not considered in this basis. However, it is envisaged that a quantity of 10m/hr will be
continuously supplied to make up the flushing oil requirements for systems handling the Pump Seal and Instrument
Flushing.
During commissioning and start-up, diesel will be provided from one of the GOHDS feed tanks as an alternate source of
Flushing Oil.
1.4.4.7 Waste oil recovery, storage and pump systems
Waste oil generated from process units and support constructions will be collected and treated in the Refinery.
Waste oil generated from RHDS, NHDS, PENEX, CCR, Aromatic, flare system and export berths will be collected to
waste oil tank, then routed to crude oil distillation unit to process.
Waste oil generated from RFCC and InALK will be collected to Catalyst Cracking Unit to process.
1.4.4.8 Power and Steam Generation System
The purpose of the steam and power generation system is twofold:

To supply all electric power to meet the demands of the Refinery Complex;
To supply steam to meet the demands of the Refinery Complex.

The refinery requires a segregated power generation system resulting in two electrical islands in order to reduce the
refinery wide flare loads
Power Generation
On-site electrical power generation is provided by the following sources:
Gas Turbine Generators (GTG)
Steam Turbine Generators (STG)
Refinery users are divided into two islands, namely Island -1 and Island -2.

System -1: 03 steam turbines capacity norm of 35.6 MW/turbine. Total power demand in system -1 is 106
MW
System - 2: 03 steam turbines capacity norm of 41.4 MW/turbine. Total power demand in system -2 is 124
MW

Plant of two gas turbine generator - Capacity Norm of 61.896 MW/turbine.


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Steam Generation System


The power generated from the STGs is insufficient to meet overall power demands and hence the
balance power is to be generated by the GTGs provided in each island.
HP and MP steam are exported from the STGs/ HRSGs to a common header from where they are
distributed to the refinery complex. Condensate is generated in the STGs to balance the power
demand, after the generation of HP and MP pressure levels. LP steam is in excess in the refinery and is
used to augment the power generation from the HP-Condensing STG in Island-2.
Condensate that is generated in STGs is cooled against sea water and sent to Demineralised Water
plant for polishing prior to re-use.
HP, MP and LP steam is used in the refinery complex for different purposes such as running steam
turbine drives, providing heat to the process and also direct use in the process (for reactions, stripping
etc.). Steam used in drives is exhausted to lower pressure levels based on overall steam balance.
Steam consumed in the process is typically lost or recovered as sour water which is treated elsewhere
in Sour Water Strippers. Steam used for process heating of exchangers is recovered as condensate at
the respective pressure levels and is finally recovered as suspect condensate after flashing to recover
LP steam. Suspect condensate is treated in the condensate treatment section of the Demineralised
Water plant and is recycled as Demin Water to the Deaerators, from where Boiler Feed Water (BFW) is
generated for supply to the Steam Generators. Any shortfall in the water supply to deaerator is made up
by demineralized water.
On-site steam generation is achieved at two pressure levels HHP Steam and HP Steam.
Conceptually, in each of the electrical islands, the steam turbine generator (STG) is the main generator.
HHP steam is generated in an utility boiler package which then drives the STG. STG is operated
between HHP and condensate, with pass outs at HP, MP and LP pressure levels to generate power.
The utility boiler package is fired using high sulphur utility fuel oil, which is a blend of clarified oil and
heavy Aromatics. Refinery fuel oil is also available as additional fuel for the utility boiler package. Flue
gases from Utility Boilers are routed to flue gas Desulphurisation unit, where SOx content is limited to
65 mg/Nm3 before atmospheric discharge to stack. In each island, power is also generated in gas
turbine generators (GTG), which are fired on mixed LPG as primary fuel with low sulphur GT fuel oil (a
blend of light cycle oil and RHDS Diesel) as back up for start up. Each GTG is connected to a heat
recovery steam generator (HRSG) which produces HP steam using the hot exhaust gases from the gas
turbine. Supplementary firing is done in HRSG with LPG with a limitation of 850C on burner duct exit
temperature. Flue gas from HRSGs is routed directly to stack.
1.4.4.9 Nitrogen Supply System
Nitrogen Supply System generates Nitrogen for distributing to various users and Liquid Nitrogen for storage. The stored
Liquid Nitrogen is vaporised at different pressure levels to supply continuous or intermittent demands.
Nitrogen is required during start-up and shut down for purging and pressurising of systems, circulation during start up
and cooling down during shut down, catalyst regeneration, blanketing during long shutdown and seal purging of
compressors in the units. It is also required in the offsites for blanketing of storage tanks and purging of flare header.
One of the critical consumers is CCR unit which requires an independent source of nitrogen supply at a higher pressure
level.
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This system consists of following units:

Nitrogen generation package is a cryogenic nitrogen generation unit. In this unit, atmospheric air is separated
into an oxygen rich waste gas stream and a nitrogen product stream.
Liquid nitrogen storage tank & vaporizers store the liquid nitrogen product from the generation units is stored in
the cryogenic storage tanks. The storage tanks serve as backup source of nitrogen for the refinery.
Liquid nitrogen cryogenic pump

1.4.4.10 Water Supply System


Treated water will be supplied through pipeline system and metered flow at barrier of the Refinery, then routed to
process water, domestic water and fire fighting water storage tanks. Designed capacity of this system is 1,560m3/hour.
Table 1.17 Water demand for the Complex
Capacity (m3/hour)
Total supplied water
Domestic water
Process water
Demineralized water

1,162
14
178
970

Source: NSRP-LLC, June 2010

Based on initial estimation, fire fighting water inside the complex will be stored in separately tank with total volume of
17,220m3.
The demineralisation plant is fed by service water and produces demineralised water for use within the refinery. The
primary consumer is make-up to the boiler feed water system for steam generation. A Demineralised Water Tank
provides buffer storage.
1.4.4.11 Intake system
1.4.4.11.1 Structure
Intake system is a construction built along seashore with an intake channel routing water to water storage structure of
the Refinery.
Intake channel is built at seashore from low crested breakwater paralleling to main breakwater in the North. At here, silt
deposit process will occur and make the channel to be dredged periodically at suitable depth so that it does not affect on
current. Sea water from intake channel will be routed to water storage structure.
Water storage structure consists of a slope section, intake forebay/sediment settlement and water channel.
Sea water from intake channel flows into the intake forebay by slope section. Intake forebay is transition area between
intake channel and water drum. It plays as a settlement tank to reset suspended solids and needs to be periodically
dredged. The in front side of intake forebay have pillars which route seawater flowing directly to water drum.

Flow through works:


Number of intake channels:
Number of drum screens:
Velocity of water through intake:

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Intake system includes following parts:


Intake channel and low-crested breakwater: The intake channel is approximately 350m in length and 70m wide at
the level of -7.92m (-6.00 m CD). It allows seawater to be extracted at all stages of the tide, including Lowest
Astronomical Tide (LAT). The intake channel is bordered by the main harbour breakwater and a low-crested
breakwater. The slopes of the breakwaters bordering the channel are constructed at a gradient of 1:2 and 1:1.5,
respectively.
Intake forebay: The forebay is the transition between the intake channel and the coarse and fine screens. It is designed
with a finished floor level at -8m, again to allow the collection of fine sediment that has not settled in the channel. On the
seaward side of the forebay there will be a 6m wide roadway supported on reinforced concrete columns.
Intake screens: There are 8 screening channels, each fitted with stop gates, coarse screens. Each channel is 3.45m
wide and each pair of channels feeds 1 x 10m diameter.
Water quality is maintained by cooling water system. It is auto injecting of following chemicals:
Biocide
Anti-inhibitor
Anti-additivies
pH adjustment substances
Demineral water is used to dilute chemicals and other dissolved chemicals which will be added at the output of cooling
water system in order to mix entirely at the input of cooling water circulation pumps.
1.4.4.11.2 Cooling Water
Cooling water is used for following system:
Indirected cooling system with fresh water;
Condenser in Steam & Electricity unit, RFCC and RHDS;
Sulphur extractor unit by absorbing SO2 and treating waste sea water. Sea water flow from Steam & Electricity
unit is used for this purpose.
Designed capacity of intake structure is 123,899 tons/hour (Table 1.18).
Table 1.18 Water demand for NSRP
Unit
Total input
Indirected cooling water
- Cooling water system
Directed cooling water
- Condenser of vapor turbine generator System 1
- Condenser of vapor turbine generator System 2
- Condenser of fans in RFCC
- Condenser of air compressors in RFCC
- Condenser of recirculated air compressors in RHDS

Capacity (ton/hour)
100,677
38,576
21,631
25,133
7,041
6,061
2,235

Source: NSRP-LLC, June 2010

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Cooling water is used for removing excess heat from process units within the refinery and petrochemical complex. It is
supplied from a closed loop fresh water cooling water system which is indirectly cooled by sea water supply.
The cooling water is cooled from 47C to 34C by transferring heat to sea water in the sea water exchangers. The sea
water is filtered to remove fine particles before entering the exchanger where it cools the closed circuit. Then, it is
returned to sea. Sea water outlet temperature is restricted to 40C to be in compliance with environmental regulations.
1.4.4.12 Chemicals, Catalysts, and Packing
Catalysts, absorbents, chemicals and similar materials are used to support refinery operations: some are consumed
continuously while others are subject to periodic replacement. Appropriate stocks of these materials are held on-site to
enable continuous refinery operation.
Materials handled include:
Catalysts & inert support materials
Lubricating oil & greases
Caustic soda
Transformer oil
Amine (MDEA)
Corrosion inhibitors
DMDS
Antifoam agents
Activated carbon
List of main chemicals and catalysts is given in Table 1.19.
Table 1.19 List of Main Catalysts and Chemicals used for NSRP
Unit
CDU

KHDS
GOHDS
RHDS

RFCC

Material
De-Emulsifer
Caustic Soda
Anti-foulant
Corosion Inhibiotr
Ni-Mo catalyst
Ni-Mo Catalyst
Corrosion inhibitor
Fouling inhibitor
Catalyst (ICR 161NAQ)
Catalyst (ICR 161LAQ)
Catalyst (ICR 161KAQ)
Catalyst (ICR 167KAQ)
Catalyst (ICR 170KAQ)
Catalyst (ICR 131KAQ)
Catalyst (ICR 153KAQ)
Catalyst (ICR 156 SSA)
DMDS
Nickel Passivator
corrosion inhibitor
Zeolite catalyst
Caustic Soda

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Purpose/component etc.
Chemical
Chemical
Chemical
Chemical
HDS
HDS reaction
Chemical
Chemical
HDM
HDM
HDM
HDM
HDM
HDS
HDS
Hydroprocess catalyst
Sulphiding agent
Chemical
Chemical
Cracking catalyst
Chemical

97.08
40
266.96
71.39
20.1
503
3994
32448
30
30
298
243
175
446
418
63
139
14.6
40.8
19
5.5

Amount
Ton/year
Ton/ year
Ton/4 year
Ton/4 year
Litter/ year
Litter/ year
Ton/ year
Ton/ year
Ton/ year
Ton/ year
Ton/ year
Ton/ year
Ton/ year
Ton/ year
Ton/ Batch
Ton/ year
Ton/ year
Ton/ year
m3/day
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Merox WS catalyst
Oxidizer (Liquid)
Catalyst (SPA-1)
Solid phosphoric acid
Catalyst (S-100 )
Ni & Mo
Catalyst (H-15 SHP)
Ni:for selective hydrogenation
NAC
Catalyst (KG55)
silica alumina
Catalyst (KF647-3Q)
Ni/Mo
Catalyst (KF542-5R)
Ni/Co/Mo
Catalyst S-120
Co & Mo on Alumina support
Penex catalyst (I-84)
Amorphous, chloride alumina
Penex chemical
Perchloroethylene
Penex chemical
Caustic Soda
CCR Adsorbent (CLR-011)
Activated Alumina
CCR Catalyst (R-264)
Pt 0.25% for Reforming
Chloriding agent
Perchloroethylen
Clay catalyst
Xylene Fractionation
Parex Absorbent
Zeolite
Isomer Catalyst (I-300)
Pt on zeolite
Tatoray Catalyst (TA-20)
Zeolite catalyst
Sulforane chemical
for Extractive distillation
Clay catalyst
B/T Fractionation
PPU
Catalysts and chemicals (Refer to detail list)
HMU
Co/Mo Catalyst
HDS
Zinc Oxide catalyst
Sulphur absorber
Nickel Oxide catalyst
Prereforming
Iron/chromium oxide cat.
HTS reactor
ARU
MDEA
Sulphur recovery
SRU
Catalyst (CR-35)
Claus reaction
Catalyst (CRS-31)
Claus reaction
TGTU
Catalyst (TG-107)
Scot Catalyst
Cooling water system
Sodium Nitrate
Corrosion inhibitor
All units which provide reactors
Ceramic balls
Catalyst support
Source: NSRP-LLC, June 2010
InAlk

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11.5
118.5
185
15.8
1.61
3.22
3.22
44.8
101.12
38.2
36
100.8
194.8
117
231
1186
58.6
83
231
80.8

litter/day
m3/1.25 to 2 year
m3/4 year
m3/3 year
m3/4 year
m3/4 year
m3/4 year
m3/4 year
m3/5 year
Ton/3 month
ton/week
m3/6 month
m3/6 month
ton/6 month
m3/4 to 6 month
m3/12 year
m3/4 year
m3/5 year
t/initial make-up
m3/6 to 12 month

20.9
294
75.35
119.7
1300
116.3
56.7
76.57

m3/4 year
m3/4 year
m3/2 year
m3/4 year
ton
ton/5 year
ton/5 year
ton/5 year

147

ton/year
by contractor

Most of chemicals, materials and equipments will be transported by ship through sea way in the East of the Complex.
Other materials will be transported by trucks on National Road 1 and Provincial Road 513.
Appropriate storage and handling facilities are provided including mechanical handling systems for the receipt,
segregation, storage and transfer of materials, secure warehouse facilities, stock control systems, safety facilities, etc.
Bulk stocks are held in a central warehouse. Daily consumption is then distributed to on-site chemical stores located
within the Refinery.
The chemical supply system will provide caustic soda solution to various users in the Complex. Fresh caustic solution is
received by road tanker and is diluted on-site prior to distribution to individual consumers.
1.4.4.13 Flare System
Flare system is designed to discharge safely off gas generated from process units in the Refinery. Design of flare is
based on following cases:
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Separate incidents, e.g. output clogging of a system;


Incidents occur in process units, e.g. loss of support sources;
Incidents affect whole the Refinery, e.g. loss of electricity/support.

All potential discharge sources from process units and support area will be calculated in the flare design.
In the Complex, electricity distribution system is divided into 02 separated systems in order to reduce total load of flare in
case of loss of electricity.
Initial height of flare is 180m with thermal radiation standard:
1. Thermal radiation in restricted area is 6.31 kw/m2 (API Standard). Minimum radius in restricted area is 60m to
avoid injuring people in case of incidents.
2. Thermal radiation in limited area is 3.18 kW/m2. Radius in limited area is established in the Plant site.
Common flare system consists of HC flare and acid gas flare:

Hydrocarbon flare system (main flare)


Discharges from all relief valves (except Acid Gas Service) are routed to the HC Flare system. A separate small
diameter HC Purge Flare is provided to dispose of the continuous purge and low flow discharges and the HC Flare
is purged with Nitrogen with pilots ignited. The low level flaring will result in burn-back and damage to the tip if routed
to the larger main HC flare. The design capacity of HC Purge flare is 10% of the design capacity of the HC Flare or
AG Flare capacity whichever is greater. Flaring gas will be routed to the HC Purge Flare / HC Flare by maintaining
the different head in the HC Purge Flare seal drum and HC Flare Seal Drum.
The HC Purge Flare is steam assisted to provide a completely smokeless flare. When sour gas is flaring,
smokeless steam will be stopped to avoid flame out due to low calorific value of acid gas. Lighter Flare also use
steam assisted to create a completely smokeless flare during maintenance period of HC Purge Flare Stack or
other emergency situations.
The HC Flare and Lighter Flare are demountable and housed in the same derrick structure.

Acid gas flare system


The AG Flare system disposes of hydrocarbon releases which are toxic, potentially corrosive or difficult to combust.
These include streams containing appreciable quantities of hydrogen sulphide. Hydrocarbon discharges containing
more than a nominal 10 percent (vol) of hydrogen sulphide are routed to this flare system. Input of this flare is from
CDU, GOHDS, KHDS, PRU, SRU, TGTU, ARU and SWS units.
The flared gas may have a low heat of combustion. Assist (supplementary) fuel gas is added upstream of the
knock-out drum via flow ratio control to achieve an acceptable degree of combustion. The same control loop will be
used to stop smokeless steam injection to the HC Purge Flare when acid gas is flaring at high rate. The flare is
made of carbon steel. Receiving head is heated with steam to maintain minimum temperature of 1100C in order to
reduce condensation and erosion or dregs. High temperature will support H2S dispersion process in case of
blazing up. The system will be directly connected to supported flare to burn acid gas. During HC Purge Flare
maintenance, acid gas will be routed to main flare. HC Purge Flare is designed as a sour flare stack with steam
tracing and insulation to avoid corrosion from acid gas.

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Figure 1.10 HC/AG flare system


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1.4.4.14 Fire and Gas Detection and Protection System


The Project fire protection system is based on the assumption that there is no outside help to the refinery and tank
storage areas or the jetty and thus the fire fighting facilities on the sites will need to be self supporting.
The fire-fighting system of NSRP will consist of:

HC, toxic gas, smoke, fire detectors and other fire alarm devices;
Water Hydrants;
Fixed and Semi-Fixed Foam Systems;
Safety Showers.

1.4.4.15 Waste treatment system


1.4.4.15.1 Off gas treatment system
1. Flue gas desulphurization system with sea water
Purpose of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) is to remove SO2 out of off gas from boilers before release into atmosphere.
Off gas must meet allowed limits, FGD system is designed with capacity of 943,000 Nm3/hour.
2. RFCC De-SOx and De-NOx system
Purpose of this system is to remove SO2 and NO2 out of emission gas generated from RFCC before discharging.
Treated gas must meet allowed limits. Treatment technology used for this system is as follows:

De-SOx unit: absorption by humid NaOH


De-NOx: deoxidation by ammonia and catalyst (stable catalyst)

De-SOx and De-NOx systems will be presented in detail in Section 4 Mitigation Measures.
1.4.4.15.2 Effluent Treatment Plant
1. Effluent collection system
Waste water is classified, collected and managed up to their nature/feature by following system:
Clean process water
Clean water is disposed directly without treatment. Disposal and regeneration effluents from demineralization unit are
considered as clean flow after neutralized and may be directly discharged through sea water circulation pipeline.
Clean storm water (CSW)
Storm water collected from areas of the Refinery is not contaminated in normal operation. Storm water drainage system
is designed to meet disposal standard without treatment.
Accidentally oil contaminated waste water (AOC)
Surface effluents (rain water, cleaning water) collected from areas in risk of being contaminated. Drainage system has a
preliminary cleaning tank designed to reduce treatment.
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Continuous oil contaminated waste water (COC)


All effluents having oil content over 10mg/l need to be separated oil and treated by biological method.
Domestic waste water
Having specific biological treatment plant.
Besides, special effluents will be collected into specific system before routed to ETP, including:

Close Benzene contaminated waste water collection system in order to avoid dispersion of Benzene into
atmosphere.
Spent caustic effluents collection system to moderate flow and prevent dispersion of H2S.
Oil contaminated waste water collection system from bottom of crude oil tanks will connect to specific API
system to remove oil. This system will serve other tanks if necessary. Waste water from fire fighting activity will
be also routed to AOC or CSW. All effluents from these systems will be temporarily stored in case of fire
incidents, so they are kept in the Refinery.

2. Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP)


ETP is designed to receive and treat effluents in accordance with Project Standards:
Effluents from process and support units in the Complex;
Effluents from storage tank;
Effluents from operation, maintenance and devices in administrative house area;
Effluents from devices at habour area.
ETP is not designed to receive following flows:
Overflow clean water;
Waste water from demineralization unit and other clean flows are considered as meeting standard.
Besides, ETP will treat a great number of waste water in hydrotest process, high contaminated waste water generated
from irregular maintenance, fire fighting water and process water not meeting project standard will be required to access
based on specific case. Designed capacity of ETP is 631m3/hour.
Detailed treatment process and overall ETP site will be presented in Section 4 Mitigation measures. Location of ETP
is given in Figure 1.4.
3. Separated collection and treatment system for export berth
Storm water from floor area will be routed to the sea through a slope. On port area, clean storm water is allowed to
discharge directly into the sea.
Overflow water may be contaminated by oil and waste water from equipment maintenance process at export berth will
be collected in sumps. These sumps are enough large to contain the first contaminated water as well as overflow water
in case of typhoons. Collected oily water will be treated before discharging into the sea or routed to main treatment plant
(identified by the Contractor).
Domestic waste water will be collected and treated by each batch before discharge.

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1.4.4.15.3 Incinerator
Purpose of the oil residue incinerator is to burn residue oil (cleaning water/sludge from API, CPI, FFU/DAF), biological
and chemical sludges from tertiary treatment process (iron sludge and activated carbon), waste oil and plastic powder
from PPU into suitable ash for disposal.
Incinerator is designed to burn 57,360 kg dehydrated sludge and 2,000 liters waste oil and plastic powder in a day.
1.4.4.15.4 Waste storage area
Waste storage area will be arranged by the Refinery for easy transport and storage of hazardous and non-hazardous
wastes before delivering to approved waste management area. Waste storage area is designed in accordance with
waste generation rate and maximum storage duration of 90 days. Additional storage area will be provided for hazardous
waste untreated properly. Waste storage area inside the complex is sited near western fence and Coc mountain (Figure
1.4).
1.4.4.16 List of main equipments of the Refinery
List of main equipments will be attached in separate annex of List of Equipments of the Project. At present, the e Project
is in tender phase. After EPC contract is signed, the Contractor will implement detail design and choose equipment
suppliers. NSRP LLC has committed that all equipments used for the Project are new, modern and provided by worldwide famous and prestigious suppliers.
1.4.5

OFFSITE FACILITIES

1.4.5.1 Marine Facilities


The development of harbour is divided into three phases follows:
Phase 1: A temporary construction jetty (TCJ) will be constructed. This facility will be used for the development of the
refinery and thus for the import of future refinery equipment and material.
Phase 2: The marine harbour elements will be constructed, comprising (Figure 1-11):
The north breakwater;
Four berths (02 berths / jetty) for export of white products (2a, 2b, 4a and 4b);
One berth for the export of LPG (3);
Berthing facility for service vessels/tugs;
One berth for transfer of sulphur (dry bulk) (1a);
One berth for the transfer of polypropylene (containerized) (b);
Harbour access channel and turning basin (dredged by Vietnamese Government);
Harbour revetments;
Navigational aids;
SPM;
Intake and outfall structure for cooling water.
After this stage, the harbour will be able to accommodate vessels up to 30,000 DWT.
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Figure 1-11 NSRP Port Layout


The Nghi Son harbour layout comprises the following main elements:
Onshore area (Refinery site);
Main breakwater (north of harbour basin);
Access channel (outer section, bend and inner section);
Turning basin;
Product berth areas (1, 2, 3, 4);
Service (vessel) berths;
Construction berths;
Future developments (future jetties and breakwater).
Some main bathymetric information in the port area is summarized below:

Harbour basin: The depth contours run approximately parallel to the shoreline up to a depth of about CD 9
m. The harbour basin (up to and including turning basin) will be built in depths ranging from about CD + 0 to
CD 5 m;

Main breakwater: The northern breakwater head is located at a seabed level of about CD 5.5 m;

Access channel: The end of the access channel (adjoining the turning basin) is located in a natural depth of
about CD 4.5 m. The start of the access channel is located at a seabed level of CD 13.2 m. From depths
of CD 9 m to 13.2 m the depth contours are oriented more obliquely to the shoreline.

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In the future, the largest vessel expected in the harbour will be a 50,000 DWT vessel. In the present design of the
harbour layout, additional space reservation (e.g. larger required channel width) is taken into account. Additional capital
dredging will be required for widening and deepening the access channel, turning basin and Berth 4.
1.4.5.1.1 Access channel
An access channel with 6,200 m length is designed to facilitate entry of vessels up to 30,000 tonnes. The access
channel is split into two straight sections by a bend located at a distance of about 2.2 km offshore:

Outer channel section:


This is the section from deep water in west-south-westerly direction (247) towards the harbour up to the bend.
It has a length of approximately 4,375 m. Over the last 600 m the channel widens up to the required bend
width.

Inner channel section:


In the bend the channel direction turns to the direction of 273. From the end of the bend up to the turning
basin the channel width is maintained equal to the bend width in order to avoid any alignment transitions in this
section (i.e. narrowing from bend width to straight channel width and subsequently widening again into the
turning basin). As the channel width of this straight section is larger than required, additional channel widening
into the turning basin is not applied. The inner section length including bend is approximately 1825 m.

The access channel will have the following dimensions:

Inner channel length:


Channel bend:
Outer channel length:
Channel bend width:
Radius of the bend:
Channel width:
Channel depth:
Overdepth:

1,180 m
645 m
4,375m
150 m
1,215 m
120 m
-13.2m
1.0m

In the future the largest vessel will increase to 50,000 DWT. Consequently, the required nautical depth increases to CD
16.2 m, channel width increases to approximately 150 m and additional capital dredging will be required.
An over-depth of 1.0 m is recommended and applied in the design. This means that in principle maintenance dredging
is not required in the first 4 years after completion of the port.
Dredging quantity is estimated of 4,855,282 m3
1.4.5.1.2 Turning basin
The centre of the turning basin is located at approximately N 19o 22 0.78, 105o 47 56.24E. The diameter of the turning
basin is 360 m.
The nautical depth of the turning basin is CD 12.1 m. In the future the nautical depth of the turning basin will increase
to CD 14.85 m for the 50,000 DWT vessels.
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An over-depth of 0.5 m is recommended and applied in the design of the harbour basin areas. This means that in
principle maintenance dredging is not required in the first 04 years after completion of the port.
1.4.5.1.3 North breakwater
Breakwaters are used to create sheltered areas where marinas, ports or entrance channels are located. The
breakwater function is to reduce waves in the sheltered area to an acceptable level.
The general characteristics of the breakwater are:
Length of the breakwater: 1,800m
Crest level: CD +9m
Crest width: 12m
Slopes of 1:2.5
Average water depth of CD -3m
Average layer thickness of soil improvement of 5m
Primary armour layer thickness for the trunk (3.0-6.0 tonne rock): 2.4m
Primary armour layer thickness for the head (4.0-7.0 tonne rock): 2.6m
Secondary armour layer thickness (0.3-1.0 tonne rock): 1.2m
Quarry run core
1.4.5.1.4 Harbour revetments
Shore protection is anticipated alongside the shore, including underneath both jetties alongside the shore. Rock
revetments protect the slope (from the sea bed up to the reclamation level) against erosion by wave action.
1.4.5.1.5 Berth pockets
There are 07 product berths (Table 1-20) for exporting liquid products or dry bulk and containers. Five berths are located
at a jetty with loading platforms. The two others are individual loading platforms. These berths shall provide all facilities
and installations or safe and reliable operations at the required capacity. The berths shall be suitable for a range of
vessels up to 30,000 DWT and up to 50,000 DWT in the future development.
Table 1-20 Dimensions of Berth Pockets
Berth pocket
1a
1b
2a/2b
3
4a/4b*
Note:

Length (m)
203
188
170
133
252 (281)

Width (m)
42
43
22
31
50 (65)

Nautical depth (m CD)


9.25
8.50
8.25
6.40
12.1 (14.85)

* Based on 30,000 DWT vessels. Between brackets are the values based on the future 50,000 DWT vessel

The areas between the berth pockets and the tuning basin must have sufficient depth to allow safe vessel maneuvering
from and to the berths and avoid grounding. Similar as for the turning basin, an over-depth of 0.5 m is applied in the
other harbour basin areas.
Two jetties are envisaged alongside the shore: The first (berths 1a and 1b) is for the export of solids (sulphur and
polypropylene) and the second (Temporary Construction Jetty TCJ) is temporary and will be used for the offloading of
the construction materials for the refinery.
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Three jetties are located in the harbour basin (jetties 2, 3 and 4) and a fourth jetty is optional (jetty 5). Jetty 2 is for small
vessels, 3,000 10,000 DWT (two berths 2a and 2b), jetty 3 is for tankers that carry pressurised LPG, 1,000 3,000
DWT. Finally, jetty 4 (and the optional jetty 5) are used for the biggest vessels, up to 30,000 DWT (two berths 4a and
4b).

Berth 1a/1b: are envisaged alongside the shore. Berth 1a (north) is designed to accommodate dry bulk carriers
exporting sulphur, ranging from 10,000 to 15,000 DWT. Berth 1b (south) is for exporting polypropylene, ranging
from 5,000 to 10,000 DWT.

Berth 2a/2b: are use to handle gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, fuel oil, para-xylene and benzene. The tanker sizes range
from 3,000 to 10,000 DWT.

Berth 3: shall be used for exporting LPG ranging from 3,000 to 5,000 DWT.

Berth 4a/4b: are used to handle oil product tankers, meant for the transport of white products. The products are
gasoline and diesel. The tanker sizes range from 5,000 to 30,000 DWT.

Berth S2 (future expansion): is designed to handle oil product tankers, meant for the transport of white products.
The tanker sizes range from 3,000 to 50,000 DWT.

Dredging volume
The required dredging volume to the nautical depth and the overdepth at harbor basin is estimated of 5,512,531m3.
Hence the total volume of capital dredging for harbor basin and access channel adds up to about 10.4 million m3.
1.4.5.2 Single Point Mooring (SPM)
The Single Point Mooring (SPM) has been located 35 km from the shoreline to avoid dredging a very large approach
channel and affect environmental sensitive areas (coral reef). Crude will be unloaded via 300,000 DWT tankers. The
offshore element typically consists of a mooring and fluid transfer system (SPM), connected by means of a subsea
pipeline to the facility onshore. The SPM mooring system enables the vessel to freely weathervane in response to the
wind, wave and current conditions, thus enabling it to offload even under relatively adverse conditions.
The SPM system which is a kind of Catenaries Anchor Leg Mooring (CALM) system, uses for imported crude oil from
Very Large Crude Carrier (VLCC) tankers and sends to plant storage area via 48 Sub-sea pipeline. The design life of
SPM system is 25 years.
The SPM main components include the following facilities (Figure 1.12):

Mooring buoy;
Anchoring System;
Anchor legs;
Pipeline End Manifold (PLEM);
Floating Hose Strings;
Under Buoy Hose Strings.

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Figure 1-12 SPM main Components


The single point mooring (SPM), the riser from the SPM, and the subsea pipeline end manifold (PLEM) will be coated
and cathodically protected.
1.4.5.3

Crude oil pipeline

Crude oil pipeline has been located to avoid the environmental sensitive area (coral reef) of Hon Me Islands (Figure 1.3).
Crude oil pipeline is a 48 double pipelines (distance between the pipeline is about 43.5m). The pipeline route starts at
pig trap locations at the plant crude oil storage area and end at offshore SPM. Crude oil is transferred from tankers
through the SPM to the double pipelines running towards the plant storage area. Total length of crude pipeline system is
35km in which there are 33.5km offshore and 1.5 km onshore. The pipelines are divided into three (03) sections as
follows:

The onshore pipelines which will run along their subsea route, are buried.

Near shore sections of the pipelines route will be trenched and backfilled to protect the pipelines against
human activities and weave/current forces.

Offshore pipelines will terminate at PLEM flanges to provide connection to the SPM.

Onshore sections of the pipeline are buried. The pipeline pressure is designed against pipeline incidental pressure.
Pipeline design pressure will be considered as a multiple of maximum allowable operating pressure MAOP with a safety
factor not less than 10%.
1.4.5.4 Product Pipeline
Product pipelines are used for exporting liquid products. The pipelines will accommodate on pipe bridge. The pipelines
will be coated externally with two layers and put on pipeline rest.
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There are 09 product pipelines (01 pipeline per product) for liquid product loading from the plant to the Jetties and 01
pipeline for the return of LPG vapour to plant.
Based on product specification and exported volume through the jetties, product pipeline sizes (Table 1-21) are
designed at 12 for LPG, 14 for jet fuel and Benzene, 16 for fuel oil and Paraxylene and 24 for Gasoline (92 & 95) and
Diesel (Premium & Regular).
1.4.5.5 Ship Loading System
Ship loading system is provided to export 95% of LPG, Gasoline, Diesel & Fuel Oil and 100% of remaining products by
ships.
Liquid products
There are 11 dedicated single product loading arms and 12 shared loading arms are required. Loading Rates and
Pipeline Sizes are given in Table 1-21.
Table 1-21 Loading Rates and Loading Ship Capacity
Product
LPG
Gasoline 92
Gasoline 95
Jet Fuel
Premium Diesel
Regular Diesel
Fuel oil
Benzene
Paraxylene

Loading
Rates (m/h)
600
3,000
3,000
600
3,000
3,000
500
750
1,200

Product
pipeline Size
(inch)
12
24
24
14
24
24
16
14
16

Normal Loading ship


capacity (DWT)

Maximum Loading ship


capacity (DWT)

1,000 - 2,000
3,000 - 30,000
3,000 - 30,000
3,000 -5,000
3,000 -30,000
3,000 - 30,000
3,000 -5,000
3,000
5,000

3,000
30,000
30,000
5,000
30,000
30,000
5,000
6,000
10,000

Source: FEED document provided by FW in October 2009

All liquid products are to be transferred from the NSRP Refinery to the jetties in dedicated product pipelines. All product
dispatch through jetty will be made directly by pumping from respective storage tanks at refinery.
Solid products
The solid sulphur from the bulkhall will be reclaimed and moved to the ship by the export conveying system (including
sulphur export weigher) to feed to the ship loaders.
Polypropylene will be received in pallets from refinery and will be exported by 10,000 DWT ships from solid export berth.
1.4.5.6 Product Truck Loading System
The truck loading is designed for 5% of liquid products. The Product Truck Loading System is located inside the
Refinery. The Truck Loading facilities are designed to achieve the following:

Receive finished products (LPG (future), Gasoline RON92, Gasoline RON 95, Premium Diesel, Regular
Diesel and Fuel Oil (future)) from tanks within Product tankage area.

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Load products into trucks using top loading /bottom loading (for LPG future) system.

Loading will be done for 12 hours per day and 6 days a week for LPG and 12 hours per day and all 07 days of
a week for other products.

The truck size is required 16m3/truck for all products, except 20m3/truck for LPG in the future. Estimated number of
trucks is required of 72 trucks per day.
1.4.6 Refinery Layout
Overview layout of the NSRP is presented in Figure 1.13 and arranged as follows:

Figure 1-13 Overview Layout of NSRP Refinery and Petrochemical Complex


Areas of facilities are assigned as followings:
1. Administration area: 14ha
2. Technology area: 88ha
3. Support area, flare and ETP: 41ha
4. Tankage area: 118ha
5. Processing/Packing area: 14ha
6. Other areas: 39ha
7. Barrier area: 10ha
8. Planting area: 49ha

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Plot plan philosophy is as follows:


1. Process area
Process Unit should be located on the good soil condition area in order to minimize the civil cost and
schedule. (e.g.; ARDS, GOHDS, RFCC)

The units which affect operating condition each other should be located near by in order to operate all
units in short time.

To reduce the heat disbenefit by the heat dissipation and to reduce the cost of pipes, the associated units
are located near by.

The facilities which need the chemicals or catalysts on stream should be located along to the road to be
able to access the vehicle easily. And the facilities which produce waste product are equally treated.

The road which is around process area should be designed straight for transfer heavy machines,
equipments and fire engines to be easy access.

Process area requires around the process unit road. And also one main centre road needs for
maintenance, transfer large equipments and fire fighting.

2. Tankage area

Crude Oil tanks should be located on the northeast in order to minimize Crude pipeline between the tanks
and the SPM.

Product tankage should be located on East side area in Area-B in order to minimize product pipeline
between the tanks and the Jetty.

Intermediate tankage should not be located far from the process area in order to minimize the pipeline
between intermediate tankage and process unit.

LPG tankage should be located far from process unit to minimize explosion hazard.

Similar property tankage should be located in one dike in order to reduce total tankage number. Normally
similar property tankage is used common when tankage is maintained.

3. Administration area, Control building and Truck loading area

Administration and Control Building should not be located on down the wind from process area in order to
avoid toxic from Process Area.

Administration and Truck loading area should face a public road in order to get easy access without
passing through the plant area.

Administration Area should be minimizing in order to reduce refinery total area.

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1.4.7

Page 1-50
Final Report

PROJECT CONSTRUCTION

It is anticipated that EPC Contract will be awarded to a Consortium of Contractors to undertake the Engineering,
Procurement and Construction (EPC) of the NSRP Project. The Consortium will consist of a number of experienced
international EPC Contractors well recognized as leaders in the EPC Contracting Industry.
1.4.7.1 Onshore Constructions
Massive land development is being carried out by the Vietnamese Government to ensure appropriate quantity and
quality of ground is available for the development of the Project. This includes relocation of dwellings, site filling and site
preparation. The construction activities for these works are mentioned in other reports prepared by authorities so that
they are not included in this EIA Report.
There are no existing foundations or underground obstructions including rock formations in the plant site area. Soil
improvement measures may be required prior to construction. Foundation for project consists of following types:

Major equipments, buildings and structures foundation will be piled;


Minor equipments, pipe supports will be on ground bearing foundations.

For tankage area, construction method may be summarized as follows:

Tank foundations are to be prepared by the Civil contractor. The Civil contractor will present the prepared
ground to the Tank contractor for review and acceptance.

The tank manufacturer will prepare pre-assembled sections of the tank, including roof, in a preassembly
workshop away from the NSRP refinery site. Each pre-assembled section consists of flat plates which are
formed and welded into circular courses of around 2.5 m each in length. Each course will be fitted with nozzles,
ladder and platform clips etc. as required.

The preassembled circular courses and all other raw materials including piping, flanges, welding consumables,
lining materials, painting materials etc are delivered to a lay down are at the NSRP site.

The bottom plate (floor plate) and annular plate are welded in situ, in sections.

The first circular course is lifted into place and welded to the bottom plate and annular plate in situ.

Each circular section is lifted into place and welded to the section below.

As the height of the tank increases, scaffolding is erected to provide access for welding and NDE of the
circumferential joints and for fitting of piping etc.

The final top section and fixed roof or floating roof will be fitted.

Each circumferential and longitudinal weld will be subjected RT, UT, magnetic particle, and dye penetrate as
required by the code and project requirements.

All external fittings, stairways, ladders, platforms, hand railing are installed.

Water Spray Cooling Systems, Tank Foam Systems, Tanks Roof Drain Systems, and Floating Roof Seal
System are fitted and tested.

All internals, mixers etc are fitted.

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Fill tank with hydrotest water and test with positive air pressure when required by code requirements.

Prepare the internal surfaces of the tank for lining and carry out lining per code and project requirements.

Prepare the external surfaces of the tank, prime and finish paint in accordance with project requirements.

Note: Different tank manufacturers will have varying methods for site fabrication of storage tanks. Fabrication method
statements will be reviewed and agreed prior to tank manufacturer commencing work.
The onshore section of the 48 crude inlet pipeline will include electrical isolation facilities at the refinery boundary
interface and at the interface with the subsea section.
All product pipelines connecting from the plant to the jetties are buried and coated externally with 3 layer polyethylene
pipe coating systems. Each pipeline will have above ground isolation joints at each end and be provided with impressed
current cathodic protection.
Estimated number of equipments used in construction phase is presented in Table 1.22 and 1.23
Table 1.22 estimated number of equipments used in construction phase
Device
Heavy crane and equipment
Chain roller and crane (200-600 tons)
Chain roller and crane (100-200 tons)
Mobile crane (up to 100 tons)
Transport truck and bulldozer
Unloading truck
Shovel
Excavator
Water tanker
60-seat bus
Others
Total

Maximum quantity (piece)


3
6
16
35
15
10
12
25
8
183
150
463

Average quantity (piece)


2
4
10
23
10
7
8
17
5
122
100
308

Source: Technical Document No.3550-8710-PR-003 provided by FWEL, August 2009

Table 1.23 Estimated number of soil diggers


Device
Unloading truck
Excavator
Bulldozer
Roller / Press
Grader
Watering cart
Total

Maximum quantity (piece)


254
48
51
32
10
30
425

Average quantity (piece)


170
32
34
21
7
20
284

Source: Technical Document No.3550-8710-PR-003 provided by FWEL, August 2009

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1.4.7.2 Offshore Construction


Crude pipeline system
The pipeline construction methodologies are much different between offshore pipeline and shore approaching. For
offshore crude pipeline, following procedures are applied:

Pipe delivery and preparation including field joint coatings, cathodic protection, line pipe delivery to the barge
and preparation for welding;

Pipeline Fabrication: The work stations are arranged approximately every 12m along the side of the barge,
matching the length of individual pipe sections such that a welded joint can be found in every station;

Pipelay operations including overbend control, sagbend control and buckle detector;

Initiation of pipelay including pipely startup and dead man anchor start-up.

For shore approaching, the laybarge will set up over the right-of-way centreline with its stern towards the beach. This will
depend on the laybarge draft and its operation period. Dredging may be carried out to provide an approach channel for
the barge so it can come closer to the shore. Especially, shallow water anchor handling vessels may be used to set the
barge's anchors. Main procedures for shore approaching include as below:

Trenching and backfilling


Pipe pulling operation
Anchorage construction (for pull-to-shore)

PLEM tie in
Tie in activities at the offshore end of the pipeline will depend on the installation phase of the SPM and PLEM. Main
procedures are applied for PLEM tie in as follows:

Lay-down Near PLEM


It is important to ensure that the end of the pipeline lands on the seabed at the target location. The engineering
design and barge positioning systems will control the approach direction of the pipe route such that the
heading of the pipeline at lay down is correct. It then remains to ensure that the length of pipeline laid is such
that the end of the pipeline arrives in the right place. This is achieved by using the laybarge navigation and
positioning systems to accurately monitor the location of the barge.

Lay-down Head
The lay down head for the oil pipeline is designed to take the full pipeline test pressure. The 48 lay down head
will be fitted with valve and check valve. This arrangement will allow air from the pipeline to escape. However, it
will prevent seawater from the outside to enter the pipeline. During lay down of the pipeline the valves are
closed.

Spool Tie-in
The spool piece and the PLEM will be connected using flanged joints. After flooding and any testing of the
pipeline in accordance with project requirements, the flanged lay down head will be unbolted and recovered to
the surface. Divers will take accurate measurements between then pipeline end flange and the PLEM tie-in
flange.

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Northern breakwater
A land based construction method is considered most likely for the construction of the breakwater. The core of
the breakwater is constructed using dumper trucks in a land based construction method. Starting from land, trucks
dump their load into the water. Excavators are used for rock placement and shaping. The construction seawards is
continued using the already placed section as construction road. The armour layers of the breakwater are placed by
large land based cranes.
Harbour revetments
Rock armour is installed at the slope for protecting, in different layers. The largest rock is the primary armour layer of the
revetment while the internal layers are appropriate sized to prevent migration of underlayer material through the armour
layer. The core and the filter are made of granular material (quarried rock).
The revetments are built using a land based construction method. The rock for the revetments is placed by long reach
excavators or cranes from the new reclaimed/profiled strip of land.
Approach channel and harbour basin
It is necessary to dredge the approach channel and harbour basin in order to make it suitable for navigation of vessels to
be accommodated (3,000 up to 30,000 DWT).
The equipment for dredging is cutter suction dredger (CSD). This device has a cutter head at the suction inlet, to loosen
the sea bed material and transport it to the suction mouth. The cutter can be used for hard surface materials like gravel
or rock. It can dredge in willow water. The dredged material is usually sucked up by a wear-resistant centrifugal pump
and discharged through a pipe line or to a barge.
Jetties
The Construction Jetty is currently estimated to be 300 metres wide and will include one or more, finger jetties to
accommodate a number of flat top, low draft, barge carrying bulk cargoes.
A marwilling area, approximately 300 metres wide, will be constructed immediately behind the construction jetty to allow
expeditious offloading and turnaround of ships and to consolidate materials and equipment for transportation to site.
Haul roads will be constructed from the construction jetty to site for the transportation of materials and equipment to site,
and will be designed and constructed with heavy and large loads
Both jetties 1 and the temporary construction jetty (TCJ) consist of a deck on piles extending from the shore.
Underneath the deck, the slope to the shore is protected by a rock revetment.
The three jetties that are not attached to the shore consist of an approach bridge, a jetty head and berthing and mooring
dolphins. The jetty head (also called the platform) and access bridge structures mainly consist of a concrete deck
founded on (most likely steel tubular) piles.
Marine based construction is considered most likely for the access bridges given the size of the spans. For the
platforms the length of the spans is considerably smaller, a land based construction method is possible.
The piles of the jetties (both access bridges as platforms) are driven into the sea bed using floating equipment. This
floating equipment consists of a rig with a diesel of hydraulic pile hammer and an additional crane to lift the piles into
position for the piling crane.
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1.4.7.3 Supply source of constructional materials


As mentioned in the scope of this report, all activities of compensation, site clearance and leveling are carried out by the
Vietnam Government and it is out of scope of this EIA. Materials for site leveling are taken from borrow pits which is
nearby project area (as Chuot Chu, Dong Vang montains, etc.). The major exploitation equipment is Excavators and
graders. Transportation mode is by trucks of 10-15 tons.
In the construction phase, EPC contractor will select suppliers of chemicals, materials and equipment for the project, so
NSRP-LLC can not get detail information at this stage. Almost chemicals, materials and equipment will be transported
by ships through eastern project side. Other materials will be transported by trucks through national road 1A and
provincial road 513.
1.4.7.4 Accommodation Facilities for Construction and Operation Workers
Currently, there is no emerging philosophy for NSRP to develop such facilities as early works for free-issue to EPC
Contractor and its Construction Subcontractors. Estimated number of labour force in construction and operation phases
will be presented in Table -24.
Table 1-24 Estimated number of employees working for NSRP
Work force
Direct and indirect labour
Source:
Note:

Construction phase (person)


Average
Maximum
21,862
32,795

Operation phase
(person)
1,700*

Technical Document No.3550-8710-PR-003 provided by FWEL, August 2009


*1700 employees in operation phase include: 900 persons managed directly by NSRP LLC; 600 persons managed by NSRP LLCs Contractor and 200
international specialists.

The currently estimated total manpower figures for EPC, Construction Subcontractors, NSRP and its PMC are nearly
33,000 at peak and the requirement for space to accommodate this number of persons is estimated to be 730,000 m2.
The optimum location of accommodation camps is driven by a number of key considerations, including topography and
suitability of available land, distance from Site, QRA issues associated with the introduction of hydrocarbons at Site
during commissioning and later and safety and difficulty issues associated with routes and roads.
EPC Contractor is responsible for building accommodation camps as requirement of NSRP LLC. Accommodation
Camps will include, but not limited to, the following:

Temporary access and egress roads.


Temporary lighting.
Drainage Facilities.
Security gatehouses and associated facilities, including road and pedestrian barriers, fencing and lighting..
Parking areas for mass transportation buses, cars, motobikes and bikes.
Kitchens, Canteens and Mess Halls.
Camp Management offices.
Sleeping quarters.
Bathrooms and toilet facilities.
First-Aid and Medical Treatment Facilities.
Fire-Fighting.
Emergency Response and Evacuation Facilities, including vehicles,
Temporary Utility Distribution Facilities for electrical power, potable water and telecommunications.

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Potable Water Storage Facilities.


Waste Water and Sanitary Sewage Collection, Treatment and Disposal Facilities.

An accommodation is being built in Xuan Lam Nguyen Binh Communes with area of 25ha by NSRM; and 15km far
from the Plant. NSRP LLC will hire this accommodation to serve for the staff in construction and operation phases.
1.4.8

CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE

NSRP aims to have the mechanical completion of the refinery and petrochemical complex in the year 2013. Duration for
the FEED work is estimated to be 16 months from the effective date of FEED contract to the completion of FEED
package including total cost estimation and preparation of EPC-ITB documents. The overall project schedule is shown
in Figure 1-25.
Table 1-25 Overall Project Schedule

1.4.9

TOTAL CAPITAL AND ESTIMATED COST FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TREATMENT


AND MONITORING FACILITIES

Total project capital: approximately 6 billion USD.


Estimated cost for environmental treatment and monitoring facilities including:

Invest and install air pollution control:


225,500,000 USD
Invest and install anti-noise system:
500,000 USD
Invest and construct effluent treatment plant (ETP):
110,000,000 USD
Invest and construct environmental monitoring system: 325,000,000 USD

Implementation cost for environmental monitoring program of the Project is estimated as follows:

Construction phase:
Operation phase:

100,000 USD/year
100,000 USD/year

Project management mode: by Project owner


Project implementation time: project comes into operation in 2013.
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Section

Page 2-1
Final Report

2.

NATURAL ENVIRONMENT
AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONDITION
This section presents briefly existing natural environment and socio-economic condition as well as
biological resources at the project area and its vicinity via desk literature, survey and investigation on
Metocean, natural resources and socio-economic situation. In addition, this section shows the analytical
results of air, water, groundwater, sediment quality, biological parameters at the project area and its
vicinity. These information are baseline data for environmental monitoring program as the project
comes into construction and operation phase.
2.1

NATURAL ENVIRONMENT CONDITION

2.1.1

OFFSHORE

2.1.1.1 Marine Topography and Geology


Coastal topography features in Nghi Son area
Coastal topography in Nghi Son area is rather even and flat with small and narrow plains interspersed
by mountain blocks as Tron island, Lach Bang cap, Nghi Son island Shape of seashore is curved
toward the land. Specific dynamic of this shape is mainly caused by waves creating sand dunes along
the coast.
Development of coastal topography in this area is based on structural foundation of new tectonics VietLaos which belongs to fold curl PZ-MZ Viet Laos zone. Coastal side is sloping and leaning to the East
with average depth of 17m, deepest area is hollow range in the West of Vang island spreading in
North-South direction, with width of 500 1,000m and depth of -29m. Away from the seashore by
14.5km is Hon Me archipelago with many small islands, the biggest island is 17 km2 in area namely Me
island. Sediments created on surface of the seabed is clayey sand, fine sand; area nearby Hon Me
island have sediments commingled by organisms (coral) with thickness of 1.5 2m [14].
Seabed topography in harbour area
Results of Coastal and Marine Geology is drawn from several boreholes in the port area, near berth,
near access chanel [Ref.1] shows that:
Soil types in harbour basin

Upper layer below seabed, comprising loose to medium dense, fine to silty sand, has a varying
thickness of 2 to 5.5 m;

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The layer below comprises mainly stiff to very stiff clay. At the zero meter depth line this is stiff
sandy clay to stiff clay.

Further offshore a small layer clayey sand is encountered a top the clay layer;

Underneath, medium dense silty sand is present down to depths which are irrelevant for
dredging.

Soil types in harbour access channel


The overall soil types in the access channel to the harbour at borehole AC154 are the following:

Upper layer below seabed, comprising medium dense silty sand, has a thickness of about 2 m;
The layer below (3 m) comprises firm sandy clay;
Then a layer of stiff clay is encountered (5.5 m);
Underneath, medium dense silty sand is present down to depths which are irrelevant for
dredging.

Figure 2.1 Rough indication of cross shore soil profile

Hon Me archipelago in Nghi Son Gulf include Hon Me, Hon Mieng, Hon So, Hon Bung, Hon Hop, Hon
Vat islands and some other small islands. Hon Me island is the biggest one, with width of 2.27km in
East-West and North-South direction. The highest top of Hon Me island is 251m in height. This
archipelago creates a natural wall preventing Nghi Son island from a partial force of waves in the East
and Northeast direction. There is a hollow basin in this area with natural height of -30m to -32m, radius
of 200-300m and 12.5km far from the shore. In the North of Hon Me island, depth is -20 to -22m and
gradually shallow with natural height of -18 to -19m.
Harbour system is located in the North of Nghi Son island and the North of an existing cement jetty.
Harbour is in front of the Complex. Harbour access is in East and Northeast, along offshore area of Hon
Me island. SPM is located under natural sea water level, in the East of Hon Me island and 33.5km far
from harbour position.

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Seabed topography along crude oil pipeline is sloping gently, 600m far from the shore but the depth is
only -3m. Seabed sediments along the route are mainly alluvium sand. According to survey results of
seabed topography in NSRP harbour show that:

Main breakwater: starts from the shore (CD+3m) to the crest at seabed in depth of CD-5.5m.

Harbour basin: boundary lines run parallel with the seashore at CD-9m. Harbour basin
including turning basin will be constructed at a height of CD+0 to CD -5m.

Access channel: final part of access channel (bounded with turning basin) locates in area of
CD-5m in depth. First part of access channel locates in seabed area in depth of CD-13.2m.

According to research results of seabed sediments [15], sediments from seabed to depth of -10m are
mainly sands, stiff clay layer locates in depth of CD-20m to CD-40m and under CD-50m. Layers of sand
are mainly fine and have similar particle size distribution. Plastic level of stiff clay layer under CD-50m
decreases gradually.
Technical geology survey results show that surface soil layer is about 2m in thickness with very loose
sandy clay and bottom layer consists of very stiff clay.
2.1.1.2 Bathymetric condition
1. Wave regime feature at Hon Ngu station [2]
Thanh Hoa sea in general and Nghi Son Hon Me in particular locate in Tokin Gulf and are seashore
suffered from many typhoons in year. Wave condition in this area is the same as Hon Ngu island.
Wave direction
According to observed data at Hon Ngu station (during 1961-2007), sea waves exist in this area in
many directions and different frequencies. Frequencies of waves moving in the North (16.2%) and the
Northeast (15.9%) are highest; and lowest in the West (5%) and the South (1.5%). Waves in the East
and the Southeast have frequency of 6.3% and 9.1% in respectively.
Table 2.1 Wave height in directions at Hon Ngu station during 1961-2007
Height (m)
E

NE

H max
H average

3.00
0.76

3.4
0.96

3.50
0.73

H max
H average

2.10
0.70

3.80
0.91

6.30
4.03

H max
H average

6.00
3.87

3.00
0.72

2.30
0.54

H max
H average

3.40
0.70

6.00
2.16

3.00
0.56

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Direction
NW
W
January
1.80
1.00
0.61
0.65
February
2.10
1.50
0.65
1.00
March
2.00
0.50
0.55
0.38
April
1.00
1.00
0.36
0.50

SW

SE

1.1
0.77

1.7
0.67

3.0
0.56

0.50
0.50

1.30
0.53

1.50
0.53

0.63
0.46

0.50
0.41

1.30
0.58

1.35
0.51

1.50
0.58

1.70
0.60
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Direction
NW
W
May
H max
2.30
3.40
6.00
1.50
1.00
H average
0.65
0.66
0.52
0.51
0.43
June
H max
2.10
3.00
2.80
2.00
1.00
H average
0.52
0.65
0.49
0.47
0.46
July
H max
1.70
3.00
2.50
1.90
1.00
H average
0.65
0.76
0.63
0.57
0.52
August
H max
3.00
6.00
3.60
2.30
1.25
H average
0.63
0.76
0.63
0.55
0.42
September
H max
4.00
6.00
6.40
5.76
1.36
H average
0.73
0.98
0.72
0.66
0.50
October
H max
5.60
7.50
7.50
3.28
1.50
H average
0.78
1.11
0.89
0.69
0.44
November
H max
2.50
3.80
4.00
2.50
0.75
H average
0.79
0.98
0.91
0.65
0.54
December
H max
2.00
3.50
3.50
2.00
1.00
H average
0.68
0.95
0.92
0.63
0.56
Year
H max
6.00
7.50
7.50
5.76
1.50
H average
0.96
0.97
0.96
0.58
0.53
Source: Report of Hydro-Meteorological at Nghi Son and Hon Me Island [2]

Page 2-4
Final Report

Height (m)

NE

SW

SE

1.50
0.43

13.0
0.53

2.00
0.56

1.50
0.50

1.30
0.56

1.50
0.55

2.00
0.47

2.20
0.56

2.10
0.55

1.25
0.40

1.30
0.51

2.50
0.49

1.80
0.48

2.25
0.58

2.50
0.59

1.30
0.51

6.00
0.87

5.00
0.71

0.50
0.50

1.50
0.65

2.10
0.66

0.00
0.00

0.75
0.43

0.80
0.48

2.00
0.46

6.00
0.57

5.00
0.57

Wave height
Average wave heights in area vary in range of 0.5 1.0m. According to statistical data for years, waves
in the North and the Northeast have average height of 1.0m and maximum value is 7.5m. Waves in the
West and the Southwest are minimum with average height of 0.5m and maximum height of 2.0m.
Waves in the South and Southwest is rather high with average height of 0.6-0.7m and maximum value
of 5.0-6.0m.
Maximum wave heights, rare frequency with the return periods of 5, 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 years
Referring to statistical data of wave regime at Hon Me station during 1961-2007 shows that:

Wave height of 2.0 2.5m: occur frequently.


Wave height of 5.5 6.5m: unusual, frequency one of 10 30 years.
Wave height of 7.0m: frequency one of every 50 year.
Especially, waves at height of 8.5m or more: very rare, frequency one of every 100 year.

Dominant high waves are mainly in North and North-Northeast directions. Other wave directions in
surveyed area are lower frequency than above directions. The highest waves often occur in typhoon
season (May to October), especially in July and August.

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Wave frequency

Above results show that in winter, dominant waves in North and Northeast direction occur with
frequency of 50%. Wave height of 1.0 2.0 occupies about 30%.

In the summer months, dominant waves are in Southeast and Southwest with frequency of 30%
and 15% at respectively. Waves in these months have height of 1 2m and frequency of 30 35%.

According to wind roses data, it may consider that in January, February and March, waves in
surveyed area are mainly in calm conditions and have frequencies of 37.7%, 34.9% and 46%
respectively. Dominant wave directions in these months are North and Northeast. In the summer
months, waves are calm at high frequency of 50 55%, with popular direction of Southeast and
Southwest, but only 2 3% in the South.

2. Tide
Presently, there is not available measurements data of water level at Nghi Son area. Therefore, water
level data of this area has to base on two nearby Hon Ngu and Van Thang (50-60km) stations (Figure
2.2). Table 2.2 is given tidal data of Hon Ngu station [Ref.2].

Figure 2.2 Hon Ngu station location

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Table 2.2 Tidal data at Hon Ngu station


Parameter

Annual Tidal Level1


(m)

Statistical Tidal Level 2


(m)

Highest astronomical tide, HAT

3.07

3.10

Mean high water spring, MHWS

2.81

2.69

Mean high water, MHW

2.50

2.42

Mean sea level, MSL

1.72

1.74

Mean low water, MLW

0.73

0.85

Mean low water spring, MLWS

0.35

0.53

Lowest astronomical tide, LAT

0.00

0.17

Source: Source: Report of Hydro-Meteorological at Nghi Son and Hon Me Island [2]

Notes:
1.
This data represents data derived from the harmonic and statistical analysis of the usable/reliable 1 year
observations in 1972 and world tidal model data.
2.

This data represents long term averages and is derived from the harmonic and statistical analysis of the
usable/reliable 18.6 years of water level observations and world tidal model data.

Preliminary conclusions are drawn as below:

Tide has a diurnal regime with one high and one low water per day.

Tide also displays a spring-neap cycle of approximately 14 days.

The preliminary water levels at Nghi Son are:


- HAT 3 3.5 m +LAT
- Spring tidal range is in the order of 2.5 m
- Mean tidal range is in the order of 1.75 m

Specific sea level


Specific sea levels in Nghi Son Gulf are based on measured sea levels at Hon Ngu station (Table 2.3).
Table 2.3 Sea levels at Hon Ngu station during 1961 2001
Parameter

Month

Year

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

HMean

183

180

174

175

175

174

175

183

199

209

203

190

185

Hmax

306

307

308

304

327

303

331

362

368

365

346

336

368

Hmin

21

26

36

28

26

12

46

63

45

26

Source: Report of Hydro-Meteorological at Nghi Son and Hon Me Island [2]

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An approximation is used to define characteristics of monthly and annual sea water levels in Nghi Son
gulf. Annual average sea water level is about 188cm, the maximum is 374cm and the minimum is about
-1cm. Sea water level get maximum value in storm season and predominant period of Northeast
monsoon season; and the minimum value is in Southwest monsoon season.
Table 2.4 Characteristics of sea level in Nghi Son gulf
Month
Parameter

Year

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Haverage

186

182

176

177

177

176

177

185

201

212

206

193

188

Hmax

311

312

313

309

332

308

336

368

374

371

352

342

374

Hmin

19.7

24.8

35

26.8

24.8

2.31

10.5

-0.8

45.2

62.6

44.2

24.8

-0.8

Source: Report of Hydro-Meteorological at Nghi Son and Hon Me Island [2]

3. Current regime
Current velocity in project area is not strong and in range of 0.1 0.3 m/s. In this area, current is
obviously affected by tide and strongly changed by space. In the spring tide, current velocity in some
positions may get value of 0.8 m/s. Dominant current direction in the winter (Northeast monsoon
season) is from the North to the South. In the summer season (Southwest monsoon season), main
direction is from the South to the North.
The following observed current data of Tedysouth 2003 shows that:

Current velocity in project area (nearshore) (Station V6, Figure 2.3) is not strong and in range
of 0.1 0.3 m/s;

Offshore average current velocities (Station V1, Figure 2.3) seem to be limited to 0.4 0.5 m/s;

In spring tide, current velocity in some positions may get value of 0.8 m/s;

The major current direction in the Winter season (Northeast monsoon season) is from the North
to the South;

In the Summer season (Southwest monsoon season), main direction is from the South to the
North;

The nearshore currents are apparently influenced by contraction around Nghi Son island.

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Figure 2.3 Wave data stations - NSRP


Apparent scour holes indicate the occurrence of large current velocities near the bed which do not
appear in the two weeks of observations that are available at present.
Briefly, it can be stated that the undisturbed, tide-driven currents are weak to moderate up to 0.6 m/s.
There are indications, however, of larger (surface) current velocities that are likely to be related to
contraction of the current around obstacles and to wind effects. Especially during typhoons strong winddriven currents may occur. For the design a current velocity of 0.6 m/s shall be used.
2.1.1.3 Extreme climatic conditions
1. Tropical storm
The paths of the typhoons in gulf of Tonkin area as recorded in the period of 1951- 2007 are presented
in Figure 2.4.

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Figure 2.4 Cyclone tracks 1951-2007 for gulf of Tonkin


The maximum radius of the 30 kts isotach of tropical storms that have occurred in the gulf of Tonkin is
typically between 50 and 200 km with maximum values up to 300 km. The maximum radius of the 50
kts is smaller with typical values between 20 and 60 km.
2. Cyclone at Nghi Son region
The number of tropical storm centers passing by Nghi Son within a certain distance R in the period
1951 2007 is summarized in Table 2.5.
Table 2.5 Number of cyclone centers passing Nghi Son gulf
Radius
0.5 56km
1.0 111km
1.5 167km
2.0 222km
2.5 278km

Cyclones

Typhoons

Total

Per year

Total

Per year

21
50
89
117
149

0.4
0.9
1.6
2.1
2.6

5
11
24
30
35

0.1
0.2
0.4
0.5
0.6

Source: Report of Hydro-Meteorological at Nghi Son and Hon Me Island [2]


Note: Observation in period 1951 - 2007

The result from Tabble 2.5 show that every year about 02 cyclones directly hit the Nghi Son area and
that once every two years a typhoon directly hits that area.

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Local cyclones may not necessarily be responsible for the largest waves in a particular. Very distant
cyclones may have more profound effect on the wave states.
The distribution of the residence time of cyclone centres is in the 2.5 area. The majority of the
cyclones in the last 57 years had a residence time smaller than 40 hours.
These residence times are the periods that the cyclones will be directly affecting the downtime of the
SPM system. The periods of indirect effect - e.g. a period with relatively large wave heights - is likely to
be longer.
3. Sea level rising by typhoons
Statistical data in 44 years (1951 - 1995) show that Nghi Son Gulf is more influenced by typhoons and
tropical low pressure than other sea areas of Vietnam with more than 50 times (28% of total typhoons
landed to Vietnam) in this period. Typhoon number 2 in year 1981 namely Kelly landed to Nghe An
territorial sea at maximum velocity of 38 m/s. Its average velocity is 22.2 km/h. Landing direction of the
typhoon is at right angle to seashore and this is the reason why it makes sea level rise more quickly. As
compared to Kelly, Nancy typhoon number 7 in 1982 is more powerful and landed to Thanh Hoa
Nghe An region causing strongly effects to project area. Wind strength of the Nancy is at level 12 and
pulling level is more than 12. Air pressure at typhoon center reduces to 970 mbar. At the time of its
landing, wind speed observed at Vinh Meteorology Station got maximum value at 40 m/s. From 1995 to
2007, there were some typhoons landing or causing effects on project area, but less powerful than Kelly
and Nancy typhoons.
In conclusion, in Thanh Hoa and the North of Nghe An areas during 1951 to 2007, there are 02 strong
typhoons landing to project area and cause sea level rise unusually (approximately 3.0m). Calculations
by numerical value method show that maximum sea level raised by typhoons in Nghi Son Gulf is more
than 2.5m.
4. Swell
Since January 2008 also swell data is available from a denser (0.5 deg x 0.5 deg) grid of the NWW3
model.
Table 2.6 Swell height and period frequency distribution
Hs (m)
0.0-0.2
0.2-0.4
0.4-0.6
0.6-0.8
0.8-1.0
>1
Total
Exceed

8-9
1.71%
1.36%
0.38%
0.07%

9-10
2.56%
1.98%
0.82%
0.20%

0.17%
3.68%
25,2%

5.56%
21.52%

Swell period (s)


10-11
11-12
2.56%
0.92%
3.14%
5.12%
0.41%
0.55%

12-13
0.65%
1.43%
0.89%

13-14
0.1%
0.14%

14-15
0.07%

6.10%
15.96%

2.97%
3.27%

0.24%
0.31%

0.07%
0.07%

6.58%
9.85%

Total

Exceed

8.56%
13.16%
3.03%
0.27%

25.20%
16.64%
3.48%
0.44%
0.17%
0.17%

0.17%
25.20%

Source: Report of Hydro-Meteorological at Nghi Son and Hon Me Island [2]

Conclusions as drawn in [2] are:


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25.2% of the considered period swell waves actually have periods of 8 seconds or larger.

The swell waves have due to the East (to East - Southeast) direction a more easterly direction
than the locally generated waves. This difference in direction is partly caused by the different
location of generation and partly by the more shoreward location of the output point of the finer
NOAA wave model (19N, 106E of the finer NOAA model as opposed to output point 19N,
106.25E of the regular NOAA model).

2.1.1.4 Existing Natural Environment


To assess environmental quality in the project area, CPSE has conducted field survey samplings in the
rainy season (August 2008 and June 2009) and dry season (February 2009) and analyzed of sea water
quality, sediment and biology samples at offshore project constructions and its vicinity. The sampling
site are showed in Figure 2.5 and 2.6.
Number of sampling stations, analysed samples and parameters are presented in Table 2.7. Detailed
coordinates of offshore sampling stations are listed in Table 2.8. The sampling method, analysis and
detailed analytical results are showed in separately report of the environmental baseline study report
for the Nghi Son Refinery and petrochemical Project (Appendix III).
Table 2.7 Summary of samples number in sampling surveys NSRP
Sample types

Number of stations

Sediment
Benthos
Surface water
Zooplankton
Phytoplankton

26
26
26
26
26

Sediment
Benthos
Surface water
Zooplankton
Phytoplankton
Underground water
Soil
Air

2
2
2
2
2
7
9
8

Sediment
Benthos
Surface water
Zooplankton
Phytoplankton
TOTAL
Source: CPSE, December 2009

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

17
17
17
17
17

Samples/station x 2 times
Offshore
3x2
3x2
2 (3 if sea depth is more than 15m) x 3
1x 2
1x 2
Onshore
3x2
3x2
2x2
1x 2
1x 2
1x 2
2x2
3 times/day, 3 consecutive days x 3
Coastal
3x2
3x2
2 (3 if sea depth is more than 15m) x 3
1x 2
1x 2

Total samples
156
156
182
52
52
12
12
8
4
4
14
36
144
102
102
72
34
34
1,176

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nnw n

nne
ne

nw

t ng m
t bng khu l i n h p l c h a du nghi sn
over al L sit e pl an of nghi son r ef inEr y and
pet r ochemical compl ex

ene

wnw

ese

wsw

se

sw
ssw

Page 2-12
Final Report

sse

sng
b ng
Bang River
River
Bang

B1

A1

Entrance
channel
import
berth
l ung vo
b
n of
nh
p du
t h
ent r ance channel of impor t ber t h

B2

Crude
oilpimport
b
n nh
du t berth
h

x mai l amvil l age


mai l m

B4

G2

A3

f ut ur e
expansion
ar ea

que
son
l ake

D3
G1

D5
A6

hn bng
ung ng xut sn phm
pr oduct expor t pipel ine

Bong island

bong isl and

hn vang
Vang
island
isl and
vang

K4

hn m
i
ng
Mieng
island

D7

isl and mieng

A7

nh m y xim ng
nghi sn

Liquid
product
export
b
n xu
t sn ph
mlberths
ng

nghi
sn
nghi
and
Nghison
Son isl
island

l iquid pr oduct expor t


ber t hs
b
n t u phc v ca cng
t ug ber t hs

B7

power
t r mbi
n
st at ion
ap
220/110KV 220/110KV

bin

Tug berths

cul au

B8

Hai t huong
ni xu
c
Xuoc
Mountain

hn v t
Vat
island
isl and vat

G4

K7
K8

nghi son cement

vNGNEOTU
D = 1000 M

hn gc
Goc
island
isl and goc

TRu mount ain

Nghi
Son
Cement Factory
f act or
y

hn hp
Hop
island
isl and hop

Product export pipeline

G3
D6

ni chut t r

ung hmqua ni

K3

K5

K6

B5
B6

t r mbi
n p - power st at ion 110/22KV

honme

submar ine cr ude oil pipel ine

vt r mai l m

A4

h
qu
sn

D4A5

Me
island
hn
m

Submarine
crudeng
oil pipeline
nhp du t h
t uy
n ung

x hi y
n
hi y
n vil l age

mai l amSit e

khu vc

D2m r ng

K1

K2

D1 A2
B3

K9

G5

Tonkin
t onkin

D8
A8

Berth for construction work and


Solid
product export
b
n phc v xy dng - xut

B9

K10

ng

sn phmr
n
ber t h f or const r uct ion wor k and sol id
pr oduct expor t

Berth
exist
andN
No.2
b
n s
1&No.1
2 cng
ghi sn

gul f
Gulf

K11 ber t h exist no1 and No2


K12

Surface
and
sampling
Offshore
12i khi
stations)
Ca
c trawater,
m laysediment
mau n
c biology
mat, tra
m tchstations
ay va sinh
hoc(Total:
- Ngoa
(Tong so: 12 tram)
Surface
water,
and
sampling
Onshore
12b
stations)
Ca
c tra
m laysediment
mau n
c biology
mat, tra
m tchstations
ay va sinh
hoc(Total:
- Tren
(Tong so: 09 tram)
Groundwater
stations
(Total:
05nstations)
Cac tram lasampling
y mau n
c nga
m (To
g so: 05 tram)
Air cand
stations
(Total:
08(To
stations)
Ca
tranoise
m lasampling
y mau kh
va tie
ng on
ng so: 08 tram)
Soil
08nstations)
Cacsampling
tram lastations
y mau (Total:
at (To
g so: 08 tram)

Embarkment

ch
n c t
embankment

Entrance
channel
of product
export
l ung vo
b
n xu
t sn ph
m berths
ent r ance channel of pr oduct expor t ber t hs

SCALE:ASA

Figure 2.5 Sampling locations in NSRP area

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Final Report

E13
E6
E5

E14

E4
E7

E8

E3
E11

E2

E20

E9

E1

E15
E19

E18

E17
E22

E23

Figure 2.6 Sampling locations in SPM area and offshore pipeline

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

E10

E12

E24
E21

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Page 2-14
Final Report

Table 2.8 Coordinates of offshore sampling stations NSRP


Station name
K-1
K-2
K-3
K-4
K-7
K-8
K-9
K-10
K-11
K-12
E-1
E-2
E-3
E-4
E-5
E-6
E-7
E-8
E-9
E-10
E-11
E-12
E-13
E-14
E-15
E-16
E-17
E-18
E-19
E-20
E-21
E-22
E-23
E-24

Sampling position
Access to old SPM (near Hon Me island)
Old SPM (near Hon Me island)
Hon Mieng island
Estuary between Nghi Son Cement jetty and NSRP harbour
Near Nghi Son fishing village
Turning basin of NSRP harbour
Access channel of NSRP harbour

Along crude oil pipeline and 04 proposed positions at SPM of the Project

Along access channel

Around Hon Me island

Source: CPSE, March 2010


Grid: UTM

Coordinates
Y (m)

X (m)

595662
594440
596385
595199
586110
585387
585714
586340
587569
588187
585762.76
588461.64
592060.14
595984.88
610800.35
619621.00
610969.00
623391.97
613487.41
623522.01
605454.85
615673.93
621035.21
624806.18
624936.22
622107.80
614259.72
584413.33
588911.45
592509.95
593863.2
595216.1
598120.3
598088.3

2143171
2139681
2143282
2142263
2139096
2138651
2135279
2134219
2132741
2132357
2143557.49
2144867.48
2146614.13
2148519.14
2150864.72
2152261.20
2147829.16
2147257.12
2144316.58
2141907.16
2145306.70
2141840.15
2153675.41
2148671.33
2143321.37
2140492.95
2140425.94
2141702.50
2142585.81
2144332.47
2140144.1
2139207.4
2139050.7
2141721.9

Datum: VN2000

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1. Sea water quality


Sea water quality in the project area and its vincinity is assessed based on comparison of analytical results of sea water
quality (Table 2.9, Table 2.10 and Table 2.11) in the rainy season (August 2008 and June 2009) and in the dry season
(February 2009) in area of offshore constructions and National Technical Regulation QCVN10:2008/BTNMT on coastal
sea water Column 3.
Table 2.9 Analytical results of physical characteristics in sea water
in the dry season (February 2009) and the rainy season (August 2008 and June 2009) samplings
pH

DO (mg/l)

Salinity ()

Temperature (oC)

Sample

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

E-1

7.7

7.6

5.7

5.6

33

30

25

27

E-2

7.8

7.7

5.9

5.6

32

30

25

27

E-3

7.7

7.8

5.8

5.6

32

31

25

26

E-4

7.6

7.5

5.6

5.6

32

31

24

26

E-5

7.7

7.6

5.5

5.6

32

31

25

27

E-6

7.7

7.7

5.4

5.5

31

31

25

27

E-7

7.7

7.6

5.4

5.6

32

31

25

27

E-8

7.6

7.4

5.4

5.5

32

30

22

26

E-9

7.7

7.7

5.6

5.6

32

31

24

26

E - 10

7.7

7.5

5.6

5.7

32

30

25

26

E - 11

7.8

7.7

5.4

5.5

32

31

25

27

E - 12

7.6

7.6

5.5

5.5

32

31

24

26

E - 13

7.5

7.5

5.6

5.7

33

31

25

26

E - 14

7.7

7.6

5.6

5.7

33

31

23

26

E - 15

7.7

7.6

5.6

5.6

32

31

23

26

E - 16

7.7

7.7

5.6

5.6

33

31

24

26

E - 17

7.7

7.8

5.6

5.6

32

31

24

26

E - 18

7.6

7.5

5.6

5.6

33

30

25

26

E - 19

7.5

7.6

5.5

5.5

33

30

23

27

E-2

7.7

7.7

5.4

5.5

32

31

23

26

E - 21

7.7

7.3

5.6

5.6

32

31

24

26

E - 22

7.6

7.3

5.6

5.6

32

31

24

26

E - 23

7.6

7.4

5.5

5.5

32

29

23

27

E - 24

7.6

7.4

5.5

5.6

33

29

23

26

K-1

7.7

7.7

5.9

6.1

33

32.8

24

26

K-2

7.6

7.7

5.5

6.1

33

32.8

24

26

K-3

7.8

7.8

5.4

5.9

33

32.5

24

26

K-4

7.9

7.8

5.5

5.9

33

32.7

24

26

QCVN 10:2008

6.5 8.5

Source: CPSE, March 2010

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Page 2-16
Final Report

Table 2.10 Analytical results of chemical characteristics of sea water


In the dry season (February 2009) and the rainy season (August 2008 and June 2009) samplings
Sample

E-1

E-2

E-3

E-4

E-5

E-6

E-7

E-8

E-9

E-10

E-11

E-12

E-13

E-14

E-15

Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season

Concentration (mg/L)
NO3Total N

TSS

THC(*)

NH4+

SO42-

NO2-

Total P

Phenol

CN-

BOD

COD

13

0.012

0.026

2150

0.016

0.012

0.41

0.012

<0.001

< 0.007

0.75

1.9

14

0.013

0.034

2250

1350

0.016

0.49

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.63

1.9

15

0.014

0.020

2230

<0.0004

0.006

1.04

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.66

1.8

14

0.014

0.072

2130

1400

0.005

0.98

<0.007-0.010

<0.001

< 0.007

0.98

2.1

16

0.013

0.018

2200

0.019

0.01

0.41

0.012

<0.001

< 0.007

0.9

2.2

16

0.013

0.013

2210

1350

0.017

0.43

0.021

<0.001

< 0.007

0.66

1.8

16

0.011

0.022

2120

0.001

0.009

0.76

0.014

<0.001

< 0.007

0.76

2.0

15

0.012

0.013

2180

1333

0.008

0.78

0.034

<0.001

< 0.007

0.70

1.8

15

0.01

0.015

0.069

0.014

1.1

0.021

<0.001

< 0.007

0.96

2.2

13

0.011

0.018

0.001

0.029

1.12

0.026

<0.001

< 0.007

1.0

2.3

14

0.012

0.010

<0.0004

0.008

0.45

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.78

2.0

13

0.012

0.017

<0.0004

0.009

0.47

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.58

1.6

16

0.014

0.016

<0.0004

0.01

0.67

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.59

1.7

15

0.013

0.022

<0.0004

0.011

0.68

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.78

2.1

15

0.015

0.007

<0.0004

0.008

0.5

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.76

2.0

15

0.014

0.009

<0.0004

0.008

0.52

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.98

2.2

14

0.013

0.019

0.033

0.02

0.57

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.59

1.7

14

0.013

0.011

<0.0004

0.016

0.58

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.87

2.0

14

0.013

0.011

<0.0004

0.007

0.44

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.61

1.7

13

0.014

0.011

<0.0004

0.009

0.45

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.63

1.8

14

0.013

0.033

<0.0004

0.005

0.42

<0.007-0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.63

1.8

15

0.014

0.016

<0.0004

0.020

0.46

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.79

2.0

15

0.013

0.008

<0.0004

0.008

0.44

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.72

1.9

14

0.014

0.013

<0.0004

0.013

0.45

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

1.10

2.4

16

0.013

0.009

<0.0004

0.008

0.61

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.71

1.9

13

0.013

0.009

<0.0004

0.010

0.63

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.77

1.9

15

0.013

0.011

<0.0004

0.008

0.45

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.76

2.0

15

0.013

0.010

<0.0004

0.015

0.57

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.84

2.0

15

0.013

0.012

<0.0004

0.009

0.43

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.65

1.8

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Sample
Rainy
season
Dry
season
E-16
Rainy
season
Dry
season
E-17
Rainy
season
Dry
season
E-18
Rainy
season
Dry
season
E-19
Rainy
season
Dry
season
E-20
Rainy
season
Dry
season
E-21
Rainy
season
Dry
season
E-22
Rainy
season
Dry
season
E-23
Rainy
season
Dry
season
E-24
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
K-1
season
Dry
season
Rainy
K-2
season
Dry
season
Rainy
K-3
season
Dry
season
Rainy
K-4
season
QCVN 10:2008

Concentration (mg/L)
NO3Total N

TSS

THC(*)

NH4+

SO42-

NO2-

14

0.014

0.011

<0.0004

0.009

15

0.013

0.01

<0.0004

14

0.015

0.009

15

0.012

0.011

14

0.013

15

Page 2-17
Final Report

Total P

Phenol

CN-

BOD

COD

0.45

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.69

1.9

0.007

0.5

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.64

1.8

<0.0004

0.009

0.52

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.70

1.9

<0.0004

0.009

0.65

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.67

1.8

0.014

<0.0004

0.012

0.66

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.96

2.1

0.013

0.0391

2200

0.017

0.011

0.64

0.035

<0.001

< 0.007

0.8

2.0

11

0.018

0.051

2150

0.005

0.026

0.58

0.029

<0.001

< 0.007

0.61

1.8

15

0.012

0.018

2250

0.002

0.008

0.81

0.008

<0.001

< 0.007

0.94

2.2

13

0.013

0.025

2100

0.002

0.031

0.73

0.003

<0.001

< 0.007

1.1

2.3

16

0.014

0.021

2190

0.022

0.011

0.53

0.012

<0.001

< 0.007

1.03

2.3

15

0.014

0.097

2200

0.063

0.084

0.75

0.010

<0.001

< 0.007

0.66

1.8

12

0.013

0.027

2280

0.045

0.015

0.61

0.014

<0.001

< 0.007

0.78

2.0

11

0.013

0.011

2550

0.002

0.018

0.59

0.248

<0.001

< 0.007

1.3

2.0

13

0.012

0.026

2100

0.039

0.02

0.56

0.016

<0.001

< 0.007

0.68

1.8

11

0.014

0.078

2200

0.002

0.012

0.59

0.110

<0.001

< 0.007

0.82

2.0

14

0.014

0.015

2330

0.043

0.018

0.49

0.017

<0.001

< 0.007

0.68

1.8

13

0.015

0.028

2150

0.002

0.017

0.40

0.013

<0.001

< 0.007

0.72

1.8

14

0.013

0.032

2330

0.046

0.019

0.54

0.02

<0.001

< 0.007

0.61

1.7

13

0.014

0.047

2333

0.004

0.021

0.61

0.008

<0.001

< 0.007

0.68

1.7

13

0.017

0.096

2210

0.032

0.017

0.49

0.036

<0.001

< 0.007

0.82

2.0

5.4

0.009

0.120

0.006

0.025

0.73

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.85

11

0.0095

0.028

2120

0.026

0.013

0.48

0.03

<0.001

< 0.007

1.04

2.3

<5

0.010

0.030

0.006

0.026

0.64

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

1.40

11

0.01

0.024

2320

0.022

0.01

0.51

0.017

<0.001

< 0.007

0.65

1.8

<5

0.015

<0.004

0.007

0.030

0.51

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

1.40

12

0.019

0.026

2340

0.068

0.039

0.68

0.022

<0.001

< 0.007

0.69

1.9

<5

0.007

<0.004

0.58

0.35

1.2

<0.007

<0.001

< 0.007

0.85

0.5

Source: CPSE, March 2010

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Page 2-18
Final Report

Table 2.11 Analytical results of heavy metals in sea water


in the dry season (February 2009) and the rainy season (August 2008 and June 2009) samplings
Sample

E-1

E-2

E-3

E-4

E-5

E-6

E-7

E-8

E-9

E-10

E11

E12

E-13

E-14

E-15

E-16

Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy

Cu

Pb

Zn

Cd

Cr

Fe

Hg

(mg/l)

(mg/l)

(mg/l)

(mg/l)

(mg/l)

(mg/l)

(mg/l)

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08

< 0,001

<0.005

<0,001 - 0,003

0,008

<0,005

< 0,02

< 0,08

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08-0,19

< 0,001

<0.005

<0,001 - 0,003

0,013

<0,005

< 0,02

< 0,08

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08-0,10

< 0,001

<0.005

<0,001

0,011

<0,005

< 0,02

< 0,02

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08-0,62

< 0,001

<0.005

<0,001 - 0,003

0,023

<0,005

< 0,02

0,15

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08

< 0,001

<0.005

<0,001 - 0,002

0,009

<0,005

< 0,02

< 0,02

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08

< 0,001

<0.005

0,004

<0,005 0,007

<0,005

< 0,02

< 0,02

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08

< 0,001

<0.005

<0,001 0,008

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

< 0,08

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08

< 0,001

<0.005

0,004

0,022

<0,005

< 0,02

< 0,08

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08

< 0,001

<0.005

0,001

0,029

<0,005

< 0,02

< 0,08

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08

< 0,001

<0.005

<0,001 - 0,008

0,009

<0,005

< 0,02

< 0,08

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

0,132

< 0,001

<0.005

<0,001

0,008

<0,005

< 0,02

< 0,08

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08

< 0,001

<0.005

0,002

0,007

<0,005

< 0,02

< 0,08

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08

< 0,001

<0.005

<0,001

0,010

<0,005

< 0,02

0,13

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08

< 0,001

<0.005

<0,001

0,008

<0,005

< 0,02

< 0,08

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08

< 0,001

<0.005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

< 0,08

< 0,001

<0,005

<0,001

<0,005

<0,005

< 0,02

<0,08-0,37

< 0,001

<0.005

0.003

0.006

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Sample

Page 2-19
Final Report

Cu

Pb

Zn

Cd

Cr

Fe

Hg

(mg/l)

(mg/l)

(mg/l)

(mg/l)

(mg/l)

(mg/l)

(mg/l)

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

<0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

0.001

<0.005 - 0.008

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

<0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

0.003

0.008

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

0.09

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

0.010

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

0.15

< 0.001

<0.005

0.003

0.008

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

0.18

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

0.007

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

<0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

0.011

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

0.17

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

0.015

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

0.27

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

0.009

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

0.006

0.050

<0.005

< 0.02

0.087

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

0.002

0.011

<0.005

< 0.02

0.086

< 0.001

<0.005

0.002

0.013

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005 -0.014

<0.005

< 0.02

<0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

<0.08-0.30

< 0.001

<0.005

0.004

0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

0.1

0.005

0.05

0.3

0.005

season
E-17

E-18

E-19

E-20

E-21

E-22

E-23

E-24

K-1

K-2

K-3

K-4

Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season

QCVN10:2008

Source: CPSE, March 2010

Based on analytical results presented in Table 2.9, 2.10 and 2.11, some conclusions of sea water quality in project area
may be summarised as follows:

In general, almost parameters of sea water quality analysed in project area meet QCVN10:2008/BTNMT.
Temperature and salinity parameters of sea water vary in very narrow range. BOD and COD contents are
relative statble between sampling stations in both seasons.
pH values are in range of 7.3 - 7.9 in both of rainy and dry seasons.
DO values at offshore sampling stations in both seasons are in the range from 5.4 to 6.1mg/l and meet QCVN
10:2008 (>5mg/l).

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Page 2-20
Final Report

Total suspended solid (TSS) at almost sampling stations varies in a narrow range from 11 to 16 mg/L in both
seasons, except stations from K1 to K4 there is different TSS contents between two sampling seasons.

The total oil content in water at offshore sampling stations is quite homogeneous and not much different
between two surveyed seasons. The highest total oil content is recorded at station K-4 (Mieng island) in the
dry season.

At almost offshore stations, CN- contents are lower than detection limit of analytical method in both of two
seasons.

NH4+ content at all sampling stations are much lower than QCVN 10:2008/BTNMT (0.5mg/l).

NO2-, NO3- contents as well as total N content at almost of sampling stations are very low and vary in a
narrow range. However, the contents of three above-mentioned parameters increase about 6 7 times higher
at station K-4, Mieng island, in the rainy season.

Total phosphorus content at most of offshore sampling stations is lower than detection limit of analytical
method. At stations E21 and E22, total phosphorus content increase significantly in the rainy season.

Among seven analyzed trace heavy metals, four metals are below the detection limit of analytical method AAS
(Cu, Cd, Cr and Hg). Other metals are also found in very low content in comparison with QCVN 10:2008 at
offshore sampling stations in both of rainy and dry seasons.

2. Seabed sediment quality


Grain size distribution
Analytical results of grain size distribution in seabed sediment in the project area are summarized in Table 2.12.
Description of physical appearance of sediments and sampling schedule are given in Appendix III Item A Sampling
Diary.
Table 2.12 Summary of analytical results of gain size distribution
in dry season (February 2009) and rainy season (August 2008 and June 2009) samplings
Station

K-1

K-2

K-3

K-4

Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season

Mean Phi

Standard
Deviation

Skew-ness

Kurtosis

Sorting index

Sediment type

0.44

1.92

1.07

3.34

Average

Coarse sand

-0.05

2.34

45.82

8.57

Bad

Coarse sand

0.15

5.66

48.07

3.07

Average

Coarse sand

1.05

3.92

6.64

18.07

Bad

Fine sand

3.50

-0.24

1.65

9.94

38.38

Very Bad

Very fine sand

2.17

2.90

0.77

2.86

16.65

21.86

Very Bad

Fine sand

3.14

2.67

-0.38

2.25

1.64

65.73

Very Bad

Very fine sand

2.38

3.77

0.49

1.63

24.95

38.32

Extremely Bad

Fine sand

% Coarse

% Fine

5.26

39.92

2.35

7.98

1.91

1.30

2.38

2.41

3.07

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Station

E-1

E-2

E-3

E-4

E-5

E-6

E-7

E-8

E-9

E-10

E-11

E-12

E-13

E-14

E-15

E-16

E-17

Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy

Mean Phi

Standard
Deviation

Skew-ness

Kurtosis

3.21

1.40

-0.17

3.54

1.69

4.15

Page 2-21
Final Report

Sorting index

Sediment type

6.75

Good

Very fine sand

2.61

16.07

Average

Very fine sand

2.77

7.59

46.65

Very Bad

Coarse silt

-0.11

3.37

2.33

53.84

Bad

Coarse silt

2.99

-0.05

2.27

14.63

39.05

Very Bad

Very fine sand

3.92

2.63

-0.09

2.84

7.36

41.35

Very Bad

Very fine sand

3.15

3.05

0.06

2.19

16.44

35.16

Extremely Bad

Very fine sand

3.35

2.92

0.11

2.34

11.47

36.70

Very Bad

Very fine sand

2.67

2.71

0.60

2.82

10.01

24.82

Very Bad

Fine sand

2.75

2.74

0.60

2.74

8.26

26.03

Very Bad

Fine sand

2.57

2.98

0.51

2.42

15.03

27.39

Very Bad

Fine sand

4.90

2.68

-0.24

2.18

1.82

60.59

Very Bad

Coarse silt

0.40

1.48

1.29

8.43

23.27

1.95

Good

Coarse sand

1.45

2.73

1.06

3.49

21.05

15.42

Very Bad

Medium sand

3.36

2.72

0.44

2.39

3.49

33.17

Very Bad

Very fine sand

3.43

3.50

0.01

1.71

16.67

45.00

Extremely Bad

Very fine sand

0.74

1.47

0.91

7.47

17.73

1.94

Good

Coarse sand

1.53

2.81

1.01

3.31

21.60

16.73

Very Bad

Medium sand

3.93

2.83

0.15

2.03

2.86

43.19

Very Bad

Very fine sand

4.57

2.72

0.08

1.96

1.01

51.10

Very Bad

Coarse silt

3.80

2.89

0.23

2.04

3.81

42.40

Very Bad

Very fine sand

2.64

2.23

1.33

4.12

1.75

19.94

Bad

Fine sand

2.90

2.16

0.92

4.36

4.11

17.93

Bad

Fine sand

3.26

3.28

0.24

1.91

11.16

39.05

Extremely Bad

Very fine sand

2.63

3.38

0.35

1.87

22.52

35.60

Extremely Bad

Fine sand

4.90

2.65

-0.11

2.02

0.78

59.19

Very Bad

Coarse silt

3.84

2.97

0.08

2.05

6.08

42.97

Very Bad

Very fine sand

5.29

2.65

-0.42

2.37

1.55

66.69

Very Bad

Medium Silt

3.86

2.84

0.15

2.04

3.15

43.31

Very Bad

Very fine sand

4.36

2.72

0.10

2.03

1.58

48.51

Very Bad

Coarse silt

3.93

2.89

0.14

1.98

3.05

43.64

Very Bad

Very fine sand

4.21

2.84

0.10

2.00

3.09

46.25

Very Bad

Coarse silt

4.19

2.74

0.15

2.02

2.54

46.87

Very Bad

Coarse silt

4.32

3.03

-0.09

2.01

5.82

50.85

Extremely Bad

Coarse silt

% Coarse

% Fine

8.91

2.49

0.33

6.48

2.72

-0.24

4.64

2.25

3.37

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Station

Mean Phi

Standard
Deviation

Skew-ness

Kurtosis

3.74

0.95

3.28

4.06

1.30

3.65

Page 2-22
Final Report

Sorting index

Sediment type

10.62

Very Good

Very fine sand

0.00

21.28

Good

Coarse silt

3.00

9.23

32.92

Very Bad

Very fine sand

0.24

2.21

12.07

29.73

Extremely Bad

Fine sand

2.63

-0.17

2.98

9.13

37.24

Very Bad

Very fine sand

3.81

2.69

0.19

2.46

4.95

38.62

Very Bad

Very fine sand

1.77

3.43

0.71

2.13

36.07

27.89

Extremely Bad

Medium sand

3.88

3.52

-0.18

1.66

13.97

53.59

Extremely Bad

Very fine sand

2.93

3.28

0.27

1.83

15.72

38.43

Extremely Bad

Fine sand

3.31

3.80

0.04

1.45

20.94

48.87

Extremely Bad

Very fine sand

6.06

1.96

-0.49

3.25

0.32

83.26

Average

Find silt

4.71

2.54

-0.07

2.51

2.62

50.56

Very Bad

Coarse silt

0.84

2.43

1.30

4.70

33.57

9.03

Bad

Coarse sand

1.24

2.87

1.18

3.52

24.67

15.69

Very Bad

Medium sand

% Coarse

% Fine

15.69

0.00

2.33

7.82

2.60

-0.09

2.93

3.01

3.82

season
E-18

E-19

E-20

E-21

E-22

E-23

E-24

Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season
Dry
season
Rainy
season

Source: CPSE, March 2010

Analytical results in Table 2.12, it may withdraw some comments as follows:

Sediments at sampling stations are quite different due to specific geology and topography. The seabed
sediments at all sampling stations are classified from medium silt to coarse sand. Mean diameter varies in a
wide range (from -0.05 to 5.29 in the rainy season and from 0.15 to 6.06 in the dry season).

Sediments at surveyed area have tendency to be coarser, especially the sediment at stations K1 and E24
which are located close to Hon Me island. Sediment in these stations containing a lot of hard rock and are
classified as coarse sand and medium sand.

At stations K1 to K4, E6, E7, E9, E12, E14 and E23, mean phi and fine content values are significantly
different between the rainy and the dry season. It may be due to geological characteristic at Nghi Son gulf are
not homogeneous.

Hydrocarbons in sediment
Analytical results of hydrocarbons in sediment in project area are presented in Table 2.13.

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Page 2-23
Final Report

Table 2.13 Analytical results of hydrocarbons in sediment


in the dry season (February 2009) and the rainy season (August 2008 and June 2009) samplings
UCM
Station

n-C13-35

CPI

Pr/Ph

UCM /n-C13-35

THC

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

K-1

0.9

0.2

0.3

1.8

1.3

1.2

K-2

1.4

0.3

0.4

1.6

0.6

0.5

K-3

2.8

1.1

0.3

3.0

1.6

1.4

K-4

2.7

0.8

0.5

4.1

1.5

2.1

E-1

0.3

0.4

1.6

0.6

2.1

E-2

0.8

0.6

3.7

1.2

2.3

E-3

0.8

0.4

2.4

0.9

2.1

E-4

0.8

0.4

3.5

1.4

1.8

E-5

0.4

0.3

2.7

0.6

1.8

E-6

0.4

0.4

4.1

2.6

1.0

E-7

0.2

0.4

1.4

1.0

1.8

E-8

0.3

0.4

2.2

1.0

2.1

E-9

0.2

0.3

1.1

1.1

1.6

E-10

0.3

0.4

2.5

1.0

1.5

E-11

0.4

0.1

3.0

1.1

0.9

E-12

0.3

0.6

2.2

1.1

0.1

16

13

E-13

0.4

0.4

3.9

1.6

1.7

E-14

0.3

0.5

1.9

0.6

1.0

E-15

0.3

0.4

2.4

0.8

10.4

E-16

0.4

0.3

2.3

0.7

1.0

E-17

0.7

0.5

4.1

1.5

0.6

E-18

0.3

0.4

1.5

1.1

0.6

E-19

0.5

0.5

3.1

1.4

0.5

E-20

0.5

0.5

2.9

1.0

0.7

E-21

0.5

0.7

3.5

1.3

0.7

E-22

0.6

0.4

2.8

1.3

1.6

E-23

0.8

0.4

3.1

1.6

1.8

E-24

0.3

0.4

1.9

0.7

1.1

Source: CPSE, March 2010

Analytical results in Table 2.13 show that:

Hydrocarbons (HC) and other organic materials exist in sediments in motive balance condition including 02
contrary chemical and physical processes: (i) accumulation of hydrocarbons deposited from water and/or HC
in earths womb to sediments, (ii) biodegradation and/or dispersion of HC from sediments to water. These
processes are much influenced by environmental conditions (temperature, current, sediment
characteristics) as well as human activities (drilling, disposal). Therefore, HCs content in sediments may
be changed by time.

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Page 2-24
Final Report

THC values at offshore sampling stations vary in a narrow range in both of rainy and dry seasons (from 1 to 6
g/g in the dry season and from 2 to 13 g/g in the rainy season).

All CPI values (Carbon Preference Index) are higher than 1 in both of rainy and dry seasons. This means the
odd n-alkane chain is more predominant than even n-alkane one. By this distribution, hydrocarbon found
usually originates from biologic compounds. It shows that Non-petrogenic hydrocarbons contribute a given
proportion in the total hydrocarbon compositions.

Heavy metals in sediment


Analytical results of heavy metals in sediments are presented in Table 2.14.
Table 2.14 Analytical results of heavy metals in sediments
in the dry season (February 2009) and the rainy season (August 2008 and June 2009) samplings
Station

Cu (g/g)
Dry
Rainy
season season

Pb (g/g)
Dry
Rainy
season season

Zn (g/g)
Dry
Rainy
season
season

Cd (g/g)
Dry
Rainy
season
season

Cr (g/g)
Dry
Rainy
season
season

V (g/g)
Dry
Rainy
season
season

Hg (g/g)
Dry
Rainy
season
season

K-1

7.4

11

24

25

38

52

<1

<1

10

27

< 63

< 63

0.047

0.072

K-2

14

20

20

28

41

57

<1

<1

13

46

< 63

< 63

0.037

0.061

K-3

30

30

17

46

83

66

<1

<1

60

66

< 63

< 63

0.063

0.069

K-4

34

35

22

39

88

71

<1

<1

59

73

< 63

< 63

0.056

0.076

E-1

10

9.3

<6

14

52

58

<1

<1

38

40

< 63

< 63

<0.02

0.076

E-2

22

21

9.1

24

62

73

<1

<1

44

50

< 63

< 63

0.048

0.071

E-3

30

21

31

20

83

73

<1

<1

50

49

< 63

< 63

0.10

0.093

E-4

25

21

25

21

80

70

<1

<1

48

47

< 63

< 63

0.08

0.077

E-5

16

18

23

23

72

71

<1

<1

39

48

< 63

< 63

0.038

0.056

E-6

20

27

27

33

73

88

<1

<1

46

54

< 63

< 63

0.059

0.048

E-7

8.3

18

15

29

42

69

<1

<1

16

47

< 63

< 63

0.072

0.061

E-8

21

31

22

32

78

95

<1

<1

50

58

< 63

< 63

0.16

0.075

E-9

7.4

27

18

31

41

85

<1

<1

16

48

< 63

< 63

0.18

0.094

E-10

21

24

23

31

76

80

<1

<1

47

50

< 63

< 63

0.12

0.070

E-11

27

11

30

35

90

51

<1

<1

49

23

< 63

< 63

0.13

0.048

E-12

20

29

30

31

71

88

<1

<1

39

48

< 63

< 63

0.17

0.072

E-13

30

26

34

30

90

85

<1

<1

53

49

< 63

< 63

0.15

0.085

E-14

24

26

24

34

85

84

<1

<1

51

49

< 63

< 63

0.13

0.061

E-15

24

24

23

35

82

92

<1

<1

58

60

< 63

< 63

0.13

0.066

E-16

26

22

28

32

85

82

<1

<1

58

56

< 63

< 63

0.15

0.077

E-17

33

30

37

35

91

99

<1

<1

56

63

< 63

< 63

0.15

0.116

E-18

10

8.9

17

17

60

51

<1

<1

42

33

< 63

< 63

0.17

0.027

E-19

22

19

23

26

68

71

<1

<1

48

46

< 63

< 63

0.16

0.067

E-20

24

30

26

36

70

89

<1

<1

49

48

< 63

< 63

0.15

0.063

E-21

33

33

42

40

89

101

<1

<1

56

54

< 63

< 63

0.13

0.087

E-22

33

26

40

33

90

77

<1

<1

59

43

< 63

< 63

0.13

0.080

E-23

37

25

36

35

92

78

<1

<1

60

44

< 63

< 63

0.21

0.093

E-24

7.8

27

14

35

41

79

<1

<1

11

45

<63

< 63

0.13

0.086

Source: CPSE, March 2010


NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Page 2-25
Final Report

Analytical results in Table 2.14 show that:

Cd and V contents are lower than the limit detection of the analytical analysis by AAS.

At stations of E7, E9 and E24, contents of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr and Hg vary rather large between the rainy and the
dry season, except Hg content at station E7. At remained stations, there is small diferent contents between
two seasons.

Biological environment
Phytoplankton
Summary results of phytoplankton community at offshore stations in August 2008, February 2009 and June 2009
samplings are presented in Table 2.15. Detail analytical results will be given in Appendix III.
Table 2.15 Analytical results of phytoplankton community
in the dry season (February 2009) and the rainy season (August 2008 and June 2009) samplings
Station
K1

Taxon quantity (taxon/0.05m3)


Dry
Rainy
season
season
13
10

Density (x103 ind/ m3)


Dry
Rainy
season
season
1516515
35

H(s)

Dry
season
0.03

Rainy
season
2.44

Dry
season
0.01

Rainy
season
0.73

Dry
season
0.99

Rainy
season
0.28

K2

13

16

1792835

62

0.04

3.20

0.01

0.80

0.99

0.18

K3

11

13

238420

37

0.17

2.84

0.05

0.77

0.96

0.22

K4

15

13

1770505

29

0.04

2.65

0.01

0.72

0.99

0.28

E2

14

23

1005095

4192

0.09

2.74

0.02

0.61

0.98

0.21

E3

13

21

3178830

8888

0.10

1.98

0.03

0.45

0.98

0.39

E4

11

21

2928150

2724

0.05

3.13

0.01

0.71

0.99

0.16

E5

16

1027830

56

0.02

1.79

0.01

0.89

1.00

0.32

E6

12

11

1143990

128

0.10

2.86

0.03

0.83

0.98

0.19

E7

11

987120

84

0.04

1.02

0.01

0.65

0.99

0.61

E8

18

1072800

120

0.08

2.44

0.02

0.94

0.99

0.20

E9

16

254220

56

0.10

1.75

0.03

0.76

0.98

0.39

E10

15

1929460

108

0.03

2.44

0.01

0.81

0.99

0.23

E11

14

4335

144

3.20

1.29

0.84

0.64

0.15

0.53

E12

17

378350

52

0.48

0.99

0.12

0.63

0.89

0.62

E13

14

10

3732755

76

0.03

2.82

0.01

0.85

1.00

0.19

E14

16

15

738720

176

0.05

3.28

0.01

0.84

0.99

0.14

E15

15

775260

148

0.02

2.32

0.01

0.77

1.00

0.26

E16

14

967950

260

0.06

0.99

0.02

0.43

0.99

0.66

E17

11

729840

2172

0.13

0.30

0.04

0.15

0.97

0.92

E19

13

19

2599640

1368

0.02

3.60

0.01

0.85

1.00

0.10

E20

17

15

1877995

768

0.03

2.98

0.01

0.76

0.99

0.17

E21

16

738010

60

0.05

2.84

0.01

0.95

0.99

0.17

E22

12

1621275

1880

0.06

0.20

0.02

0.07

0.99

0.96

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Taxon quantity (taxon/0.05m3)


Dry
Rainy
season
season
E23
8
4

Density (x103 ind/ m3)


Dry
Rainy
season
season
59990
44

E24

12

221130

Mean

14

10

Max

18

Min

Station

H(s)

Page 2-26
Final Report

Dry
season
0.09

Rainy
season
1.87

Dry
season
0.03

Rainy
season
0.93

Dry
season
0.98

Rainy
season
0.29

44

0.26

1.82

0.07

0.91

0.94

0.31

1280424

912

0.21

2.18

0.05

0.71

0.95

0.34

23

3732755

8888

3.20

3.60

0.84

0.95

1.00

0.96

4335

29

0.02

0.20

0.01

0.07

0.15

0.10

Source: CPSE, March 2010

Analytical results in Table 2.15 show that:

Although recorded taxon quantity in the dry season is higher than the ones in the rainy season, but in the dry
season, phytoplankton community in offshore surveyed area is not diversity and homogenous. The reason is
due to algae blooming phenomenon during survey time (strong blooming phenomenon of marine algae).

Taxon composition and distribution: It is easy to recognize that on the dry season, the number of taxon among
stations is rather eveness while these taxons are strongly changed among stations in the rainy season. Taxon
quantity is too low at stations of E5, E7, E11, E12, E17, E23, E24 and rather high at stations E2, E3, E4, E19.

Concerning to taxon composition, in the dry season, there are four phyla identified in which each phylum of
Dianophyta and Bacillariophyta occupies about 50%. The portions of the others are too small. In the rainy
season, there are 05 phyla identified in which Bacillariophyta is the most diversity; following ones are
Dianophyta, Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta and Euglenophyta in descending order.

Density composition and distribution: the remarkable note that the phytoplankton density in the dry season is
thousands times higher than that in the rainy season. This phenomenon is probably related to nutrient
contents of water in the dry season. In some cases, the increament of Nitrate content will form a suitable ratio
between nutrient substances which pushs up the developemnt of algae blooming. The sharply increasing
density among studied stations E2, E3, E4 made density variation between stations in the rainy season is
higher than that ones in the dry season. Structural densities are much different between stations named E17,
E22 and E16 in the rainy season with the dominant of green algae (Cyanophyta). This means there is in
fluctuating between density and taxon quantity in the water environment of the studied area.

To density composition, although there are 04 phyla of phytoplankton presented, the Bacillariophyta takes
nearly 100% of density; portions of the others are very small. In the rainy season, Bacillariophyta also takes the
largest one, however, portions of Cyanophyta, Dianophyata and Chlorophyta are also remarkable.

Concerning to community indices: in the dry season, like a consequence of the blooming of one species
algae, all community indices are almost in bad levels. Diversity index (H(s)) and Evenness index (J) are low
while predominant index (C) is high at almost stations. At station E14, this phenomenon is not recorded. On a
contrary, all community indices are almost in normal levels in the rainy season.

The zooplanktonic community


Analytical results of zooplankton community at offshore sampling station are summarized in Table 2.16. Detailed results
are presented in Appendix III Item B.
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Table 2.16 Analytical results of zooplankton community


in the dry season (February 2009) and the rainy season (August 2008 and June 2009) samplings
Density
(ind/m3)

Taxon quantity (/station)


Station

H(s)

K1

Dry
season
34.0

Rainy
season
32.0

Dry
season
201.2

Rainy
season
953.7

Dry
season
4.08

Rainy
season
3.64

Dry
season
0.80

Rainy
season
0.73

Dry
season
0.09

Rainy
season
0.12

K2

37.0

24.0

499.9

209.1

3.75

3,82

0,72

0,83

0,12

0,10

K3

35.0

25.0

483.1

365.4

3.20

3.84

0.62

0.83

0.23

0.10

K4

38.0

35.0

706.1

3,799.1

3.31

3.97

0.63

0.77

0.24

0.09

E2

23.0

33.0

2,254.8

784.9

3.54

4.07

0.78

0.81

0.09

0.09

E3

30.0

40.0

1,487.1

485.3

4.08

4.04

0.83

0.76

0.09

0.13

E4

28.0

40.0

3,716.7

919.9

4.08

4.44

0.85

0.84

0.11

0.07

E5

31.0

35.0

260.1

273.0

2.97

3.95

0.60

0.77

0.12

0.09

E6

33.0

32.0

421.5

1,149.0

4.48

3.72

0.89

0.74

0.14

0.12

E7

35.0

27.0

656.5

357.9

4.28

2.60

0.83

0.55

0.09

0.35

E8

34.0

35.0

526.5

598.0

4.22

3.50

0.83

0.68

0.14

0.18

E9

38.0

35.0

1,468.0

773.8

4.04

4.29

0.77

0.84

0.06

0.07

E10

28.0

30.0

737.3

601.1

3.26

3.05

0.68

0.62

0.27

0.18

E11

28.0

35.0

266.7

138.5

3.36

4.06

0.70

0.79

0.07

0.09

E12

28.0

36.0

2,567.7

603.4

3.51

4.03

0.73

0.78

0.17

0.09

E13

40.0

35.0

387.1

1,014.1

4.19

4.13

0.79

0.81

0.07

0.09

E14

32.0

30.0

1,112.8

356.0

4.00

3.82

0.80

0.78

0.16

0.11

E15

22.0

33.0

1,104.8

936.9

3.62

3.54

0.81

0.70

0.27

0.14

E16

28.0

33.0

1,117.9

401.1

3.73

3.98

0.77

0.79

0.35

0.10

E17

40.0

38.0

30,840.0

1,816.8

3.44

3.80

0.65

0.72

0.08

0.12

E19

20.0

34.0

4,895.0

1,239.4

3.19

3.72

0.74

0.73

0.13

0.15

E20

34.0

27.0

796.6

9,541.7

4.38

3.89

0.86

0.82

0.08

0.09

E21

31.0

36.0

738.7

252.4

3.01

4.20

0.61

0.81

0.09

0.09

E22

31.0

41.0

8,280.0

538.3

4.31

4.38

0.87

0.82

0.15

0.07

E23

35.0

35.0

335.4

1,717.2

3.63

4.02

0.71

0.78

0.09

0.09

E24

33.0

39.0

506.7

2,005.8

4.27

3.95

0.85

0.75

0.10

0.10

Mean

31.8

33.7

2,552.6

1,224.3

3.77

3.86

0.76

0.76

0.14

0.12

Max

40.0

41.0

30,840.0

9,541.7

4.48

4.44

0.89

0.84

0.35

0.35

Min

20.0

24.0

201.2

138.5

2.97

2.60

0.60

0.55

0.06

0.07

Source: CPSE, March 2010

Analytical results in Table 2.16 show that:

Difference from phytoplankton community, the number of zooplankton taxon is relatively high and evenness
among stations as well as between two seasons. Concerning to taxon composition, Copepoda is the most
diversity group in zooplankton community on both of dry and rainy seasons. It takes 75% of total taxon
quantity. The second belongs to Chaetognata group. The other groups took smaller portions and different
between two seasons.

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Similar to taxon quantity, density of zooplankton community is rather evenness. Exception for the strong
increasing of density causing by strong development of Copepoda and Ostracoda groups record at station
E17 in the dry season; and the increasing in density at station E20 on rainy season causing by the strong
development of Larva, Chaetognata and Ostracoda groups. At other stations, the variation of density between
two seasons as well as among stations is not big different.

To density composition, Copepoda is also the most dominant in both of rainy and dry season; the following
ones are Larvae and Cladocera. The others are changed a lot between two seasons.

In both of rainy and dry seasons, all community indices are at relatively good levels.

Macrobenthic community
Analytical results of macrobenthic community at offshore sampling station are summarized in Table 2.17.
Table 2.17 Analytical results of macrobenthic community
in the dry season (February 2009) and the rainy season (August 2008 and June 2009) samplings
Station

Taxon quantity
(taxon/0.3m2)
Dry
Rainy
season
season

Density
(ind./m2)
Dry
Rainy
season season

Biomass
(g/m2)
Dry
Rainy
season season

H(s)

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

C
Rainy
Dry
Rainy
season season season

K1

28

43

493

600

4.77

11.69

2.50

3.98

0.52

0.73

0.42

0.15

K2

44

56

650

530

8.59

5.74

2.88

5.31

0.53

0.92

0.39

0.04

K3

54

60

403

557

14.02

8.75

5.18

5.26

0.90

0.89

0.05

0.04

K4

42

59

247

727

26.55

12.43

5.04

5.26

0.94

0.89

0.04

0.04

E2

46

63

1,197

1,663

74.48

78.57

3.12

4.78

0.56

0.80

0.29

0.07

E3

61

59

1,087

957

31.53

49.47

4.66

4.83

0.79

0.82

0.07

0.06

E4

75

63

1,187

777

35.00

30.60

4.61

5.27

0.74

0.88

0.09

0.04

E5

70

56

727

460

20.04

30.34

5.23

5.35

0.85

0.92

0.05

0.03

E6

68

33

597

360

29.70

9.15

5.33

3.95

0.88

0.78

0.05

0.13

E7

28

55

300

347

4.09

16.34

4.12

5.47

0.86

0.95

0.08

0.03

E8

29

18

153

93

1.48

2.39

4.54

4.04

0.94

0.97

0.06

0.07

E9

46

36

370

287

7.06

6.85

5.13

4.80

0.93

0.93

0.04

0.05

E10

23

41

137

227

1.49

8.43

4.23

4.96

0.93

0.93

0.07

0.05

E11

35

56

197

537

4.75

16.95

4.88

5.02

0.95

0.86

0.04

0.05

E12

71

45

920

373

33.27

8.34

4.97

4.99

0.81

0.91

0.06

0.04

E13

49

27

337

120

21.37

4.88

5.18

4.61

0.92

0.97

0.04

0.05

E14

25

31

90

157

11.93

7.29

4.61

4.72

0.99

0.95

0.04

0.05

E15

27

33

117

190

7.27

2.17

4.63

4.71

0.97

0.93

0.04

0.05

E16

25

30

107

130

1.54

3.19

4.54

4.80

0.98

0.98

0.05

0.04

E17

49

37

273

210

18.79

6.21

5.42

4.81

0.96

0.92

0.03

0.05

E19

57

61

447

1353

7.27

48.93

5.04

4.07

0.86

0.69

0.05

0.16

E20

66

49

637

757

25.55

33.91

5.35

4.72

0.89

0.84

0.04

0.06

E21

61

66

360

573

9.92

17.14

5.64

5.68

0.95

0.94

0.02

0.05

E22

64

67

573

587

34.32

27.48

5.29

5.67

0.88

0.94

0.05

0.03

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Taxon quantity
(taxon/0.3m2)
Dry
Rainy
season
season

Station

Density
(ind./m2)
Dry
Rainy
season season

Biomass
(g/m2)
Dry
Rainy
season season

H(s)

Page 2-29
Final Report

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

C
Rainy
Dry
Rainy
season season season

E23

37

61

333

417

5.76

9.42

3.89

5.55

0.75

0.94

0.18

0.03

E24

42

57

543

340

7.38

9.21

2.95

5.63

0.55

0.97

0.38

0.02

Mean

47

49

480

513

17.23

17.92

4.58

4.93

0.84

0.89

0.10

0.06

Max

75

67

1,197

1,663

74.48

78.57

5.64

5.68

0.99

0.98

0.42

0.16

Min

23

18

90

93

1.48

2.17

2.50

3.95

0.52

0.69

0.02

0.02

Source: CPSE, March 2010

Analytical results in Table 2.17 show that:

Some community parameters such as density, biomass also fluctuates strongly among stations as well as
between two seasons. Almost remained parameters (except biomass and density) are similar between two
seasons and their values are in good level. At stations E2, E3 and E4 density and biomass strongly increase due to
the strong development of Mollusca and Echinodermata groups.

Regarding to the composition, there are 04 groups including Polychaeta, Crustacean, Mollusca and
Echinodermata in which, Polychaeta took the largest portion of taxon quantity, following ones are Crustacean,
Mollusca and Echinodermata. Composition of density as well as biomass is much different among stations. This
shows the non-symetric in structure of density and biomass of the Macrobenthic community and distributes the
different of living conditions in seabed sediment between these stations.

2.1.1.5 Marine Resources


Thanh Hoa shoreline has a bow-shaped with 102 km long and it is limited from Day estuary (Ninh Binh) to Dong Hoi
belonging to Ha Hai commune, Tinh Gia district (Nghe An province borders). The territorial waters area is 1.7 thousand
km2. This area is influenced by the hot-cold sea current and it creates the fishing ground with large reserves particularly
Hon Me islands, Tinh Gia district. Hon Me Island area exploits important seafood in Northern Bay and it is not only living
place of resident community for Tinh Gia district Thanh Hoa province but also its vicinity as well as commercial
enterprises. The sea area, there is the aquatic products with high economic value such as fish, shrimp and squid
sources.
1. Fish [4]
Hon Me Island (Tinh Gia district) is important sea product exploitation in Northern Bay. The sea area has a large
number of seafood species having high economic value such as pagrus (Pagrus major- c nho), commom pony fish
(Leiognathus spp-c liet), Sepia (Sepia lycidas- muc nang mat cao), chirocentrus (Chirocentrus dorab C Ria),
Plotosus anguilaris (c ngt), Indo-Pacific mackerel (Scomberomorus guttatus- c thu cham), commersonis anchovy
(Stolephorus commersoni- c com), marine tilapia (Pomacentridae- c r bien), Holocentridae (c son ).
Previously fishing grounds are located in the east and southeast of Hon Me islands at the depth of 30-40m (Figure 2.7
and 2.8). Up to now, commercial fishes were reduced, trash fish increased. However, distribution area is quite stable.

The fishing grounds at the East of Hon Me island, in Northeast monsoon season, Pagrus major (c Nho) has
the highest yield rate (17.52%), Leiognathus spp (c liet) (12.34%), Sepia lycidas (10.96%), others species
are below 10%. Otherwise in South-West monsoon season, in the fishing grounds at the East of Hon Me
island there is the predominating species such as Evynnis cardinalis (c mien snh hai gai) (71.99%) and
Leiognathus (c liet) (8.89%).

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Figure 2.7 Distribution of pelagic fishery in Southern crop

Figure 2.8 Distribution of pelagic fishery Ground in Northern crop


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Table 2.18 Fluctuation of fisheries yield at the East of Hon Me Island


No
1
2
4
5
6
7
8
10
11
12
13

Scientific name
Pagrus major
Leiognathus spp.
Saurida elongata
Nemipterus japonicus
Scolopsis taeniopterus
Saurida undosquamis
Scomberomorus guttatus
Pennahia macrocephalus
Evynnis cardinalis
Trichiurus haumela
Upeneus sulphureus

English name

Northeast monsoon
season (%)

Pony fish
Lizard fish
Japan bream
True lizard fish
Indo-Pacific mackerel
Croaker
Hairtail
-

17.52
12.34
9.25
8.51
6.92
6.17
5.73
3.00
-

Southwest
monsoon season
(%)
8.89
1.79
71.99
2.12
2.12

Source: [4]

In the fishing grounds at Southeast of Hon Me island, in Northeast monsoon season there are Chirocentrus dorab
(c rua) (24.26%), Plotosus anguilaris (c ngt) (21.28 %), Scomberomorus guttatus (c thu cham) (16.60%),
Stolephorus commersoni (c com thuong) (10.06 %), other species (10%). In the Southwest monsoon season
there is Evynnis cardinalis (c mien snh hai gai) (58.42%), Indian anchovy (c com An o) (9.56%) and other
species with low yield.
Table 2.19 Fluctuation of fisheries yield at South of Hon Me Island

No

Scientific name

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
12

Chirocentrus dorab
Plotosus anguilaris
Scomberomorus guttatus
Stolephorus commersoni
Leiognathus sp.
Nemipterus japonicus
Stolephorus indicus
Evynnis cardinalis
Priacanthus tayenus

13

Scomberomorus commerson

14

Saurida tumbil

English name
Mackerel
Anchovy
Pony fish
Bream
Indian anchovy
Purple-spotted bigeye
Narrow-barred king
mackerel
Lizard fish.

24.26
21.28
16.60
10.06
6.22
2.92
2.92
-

Southwest
monsoon season
(%)
9.56
58.42
2.65

2.18

2.12

Northeast monsoon
season (%)

Source: [Ref 4]

In general, territorial waters regions of Thanh Hoa province are about 1.7 thousand km2. Stock/biomass of the seafood
sources estimated about 10 thousand to 12 thousand tons in which:

Pelagic fishery is about 5 to 6 thousand tons such as Decapterus maruadsi (c nuc), Rainbow sardine (c lam),
Auxis (c ngu) (50%), Scomberomorus guttatus (c thu), Pomfret fish (c chim), Sardinella fish (c trch) (20%). Up

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to now, fish species yield such as Sardinella fish (c trch), Stolephorus indicus are significantly changed due to
excessive catch by the explosive.

The fish species have high economic value such as Lutjanus. sp (c hong), Muraenesox cinereus (c dua),
Pseudupeneus luteus (c phn), Nemipterus japonicus (c luong) ...The possibility of exploitation every year is 1.5 2.0 thousand tons. The tendency development exploitation of fish in the sea bottom is essential.

2. Shrimp [4]
According to the survey results on marine shrimp in the Vietnam sea show that there are 225 species, 69 varieties of 24
families. Of which there were 96 species with economic and export value as Table 2.20.
Table 2.20 List of marine shrimp species with economic and export value
Scientific name
Penaeus merguiensis
P. indicus
P. chinensis (P. orientalis)
P. marginatus (P. teraoi)
P. semisulcatus
P. japonicus
P. monodon
P. latisulcatus
P. longistylus
Funchalia woodwardi
Metapenaeus ensis
M. affinis
M. joyneri
M. intermedius
M. tenuipes
M. spinulatus
M. brevicornis
M. moyebi (M. burkenroadi)
Parapenaeopsis hardwickii
P. sculptilus
P. hungerfordi
P. gracillima
Aristaeidae
Aristaeomorpha foliacea
Aristeus virilis
Plesiopenaeus edwardsianus
Solenoceridae
Solenocera crassicornis
S. chopraj
S. melantho
Nephropidae (Homaridae)
S. chopraj
S. melantho
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Australian banana prawn
Indian prawn
Penaeus orientalis
Prawn
Prawn
Kuruma prawn
Giant tiger prawn
Greasy back shrimp
Pink prawn
Yellow prawn
King prawn
prawn
prawn
Cat prawn
Cat prawn
Cat prawn
Lobster
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Scientific name
Nephropidae (Homaridae)
Metanephrops andamanicus
M. thompsoni
M. sinensis
Palinuridae
Panulirus longipes
P. homarus
P. penicillatus
P. polyphagus
P. versicolor
P. stimpsoni
P. ornatus
Linuparus trigonus
Puerulus angulatus
Scyllaridae
Scyllarides squammosus
Ibacus ciliatus
Thenus orientalis

Page 2-33
Final Report

English name
Lobster
Lobster
Ringsping lobster
Lobster
Slipper lobster
-

Source: Natural condition and biological resources at Hon Me island - Thanh Hoa province- Tendency of social-economic Development [4]

Most of the main shrimp species exists at the Hon Me sea. The shrimp grounds in the south season tend to be
distributed at greater depth (Figure 2.9). Estimated reserves are about 1,700 - 2,000 tons, mainly in two shrimp grounds
such as Hon Ne and Hon Me. Annual exploitation is about 1,000-1,300 tons. The main components were M. affinis
(pink prawn) and Cat prawn (Tm s t).

Figure 2.9 Distribution of shrimp ground in Hon Me sea area


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3. Squid [4]
It is identified 53 squid species at Hon Me waters in which one species belongs to Nautiloidea subclass and 52 species
belong to Coleoidea subclass (12 varieties, 6 families, 3 orders). 12 species with high economic value found in Nghi Son
waters are Sepioteuthis lessoniana, Loligo chinensis, Loligo duvauceli, Loligo edulis, Loligo singhalensis, Sepia
latimanus, Sepia pharaonis, Sepia aculeata, Sepia lycidas, Sepia esculenta, Symplectoteuthis oualaniensis and
Octopus vulgaris.
There are two main squid grounds (Figure 2.10):

Squid ground 1: Distribution in the coastal strip from Bien Son to Lach Ghep (around Hon Me island)

Squid ground 2: Offshore Hon Me island (east and southeast of Hon Me island)

Estimated reserves is about 6,000 tons of squid (ability to exploitation of 3,000 tons) and 3,000 tons of Cuttle fish (ability
to exploit of 1,500 tons).

Figure 2.10 Distribution of Cephalopoda ground at Hon Me Sea area

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4. Coral Reefs [5]


According to surveyed results of NSRP at 15 coral reefs locations around Hon Me archipelogoes, a total of 31 coral
species in three orders (hard, soft, black coral order) were found. Among them, 22 hard coral species, 8 soft coral
species and only 1 black coral were found (Table 2.21). When comparing with other coral community, obviously coral in
Hon Me is one of the less abundant although environment, clear water, hard bottom, good water circulation, is quite
suitable for coral growth.
According to Yet et al. (1997), there were 56 coral species belong to 30 genera, 14 families in Hon Me Archipelagoes.
The comparison between two surveyed in 1997 and 2009 shows that this survey reveal a reduction of 45% in number
of species, 40% in number of genus and 29% in family (Figure 2.11). Number of black and soft coral species was quite
stable but the number of hard coral is reduced dramatically, some families like Agariciidae, Mussidae, Pectiniidae,
Siderastreidae are not anymore present at the transect sites.
Table 2.21 Structure of Coral Class in Hon Me Archipelago (2009)
Taxon

1997
Genus
number
26
5
1
30

Family
number
10
3
1
14

Order
Hard coral (Scleractinia)
Soft coral (Alcyonacea)
Black coral (Antiphatharia)
Total

Species
number
49
6
1
56

Family
number
4
5
1
10

2009
Genus
number
11
6
1
18

Species
number
22
8
1
31

Source: Report on Investigation and assessment of Coral Reefs of NSRP [.5]

Black coral (Antiphatharia)

Species

2009

Soft coral (Alcyonacea)


Genus
Hard coral (Scleractinia)
Family

1997

Species

Genus

Family

10

20

30

40

50

60

Figure 2.11 Comparison of coral structure between 1997 & 2009


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5. Aquatic species having extinct danger at Thanh Hoa Waters


According to the decision of the Agriculture and Rural Development Ministry No 82/2008/QD9-BNN in
July 17th, 2008 given list of extintc danger aquatic species in Vietnam should be protected, recovered
and developed. Based on this decision, some aquatic species having extinct danger of Thanh Hoa sea
are presented in Table 2.22.
Table 2.22 Aquatic species having extinct danger of Thanh Hoa Sea
No
I
1.

Enghlish name
ANIMAL
Whale

II
2.
III
3.
4.
5.
6.
IV
7.

REPTILE
Tortoise
FISH
Ca Bong bop
Blotched snakehead
Ca Chia voi
Greasy grouper
CRUTACEAN
Scalloped spiny
lobster
Ornate spiny lobster
FLORA
Macro-Algae

8.
V
9.

Latin Name

Natural Distribution Area

Neophocaena
phocaenoides

Around Me island

Dermochelys coriacea

From Thanh Hoa to Binh Thuan and Truong Sa

Bostrichthys sinensis
Channa maculata
Trachryrhamphus serratus
Epinephelus tauvina

From Quang Ninh Thanh Hoa Ha Tinh


The province of the North to Thanh Hoa
From Quang Ninh to Kien Giang
From Quang Ninh to Kien Giang

Panulirus homarus

Vietnam sea, mainly central sea.

Panulirus ornatus

Vietnam sea, mainly central sea.

Hypnea japonica

Thanh Hoa (Quang Xuong), Nghe An, Ha Tinh,


Quang Binh, Quang Tri, Thua Thien Hue, Da
Nang and Quang Nam.

Source: Natural condition and biological resources at Hon Me island - Thanh Hoa province- Tendency of social-economic Development [4]

2.1.2 ONSHORE ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE


2.1.2.1 Topographic, geological and seismic conditions
1. Topography
Nghi Son area possesses a multiple-type topography, divided into the following main types:

Mountains and hills at the West and Southwest of the Project area have average elevation
varying from 100 m to 560 m, formed by Cretaceous ferruginous sediment rock. This relief
covers an area of 5,100 ha in the mountains of Chuot Chu and Xuoc, of which bare hills and
mountains make up 2,225 ha, projected forestations land accounting for 2,548 ha and thinly
scattered and low vegetation for 327 ha.

Coastal delta with 2 to 6 m sand dunes consists of 1,278 ha of cultivated land, 180 ha of
Natural land and 800 ha of residential land. Generally, the land is flat. The possibility of being
flooded is limited.

The Delta of Lach Bang is flat terrain, slopping gradually to the sea. The rivers of Lang Bach
and Ha Nam are regularly submerged by seawater. Aquaculture area along these rivers

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occupies approximately 94 ha. These lands belong to Hai Binh, Hai Thuong and Hai Ha
communes.

The area of Nghi Son Island has shallow waters and nearshore islands. Nghi Son Island is 4.5
km length, extended in South - North direction. The topography of the Island is mainly hilly.

Hon Me Archipelagos are located some 10 km from the coast. The topography of these islands
is rather hilly with shallow sea water.

2. Geology
Based on the literature review and the latest survey results, the following geological formation of Nghi
Son area are identified:

Cam Thuy formation is located on the eastern part of Hon Me Island. This formation is
composed of alteration basalt, limestone lenses, effusive agglomerates of late age with
thickness of about 300 to 400 m.

Dong Trau formation is distributed on the western part of the National Road 1A. Its composition
consists of sandstone and siltstone-claystone in the inferior part, and thick bedded limestone
and marine-limestone in the superior part. The thickness of this stratum is about 1,000 1,500
m.

Dong Do formation is distributed on the eastern part of the National Road 1A. Its includes the
Xuoc, Coc and Bien Son mountains. The major composition comprises brownish grey
sandstone, interceded siltstone-clay stone and conglomerate. The strata structure is inclined by
oblique bedding of 80 90 < 30 60. The upper part of the rock surface is completely
weathered to become centimetre- to-meter thick residual soil.

Quaternary Period Origin of marine sedimentation (mQ): This geological formation is mainly
distributed along seaside and low valleys around the mountains of Xuoc and Chuot Chu and
along valleys of the communes of Tinh Hai, Hai Yen which makes up approx 80% of their total
area. It is discordantly covered on the Dong Do formation. The composition is interceded by
sand, sandy clay and silty clay. Based on geotechnical properties, from the surface
downwards, the soil is divided into the following layers:
Layer 1: backfill and cultivated land;
Layer 2: fine sand from marine deposit;
Layer 3: soft clay sandy clay;
Layer 4: clay silty clay;
Layer 5: sand;
Layer 6: sandy clay;
Layer 7: residual and collusion soil;
Bed-rock, weathered rock layer.

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Soil layers in surveyed area are summarized in Table 2.23.


Table 2.23 Summary of soil conditions
Stratum
Code

Stratum Name
General or Predominant Description

Stratum thickness (m)


Max

Min

Mean

RECENT FILL
Generally stiff red brown but locally pinkish white sandy
gravelly CLAY with some cobbles and boulders
(At time of investigation. Final thickness will be up to 5m)

3.0

0.4

1.3

MAKE GROUND, TOPSOIL AND SUBSOIL


Silty clay with some gravel, organic matter, locally a sand

2.0

0.3

0.8

PROBABLY MARINE DEPOSITS


Granular Loose to medium dense fine SAND locally
dense, slightly clayey
Cohesive Soft locally firm CLAY occasionally with shells.
Upper layers can be stiff, desiccated crust?

12.5

0.4

5.7

13.9

0.8

4.9

C1
C2

Base level of Marine Deposits


D

PROBABLY DELTAIC DEPOSITS

D1

Cohesive Firm to stiff becoming very stiff vartbly coloured


CLAY locally sandy and/or with sand bands

54.9

1.5

18.1

Granular Medium dense to very dense locally loose fine


to medium silty locally clayey SAND

20.5

0.1

3.9

D2
E

COMPLETELY WEATHERED BEDROCK/RESIDUAL


SOIL
Dense to very dense SAND or very stiff to hard often
gravelly CLAY

BEDROCK
Interbedded weak to moderately strong red brown
SANDSTONE, SILTSTONE and/or MUDSTONE locally
strong and very strong locally with layers weathered to a
clay/sand
Source: NSRP-LLC, June 2010

Level of Top of Completely


Weathered Bedrock/Residual
Soil
20.0
0.0
4.8
Rockhead Level
18.2
1.1

Reduced level (m ND)


Max

Min

Mean

5.9

-13.2

-7.1

9.3

-70.6

-27.0

9.3

-83.9

-31.0

6.6

Depth Penetrated

3. Seismic
Seismological characteristics
The Nghi Son site is located in the north east part of the region with the age of continent crust dating
back to early Carboniferous- Truong Son Hercynides. Adjacent to it in the north east there is the North
West tectonic region where the continental crust was formed in early Paleozoic, separated from the
Truong Son Hercynides zone by the Ma river deep-seated fault, 12 km apart from the plant to the north
east. In the late Paleozoic and during the Mesozoic the continental crust was destroyed again in most
of the north west area of Vietnam and a new crust was formed at the end of the late Triassic (the Da
river intercontinental rift). This intensive tectogenesis process has greatly influenced the tectonics of the
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project site. The north east part of the Hong river fault zone was developed into the Hanoi Cenozoic
superimposed depression. The formation and development of the Hanoi depression have closely been
related to the tectonic activities of the Hong river, Chay river and Lo river fault zones in the Cenozoic.
The Truong Son Hercynides covers a quite large area, limited by the Ma river deep-seated fault to the
north east and by Ta Khet Zone to the south and southwest.
Tectonic fault characteristics of the project site: seismological activities are closely related to tectonic
fault characteristics at project site and the vicinity.
Main faults

The fault of Ma river: This is one of the deep- seated faults. It plays an important role in two tectonic
regions with the age of continental crust formation dating to the Paleozoic (in the northeast) and
early Carboniferous (in the Southwest). The Fault has an extension of over 400km in the north west
south east direction from the land to Tinh Gia. The current activity of the fault is demonstrated by
earthquake activities. It can be said that this is one of the faults in Vietnam with the strongest
seismic activities. The current activity of the fault is also demonstrated by remote sensing,
landslide, land-cracking and the occurrence of thermal and mineral spings. This is a large fault with
high activity, located very close to the Nghi Son refinery and petrochemical complex (the nearest
point at a distance of 12 km), and thus can directly influence structures.

The fault of Fumay Tun (Ma river 2): This is a II order fault separating the facio-structural zones
within the continental crust region at the beginning of Early Carboniferous, almost parallel with the
Song Ma fault. It begins from Dien Bien and runs along the SW slope of the Fumay Tun mountain
range, passing the NW of Pa Hoc village, then joins the Song Ma fault NW of Lang Chanh with a
length of 250km.
At present this zone is in relatively high activity with strong and deep centered earthquakes on the
Vietnam- Laos border and south west of Lang Chanh. Since this fault is about 125 km away from
the project site, the possibility that it could influence the project site is small.

The fault of Son La: This is a deep-seated fault which extends long (500km) and sinuously starting
at Sing Ho. The fault zone extends in a sub-meridian direction to the NW of Tuan Giao, Moc Chau;
then in the NW-SE direction it reaches the sea in the area of Nga Son.
The current activity of the Son La fault zone is expressed clearly through earthquake activities. Its
activity is also expressed by the land cracking and landslides in Lai Chau province, Son La town (in
1990) and the occurrence of thermal and mineral water springs.
This is one of the strong earthquake-generating fault zones, located not far from the study area
(about 70km to the NE), and may cause earthquake danger to structures.

The fault of Da river: This is a II order fault, located relatively far away from the Project area and its
earthquake generation capacity is not high and thus there is a small possibility that it poses
earthquake danger to structures.

The fault of Hong river: This is a deep-seated fault zone of global scale, extending near 1,000 km
from Tibet, running in NW-SE direction along the valley of the Red river through Yen Bai to Son Tay

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and further buried under the Quaternary sediments of the Red river delta. Recent research results
show that in the Neotectonic stage, two opposite strike-slip phases happened. This is cause of
seismic activities in the Hanoi low land areas and other areas along the fault.

The fault of Chay river, located far away from the Project area and thus there is a small possibility
that it poses earthquake danger to structures.

The fault of Ca river:The Song Ca fault in the south west of Nghi Son has a fairly great penetration
depth with geotectonic activities expressed by a variety of evidence:
- Distinct lineaments shown in the remote sensing images
- Destruction of the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, including Neogene formations
- Many earthquakes happened along it during the last century.

Main tectonic faults of the project site and the vicinity are given in Figure 2-12.

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Figure 2-12.

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Table 2.24 Basic features of fault zones in Nghi Son area

No

Fault name

Extending
direction

Order
and
number

Length
(km)

Ma river

NW-SE

1- 4

400

Son La

NW-SE

1- 3

500

Hong river

NW-SE

1- 2

Chay river

NW-SE

Fumay y Tun
(Ma river 2)

Penetration
depth (km)

Dipping
direction
and angle

Nearest
distance to
project
(km)

Displacement
mechanism in N-Q

Right-slip reverses to
normal right-slip in
SE extreme section.

60

NE/60-80

60

NE/60-70

As above

67

>1,00
0

35-40

NE/65-70

As above

90

1-1

450

35-40

NE/80

As above

134

NW-SE

2- 5

250

25-30

NE/60-65

As above

115

Da river

NW-SE

2- 6

350

25-30

NE/60-80

As above

76

Ca river

NW-SE

2- 2

> 230

25-30

NE/60-80

Right-slip to normal
right-slip in SE
extreme section

84

Ca river

NW-SE

2- 3

> 150

35-40

NE/65-80

As above

55

Rao Nay

NW-SE

2-1

230

35-40

NE/65-80

As above

96.5

11,.3

Source: NSRP-LLC, June 2010

Recent seismic in project area


Project area has high density of seismic centers. One of the most powerful seismic at magnitude of 6.7 has been
recorded in project area. Seismic at M>4.5 with center vibration level of 6-7 occur quite frequent. Depths of seismic
focuses are in range of 10-30km.
2.1.2.2 Meteorological conditions
Thanh Hoa province has a transitional climate between the Northern and Central Regions of Vietnam
with tropical monsoon type. The climatic characteristics during the winter are the same than for the
Northern Region with hot (from May to September) and cold (from December to next year April). The
rainy season and the storm season arrive later than in the Northern Region. Predominant wind direction
of the province is East and Southeast. Annually, about 30 days have also West wind called Laos wind.
1. Temperature [6]
Project area is located in the tropical monsoon area, besides it is affected by the Laotian wind (hot-dry
in the summer) that often causes unfavorable for production and life of people. Monthly average
temperature in Tinh Gia district in the period of 2004-2008 are presented in Table 2.25.

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Table 2.25 Monthly Average Meteorological Data at Tinh Gia Station from 2004 to 2008
Month
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
Average

Temperature
(0C)
17.1
18.0
20.1
24.1
27.3
29.8
29.5
28.6
27.3
25.4
22.5
18.9
24.1

Rainfall
(mm)
24.2
3.2
15.6
4.3
24.5
18.3
69.5
127.9
90.6
105.1
56.5
4.9
544.6

Radiation
(hour)
60.0
55.0
59.0
121.0
184.0
192.0
192.0
152.0
140.0
116.0
136.0
71.0
1,477

Wind velocity
(m/s)
1.0
1.2
1.0
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.4
1.0
1.4
1.6
1.8
1.6
1.32

Source: Southern Region Hydro Meteorogical Center. 2008

Based on monthly average temperature data at Tinh Gia station during 2004-2008 show that:

Average temperature in the project area is 24.1oC


The lowest temperature is about 17oC (January) and the highest one 29.8oC (June)

According to statistical data of absolute maximum and minimum temperature at Tinh Gia stations during 1951 2008
[6] show that:
Absolute lowest temperature was recorded of 4.6oC in January (20th January 1954)
Absolute highest temperature was recorded of 41.2oC in May (3rd May 1994)
During first six months of 2010, Tinh Gia is one area getting highest temperature of the Northern provinces. Air
temperature recorded at Tinh Gia area in June 2010 reaches to 39oC 41oC.
2. Rainfall [6]
Monthly average rainfall (mm) at Tinh Gia station in the period of 2004-2008 is presented in Table 2.25.
The rainfall results in this period show that:

Annual rainfall focus on May to October. The maximum rainfall occurs from August to October
with a maximum rainfall reaching 4127.9mm in August. Dry season lasts from November to
April. Even during the dry season, rainfall still occurs at a lower rate.

Total annual rainfall shows that there is no stability on the rainfall regime from year to year. The
rainfall variability is very strong through the years and it depends on the unusual fluctuation of
storms and tropical low pressure. Yearly rainfalls can vary in range of 1,506.2 2,397.5mm.
Annual average rainfall (period 2004-2008) was 544.6mm.

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3. Radiation [6]
Compared to Thanh Hoa province, annual average sunshine hours in Tinh Gia district are higher. Total
annual average hours at Tinh Gia district during 2004 2008 are 1,477 hours. The highest and lowest
sunshine hours are 190.0 (in June and July) and 55.0 hours (in February).
4. Wind [6]
Annual average wind speed recorded at Tinh Gia Station in period of 2004-2008 is 1.32m/s. Annual
maximum wind speed is 1.8m/s (November) and minimum value is 1.0m/s (January, March and
August).
Besides, according to statistical data of highest wind speed (Table 2.26) and wind roses (Figure 2.13) in
period of 1951 2008 recorded at Tinh Gia Station show that:

From October to February, prevalent wind direction is North, Northeast and Northwest. Wind
direction is relatively stable with appearance frequency in January with directions of 37.3%,
19% and 15.7%, respectively. Average wind velocity is about 3.3 to 3.5 m/s and maximum wind
velocity reaches 31 m/s. Maximum wind velocity frequency (< 5 m/s) reaches 70.8% in
December and 78.3% in February. Frequency of maximum wind velocity (> 10m/s) reaches
6.0% in December and 1.1% in February.

March to May is a transitional period. The wind directions are not stable and the main wind
directions are North (23.4%), Northeast (15%) and Southeast (7.6%). Average wind velocity is
3.2 to 3.4 m/s and the maximum wind velocity is 24 m/s. In this period, wind frequency of <5
m/s is about 85.4% (April). Wind frequency of above 10 m/s occurs rarely during this period
with a frequency of about 0.4% (in April).

From May to August, the prevalent wind direction is Southwest (31%), South (20,9%) and
Southeast (17%) (July). Along with the change of wind direction, average wind velocity varies
about 3.6 to 4 m/s, the maximum wind velocity is quite strong with 35 m/s. Frequency of weak
wind velocity varies from 18.2% (June) to 73.9% (August).

September to November is the transition period with variation of wind velocity and direction.
The frequencies of North, Northeast of and Northwest directions are 35%, 19.8%, 16.2%
respectively. Average velocity varies about 3.6 to 4.0 m/s and the maximum wind velocity
reaches 46 m/s. Frequency of wind velocity (< 5 m/s) accounts for 80.3% (September) and
70.0% (December). Frequency of wind velocity (>10 m/s) appears mostly in October (5.9%).

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Table 2.26 Annual Maximum Wind Velocity at Tinh Gia Station (m/s)
Year

Vmax

Direction

Month

Year

Vmax

Direction

Month

1951

29

3/IX

1980

38

SE

16/IX

1952

27

ENE

28/VIII

1981

15

NNE

9/XI

1953

26

SW

14/VIII

1982

20

NW

18/X

1954

14

SW

12/XII

1983

12

SSW, SE

VII

1955

10

NE

2/II

1984

10

22/X

1956

16

NE

1/IX

1985

24

22/X

1957

12

ENE

13/III

1986

20

NW

10/VIII

1958

12

NNE

6/VI

1987

27

23/VIII

1959

SW

3/VI

1988

15

SW

3/VII

1960

NW

13/X

1989

40

24/VII

1961

SSW

12/VI

1990

16

NNW

20/IX

1962

10

NE

17/IX

1991

10

ENE

17/VIII

1963

20

9/IX

1992

NE

XII

1964

17

NW

8/X

1993

34

SE

12/VII

1965

NE

2/IX

1994

18

31/VII

1966

10

NE

14/XI

1995

15

SW

1967

12

NW

7/IX

1996

25

23/VIII

1968

10

13/VIII

1997

18

NNW

22/IV

1969

SW

5/VI

1998

14

NNW

5/X

1970

>20

NNW

29/IX

1999

10

SW, N

19/III, 19/X

1971

17

SE

18/VII

2000

18

10/V

1972

12

6/IX

2001

15

NE

15/VIII

1973

20

8/VII

2002

10

06/X

1974

NE

6/XII

2003

18

SW

22/VII

1975

24

WWNN

20/IX

2004

14

SSE

20/IX

1976

16

VII

2005

33

SSE

IX

1977

18

SE

5/IX

2006

29

SSW

VII

1978

18

NNE

12/VIII

2007

16

NE

1979

12

NNW, NE

8,9/IX

2008

10

NE,NNW

22/III, 30/IX

Source: Southern Region hydro Meteorogical Center, 2009

Below wind rose figures show prevail wind direction and velocity for each month in Tinh Gia station during 1951-2000.

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JANUARY

FEBRUARY

15

NNW
NW

MARCH

NNW

NNE
NW

NE

10

WNW

Page 2-46
Final Report

ENE

15

NNE
NE

10

WNW

12

NNW
NW
ENE

NNE

10

NE

8
6

WNW

ENE

4
2

WSW
SW

ESE

WSW

SW

SE
SSW

APRIL
N

NNW
NW

NNW

NE

WSW
SW

JUNE
NE

ENE

ESE

WSW

SSW

NNW

ESE

WSW

SE

SW
SSW

WNW

SEPTEMBER
N

NNE

12

NNW
NE

NW
ENE

WSW
SW

ESE

WSW
SW

WNW

ESE

WSW

ESE
SW

SE
SSW

DECEMBER

NNE

NNW

NE

10
8
6
4

20

N
NNW

NNE

15

NW

ENE

NE

10

WNW

ENE

WSW
SW

SE
SSE
S

Ch thch
LEGEND
0.1 - 3.9 (m/s)
4 - 8.9 (m/s)
9 - 14.9 (m/s)

ESE

WSW

20

NNE

15

NW

NE

10

WNW

ENE

2
0

SSW

SSE
S

NOVEMBER

OCTOBER

ENE

SSE

14
12

SE
SSW

SSE

NE

SE

NNE

10

SSW

SSE
S

ENE

10

ESE

SSE

NW

NE

WNW

AUGUST
NNE

ENE

10

NW

WNW

SE

SW

NE

JULY

NNE

10

NW

SSE

12

NNW

12

NNW

NNE

12

WNW

SE
SSW

WNW

SSE

NW

SSW

MAY

NNW

SE
S

10

NW

ENE

ESE
SW

SSE

WNW

WSW

NNE

10

ESE

12

SE
SSW

SSE

SE

SW
SSW

SSE
S

ESE

WSW

ESE
SE

SW
SSW

SSE
S

Figure 2.13 Monthly wind roses in period of 1951-2000


at Tinh Gia station

> 15 (m/s)

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5. Extreme climatic phenomena [6]


According to meteorological statistic data from 1951 to 2008, there were approximately 43 storms
landed or impacted directly on Thanh Hoa province. Table 2.27 shows the time, direction and moving
velocity of the major storms from 1951 to 2007.
Table 2.27 Major Storms in Thanh Hoa Province in period of 1951 - 2007
No.

Name of storm

Time

Location

Direction

Velocity (m/s)

NORA

3/9/1951

Thanh Hoa

22

LOIS

28/8/1951

Thanh Hoa

WNW

25

OPHELIA

14/8/1953

Thanh Hoa

NW

21

NONAME

29/8/1958

Thanh Hoa Nghe An

WNW

18

AGNES

18/8/1960

Thanh Hoa

WNW

17

CHARLOTTE

22/9/1962

Ninh Binh

WNW

27

PAYE

9/9/1963

Thanh Hoa

SSW

13

ROSE

6/9/1965

Ninh Binh

WSW

30

PHYLLIS

2/8/1966

Ninh Binh

NW

15

10

PATSY

7/9/1967

Nghe An

21

11

ROSE

13/8/1968

Ninh Binh

22

12

HARRIET

7/7/1971

Thanh Hoa

NW

10

13

TEAN

18/7/1971

Thanh Hoa

WNW

25

14

MARGE

15/9/1973

Thanh Hoa

WNW

18

15

10 DELLA

27/10/74

Thanh Hoa

13

16

8 MICE

20/9/1975

Thanh Hoa

30

17

RUTH

16/9/1980

Thanh Hoa

WSW

19

18

KELLY

4/7/1981

Thanh Hoa Nghe An

WNW

14

19

CECIL

16/10/1985

Quang Tri Ha Tinh


Thanh Hoa

WNW

20

20

DOT

22/10/1985

Ha Tinh Thanh Hoa

WNW

18

21

IR VING

24/7/1989

Thanh Hoa

NW

19

22

7 BRIAN

3/10/1989

Nghe An Thanh Hoa

WNW

25

23

2 LEWIS

12/7/1993

Nghe An Thanh Hoa


Quang Ninh

WNW

10

24

AMY

31/7/1994

Thanh Hoa

WSW

17

25

LUKE

14/9/1994

Thanh Hoa

20

26

LOIS

28/8/1995

Thanh Hoa

WNW

13

27

TED

11/10/1995

Thanh Hoa

10

28

WILLIE

22/9/1996

Nghe An
Ha Tinh

WSW

12

29

WUKONG

10/9/2000

Ha Tinh

WSW

19

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No.

Name of storm

Page 2-48
Final Report

Time

Location

Direction

Velocity (m/s)

30

Tropical low pressure

27/9/2000

Thanh Hoa

WNW

10

31

USAGI

11/8/2001

Nghe An-Ha Tinh

WNW

15

32

ATN

10/9/2001

Thanh Hoa-Nghe An

WNW

15

33

3 KONI

22/7/2003

Thanh Hoa

NW

25

34

Tropical low pressure

9/9/2003

Nghe An-Ha Tinh

NW

20

35

Storm No 2

31/7/2005

Nam Dinh

WNW

15

36

Storm No 3

12/8/2005

Thanh Hoa

WNW

15

37

Storm No 5

31/8/2005

Nghe An

WNW

15

38

DAMREY

27/9/2005

Thanh Hoa

WNW

20

39

ATN

3/7/2006

Thanh Hoa

NW

15

40

Storm No 5

25/9/2006

Ha Tinh-Quang Binh

WNW

15

41

Storm No 2

7/8/2007

Thanh Hoa-Nghe An

NW

10

42

Storm No 4

25/9/2007

Thai Binh

WNW

15

43

Storm No 5

3/10/2007

Quang Binh-Ha Tinh

WNW

15

Source: Southern Region hydro Meteorogical Center, 2009

Statistical data for 56 years (1951-2007) show that Nghi Son Gulf is more influenced by storms and tropical low
pressure than other area in Vietnam. There were more than 50 storms and cyclones landed to this area. But almost
these storms created height waves, especially Kelly and Nancy storms. The maximum sea level risen by storms in Nghi
Son Gulf is over 2.5m. Besides, two these storms had caused damages and impacted to houses, fishing boats and
trees of local residents. But damage level is not serious.
2.1.2.3 Water Resources
1. Surface water
There are Lach Bang, Thi Long and Yen Hoa rivers in the project area. However, discharges of these rivers are small
and their waters are salinity intrusion. Besides, in project area and its vicinity, there are some reservoirs and lakes,
such as Dong Chua, Que Son, Kim Giao, Muc and Yen My. Characteristics of these lakes/reservoirs are presented in
Table 2.28.
Table 2.28 Characteristics of reservoirs
Lake name
Dong Chua
Que Son
Kim Giao
Song Muc
Yen My

Area
(km2)
9.2
3.1
236.0
137.0

Serviceable Volume
(million m3)
1.26
0.44
2.28
187.0
80.63

Flood protective volume


(million m3)
0.64
0.194
58.8

Source: Overall Plan of NSEZ in Period of 2006-2025

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2. Ground water
Based on surveyed results of ground water level in the project area, especially in Mai Lam commune undertaken in FS
stage show that ground water was found in layer (1) and fine sand layer (2). The surveyed results of ground water in
Mai Lam commune are presented in Table 2.29.
Table 2.29 Ground water level in boreholes at Mai Lam commune
Borehole
name

Water depth
(m)

K-3

0.51

Ground
elevation
(m)
0.56

Water level
(m)

Borehole
name

Water depth
(m)

0.05

K-37

0.4

Ground
elevation
(m)
2.4

K-5

0.90

0.94

0.04

K-39

1.7

3.7

2.0

K-7

1.68

2.3

0.6

K-41

0.4

1.4

1.0

K-9

0.50

2.6

2.0

K-43

1.6

3.0

1.4

K-16

2.1

6.2

4.1

K-55

0.5

2.7

2.2

K-18

2.7

K-57

1.2

2.3

1.1

K-20

0.55

1.1

0.6

K-59

1.0

1.9

0.8

K-22

0.7

K-61

0.8

1.2

0.3

K-24

1.5

K-63

1.2

2.0

0.8

K-1

4.0

2.58

-1.42

K-34

3.1

4.24

+1.14

K-2

2.5

2.23

-0.27

K-36

1.22

2.73

+1.51

K-4

1.0

1.25

+0.25

K-38

1.1

2.47

K-6

1.6

1.31

-0.29

K-40

1.94

1.37
-

K-10

1.25

1.65

+0.4

K-42

1.1

1.63

0.53

K-11

1.5

1.03

-0.47

K-44

3.4

2.51

-0.89

K-12

0.8

1.56

+0.76

K-45

3.4

2.28

-1.12

K-13

1.0

1.06

+0.06

K-46

1.46

2.44

0.98

K-14

1.8

1.65

-0.15

K-47

1.42

2.14

+0.72

K-15

1.8

1.06

-0.74

K-48

1.1

2.43

+1.33

K-17

1.8

5.48

+3.68

K-49

1.8

2.49

+0.69

K-19

2.3

2.86

+0.56

K-50

0.8

1.1

+0.3

K-21

1.05

0.72

-0.33

K-51

1.5

1.20

-0.3

K-23

1.6

1.24

-0.36

K-52

1.1

1.33

+0.23

K-25

3.3

4.71

+1.41

K- 53

1.0

1.43

+0.43

K-26

3.6

2.83

-0.77

K-54

3.5

2.94

-0.46

K-27

1.22

2.80

+1.58

K-56

1.4

2.27

+0.87

K-28

1.15

2.71

+1.56

K-58

2.54

K-29

1.72

1.34

-0.38

K-60

0.9

1.47

0.57

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Borehole
name

Water depth
(m)

Ground
elevation
(m)

Water level
(m)

Borehole
name

Water depth
(m)

Ground
elevation
(m)

Water level
(m)

K-30

1.4

1.66

0.26

K-62

0.9

1.28

+0.38

K-31

1.52

1.73

+0.21

K-64

1.3

2.80

1.5

K-32

0.9

1.97

+1.07

K-65

1.8

1.73

-0.

K-33

1.0

1.20

+0.2

K-66

1.2

1.27

+0.07

Source: NSRP-LLC, June 2010

Monitoring results of ground water show that total discharge in 08 boreholes may be up to 13.306 m3/day. Water quality
in project area is not equal (ground water quality at some boreholes are good, but water at some boreholes are salinity
intrusion and acid sulphate soil), reserve is not much and unstable.
2.1.2.4 River system and flooding situation in project area
Project area locates near Lach Bang river. This river connects to Hoang Mau and Yen Hoa rivers by Nha Le channel
before flowing to Nghi Son Gulf. Lach Bang river is 34.5km in length and 246.5km2 in area. Total discharge of this river is
about 800 million m3. There is flood control dike 3m in height with frequence of 10% built along Lach Bang riverside.
Hydrological regime of Lach Bang river is influenced by tidal regime of Nghi Son Gulf. Amplitude of tide in Lach Bang
river is about 2.0m.
Project area locates near Lach Bang river and is influenced by tidal regime of Nghi Son Gulf. Lach Bang river flows to
Nghi Son Gulf, so maximum water level in Lach Bang river may up to 2.5 m in case of typhoons. However, foundation
of project area is +3m in height, it is hardly to be flooded in this area .
Moreover, lower section of Lach Bang river is flat and even, sloping gently to the sea, so drainage ability of this area is
very well and foundation of the Plant is +6m after clearance. Therefore, it is unable to occur flood in Project area.
2.1.2.5 Existing Environmental Conditions of Onshore and Coastal Area
To assess environmental quality in the project area, CPSE has conducted survey sampling in two
seasons: rainy season (August 2008 and June 2009) and dry season (February 2009) and analyzing of
surface water, sediment and biology samples at onshore of the project area and its vicinity. The
sampling locations are showed in Figure 2.5.
2.1.2.5.1 Air quality
There are total 08 air sampling stations in project area, harbour, pipeline and its vicinity. Coordinates of these sampling
stations are presented in Table 2.30.

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Table 2.30 Coordinates of onshore air sampling stations


Station

Coordinates

Location

A-1
A-2
A-3
A-4
A-5
A-6
A-7
A-8

Y (m)
581809
581262
581571
579741
582102
583085
586207
586274

Residential area near Lach Bang river


Residential area near Hai Yen commune
Project area
School in Mai Lam commune
Along export pipeline
Export berth
Fishing village in Nghi Son

X (m)
2145674
2142614
2140920
2139607
2141271
2139745
2135224
2138406

Grid: UTM; Datum: VN2000

1. Ambient hourly air quality


Analytical results of air quality measured hourly are presented in Table 2.31.
Table 2.31 Analytical results of hourly air quality in onshore area
in dry season (February 2009) and rainy season (August 2008 and June 2009) samplings
Station
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8

Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season

QCVN 05:2009 (1)


QCVN 06:2009 (2)
Source: CPSE, March 2010

NO2

CO

SO2

H2S

0.014
0.010
0.011
0.004
0.013
0.007
0.011
0.014
0.007
0.005
0.014
0.007
0.009
0.008
0.009
0.009
0.2
-

3.2
3.3
3.4
4.1
3.3
4.3
3.6
4.4
3.3
4.0
3.7
2.3
3.1
3.4
3.2
2.6
30
-

0.012
0.011
0.010
0.007
0.012
0.004
0.009
0.007
0.005
0.002
0.004
0.007
0.005
0.007
0.008
0.010
0.35
-

<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
0.042

TSP
mg/Nm3
0.19
0.23
0.21
0.17
0.20
0.19
0.18
0.35
0.21
0.22
0.20
0.47
0.19
0.20
0.22
0.23
0.30
-

Benzene

Xylene

PM10

THC

KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
0.022

KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH
KPH(1)
KPH(1)
1

0.03
0.03
0.03
0.02
0.03
0.02
0.03
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.04
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.04
0.02
-

1.6
10
2.5
7.6
2.2
8.0
1.9
7.1
1.9
9.3
3.7
5.9
2.3
7.5
3.6
10
-

The analytical results of air quality in Table 2.31 show that:


Carbon monoxide (CO)

CO is one of important parameters used for emission research. This is a toxic gas formed from
uncompleted oxidation process. Final products of engines are mainly CO2 and water, so
increase of CO content in emission is caused by operation of flares.

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Average value of CO contents at sampling stations range in a narrow range in both seasons.
Compare to the results in the rainy season, CO in dry season is a slightly higher but these
values are significantly lower than the allowable limit of 30mg/m3 of QCVN 05:2009/BTNMT
and the allowable limit of 40mg/m3 of Equator principles.

Total hydrocarbon content (THC)

There is noticeable changing of THC content among sampling times in day. Average value of
THC content recorded in dry season is much lower than that in rainy season at all of sampling
stations.

Gas chromatography shows that THC is mainly CH4 formed from anaerobic decomposition of
organic substances. In the rainy season, CH4 increase highly since strong operation of
microorganisms in humid condition. CH4 tends to fly and disperse into atmosphere due to its
light molecular weight. At sampling time, since temperature is low and dispersion process
decreases, CH4 is easily captured.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2)

SO2 contents at all sampling stations are significantly lower than allowable limit of QCVN
05:2009/BTNMT(0.35mg/m3).

Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)

All H2S values recorded in two seasons are lower than detection limit method and
significantly lower than allowable limit of QCVN 05:2009/BTNMT (0.042 mg/m3).

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2)

In both sampling seasons, NO2 content at all stations is lower than allowable limit of 0.2
mg/m3 (QCVN 05:2009/BTNMT).

Total Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM)

Average content of SPM is exceeded allowable limit (0.3mg/m3 QCVN 05:2009) at


stations A4 and A6 in the rainy season. This may be due to the fact that SPM is not only
originated from transportation activity but also from other activities such as movement of
some trucks bulldozers, digging, etc.

PM10

In generally, Particulate Matter (PM10) at all sampling stations in the dry season are higher
than the ones in the rainy season.

Benzene and Xylen

In both of rainy and dry seasons, benzene and xylen contents at all sampling stations are lower
than detection limit of analytical methods (GC-MS method).

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2. Ambient air quality in 24 hours


Parameters of CO, SO2 and SPM are measured continuously 24 hours in one day at 3 stations (A1, A2
and A5) in the rainy season June 2009. Analytical results of these parameters were presented in Table
2.32.
Table 2.32 Analytical results of ambient air quality in 24 hours
CO
mg/m3
3.3
4.4
1.8
5.0

Station
A1
A2
A5

SO2
mg/m3
0.024
0.037
0.035
0.125

QCVN 05:2009 (1)


Source: CPSE, March 2010
(1) QCVN 05:2009/BTNMT: Air quality Ambient air quality standards, 24 hourly average

SPM
mg/m3
0.15
0.14
0.21
0.20

SPM parameter at station A5 is a little higher than allowable limit stipulated in QCVN 05:2009/BTNMT,
but all other parameters are much lower than allowable limit of QCVN 05:2009/BTNMT.
Noise and vibration quality
To assess noise and vibration quality in the project area, CPSE has measured noise and vibration
nearby residential areas and in the plants boundary (Figure 2.14).

N15
N16
N14
N11

N13

N12

N10

N09
N08

N07
N01

N06

N02
N03

N05
N04

Figure 2.14 Stations for Site Measurement of Noise and Vibration at the Boundary of Plant Area

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Measure results of vibration and noise are shown in Table 2.33 and 2.34.
Table 2.33 Measure results of vibration and noise at residential site (hourly average)
Noise
Dry season

Station
6am-6pm

6pm-10pm

Vibration
Rainy season

10pm6am

6am-6pm

A6
73.6
66.7
55.0
56.9
A7
59.1
55.3
50.3
45.0
A8
49.7
48.1
47.0
43.6
N17
43.9
48.2
39.8
51.7
N18
43.6
58.3
39.9
46.5
N21
58.7
51.5
39.4
48.4
TCVN (1)
70
70
50
70
Source: CPSE, March 2010
Note: (1) Noise standard of the Project for residential area

Dry season

Rainy season

6pm10pm

10pm6am

7am-7pm

7pm-7am

7am-7pm

7pm-7am

57.2
45.5
43.9
51.7
47.0
44.9
70

56.6
45.8
43.7
52.2
47.2
49.0
50

56.8
53.7
47.9
44.2
43.7
50.5
75

54.4
50.5
47.1
44.9
54.8
46.5
65

57.7
52.7
49.7
45.7
44.9
51.5
75

51.9
51.5
47.9
45.8
57.2
50.6
65

Table 2.34 Measurement results of vibration and noise at Plant site (hourly average)
Noise
Dry season
Rainy season
6pm10pm6pm10pm6am-6pm
6am-6pm
10pm
6am
10pm
6am
N2
74.9
75.5
48.6
54.9
54.6
54.8
N5
71.9
76.6
49.7
58.3
57.2
55.0
N6
68.3
64.1
48.3
52.0
50.7
49.0
N7
52.3
55.3
56.6
55.0
55.2
55.1
N9
61.4
55.7
55.5
54.3
53.8
53.6
N10
50.0
49.4
49.8
50.0
50.0
50.0
N13
50.6
46.5
46.3
53.0
51.5
51.2
N14
55.2
49.1
47.2
52.7
52.5
51.3
N15
52.7
51.5
50.8
51.2
51.9
50.9
N16
71.1
72.3
48.3
55.7
56.4
55.7
A3
49.6
49.4
47.9
49.2
49.4
48.8
A4
55.1
49.3
51.4
53.1
52.8
52.8
TCVN (1)
70
70
70
70
70
70
Source: CPSE, March 2010
Note: (1) Noise standard of the Project for residential area
Station

Vibration
Dry season
Rainy season
7am7pm7am-7pm 7pm-7am
7pm
7am
64.1
61.5
64.9
63.2
61.7
60.3
63.9
60.8
60.5
55.2
62.5
60.9
48.8
53.8
49.4
50.2
50.7
52.7
48.7
51.3
48.5
49.2
48.6
51.1
48.7
46.8
49.0
45.3
48.4
47.9
47.1
46.7
49.1
49.9
47.2
48.8
60.0
56.7
59.9
57.2
47.9
47.2
47.2
45.9
47.8
47.6
47.8
45.8
75
65
75
65

Results in Table 2.33 and 2.34 show that:


At residential area

In general, noise values at residential area in dry and rainy season (except station A6) are
lower than limit level of Project Noise Standards. Noise values of station A6 in shift 1 (6am-

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6pm) and shift 3 (10pm-6am) are higher than limit level due to this station is located near the
road with a lot of traffic.

The values of vibration at residential area are lower than limit level stipulated in Vietnamese
standard (TCVN 6962:2001).

There is no different of noise and vibration between rainy and dry season.

At Plant area

Noise values at station N2, N5 and N16 in the dry season are higher than Project noise
standards (70dB) from 6am to 10pm. The reason is due to these stations are sited along the
dense traffic road. Beside that, stations N5 and N16 are also located at high noise area

All vibration values at plant area are lower than limit level stipulated in Vietnamese standard
(TCVN 6962:2001). At all station, there are no different of vibration values at dry and rainy
season.

2.1.2.5.2. Water quality


Assessment of water quality in onshore area is based on analytical results and comparison with QCVN
08:2008/BTNMT. Location of surface water, sediments and biology sampling stations in onshore area (B1 and B2
stations) and coastal area (B3 to B11 station) are presented in Table 2.35.
Table 2.35 Location of surface water, sediments and biology sampling stations in onshore and coastal areas
Station

Sampling Location

Coordinate
Y (m)

X (m)

B-1

Lach Bang estuary

582403

2145255

B-2

Lach Bang river

580628

2145943

B-3

Organic soil disposal site of the Project

580881

2142931

B-4

Planned outfall point

583207

2141610

B-5

Planned cooling water intake point

583467

2140543

B-6

Planned cooling water discharge point

583630

2139896

585726

2136850

585882

2135532

586049

2134913

B-7
B-8

Vicinity of product export berth (old export port alternatives)

B-9
B-10

Area between B1 and B4 station

582736.2

2143735.6

B-11

Near Nghi Son fishing village

586893.4

2138191.2

Grid: UTM; Datum: VN2000

1. Onshore area
Analytical results of onshore surface water quality and its vicinity are presented in Table 2.36, 2.37 and 2.38.

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Table 2.36 Physical analysis results of onshore surface water quality


(August 2008 and February 2009)
Station
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season

B-2
B-3

On field parameters
Salinity
31
32
32
31
-

pH
7.5
7.5
7.2
7.3
5.5 9

QCVN 08: 2008/BTNMT


Source: CPSE, March 2010

Temperature oC
23
28
22
27
-

Table 2.37 Chemical analysis results of onshore surface water quality


(August 2008 and February 2009)
Parameter (mg/L)
Station
Dry
season
B-2
Rainy
season
Dry
season
B-3
Rainy
season
QCVN 08 :
2008/BTNM

TSS

Oil

NH4+

Total N

Total P

Phenol

TOC

Benzene

CN-

BOD

Coliform
(MPN/
100ml)

30

0.011

0.046

0.84

0.023

<0.001

1.2

< 0.001

< 0.007

0.57

19

5.8

0.011

<0.004

0.70

<0.007

<0.001

1.1

< 0.001

< 0.007

0.79

105

17

0.012

<0.004

1.03

0.015

<0.001

2.8

< 0.001

< 0.007

0.66

22

26

0.012

0.060

1.03

<0.007

<0.001

3.35

< 0.001

< 0.007

2.61

11

100

0.3

0.02

0.02

25

10,000

Source: CPSE, March 2010

Table 2.38 Metal analysis results of onshore surface water


(August 2008 and February 2009)
Station

Cu (mg/l)

Pb
(mg/l)

Zn
(mg/l)

Cd
(mg/l)

Dry
<0.005
0.004
<0.005
<0.005
season
B-2
Rainy
<0.001<0.005
<0.005-0.006
<0.005
season
0.002
Dry
<0.005
0.003
<0.005
<0.005
season
B-3
Rainy
<0.005
0.004
0.015
<0.005
season
QCVN 08 : 2008/BTNMT
1
0.05
2
0.01
Source: CPSE, March 2010
Note: QCVN 08:2008/BTNMT, Column B2: National technical regulation on surface water quality
From results of above tables, it may withdraw some conclusions as followings:

Cr
(mg/l)

Fe
(mg/l)

Hg
(mg/l)

< 0.02

0.33

< 0,001

< 0.02

<0.080.12

< 0,001

< 0.02

0.24

< 0,001

< 0.02

0.61

< 0,001

0.05

0.002

Surface water quality (B2 and B3 station) in both of two seasons are quite good and lower than
allowable limits stipulated in QCVN 08:2008/BTNMT;

Phenol, benzene, CN- and some heavy metal contents are lower than the detection limit of analytical
methods;

TSS, NH4+ and total P contents at station B2 in dry season is much higher than the ones in the rainy
season.

Metal contents are lower than allowable limits stipulated in QCVN 08:2008/BTNMT.

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2. Coastal area
Analytical results of surface water in coastal area and its vicinity are presented in Table 2.39, Table 2.40 and Table 2.41.
Table 2.39 Physiochemical analysis results of coastal surface water quality
(August 2008 and February 2009)
Station
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
K-8
Rainy season
Dry season
K-9
Rainy season
Dry season
K - 10
Rainy season
Dry season
K - 11
Rainy season
Dry season
K - 12
Rainy season
Dry season
E-1
Rainy season
Dry season
E - 18
Rainy season
Dry season
B-1
Rainy season
Dry season
B-4
Rainy season
Dry season
B-5
Rainy season
Dry season
B-6
Rainy season
Dry season
B-7
Rainy season
Dry season
B-8
Rainy season
Dry season
B-9
Rainy season
Dry season
B - 10
Rainy season
Dry season
B - 11
Rainy season
QCVN 10 : 2008
K-7

pH
7.5
7.6
7.8
7.7
7.7
7.2
7.7
7.4
7.5
7.4
7.7
7.5
7.7
7.6
7.6
7.5
7.8
7.7
7.8
7.7
7.8
7.8
7.7
7.8
7.7
7.7
7.8
7.7
7.8
7.7
7.8
7.7
7.8
7.7
6.5 8.5

DO (mg/l)
5.5
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.6
5.6
6.0
5.4
5.6
5.6
6.0
5.6
5.7
5.6
5.6
5.6
-

Parameter
Salinity ()
32.9
29
32.5
29
32.3
31
32.3
31
32.5
30
32.9
31
33
30
33
30
31
32.0
32
31.8
32
31.9
32
32.1
29
28.5
33
32.8
33
32.9
33
29
32
28
-

Temperature (oC)
24.1
27
24.4
26
24.4
26
24.2
27
24.5
26
24.2
27
25
27
26
23
27.7
22
27.5
23
27.4
23
27.3
22
28.3
24
27.3
24
28.3
23
25
24
26
-

Source: CPSE, March 2010

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Table 2.40 Chemical analysis results of coastal surface water quality (August 2008 and February 2009)
Parameter (mg/L)
Station

Season

Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
B-4
Rainy season
Dry season
B-5
Rainy season
Dry season
B-6
Rainy season
Dry season
B-7
Rainy season
Dry season
B-8
Rainy season
Dry season
B-9
Rainy season
Dry season
B - 10
Rainy season
Dry season
B - 11
Rainy season
Dry season
K-7
Rainy season
Dry season
K-8
Rainy season
Dry season
K-9
Rainy season
Dry season
K - 10
Rainy season
Dry season
K - 11
Rainy season
Dry season
K - 12
Rainy season
Dry season
E-1
Rainy season
Dry season
E - 18
Rainy season
QCVN 10 : 2008/BTNMT
B-1

TSS

THC

18
5.1
16
5.8
14
5.4
15
6.0
17
7.3
15
10.5
14
9.5
16
8.3
15
9.4
11
11
14
13
14
14
19
15
18
16
19
15
13
14
15
11
-

0.013
0.013
0.022
0.022
0.011
0.011
0.0091
0.009
0.0085
0.009
0.013
0.013
0.0096
0.010
0.009
0.016
0.011
0.017
0.011
0.012
0.01
0.012
0.011
0.017
0.015
0.017
0.015
0.015
0.014
0.015
0.012
0.013
0.013
0.018
0.2

(*)

NH

4+

0.059
<0.004
0.051
0.022
0.06
0.023
0.049
0.023
0.18
0.50
0.079
<0.004
0.028
0.024
0.026
0.046
0.10
0.053
<0.004
0.13
0.0093
0.097
0.014
0.014
0.0086
0.022
0.0085
0.05
0.0081
0.063
0.026
0.034
0.0391
0.051
0.5

SO

42-

2310
2360
2320
2310
2250
2440
2420
2340
2215
2320
2060
2170
2150
2370
2340
2375
2245
2390
2130
2420
2150
2415
2225
2390
2150
2370
2150
-

NO

2-

0.019
0.048
0.037
0.004
0.014
0.007
0.027
0.005
0.021
0.018
0.025
0.006
0.016
0.001
0.017
0.005
-

NO

3-

0.089
0.012
0.014
0.005
0.021
0.015
0.009
0.016
0.029
0.012
0.032
0.009
0.0.12
0.016
0.011
0.026
-

Total N

Total P

Phenol

TOC

Benzene

CN-

BOD

COD

0.93
0.23
0.60
0.54
0.74
0.63
0.57
0.65
0.96
1.5
0.57
0.50
0.68
0.46
0.65
0.88
0.58
0.72
0.58
0.62
0.81
0.70
0.57
0.60
0.56
0.58
0.46
0.55
0.55
0.94
0.41
0.49
0.64
0.58
-

0.019
<0.007
0.018
<0.007
0.034
<0.007
0.013
<0.007
0.055
<0.007
0.013
<0.007
0.007
<0.007
0.017
0.012
0.028
0.009
0.032
0.012
0.034
0.023
0.021
0.012
0.018
0.013
0.013
0.011
0.012
0.089
0.012
<0.007
0.011
0.029
-

<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
<0.001
0.002

1.3
1.2
1.2
1.1
1.1
0.935
1.0
0.94
1.9
2.1
1.3
1.1
1.1
1.0
1.3
1.4
1.2
1.3
<0.001
0.032
0.034
0.034
0.01
0.01
0.018
0.018
0.013
0.013
0.012
0.012
0.012
<0.007
0.035
0.029
-

< 0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
<0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
< 0.001
<0.001
< 0.001
<0.001
< 0.001
<0.001
< 0.001
<0.001
< 0.001
<0.001
< 0.001
<0.001
< 0.001
<0.001
< 0.001
<0.001
< 0.001
-

<0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
<0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
<0.007
<0.007
<0.007
<0.007
<0.007
<0.007
<0.007
<0.007
<0.007
<0.007
<0.007
<0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
< 0.007
<0.007
0.01

0.7
0.80
0.89
0.71
0.67
0.67
0.69
0.80
0.65
4.81
0.73
0.81
0.69
0.73
0.77
0.64
0.75
0.78
0.69
0.69
0.68
0.68
0.71
0.71
0.66
0.66
0.68
0.68
0.66
0.66
0.75
0.63
0.8
0.61
-

1.9
2.1
1.8
1.9
1.8
1.9
1.9
0.92
1.1
1.9
1.9
1.8
1.8
1.9
1.9
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.9
1.9
2.0
1.8
-

Source: CPSE, March 2010

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Coliform
(MPN/100ml)
48
140
160
25
80
25
14
28
22
125
10
355
11
125
10
<2
10
<2
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Table 2.41 Metal analysis results of onshore surface water


(August 2008 and February 2009)
Parameter (mg/L)

Station
B-1
B-4
B-5
B-6
B-7
B-8
B-9
B-10
B-11
K-7
K-8
K-9
K-10
K - 11
K - 12

E-1

E - 18

Cu

Pb

Zn

Cd

Cr

Fe

Hg

Dry season

<0.005

0.008

0.032

<0.005

< 0.02

0.319

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

0.002

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

<0.001-0.016

0.050

<0.005

< 0.02

0.167

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

0.003

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

0.006

0.009

<0.005

< 0.02

0.290

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

<0.001-0.004

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

<0.08-0.14

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

0.004

<0.005-0.007

<0.005

< 0.02

0.364

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005-0.008

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

0.004

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

0.182

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005-0.012

<0.005

< 0.02

<0.08-0.08

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

0.004

0.010

<0.005

< 0.02

0.260

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

0.004

0.010

<0.005

< 0.02

0.26

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

0.006

0.009

<0.005

< 0.02

0.238

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

<0.001-0.003

<0.005-0.007

<0.005

< 0.02

0.14

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

0.002

0.030

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

0.002

0.030

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

0.001

0.014

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

0.001

0.014

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

<0.001

0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

<0.001

0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08 0.77

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08 0.77

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

<0.001

0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

<0.001

0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

<0.001

0.006

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

<0.001

0.006

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

<0.08

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

<0.001 0.003

0.008

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Dry season

<0.005

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

<0.08

< 0.001

Rainy season

<0.005

0.003

0.008

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

Source: CPSE, March 2010

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Above results show that:

In general, most of analytical results of coastal surface water are rather good and lower than
allowable limits stipulated in QCVN 10:2008/BTNMT.

Phenol, Benzene, CN- and some heavy metal contents (Cd, Cu, Cr and Hg) are lower than the
detection limit of analytical methods.

The parameters of pH, Temperature, Salinity, Dissolved Oxygen are stable between stations
and between two sampling seasons. At some stations locating very close to onshore,
especially station B7, there are existing a lot of algae in the rainy season, so the concentration
of BOD, NH4+, Total N and TOC increase slightly.

2.1.2.5.3 Groundwater quality


Assessment of water quality in onshore area is based on analytical results and comparison with QCVN
09:2008/BTNMT. Locations of sampling stations are presented in Figure 2.5 and coordinates of them are shown in
Table 2.42.
Table 2.42 Coordinates of ground water sampling stations - NSRP
Station
G-1
G-2

Plant site

Coordinate
Y (m)

X (m)

579714

2139604

581571

2140920

G-3

Along onshore pipeline route

583088

2139762

G-4

Product export berth

586212

2135223

G-5

Nghi Son fishing village

586042

2138253

G-6

The East of the Refinery Plant close to shoreline

582102.0

2141271.0

Refinery area

581014.7

2141872.5

G-7
Grid: UTM;

Location

Datum: VN2000

The water depths of sampling wells are as follows: 6-7m at G1 well; 9-10m at G2 well; 10m at G4 well; 14m at G6 well.
Wells G3, G5 and G7 are pumping wells. Analytical results of ground water in Project area are presented in Table 2.43
and Table 2.44.

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Table 2.43 Analytical results of ground water quality in Project area (August 2008 and February 2009)
Parameter (mg/l)
pH

Colour
(Co/Pt)

Oil

NH4+

SO42-

NO3-

Phenol

Cl-

Benzene

CN-

TDS

Hardness
(mgCaCO3/L)

COD
(mg/l)

Coliform
(MPN/
100ml)

Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season

6.3

225

0.014

0.066

30

1.39

<0.001

43

< 0.001

< 0.007

295

95

5.0

34

6.1

221

0.024

0.037

11

0.19

<0.001

50

< 0.001

< 0.007

40

11

3,400

6.7

22

0.013

0.016

34

1.99

<0.001

53

< 0.001

< 0.007

295

90

3.4

49

7.1

34

0.012

0.12

26

0.21

<0.001

106

< 0.001

< 0.007

160

3.5

140

7.0

<5

0.011

<0.004

30

1.52

<0.001

39

< 0.001

< 0.007

390

195

1.7

33

6.6

3.9

0.011

0.011

21

1.7

<0.001

71

< 0.001

< 0.007

370

7.1

700

Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season
G-5
Rainy
season
Dry season
G-6
Rainy
season
Dry season
G-7
Rainy
season
QCVN 09 :
2008/BTNMT

5.1

<5

0.014

0.0048

25

1.82

<0.001

58

< 0.001

< 0.007

245

65

2.5

350

4.4

1.8

0.014

0.066

41

1.4

<0.001

355

< 0.001

< 0.007

320

4.7

49

7.1

<5

0.008

<0.004

24

0.08

<0.001

30

< 0.001

< 0.007

265

85

2.5

7.0

1.8

0.006

<0.004

6.7

0.20

<0.001

28

< 0.001

< 0.007

180

4.7

23

7.7

<5

0.011

<0.004

42

1.25

<0.001

84

< 0.001

< 0.007

640

220

1.7

110

7.8

<5

0.024

0.037

11

0.19

<0.001

50

< 0.001

< 0.007

40

11

3,400

6.7

<5

0.012

0.017

29

0.98

<0.001

78

< 0.001

< 0.007

600

250

5.6

790

7.3

<5

0.013

0.020

25

1.5

<0.001

91

< 0.001

< 0.007

660

250

5.1

1,720

5,58,5

0.1

400

15

0.001

250

0.01

500

Station

G-1

G-2

G-3

G-4

Source: CPSE, March 2010

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

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Page 2-62
Final Report

Table 2.44 Metal analysis results of ground water in Project area


(August 2008 and February 2009)
Station

Cu (mg/l)

Dry
<0.005
season
G-1
Rainy
0.029
season
Dry
<0.005
season
G-2
Rainy
<0.005
season
Dry
<0.005
season
G-3
Rainy
0.005
season
Dry
<0.005
season
G-4
Rainy
<0.005
season
Dry
<0.005
season
G-5
Rainy
<0.005
season
Dry
<0.005
season
G-6
Rainy
0.029
season
Dry
<0.005
season
G-7
Rainy
<0.005
season
QCVN 09 :
1
2008/BTNMT
Source: CPSE, March 2010

Pb (mg/l)

Zn
(mg/l)

Cd (mg/l)

Cr
(mg/l)

Fe
(mg/l)

Hg (mg/l)

Mn
(mg/l)

0.007

0.017

<0.005

< 0.02

0.19

< 0.001

0.03

0.008

0.030

<0.005

0.28

< 0.08

< 0.001

0.12

0.002

0.008

<0.005

< 0.02

0.10

< 0.001

< 0.03

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

0.03

0.002

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

0.18

< 0.001

0.68

0.003

0.013

<0.005

0.25

< 0.08

< 0.001

1.40

0.004

0.014

<0.005

< 0.02

0.29

< 0.001

< 0.03

0.01

0.15

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

0.31

0.002

0.042

<0.005

< 0.02

0.11

< 0.001

<0.03

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

0.03

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

0.09

< 0.001

<0.03

0.008

0.030

<0.005

0.28

< 0.08

< 0.001

0.12

0.004

0.023

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

0.04

<0.001

<0.005

<0.005

< 0.02

< 0.08

< 0.001

<0.03

0.01

0.005

0.05

0.001

0.5

Analytical results in Table 2.43 and Table 2.44 show that:

In both seasons, except G1 (shallow well, high turbidity and yellow color), water of remained wells are clear
and colorless.

In rainy season as well as in dry season, most of analytical results of ground water are quite
good and lower than allowable limit of QCVN 09:2008/BTNMT, except coliform (at all of
stations) and Mn (at station G-3) which is exceeded the allowable limit.

Phenol, CN-, and almost metal contents are lower than detection limit of analytical methods.

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Page 2-63
Final Report

2.1.2.5.4 Sediment Quality


1. Grain size distribution in onshore sediment
Analytical results of grain size distribution are summarized in Table 2.45, 2.46 and 2.47.
Table 2.45 Analytical results of grain size distribution in onshore sediment
(August 2008 and February 2009)
Mean of
diameter

Standard
deviation
(diameter)

Unsymmetry

Sharpness

%
coarse

%
fine

Classification
index

Dry season

3.52

1.73

0.96

4.92

0.89

19.66

Average

Rainy season

1.55

1.31

1.65

11.16

3.20

3.00

Good

Dry season

3.16

1.44

1.84

8.53

0.64

10.25

Good

Rainy season

3.80

1.86

1.38

4.20

0.00

23.79

Average

Station

Type of
sediment

Very fine
sand
Average
sand
Very fine
sand
Very fine
sand

B-2

B-3

Source: CPSE, March 2010

Table 2.46 HC analysis results of onshore sediment (August 2008 and February 2009)
Station

UCM

n-C13-35

CPI

Pr./Ph.

UCM /n-C13-35

THC

Dry season

14

2.2

0.7

19

Rainy season

0.3

2.2

0.9

Dry season

1.8

3.8

Rainy season
2
Source: CPSE, March 2010

1.8

3.9

2.9

B-2
B-3

Table 2.47 Metal analysis results of onshore sediment


(August 2008 and February 2009)
Station

Cu (g/g)

Pb (g/g)

Zn (g/g)

Cd (g/g)

Cr (g/g)

Fe (%)

Hg (g/g)

Dry season

26

34

65

<1

43

3.1

0.27

Rainy season

20

31

<1

3,0

19

0.038

Dry season

8.4

17

46

<1

27

1.5

0.052

Rainy season
13
Source: CPSE, March 2010

18

46

<1

3.1

63

0.030

B-2
B-3

Results in above tables show that:

Sediment at station B2 in rainy season is coarser than the ones in dry season. By visual
observation, environment at station B2 is contaminated by many waste sources in the dry
season.

Similar to variation of grain size, total hydrocarbon content in sediment at station B2 in the dry
season (19g/g) is much higher than that in rainy season (2g/g) due to the difference of
sediment characteristis between two seasons.

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Page 2-64
Final Report

At all onshore stations, metal contents in sediment samples are at normal level in both of two
seasons. Cd contents are lower than the detection limit (1g/g). Fe content in sediment as well
as soil recorded in rainy season is much higher than that in dry season.

2. Grain size distribution in coastal sediment


Analytical results of grain size distribution in coastal sediment and vicinity are presented in Table 2.48, Table 2.49 and
Table 2.50.
Table 2.48 Analytical results of grain size distribution in coastal sediment
August 2008 and February 2009
Mean of
diamete
r

Standard
deviation
(diameter)

Unsymme
try

Sharpness

%
coarse

%
fine

Classify index

5.11

1.89

0.59

2.49

0.00

57.63

Average

5.66

2.08

-0.27

3.01

0.66

75.50

Poor

2.43

2.28

0.79

4.04

5.60

11.56

Poor

Moderate
sludge
Moderate
sludge
Fine sand

3.42

1.48

1.79

7.39

0.34

15.11

Good

Very fine sand

4.78

1.87

0.91

2.68

0.00

41.94

Average

4.93

2.16

0.41

2.10

0.00

53.68

Poor

3.86

1.42

1.50

7.91

0.69

17.69

Good

Coarse
sludge
Coarse
sludge
Very fine sand

3.71

2.16

0.57

3.71

2.61

29.45

Poor

Very fine sand

Dry season

5.43

1.91

0.28

2.40

0.00

68.41

Average

Moderate
sludge

Rainy
season

6.12

1.77

0.03

2.31

0.00

85.37

Average

Fine sludge

Dry season

5.88

1.80

0.09

2.40

0.00

81.82

Average

Moderate
sludge

6.40

1.69

-0.04

2.48

0.00

92.51

Average

Fine sludge

3.21

1.40

-0.17

8.91

2.49

6.75

Good

Very fine sand

3.54

1.69

0.33

6.48

2.61

16.07

Average

Very fine sand

3.74

0.95

3.28

15.69

0.00

10.62

Very good

4.06

1.30

2.33

7.82

0.00

21.28

Good

3.51

0.53

4.87

46.10

0.00

2.55

Very good

Very fine sand


Coarse
sludge
Very fine sand

0.95

1.16

1.17

8.74

4.31

1.03

Good

Coarse sand

3.74

1.15

1.76

14.21

0.84

9.68

Good

Very fine sand

3.25

0.82

2.58

18.96

0.00

3.25

Very good

Very fine sand

3.59

0.73

2.29

33.57

0.40

4.51

Very good

Very fine sand

3.13

0.85

1.96

18.19

0.29

3.27

Very good

Very fine sand

3.48

0.73

-2.22

38.94

1.23

2.42

Very good

Very fine sand

Station

K-7

K-8

K-9

K-10

K-11

K-12

E-1

E-18

B-1

B-4

B-5
B-6

Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season

Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

Type of
sediment

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ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


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Station

B-7

B-8

Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season

Rainy
season
Dry season
B-9
Rainy
season
Dry season
B-10
Rainy
season
Dry season
B-11
Rainy
season
Source: CPSE, March 2010

Page 2-65
Final Report

Mean of
diamete
r

Standard
deviation
(diameter)

Unsymme
try

Sharpness

%
coarse

%
fine

Classify index

2.82

0.72

1.78

22.21

0.38

1.81

Very good

Fine sand

2.06

2.30

0.43

3.17

13.26

12.81

Poor

Fine sand

3.41

2.73

0.23

2.58

7.89

31.39

Very poor

Very fine sand

4.44

1.85

1.12

3.32

0.03

33.32

Average

Coarse
sludge

2.96

1.23

2.59

11.72

0.16

8.31

Good

Fine sand

6.39

1.61

-0.27

3.30

0.00

93.62

Average

Fine sludge

2.87

1.22

2.94

13.70

0.20

8.13

Good

Fine sand

3.37

0.73

3.19

22.85

0.00

3.51

Very good

Very fine sand

3.37

0.73

3.19

22.85

0.00

3.51

Very good

Very fine sand

2.15

3.09

0.55

2.26

20.23

23.74

Extremely poor

Fine sand

2.15

3.09

0.55

2.26

20.23

23.74

Extremely poor

Fine sand

Type of
sediment

Sediments at coastal sampling stations are classified as fine silt to coarse silt in the rainy season
and from fine silt to fine sand in the dry season. It is noted that, the dredging activity at areas of
shipping channel is observed in dry survey, so sediment at stations B8 and B9 seems to be finer
than that of the rainy survey.

It also records that sediment at station B1 significantly changed between two sampling seasons. It
may be due to stations B1 locates at the estuary of Lach Bang River, where is noticeably effected
by current, weather from season to season.
Table 2.49 Analysis results of Hydrocarbon in coastal sediment
August 2008 and February 2009
Station
K-7
K-8
K-9
K-10
K-11
K-12
E-1
E-18

UCM

n-C13-35

CPI

Pr/Ph

UCM /n-C13-35

THC

10
18
1.4
5
13
29
5.8
2
6.1
7
5.3
6
2
1
2

1.2
1.7
0.3
0.6
1.1
1.1
0.9
0.4
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.4
0.4
0.3
0.4

4
4.2
1
2.3
3
2.8
3
3.0
4
4.1
4
4.1
3
1.6
1

1.5
2.2
0.7
1.7
1.1
1.4
2.3
1.3
2.1
3.7
2.0
3.0
2.1
0.6
0.6

8
11
5
9
11
26
7
6
5
5
4
4
5
6
6

13
22
2
7
16
32
9
3
9
9
8
9
3
2
3

Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season

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Station

UCM

n-C13-35

CPI

Pr/Ph

UCM /n-C13-35

THC

1
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
4
11
15
10
18
7
2
2
4
4

0.3
0.3
0.2
0.4
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
2.0
2.2
1.5
0.6
2.1
0.3
0.2
0.2
0.9
0.9

1.5
1
1.0
1
1.5
1
1.7
1
1.5
4
3.8
3
2.6
4
1.5
2
2
2
2

1.1
0.8
0.9
1.2
1.7
1.1
1.7
0.9
1.7
1.2
0.9
1.1
1.1
3.9
1.0
0.6
0.6
0.8
0.8

5
9
10
5
7
8
8
8
6
2
5
10
17
9
26
10
10
4
4

2
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
8
17
19
11
23
8
3
3
6
6

Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season

B-1
B-4
B-5
B-6
B-7
B-8
B-9
B-10
B-11

Page 2-66
Final Report

Source: CPSE, March 2010

Hydrocarbons analysis results of coastal sediment at the project and its vicinity are presented in Table
2.49 showing that:

THC values at coastal sampling stations vary in a wide range in both of rainy and dry seasons
(from 2 to 23 g/g in the dry season and from 2 to 32 g/g in the rainy season).

THC contents at stations B8, B9 and K9 vary greatly from rainy season to dry season.

All CPI values (Carbon Preference Index) are higher than 1 in both of rainy and dry seasons.
Table 2.50 Metal analysis results of coastal sediment
August 2008 and February 2009
Station

K-7

K-8

K-9

K-10
K-11

Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season
Rainy
season
Dry season

Cu (g/g)

Pb (g/g)

Zn (g/g)

Cd (g/g)

Cr (g/g)

V (g/g)

Fe (%)

Hg (g/g)

30

32

77

<1

54

< 63

0.106

40

36

73

<1

98

< 63

14

17

50

<1

41

< 63

0.114

16

21

55

<1

56

< 63

23

13

71

<1

48

< 63

0.034

27

26

53

<1

65

< 63

12

8,5

55

<1

33

< 63

0.031

14

15

39

<1

49

< 63

27

16

73

<1

53

< 63

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

0.092

0.044

0.053

0.022
0.024
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ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


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Station

Cu (g/g)

Rainy
season
Dry season
K-12 Rainy
season
Dry season
E-1 Rainy
season
Dry season
E-18 Rainy
season
Dry season
B-1 Rainy
season
Dry season
B-4 Rainy
season
Dry season
B-5 Rainy
season
Dry season
B-6 Rainy
season
Dry season
B-7 Rainy
season
Dry season
B-8 Rainy
season
Dry season
B-9 Rainy
season
Dry season
B-10 Rainy
season
Dry season
B-11 Rainy
season
Source: CPSE, March 2010

Pb (g/g)

Zn (g/g)

Cd (g/g)

Cr (g/g)

V (g/g)

32

33

59

<1

72

< 63

29

16

73

<1

43

< 63

31

33

58

<1

70

< 63

10

<6

52

<1

38

< 63

9,3

14

58

<1

40

< 63

10

17

60

<1

42

< 63

8,9

17

51

<1

33

< 63

20

58

<1

41

27

22

<1

2,2

21

48

<1

1,9

11

16

49

<1

20

45

11

15

Page 2-67
Final Report

Fe (%)

Hg (g/g)

0.055

0.049
0.053

<0.02

0.17

0.076

0.027

2.7
2.2

0.074

32

0.046

3,0

3.0

0.030

<1

1,9

31

0.053

49

<1

3,6

3.6

0.024

14

49

<1

2,0

34

0.061

11

24

58

<1

4,4

4.4

0.031

17

41

<1

1,6

23

0.067

15

24

37

<1

1,9

1.9

0.045

23

20

62

<1

2,7

47

0.14

12

20

43

<1

3,1

3.1

0.041

28

27

64

<1

2,6

50

0.15

14

26

38

<1

2,7

2.7

0.050

16

21

53

<1

37

2.4

0.07

15

21

46

<1

28

2.3

0.062

21

23

54

<1

39

2.4

0.13

7,7

18

51

<1

24

2.3

0.033

0.051

Metal analysis results of coastal sediment in Table 2.50 show that:

Among selected metals, Cd and V are found lower than detection limit of AAS method.

Contents of metals are not much changed from season to season at most of coastal sampling
stations accept at stations B8, B9 where observed the dredging activity in dry survey.

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


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Page 2-68
Final Report

2.1.2.4.5 Soil quality


Soil sampling locations are shown in Figure 2.4 and coordinates of them are presented in Table 2.51.
Table 2.51 Soil sampling coordinates in Project area
Station
D-1
D-2
D-3
D-4
D-5
D-6
D-7
D-8
D-9
Source: CPSE, March 2010
Grid: UTM; Datum: VN2000

Station
D-1
D-2
D-3
D-4
D-5
D-6
D-7
D-8
D-9

Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
Rainy season

Coordinate

Location
Disposal site of the Project
Open site
Project site
Along pipeline
Product export pipeline
Nghi Son fishing village
Refinery site

Y (m)

X (m)

580881
579697
579714
581571
581919
583088
586212
586042
581014.7

2142931
2140014
2139604
2140920
2140049
2139762
2135223
2138253
2141872.5

Table 2.52 HC analysis results of soil in Project area


August 2008 and February 2009
UCM

n-C13-35

CPI

Pr./Ph.

UCM /n-C13-35

THC

% TOM

2
0
1
0
18
2
2
0
2
3
2
2
76
205
7
2
5
4

2.0
1.0
0.4
0.4
3.3
0.9
0.7
0.5
1.4
1.6
1.8
1.1
2.0
KPH
0.6
0.4
2.4
2.2

3.5
3.8
2.1
1.9
1.6
3.8
3.9
3.9
2.7
4.4
4.4
4.6
2.2
KPH
1.6
3.0
7.4
5

0.9
0.6
0.8
1.0
0.7
0.3
0.7
0.7
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.5
0.4
KPH
0.9
0.8
0.5
0.4

1
0
3
1
5.4
2
2
1
1
2
1
2
38
KPH
11
4
2
2

6
2
3
1
28
5
4
1
5
6
6
5
84
219
16
3
9
8

1.9
0
0.5
0
4.4
2
0.9
0
1.7
3
2.0
2
2.8
205
1.6
2
1.7
2.1

Source: CPSE, March 2010

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Table 2.53 Metal analysis results of soil in Project area


August 2008 and February 2009
Station
Dry season
Rainy season
Dry season
D-2
Rainy season
Dry season
D-3
Rainy season
Dry season
D-4
Rainy season
Dry season
D-5
Rainy season
Dry season
D-6
Rainy season
Dry season
D-7
Rainy season
Dry season
D-8
Rainy season
Dry season
D-9
Rainy season
QCVN 03:2008/BTNMT(*)
D-1

Cu (g/g)
8.3
14
9.6
14
17
17
5.5
7
11
12
7.4
11
37
19
17
14

Pb (g/g)
19
22
6.9
14
17
15
17
27
29
27
27
28
19
27
24
46

Zn (g/g)
32
42
8.9
24
45
32
29
32
57
64
68
84
69
29
28
38

11
8.2
100

15
22
300

52
79
300

Cd (g/g)
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
10

Cr (g/g)
28
2.1
11
1.5
13
0.87
17
1.9
28
3.4
38
3.1
19
4.3
39
2.3
22
15
-

Fe (%)
1.6
38
0.81
22
1.0
14
1.3
22
2.1
41
2.4
57
1.9
52
2.4
39

Hg (g/g)
0.12
0.048
0.069
0.040
0.074
<0.02
0.087
0.034
0.14
0.050
0.11
0.034
0.21
0.073
0.067
0.037

1.5
1.2
-

0.10
0.066
-

Source: CPSE, March 2010

From above results, some conclusions may be withdrawn as followings:

Total hydrocarbon contents of soil at sampling stations vary in wide range (from 3 to 84g/g in the
dry season and from 1 to 219g/g in the rainy season). The highest value of THC is found at station
D7 located at Nghi Son fishing village in both of two seasons;

At all onshore stations, metal contents in soil samples are lower than QCVN 03:2008/BTNMT;

Cd contents at all stations are lower than detective threshold of analytical method (1<g/g). Recorded Fe contents
in sediment samples in rainy season are higher than they are in dry season.

2.1.2.5.6 Biological Ecosystem


1. Terrestrial Ecosystem
Flora [7]
Based on survey result in the radius 7.5 km, the flora ecosystem types in the Project study area have
been defined as follows:

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Secondary broad-leaf, restored tropical forests ecosystem


This ecosystem mainly exists on Hon Me Island. The whole island is covered by small and medium
green broadleaf trees and bushes with some main species including Schaeffer octophylla of
Araliaceae family, Sapium discolor of Euphorbiaceae family, Sterculia lanceolata of Sterculiaceae
family, etc.

Plantation forest ecosystem


Plantation forest ecosystem is located in many areas of the Project Study Area. The main plantations are located
on the Do (Hai Thanh commune), Chuot Chu, Cam mountains and some hills of Hai Yen, Hai Thuong and Mai
Lam communes. Plantation forests here occupied diverse areas and have different species and plant
ages. Most species in plantation forest are Eucalyptus (Bach an) with age of 7-10 years, Pinus
merkusiana (cy thng) with age of 15-20 years, Eucalyptus exserta (bach an lieu) with age 1-5 years,
Acacia auriculaeformis (Keo la tram), Albizia corniculata (muong) and the top layer of Pinus (thong). There are
few Acacia magnum (Keo tai tuong).

Shrub - ecosystem
This is the most common ecosystem in the project area, appearing in hilly and mountainous areas. Shrub
ecosystem is the consequence of human effects on the model of broad-leaf restored tropical forest. However, even
on Hon Me Island, where tree cutting activities have not been done by residents during the past decades, shrub
ecosystem still exists because poor soil or thin soil layer cannot support development of trees. Shrub ecosystem
structure only includes 2 layers: shrub ecosystem at the maximum height of 8m and bush layer at
the maximum height of 3m. However, the diversification is decided by the high quantity of species
per area unit. Furthermore, advantageous number of bush species usually changes in a relatively
small area, for example, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa can dominate in one area and Melastoma
candidum can be abundant just several meters beside. This is different from pure forest or
advantageous plants forest, like - Dipterocarpaceae forest.

Grass ecosystem, coastal sand-bank


Grass and coastal sand bank ecosystem is counted to have 106 species which ranks 4th in term or
species quantity among 8 ecosystems of the projected area. The common species are Imperata
cylindrica (c tranh), Ischaemum indicum (c tru), Ischaemum indicum (c lng sng), Microstegium
vagans (c l tre), Miscanthus nepalensis (lch), M. floridulus (ch v), Saccharum spontaneum (lau),
Thysanolaena latifolia (t).

Standstill water ecosystem


Project area has some standstill water as lakes, bogs, ponds where shrimps are bred. It has a
small quantity of botany species with 12 species, ranking 7th among 8 ecosystems of the area. All
the botanies in this ecosystem are herbaceous plants in which Pteridophyta has 2 species
Equisetum diffusum, Acrostichum aureum. Angiospermae has 3 species Enhydra fluctuans,
Homonoia riparia, Ipomoea aquatica belonging to Dicotyledones. Monocotyledones has 7 species:
Sagittaria sagittaefolia, Acorus calamus, A. gramineus, Pistia stratiotes, Eleocharis palustris,
Cyperus elatus, Eichornia crassipes.

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Agricultural ecosystem
Agricultural ecosystem includes food plants, mainly short-term plants planted on the agricultural
land in the project area. This ecosystem has 79 species, ranking 5th in term of species quantity
among 8 ecosystems.

Population ecosystem
Floral species composition in this ecosystem is relatively diversified, including not only wild plants
but also different useful plants used to produce handicraft, constructional material, beverage, to
chew, fruit tree, plant for packing, drug plants, used as spices, vegetable, pot plant, shade tree... It
has 127 species, ranking 3rd just after shrub ecosystem and secondary broad-leaf restored tropical
forest ecosystem.
Most of families raise such fruit trees as coconut, guava, starfruit, banana, averrhoa, papaya,
longan, leechesand do the same with such greens and plants of the spices as thi la (Anethum
graveolens), rau mui (Coriandrum sativum), mui tau (Eryngium foetidum), rau hung lang (Mentha aquatica), kinh
gioi (Elsholtzia ciliata), hung chanh (Coleus amboinicus ) Other plants can be named are cruciferae like
cai xanh (Brassica juncea), su ho (B. caulorapa), bap cai (B. oleracea)

Mangrove forest ecosystem


Mangrove system mainly located in Lach Bang, Thanh Binh Hamlet, Hai Thanh and Hai Binh
Communes and Yen Hoa river belonging to Hai Ha and Hai Thuong communes.
The mangrove forest ecosystem has 10 species such as uoc Voi (Rhizophora stylosa), Vet Du
(Bruguiera gymnorhiza), Mam Bien (Avicennia marina) and Ban Chua (Sonneratia caseolaris).
Distribution Map of Flora ecosystem is shown in Figure 2-15.

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Figure 2-15

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Regional Threats to Flora Diversity


Flora diversity in the Project Study Area has not yet been affected by regional threats except the invasive introduced
species that not only affect directly to the environment but also cause damage for preservation as well as communitys
health and living. According to Harmful exotic plants published by IUCN and The Institute of Ecology and Biological
Resources in 2003, the project area has these following invasive introduced species:
1. Mimosa pigra L. (common English name for all)
2. Lantana camara L.
3. Imperata cylindrica ( L.) P.Beauv.
4. Eupatorium odoratum L.
5. Leucaena leucocephala ( Lamk.) de Wit.
6. Eichhornia crassipes ( Mares ) Solms.
The lesson of Mai Duong (Mimosa
pigra) plant in Tram Chim National
Garden is the warning for un-extended
growth and persistent of invasive
introduced species because it springs
up well in any type of soils, sprouts even
in stumps, breed and flourish strongly
after burned, its seeds can scatter far
following streamsIn the Project Study
Area, Mimosa pigra makes its
appearance in many places with few
individuals. For instances, this exotic
plant can be found along the road, on
the ponds of Mai Lam Commune.

Vegetation and Flora Assemblages in the Project Area


The project affects some different areas such as Plant site area (328ha), Nghi Son Refinery Project Management
Board, Equipment storage area and other area for constructor (101 ha), Borrow pit - Chuot Chu Mountain (136 ha),
Disposal area (40 ha), Access road (8 ha), Pipeline (30ha) and Port and Jetty (36 ha). According to collection data
during field survey, vegetation and flora assemblages in specific project area are shown as following:

Plant site area


Vegetation in the project area mainly plant short-term food product such as rice, sweet potatoes, corn and peanut.
In addition, in residential areas plant fruit trees as pineapple, guavab, banana, pepper, papaya and vegetables.

Borrow pit Chuot Chu Mountain


The vegetation on Chuot Chu Mountain is mainly covered by Eucalyptus (Bach an) (7-10 year), Pinus
merkusiana (cay thong) (15-20 year), Acacia auriculaeformis (keo la tram), Acacia magnum (keo tai tuong). Under

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the wood layer is shrub layer, liana and grass. Eucalyptus with shrub layer is scattered such as Rhodomyrtus
tomentosa (cy sim), Melastoma candidum (mua), Saccharum spontaneum (Lau), Miscanthus japonicus (cht), M.
Floridulus (ch v), Dicranopteris linearis (gu t), Bidens pilosa ( n bu t), Eupatorium odoratum (c lo), Ischaemum
indicum (c lng s ng), Imperata cylindrica (c tranh).

Disposal area and Access road


The Disposal area and access road was previous used for aquaculture along Lach Bang river. Vegetation at this
area includes c tranh (Imperata cylindrica), c tr u (Apluda mutica), c lng s ng (Ischaemum indicum ), c l tre
(Microstegium vagans), lch (Miscanthus nepalensis), ch v (M. floridulus), lau (Saccharum spontaneum) and t
(Thysanolaena latifolia).

Pipeline and Port and Jetty


The vegetation along Pipeline and Port and Jetty is mainly Population and Grass and coastal sand bank
Ecosystem.
Terrestrial Fauna [8]

The existing fauna in the Project Study Area has been described through specific field survey, data, sample collection
and analysis in laboratory conducted by CPSE from August 16th to September 3rd 2008.
Mammal
Through field survey, interviews of local communities and reference document related to the Project Study Area, 24
species, 15 families, 9 orders of mammal have been identified.
Mammal species composition and distribution in the project area and its vicinity are presented in Table 2.54.
Table 2.54 Mammal Species Composition and Distribution
No

2
3

4
5

Scientific name

English name

I. SCANDENTIA
1. Tupaidae
Tupaia belangeri
II. PRIMATES
2. Cercopithecidae
Macaca assamensis
Macaca fascicularis
III. SORICOMOPHA
3. Soricidae
Crocidura attennata
Suncus murinus
IV. CHIROPTERA
4. Hipposideridae
Asellicus stoliczkanus
5. Pteropodidae

TREE-SHREWS
Tree-Shrews
Common Tree-Shrew
PRIMATES
Old-World Monkeys
Assamese Macaque
Crab-Eating Macaque
INSECTIVORES
Shrews
Grey Shrew
House Shrew
BATS
Trident Bats
Stoliczkas Trident Bat
Fruit Bats

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(1)

(2)

Ecosystem
(3)
(4)

(5)

(6)

x
x

x
x

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No

Scientific name

English name

Macroglossus minimus
V. PHOLIDOTA
6. Manidae
Manis pentadactyla
VI. CARNIVORA
7. Viverridae
Viverra zibetha
Viverricola indica
8. Herpestidae
Herpestes javanicus
Herpestes urva
VII. ARTIODACTYLA
9. Suidae
Sus Serofa
10. Cervidae
Muntiacus muntjak
VIII. RODENTIA
11. Sciuridae
Callosciurus erythraeus
Callosciurus inornatus
Tamiop macclellandii
12. Spalacidae
Rhizomys pruinosus
13. Muridae
Mus caroli
Mus musculus
Rattus losea
Rattus tanezumi
14. Hystricidae
Hystrix brachyura

Common Long-Tongued Fruit bat


PANGOLINS
Pangolins
Chinese Pangolin
CARNIVORES
Civets, Viverrids
Large Indian Civet
Small Indian Civet
Mongooses
Small Asian Mongoose
Crab-Eating Mongoose
EVEN-TOED UNGULATED
Pigs
Wild Boar
Deer
Common Barking Deer
VIII. RODENTS
Non-Flying Squirrels
Pallas Squirrel
Irrawaddy Squirrel
Himalayan Striped Squirrel
Bamboo Rats
Hoary Bamboo Rat
Rats
Ryukyu Mouse
House Mouse
Lesser Rice-Field Rat
House Rat
Old-World Porcupines
Malayan Porcupine

9
10
11
12

13
14

15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
TOTAL

(1)

(2)

Page 2-79
Final Report

Ecosystem
(3)
(4)
x

(5)

(6)
x

x
x

x
x

x
x

x
x

x
x

x
x

x
x
x

10

x
16

Source: Assessment of existing biodiversity of terrestrial fauna (mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians) in the Nghi Son
Petrochemical Project, Tinh Gia district, Thanh Hoa province by Prof. Dr. Dang Huy Huynh, M.Sc. Ngo Xuan Tuong and
Coworkers, 2008

Avifauna
Through field survey, interviews of local communities and reference document related to the Project Study Area; 73
species, 26 families, 7 orders of avifauna have been identified. Avifauna species composition and distribution in the
Project Study Area are presented in Table 2.55.

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Table 2.55 Avifauna species composition and distribution


No

1
2

3
4
5

6
7

8
9

10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

Scientific name
I. GALLIFORMES
1. Phasianidae
Francotinus pincadeanus
Gallus gallus
II. CORACIIFORMES
2. Alcedinidae
Alcedo atthis
3. Halcyonidae
Halcyon smyrnensis
Halcyon pileata
III. CUCULIFORMES
4. Centropodidae
Centropus sinensis
Centropus bengalensis
IV. APODIFORMES
5. Apodidae
Collocalia fuciphaga
Apus pacificus
V. COLUMBIFORMES
6. Columbidae
Streptopelia tranquebarica
Streptopelia chinensis
Treron curvirostra
VI. CICONIIFORMES
7. Scolopacidae
Tringa nebularia
Actitis hypoleucos
8. Charadriidae
Himantopus himantopus
Charadrius dubius
Charadrius alexandrinus
Charadrius mongolus
9. Laridae
Sterna sp.
10. Accipitridae
Milvus migrans
Spilornis cheela
11. Falconidae
Falco severus
12. Podicipedidae
Tachybaptus ruficollis
13. Ardeidae
Egretta garzetta

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English name

Threatened species
SVN, 2007
N32 /2006

Chinese Francolin
Red Junglefowl

Common Kingfisher
White-throated Kingfisher
Black-capped Kingfisher

Greater Coucal
Lesser Coucal

Edible-nest Swiftlet
Fork-tailed Swift

Red Collared Dove


Spotted Dove
Thick-billed Green Pigeon

Common Greenshank
Common Sandpiper
Black-winged Stilt
Little Ringed Plover
Kentish Plover
Lesser Sand Plover
Tern
Black Kite
Crested Serpent Eagle

IIB

Oriental Hobby
Little Grebe
Little Egret

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No

Scientific name

25
26
27
28
29

Casmerodius alba
Bubulcus ibis
Ardeola bacchus
Butorides striatus
Nycticorax nycticorax
14. Pelecanidae
Pelecanas philippensis
VII. PASSERIFORMES
15. Laniidae
Lanius collurioides
Lanius schach
16. Corvidae
Corvus macrorhynchos
Artamus fuscus
Rhipidura albicollis
Hypothymis azurea
Dicrurus macrocercus
Dicrurus leucophaeus
Oriolus chinensis
17. Muscicapidae
Monticola solitarius
Culicicapa ceylonensis
Copsychus saularis
18. Sturnidae
Sturnus nigricollis
Acridotheres tristis
Acridotheres grandis
Acridotheres cristatellus
19. Paridae
Parus major
20. Hirundinidae
Hirundo rustica
Hirundo daurica
21. Pycnonotidae
Pycnonotus jocosus
Pycnonotus sinensis
Pycnonotus cafer
Pycnonotus aurigaster
Pycnonotus finlaysoni
Alophoixus pallidus
22. Cisticolidae
Cisticola juncidis
Prinia subflava
23. Zosteropidae
Zosterops japonicus

30

31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58

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English name

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Final Report

Threatened species
SVN, 2007
N32 /2006

Great Egret
Cattle Egret
Chinese Pond Heron
Little Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Spot-billed Pelican

EN

Burmese Shrike
Long-tailed Shrike
Large-billed Crow
Ashy Woodswallow
White-throated Fantail
Black-naped Monarch
Black Drongo
Ashy Drongo
Black-naped Oriole
Blue Rockthrush
Grey-headed Canary flycatcher
Oriental Magpie Robin
Black-collared Starling
Common Myna
White-vented Myna
Crested Myna
Great Tit
Barn Swallow
Red-rumped Swallow
Red-whiskered Bulbul
Light-vented Bulbul
Red-vented Bulbul
Sooty-headed Bulbul
Stripe-throated Bulbul
Puff-throated Bulbul
Zitting Cisticola
Plain Prinia
Japanese White-eye

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No
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
Source:
Notes:
-

Scientific name

Page 2-82
Final Report

Threatened species
SVN, 2007
N32 /2006

English name

24. Sylviidae
Orthotomus sutorius
Common Tailorbird
Orthotomus atrogularis
Dack-necked Tailorbird
Macronous gularis
Striped Tit Babbler
Garrulax chinensis
Black-throated Laughingthrush
Garrulax canorus
Hwamei
Stachyris nigriceps
Grey-throated Babbler
Yuhina zantholeuca
White-bellied Yuhina
25. Nectariniidae
Dicaeum concolor
Plain Flowerpecker
Dicaeum cruentatum
Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker
Nectarinia jugularis
Olive-backed Sunbird
Aethopiga siparaja
Crimson Sunbird
Arachrothera longirostra
Little Spiderhunter
26. Passeridae
Passer montanus
Eurasian Tree Sparrow
Anthus richardi
Richard's Pipit
Lonchura punctulata
Scaly-breasted Munia
Assessment of existing biodiversity of terrestrial fauna (mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians) in the Nghi Son Petrochemical Project,
Tinh Gia district, Thanh Hoa province by Prof. Dr. Dang Huy Huynh, M.Sc. Ngo Xuan Tuong and Coworkers, 2008
SVN (2007): Red Data Book of Vietnam 2007: EN: Endangered.
N32/2006: The Governmental Decree No 32/2006/N-CP: IIB: Limit of exploitation and use.

Reptiles
Through field survey, interviews of local communities and reference document related to the Project Study Area; 22
species, 7 families, 1 orders of reptiles have been identified. Composition and distribution of Reptile in the Project Study
Area are presented in Table 2.56.
Table 2.56 Reptiles species composition and distribution
No

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Scientific name
I. SQUAMATA
1. Geckonidae
Gecko gecko
Hemydaclylus frenatus
2. Agamidae
Acanthosuura lepidogaster
Calotex versicolor
Physignathus cocincinus
Leiolepis guttata
3. Seincidae
Lygosoma quadrupes
Mabuya longicaudata

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English name

(1)

Tockay, Gecko
Spiny-tailed House Gecko

Scale-bellied Tree Lizard


Garden fence lizard
Indochineses water dragon
Gutta butterfly lizard

x
x
x

Short-limbed supple skink


Long-tailed Skink

(2)

Ecosystem
(3)
(4)

(5)

(6)

x
x

x
x

x
x
x

x
x
x

x
x
x

x
x

June, 2010

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No

Scientific name

11
12
13
14

4. Varanidae
Varanus salvalor
5. Boidae
Python molurus
6. Colubridae
Ahaetulba prasina
Amphiesma stolata
Boiga multomculata
Elaphe radiata

15
16
17

Pareas hamptoni
Ptyas korros
Ptyas mucosus

18

Xemochrophis piscata
7. Elapidae
Bungarus fasciatus
Bungarus multicinctus
Naja atra
Trimeresurus albolabrix

9
10

19
20
21
22

English name
Water monitor

(1)

(2)

Page 2-83
Final Report

Ecosystem
(3)
(4)

(5)

Burmese python, Asiatic rock python


Oriental Whip Snake
Buff-striped Keelback
Multitemporaled Cat Snake
Copperhead racer, Radiated rat
snake
Hamptons slug snake
Indochineses rat snake
Common rat snake, Oriental rat
snake
Checkered keelback

x
x
x
x

x
x

x
x
x

x
x
x

x
13

x
x
x
x
17

x
x

Banded krait
Many-banded krait
Chinese Cobra
White-lipped pitviper, Bamboo snake
Total

(6)

x
6

10

Source: Assessment of existing biodiversity of terrestrial fauna (mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians) in the Nghi Son
Petrochemical Project, Tinh Gia district, Thanh Hoa province by Prof. Dr. Dang Huy Huynh, M.Sc. Ngo Xuan Tuong and
Coworkers, 2008

Amphibian
Through field survey, interviews of local communities and reference document related to the Project Study Area, 11
species, 4 families, 1 orders of amphibian have been identified. Amphibian species composition and distribution in the
Project Study Area are presented in Table 2.57.
Table 2.57 Distribution of amphibians species in the Project area
No

Scientific name

1
2

I. ANURA
1. Bufonidae
Bufo galeatus
Bufo melanosticus

3
4

2. Ranidae
Huia sp.
Hoplobatrachus rugulosus

5
6
7

Limnoneates limnocharis
Rana guentheri
Rana johnsi

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

English name

Gamboja toad
Asian common toad, Common sunda toad,
Black spined toad
frog
Common lowland frog, Chinese bullfrog,
Taiwanese frog
Grass frog, Paddy frog, Rice frog, Asian pool frog
Gunthers amoy frog, Gunthers frog
Johnsi frog

(1)

x
x

(2)

Ecosystem
(3)
(4)

(5)

(6)

x
x

x
x

x
x

x
x
x

x
x
x
June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

No
8
9
10
11

Scientific name

English name

Rana nigrovittata (*)


3. Rhacophoridae
Polypedates leucomystax
4. Michrohylidae
Kaloula pulchra
Michrohyla ornata

(1)

(2)

Page 2-84
Final Report

Ecosystem
(3)
(4)

(5)

(6)
x

x
x
8

x
6

Black-striped frog
Four-lined Treefrog

Guangdong Rice Frog


Ornate Pigmy Frog
Total

Source: Assessment of existing biodiversity of terrestrial fauna (mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians) in the Nghi Son
Petrochemical Project, Tinh Gia district, Thanh Hoa province by Prof. Dr. Dang Huy Huynh, M.Sc. Ngo Xuan Tuong and
Coworkers, 2008

Diversity of invertebrate fauna based on habitat types in the project area is presented in Table 2.58.
Table 2.58 Diversity of vertebrate fauna based on habitat types in the project area
No

Class animal

1
2
3
4

Mammal
Bird
Reptile
Amphibians
Total

Hon Me Island
8
47
6
2
63

Tidal mud
flat
0
26
1
0
27

Species quantity
Residential
Agricultural area
area
6
4
50
36
10
2
5
6
71
48

Shrub area
10
42
13
8
73

Plantation forest and


hilly forest
16
50
17
6
89

Source: Assessment of existing biodiversity of terrestrial fauna (mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians) in the Nghi Son
Petrochemical Project, Tinh Gia district, Thanh Hoa province by Prof. Dr. Dang Huy Huynh, M.Sc. Ngo Xuan Tuong and
Coworkers, 2008

Table 2.58 shows that the vertebrate fauna is not diverse. It is noted that the range of animals is overlaped in different
habitat types and also depends on the seasons. In migration season, many water birds are found in the lakes and
estuary, where they can find the food during migration time.
Sensitive and Protected Species
Based on the Vietnam Red Book (2007) and Decree 32/2006/ND-CP of the Government, the threatened species
located in the Project Study Area are presented in Table 2.59.
Table 2.59 Threatened species in the Project Study Area
No

1
2
3
4
5
6

Scientific name
MAMMALIA
Macaca assamensis
Macaca fascicularis
Manis pentadactyla
Viverra zibetha
Viverricola indica
Hystrix brachyura
AVES

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

English name
MAMMAL
Assamese Macaque
Crab-Eating Macaque
Chinese Pangolin
Large Indian Civet
Small Indian Civet
Malayan Porcupine
BIRD

SVN 2007
Four species
VU
LR
EN

VU
One species

N32
/2006
Five species
IIB
IIB
IIB
IIB
IIB
One species
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No
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
Source:
Notes:
-

Scientific name

English name

SVN 2007

Page 2-85
Final Report

N32
/2006
IIB

Spilornis cheela
Crested Serpent Eagle
Pelecanas philippensis
Spot-billed Pelican
EN
REPTILIA
REPTILE
Eight species
Six species
Leiolepis guttala
Gutta butterfly lizard
VU
Varanus salvalor
Water monitor
EN
IIB
Python molurus
Burmese python, Asiatic rock python
CR
IIB
Elaphe radiata
Copperhead racer, Radiated rat snake
VU
IIB
Ptyas korros
Indochineses rat snake
EN
Ptyas mucosus
Common rat snake, Oriental rat snake
EN
IIB
Bungarus fasciatus
Banded krait
EN
IIB
Bungarus multicinctus
Many-banded krait
IIB
Naja atra
Chinese Cobra
EN
AMPHIBIA
AMPHIBIANS
One species
Bufo galeatus
Gamboja toad
VU
Assessment of existing biodiversity of terrestrial fauna (mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians) in the Nghi Son Petrochemical Project,
Tinh Gia district, Thanh Hoa province by Prof. Dr. Dang Huy Huynh, M.Sc. Ngo Xuan Tuong and Coworkers
SVN (2007): Red Data Book of Vietnam 2007: CR: Critically Endangered; EN: Endangered; VU: Vulnerable.
N32/2006: The Governmental Decree No 32/2006/N-CP: IIB: Limit of exploitation and use.

Threatened species are listed in the Vietnam Red Data Book (2007) and the Government Decree No 32/2006/N-CP
including six species of mammals, two species of birds, nine species of reptiles, and one species of amphibians.
However, these species are distributed in the mountains and forests which are quite far from the construction site and
the future Refinery and Petrochemical Complex Plant. The remaining (unthreatened) species are distributed widely in
Tinh Gia District (Thanh Hoa) in particular and Vietnam general.
Location, coordinates and distribution map of threatened species (animals, birds, reptiles, amphibians) are presented as
follows:

Assamese Macaque Macaca assamensis (Assamese Macaque)


Location: Hon Me Archipelago. Coordinate: 19o2107.3N-105o5454.4E.

Crab-Eating Macaque Macaca fascicularis (Crab-Eating Macaque)


Location: Hon Me archipelago. Coordinate: 19o2107.3N-105o5454.4E.

Chinese Pangolin Manis pentadactyla (Chinese Pangolin)


Locations: Xuoc mountain, Rang Cua mountain.

Large Indian Civet Viverra zibetha (Large Indian Civet)


Location: Xuoc mountain.

Small Indian Civet Viverricola indica (Small Indian Civet)


Locations: Cam mountain, Rang Cua mountain. Coordinate: 19o2021.7N-105o4554.4E.

Malayan Porcupine Hystrix brachyura (Malayan Porcupine)


Locations: Chuot Chu mountain, Cam mountain. Coordinates: 19o2047.2N-105o4650.8E; 19o2021.7N105o4554.4E.

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Final Report

Crested Serpent Eagle Spilornis cheela (Crested Serpent Eagle)


Locations: Hon Me Archipelago, Chuot Chu mountain, Cam mountain, Xuoc mountain, Rang Cua mountain.
Coordinates: 19o2107.3N-105o5454.4E; 19o2047.2N-105o4650.8E; 19o2021.7N-105o4554.4E.

Spot-billed Pelican Pelecanas philippensis (Spot-billed Pelican)


Location: Gieng Ngoc area (Nghi Son commune). Coordinate: 19o1937.5N-105o4858.0E.

Gutta butterfly lizard Leiolepis guttala (Gutta butterfly lizard)


Locations: Along seaside of communes: Hai Hoa, Hai Thuong, Hai Yen, Nghi Son

Water monitor Varanus salvalor (Water monitor)


Locations: Hon Me archipelago, Xuoc mountain. Coordinate: 19o2107.3N-105o5454.4E.

Burmese python, Asiatic rock python Python molurus (Burmese python, Asiatic rock python)
Locations: Chuot Chu mountain, Xuoc mountain, Rang Cua mountain. Coordinate: 19o2047.2N105o4650.8E.

Copperhead racer, Radiated rat snake Elaphe radiata (Copperhead racer, Radiated rat snake)
Location: Hon Me Archipelago. Coordinate: 19o2107.3N-105o5454.4E.

Indochineses rat snake Ptyas korros (Indochineses rat snake)


Locations: Hon Me archipelago, Chuot Chu mountain, Cam mountain. Coordinates: 19o2107.3N105o5454.4E; 19o2047.2N-105o4650.8E; 19o2021.7N-105o4554.4E.

Common rat snake, Oriental rat snake Ptyas mucosus (Burmese python, Asiatic rock python)
Locations: Hon Me archipelago, Rang Cua mountain. Coordinate: 19o2107.3N-105o5454.4E.

Banded krait Bungarus fasciatus (Banded krait)


Location: Hon Me archipelago. Coordinate: 19o2107.3N-105o5454.4E.

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Page 2-87
Final Report

Figure 2-16

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Page 2-88
Final Report

2. Aquatic ecosystem
To assess aquatic ecosystem (plankton and benthos) at the coastal and onshore areas nearby the
project area; CPSE carried out the sampling in dry and rainy seasons (2008-2009). Biological sampling
locations will be illustrated in Figure 2-5.

Onshore area
Phytoplankton
Analytical results of phytoplankton community at two onshore stations are presented in Table 2.60 and detailed results
will be attached in Appendix III.
Table 2.60 Analytical results of phytoplankton community in onshore area
August 2008 and February 2009
Station

Number of taxon
(taxon/0.05m3)
Dry
Rainy
season season

Density
(103.inds/m3)
Dry
Rainy
season season

H(s)

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

B2

19

19

5,670

318

2.85

3.27

0.67

0.77

0.26

0.14

B3

15

14

15,939

175

2.61

2.07

0.67

0.54

0.20

0.41

Average

17

17

10,805

247

2.73

2.67

0.67

0.66

0.23

0.27

Diversity of phytoplankton community is rather difference between two studied stations. At station B2,
both of taxon quantity and diversity index are higher than that at station B3.
The changing of other parameters of phytoplankton is in normal range between two stations as well as
two seasons.
Concerning taxon composition, on both of two seasons, there are 03 phyla presented including
Bacillariophyta, Dinophyta and Cyanophyta. The Bacillariophyta is the most diversity one. It takes 73%
and 58% of taxon total on dry and rainy seasons. The following ones are Dianophyta and Cyanophyta.
Concerning to density composition, Bacillariophyta also takes the largest portion, on dry season;
following ones are Cyanophyta and then Dianophyata. However, on rainy season, the highest portion
belongs to Cyanophyta phylum. The portions of the others are nearly equal

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Zooplankton
Analytical results of zooplankton at two onshore stations are presented in Table 2.61.
Table 2.61 Analytical results of zooplankton in onshore area
August 2008 and February 2009
Station

Density
(ind/m3)

Number of taxon

H(s)

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

B2

5.0

1.0

1,960

300

2.05

0.00

0.88

0.12

1.00

B3

4.0

4.0

1,040

360

1.69

1.97

0.85

0.99

0.08

0.26

Average
4.5
2.5
Source: CPSE, March 2010

1,500

330

1.87

0.99

0.86

0.99

0.10

0.63

Parameters of zooplankton community are much difference depending on location and season. Except density, all other
indices are in relatively low level; especially at B2 where just one taxon presents in the rainy season. At both stations,
density on the dry season is much higher than that one in the rainy season.
Concerning to taxon composition, there are four groups presented including Copepoda, Ostracoda, Chaetognata and
Larva. The taxon of larva group is not defined. Copepoda predominantly presents on both seasons as well as two
stations. Ostracoda just presents on dry season while Chaetognata just presents on rainy season.
Concerning to density composition, Copepoda also takes the largest portion on dry season and takes the second
portion on rainy season. Not be counted on taxon composition but larva group takes the important portion in density on
both seasons.
Benthos
Analytical results of benthos community at two onshore stations are presented in Table 2.62. Detailed results are given
in Environmental baseline report of NSRP as Appendix III.
Table 2.62 Analytical results of benthos community in onshore area
August 2008 and February 2009

Station

Number of taxon
(taxon/0.3m2)

Density
(ind/m2)

Mass
(g/m2)

H(s)

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

B2

14

23

770.00

0.34

191.23

0.59

1.08

0.59

0.28

0.73

0.72

B3

12

10

83

86.67

4.61

0.19

3.04

2.80

0.85

0.84

0.18

0.19

Average

7.0

12

53.3

428.3

2.48

95.71

1.82

1.94

0.72

0.56

0.46

0.46

Source: CPSE, March 2010

It is said that the macrobenthos community is much different in number of taxon, density as well as biomass. They are
high or low depend on the sampling location as well as the sampling season

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The community indices are also much different between stations. However, it was similar between two
seasons. They are rather good at station B3 but bad at station B2.
There are 04 benthic groups identified including Polychaeta, Crustacea, Mollusca and Echinodermata.
Polychaeta takes the largest portion of taxon quantity; following ones are Crustacea or Mollusca and
Echinodermata. In density, Mollusca group takes the largest portion; the second large portion belongs
to Polychaeta then Crustacea.
Biomass is too different between two seasons as well as two sampling stations; on the rainy season,
biomass value is too high due to increasing biomass of Mollusca. Therefore, biomass portion is the
highest in this season. However, in the dry season, the largest portion belongs to Crustacea.
Coastal area
Phytoplankton
Analytical results of phytoplankton community at coastal stations are presented in Table 2.63.
Table 2.63 Analytical results of phytoplankton community at coastal stations
August 2008 and February 2009

Station

Number of taxon
(taxon/0.05m3)
Dry
Rainy
season season

Density (103.ind/m3)

H(s)

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

B1

14

17

1,289,520

193

0.053

2.25

0.01

0.55

0.99

0.37

B4

16

14

2,464,575

310

0.026

2.16

0.01

0.57

1.00

0.34

B5

17

24

96,210

320

0.318

2.96

0.08

0.65

0.93

0.23

B6

19

18

256,585

284

0.308

2.44

0.07

0.58

0.94

0.29

B7

12

512,575

12,064

0.039

0.11

0.01

0.04

0.99

0.98

B8

12

25

681,333

121

0.103

3.66

0.03

0.79

0.98

0.11

B9

14

23

1,200,792

107

0.041

3.81

0.01

0.84

0.99

0.10

B10

18

12

4,312,960

1,684

0.037

2.40

0.01

0.67

0.99

0.25

B11

15

219,545

52

0.416

1.99

0.11

0.86

0.91

0.30

K7

17

10

122,725

1,491

0.23

0.89

0.06

0.27

0.96

0.72

K8

15

18

154,880

55

0.36

3.25

0.09

0.78

0.92

0.18

K9

22

23

73,560

246

1.10

3.44

0.25

0.76

0.70

0.14

K10

12

20

1,884,135

97

0.02

3.45

0.01

0.80

1.00

0.13

K11

14

21

420,060

125

0.06

2.71

0.02

0.62

0.99

0.30

K12

12

18

817,080

54

0.05

3.46

0.01

0.83

0.99

0.12

E1

14

19

4,132,700

3,096

0.03

2.97

0.01

0.70

1.00

0.18

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Number of taxon
(taxon/0.05m3)
Dry
Rainy
season season

Station

Density (103.ind/m3)

H(s)

Page 2-91
Final Report

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

E18

19

17

1,651,160

3,636

0.03

2.87

0.01

0.70

1.00

0.19

Average

15

17

1,193,553

1,408

0.19

2.64

0.05

0.65

0.96

0.29

Max

22

25

4,312,960

12,064

1.10

3.81

0.25

0.86

1.00

0.98

Min

12

73,560

52

0.02

0.11

0.01

0.04

0.70

0.10

Source: CPSE, March 2010

Variation of taxon quantity is rather great, especially on rainy season. The number of taxon is also
different among studied stations; on rainy season, taxon number of two stations (B11 and B7) strongly
reduces; and the taxon quantity increases in stations B5, B8.
Density recorded in the dry season is about a thousand times higher that that on rainy season.
Extremely high of density of phytoplankton in the dry season with the average value is about billion
cells/m3 causing by strong development of algae species named Pseudonitzschia sp. (Bacillariophyta)
leads the high density in this area. As this result, the Bacillariophyta group occupied almost density at
all stations. Dinophyta takes a very small portion in density. The density portion of the others is not
worth at all sampling stations.
As a consequence of the abnormal developing of one alga species, in the dry season the predominant
index so high while the evenness index and diversity index is too low. This phenomenon is not recorded
on the rainy season. This phenomenon could be related to the eutrophication due to the increase of
concentration of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in sea water as given in these above sections.
Zooplankton
Analytical results of zooplankton at coastal stations are presented in Table 2.64.
Table 2.64 Analytical results of zooplankton at coastal stations
August 2008 and February 2009
Species
Station

Density (Cell/m3)

H(s)

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

B1

28,0

7,0

8075,0

21,1

3,45

2,10

0,72

0,75

0,20

0,32

B4

32,0

8,0

2189,3

27,9

4,19

2,70

0,84

0,90

0,08

0,18

B5

25,0

11,0

2393,3

57,2

3,80

2,45

0,82

0,71

0,29

0,28

B6

36,0

18,0

2496,9

33,5

3,88

2,10

0,75

0,50

0,06

0,45

B7

18,0

7,0

13880,0

4700,0

3,90

1,80

0,94

0,64

0,07

0,42

B8

34,0

11,0

659,5

243,1

3,88

2,44

0,76

0,73

0,09

0,26

B9

13,0

16,0

341,1

143,6

3,13

3,23

0,85

0,81

0,09

0,15

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Species
Station

Density (Cell/m3)

H(s)

Page 2-92
Final Report

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

B10

21.0

33.0

1077.5

280.5

3.73

3.65

0.85

0.72

0.21

0.14

B11

34.0

32.0

2177.2

232.9

3.99

4.24

0.78

0.85

0.18

0.07

K7

26.0

7.0

521.2

67.1

3.78

2.45

0.80

0.87

0.10

0.21

K8

29.0

5.0

2368.9

26.1

4.01

1.54

0.83

0.66

0.08

0.48

K9

36.0

16.0

833.5

381.1

4.02

3.20

0.78

0.80

0.10

0.15

K10

28.0

20.0

1732.6

314.7

3.65

3.74

0.76

0.87

0.11

0.09

K11

36.0

26.0

947.3

5788.2

4.07

3.84

0.79

0.82

0.09

0.09

K12

39.0

22.0

855.0

449.1

3.94

3.51

0.75

0.79

0.10

0.12

E1

29.0

33.0

22749.7

1164.0

3.13

4.09

0.64

0.81

0.16

0.08

E18

30.0

33.0

2727.6

224.8

3.94

3.73

0.80

0.74

0.09

0.14

Mean

29.1

17.9

3883.9

832.6

3.79

2.99

0.79

0.76

0.12

0.21

Max

39.0

33.0

22749.7

5788.2

4.19

4.24

0.94

0.90

0.29

0.48

Min

13.0

5.0

341.1

21.1

3.13

1.54

0.64

0.50

0.06

0.07

Source: CPSE, March 2010

Parameters of zooplankton community change a lot among the sampling stations as well as between
two seasons. Generally, the zooplankton community was relatively diversity and evenness especially
on the dry season. The number of taxon, density as well as H(s) recorded on the dry season is higher
than that ones in the rainy season at almost stations.
Taxon distribution and composition: total of 10 groups are classified, in which Copepoda took over 75%
on both seasons however its portion also strongly changes among stations. Cladocera is quite common
and evenness among studied stations on dry season but it is not common on the rainy season. On the
contrary, Chaetognata is more common in the dry season but it just present at several stations in the
dry season. The portion of other groups changes a lot between two seasons.
Density distribution composition: total density as well as density of each group strongly changed among
stations, especially on rainy season, Copepoda takes almost density on dry season, took a small
portion at several stations on rainy season. Larva group, although not be counted on taxon quantity,
also takes large portion at almost stations.
Benthos
Analytical results of benthos community at coastal sampling stations are presented in Table 2.65.

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Table 2.65 Analytical results of benthos community at coastal sampling stations


August 2008 and February 2009
Station

Number of taxon
(taxon/0.3m2)
Dry
Rainy
season season

Density
(ind/m2)
Dry
Rainy
season
season

Mass balance
(g/m2)
Dry
Rainy
season
season

H(s)

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

Dry
season

Rainy
season

B1

28

15

367

193

8.40

26.20

3.17

3.04

0.66

0.78

0.26

0.19

B4

41

31

1,567

580

125.22

21.40

1.94

3.64

0.36

0.73

0.55

0.14

B5

44

21

3,080

807

286.04

17.07

0.97

1.22

0.18

0.28

0.81

0.72

B6

24

21

10,527

6,090

607.05

305.71

0.20

0.31

0.04

0.07

0.97

0.94

B7

117

340

47.10

6.67

0.37

0.99

0.24

0.35

0.05

0.68

B8

25

16

220

163

3.90

0.75

4.31

3.15

0.93

0.79

0.06

0.17

B9

17

17

253

0.53

1.09

1.92

3.35

0.96

0.82

0.28

0.14

B10

23

20

4,953

1,073

299.95

71.46

0.45

2.62

0.10

0.61

0.91

0.25

B11

65

37

1,023

1,473

42.29

21.76

5.06

2.91

0.84

0.56

0.05

0.24

K7

54

30

597

520

4.83

17.60

4.96

3.36

0.86

0.69

0.06

0.17

K8

34

61

277

1,400

11.10

13.69

4.36

4.33

0.86

0.73

0.09

0.13

K9

23

83

8.99

1.27

2.81

1.92

1.00

0.64

0.14

0.43

K10

15

22

207

237

11.29

4.75

2.71

3.76

0.69

0.84

0.24

0.11

K11

41

32

490

217

4.17

6.92

4.30

4.59

0.80

0.92

0.10

0.05

K12

26

38

130

710

0.18

32.90

4.53

3.75

0.96

0.71

0.05

0.15

E1

39

54

480

1,970

11.97

96.63

4.36

3.70

0.83

0.64

0.09

0.17

E18

25

42

553

880

7.88

44.96

3.40

3.06

0.73

0.57

0.16

0.33

Average

29

28

1,449

999

87.11

40.64

2.93

2.92

0.65

0.63

0.29

0.29

Max

65

61

10,527

6,090

607.05

305.71

5.06

4.59

1.00

0.92

0.97

0.94

Min

17

83

0.18

0.75

0.20

0.31

0.04

0.07

0.05

0.05

From above results, some conclusions are drawn as follows:

Parameters of benthos community at coastal stations are also different among stations as well
as between two seasons. On average, however, almost parameters (except biomass and
density) are similar between two seasons.

At some stations such as B5, B6, B7, B10.., the community parameters are in bad level.
However, at some other stations such as K8, K11, K12 the parameters were in good levels.
Density and biomass are two items got the largest changing among sampling stations as well
as between two seasons.

At stations B10, B5, B4 and especially at B6, density and biomass strongly increase basing on
the strong development one mollusk species.

Regarding to the composition, there are 04 groups including Polychaeta, Crustacean, Mollusca
and Echinodermata in which, Polychaeta took the largest portion of taxon quantity, following
ones are Crustacean, Mollusca and Echinodermata; the Mollusca group takes the largest
portion of density as well as biomass, the order of other groups was similar to that in taxon
quantity.

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PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT ON ENVIRONMENTAL LOADING CAPACITY

2.1.3.1 Assessment on Environmental Sensitivity of the Project Area


Refer environmental sensitivity map at Nghi Son-Thanh Hoa and its vicinity established by CPSE in
2009, Environmental sensitivity index (ESI) is defined basing on ecological characteristic and socialeconomic factors. Resource sensitivity index at the study area is classified to riverside, coastal and
nearshore area units depending on their sensitivity level to oil pollution.
ESI map of the project area and its vicinity in Figure 2-17 shows that:

Main site of the Complex has moderate ESI since this area is mainly agricultural land and
forestry area;

Around Me island, ESI is high since there are fish, shrimp, cuttle ground and coral reefs;

Coastal area from Nghi Son port to Lach Bang fishing port has high ESI because there are
many natural oyster grounds and fish cages concentrated in this area;

Along Lach Bang river, there are mangrove forest and aquacultural activities. Therefore, ESI of
this area is assessed as high;

The rest area belonging to Project area and its vicinity has ESI at low to moderate level.

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Figure 2 - 17

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2.1.3.2 Preliminary Assessment on Environmental Loading Capacity


NSRP Project is sited within NSEZ where other industrial activities are planned as:
1. Integrated Nghi Son Port and Vinashin Shipyard is under site leveling. Nghi Son Port is located
at about 7 km south of the Project site. The existing Integrated Nghi Son harbour is mainly
used to import and export of constructional materials and domestic goods.
2. Opposite with integrated port is Nghi Son Power plant 600 megawatts which are about 6 km
from NSRP plant site. The Project will use 14 tons/hour of coal mined in Hon Gai, Quang Ninh
Province. The coal will be shipped from the mine to the power plant jetty, and then transported
to the coal storage yard by conveyor belt.
3. Nghi Son Cement plant operating is about 5 km from the project site. The plant is along
Provincial Road 513, but the jetty is stretching from the plant to Nghi Son Bay. This jetty is next
to NSRP harbour.
4. In the future, a new NSEZ port will be built next to NSRP harbor. This new NSEZ port may
cause some problem of accident since it will be very close to the NSRP harbour.
However, up to now, most of industrial factories of Thanh Hoa province are located at Tinh Gia town and coastal
communes such as Nghi Son, Hai Chau, Hai Ha, Hai Binh and Hai Thuong that far away from project area.
NSRP plant is located at pure agricultural area where air quality is still good. Marine facilities such as habour are located
along the coastal communes where salt and seafood production has not been existed.
Basing on the results of baseline survey carried out by CPSE in the rainy season (from 8/8/2008 to
15/8/2008) and dry season (from 20/2/2009 to 1/3/2009 and from 18/3/2009 to 26/3/2009), some
conclusions on existing environment and estimated environmental loading capacity are as below:

In onshore areas
All parameters of air, water, sediment, soil and groundwater are still much lower than the allowable Vietnamese
standards. So, this proves that the existing environment is still good and not much polluted and NSRP activities will
not increase much environment loading capacity because all wastes will be treated and managed strictly as
mentioned in following sections (mitigation measures, environmental management plan,).

In coastal and offshore areas


In generally, most of analytical results of surface water are quite good and lower than allowable
limits stipulated in QCVN 10:2008/BTNMT. So, the environment loading capacity in coastal and sea
area nearby the project is rather good. In particular, coral around Me islands has declined so much
because of explosive catching from fishermen. However, NSRP LLC considered this sensitivity
ecosystem and carried out the survey on existing coral distribution to change the pipeline route to
SPM to avoid the impact on coral as much as possible. During the operation phase, the NSRP LLC
will also treat the temperature of cooling water effluent to minimize the impact on sea water quality
as well as aquatic species in the area.

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EXISTING SOCIAL CONDITIONS [9]

2.2.1 Economic Condition


2.2.1.1 Agriculture
Tinh Gia district plans to transfer economic structure from rural agricultural economy to agriculture industry service
oriented intensive cultivation, lower prices, increase income per area unit and connecting raw material areas with
product area. The status of agriculture of communes in the project area is presented in Table 2.66.
Table 2.66 Agriculture Status of Communes Belong to Project Area
Parameter
Area of cultivation (ha)
- Rice (ha)
- Corn (ha)
- Peanut (ha)
- Sesame (ha)
- Sweet potato (ha)
- Vegetation (ha)
Breed (animal)
- Cattle
- Pig
- Poultry

Tinh Hai

Hai Yen

Mai Lam

255.8
103.2
50.3
43.2
59.1
22,840
150
2,910
19,780

151.5
50.8
55.0
30.2
4
11.5
17,307
135
172
17,000

891.0
431
61
175
135.0
78.5
10.5
38,307
1,214
3,243
33,850

Source: report Economic-Social situation of commune, 2009

2.2.1.2 Industry
Most of industry factories are located at Tinh Gia town and coastal communes such as Nghi Son, Hai Chau, Hai Ha,
Hai Binh and Hai Thuong.
Mechanical engineering, manufacturing, construction materials are mainly located at centre of district; agriculture
production is mainly located at Son Lam, Truc Lam, Mai Lam, Phuong Cat, Salt and seafood production are located
at coastal villages as Hai Chau, Hai Ha, Hai Binh, Hai Thuong and Hai Thanh.
Currently, at the new Nghi Son economic zone there is only Nghi Son cement plant operating. This will be industrial
centre of Nam Thanh Bac Nghe region.
Table 2.67 Total industrial production of Tinh Gia district
Unit: Million VND
Year
Total production value

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

65

75.95

95.69

119.25

151.35

Source: Statistics Department of Tinh Gia district, 2009

In general, the industrial factories are small and mainly satisfy the local demand except Nghi Son cement plant and
some products like fish sauce, seafood and fired-brick.
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Tinh Gia district concentrates on future industrial development as follows:

Refinery and Petrochemical industry


Presently, NSRP-LLC has completed FEED stage for NSRP. Total capacity of NSRP is about 200,000 thousand
barels/year.

Steel industry and mechanical industry


Nghi Son economic zone have attracted investment to build steel sheet factory, shape-steel, high-grade steel to
satisfy the demand of economic zone, especially for build and repair ship. This is plan development Nghi Son
shipyard with capability to build 50,000 DWT for new ship and repair 100,000DWT ship.

Construction materials industry


Nghi Son cement plant has capacity of 2.15 million tons per year and has been upgraded capacity of plant to 4.3
million tons per year. In addition, Cong Thanh cement plant has capacity of 2.8 million tons per year. In year 2020,
Truong Lam brick factory has improved capacity to 55 millions bricks per year.

Electrical industry
The Nghi Son economic zone will build the thermal power plant with capacity of 1,800MW at Nghi Son. Currently,
the thermal power plant has been deployed to build the first phase with capacity of 600MW.

Processing industry of agricultural-forestry products


The factory of seafood export and processing has capacity of 2,500 to 3,000 tons per year, the salt factory at Hai
Chau has capacity about 15,000 tons per year. Currently, district is investing and building pet-food factory, cannedfood processing factory and soft-drink factory,

Consumer product industry


Developing industrial products for consumer as textile, leather footwear, electronic, high-level refrigeration to
serve for province, Nam Thanh Bac Nghe region, Central area and export..

In addition, there are light industrial activities in Tinh Gia district as follows:
- Dong Chem industrial group at Nguyen Binh commune are mainly consumer woodwork, garment and
mechanical service.
- Industries located at Hai Binh commune are to serve logistic for fishery and seafood processing.
- Industries located at Tan Truong Truong Lam commune are to produce construction materials and mining.
- Industries at Tan Dan commune are to product stone for exporting, consumer woodwork and electronic repair.
- Cho Kho industries belong to Hai Ninh commune which main branches are mechanical, electronic repair,
refrigeration and electronic.
- Restore and develop tradition trade villages at fish sauce production (Hai Thanh, Hai Chau communes), salt
production (Hai Chau, Hai Ha, Hai Binh and Hai Thuong communes), handicraft (communes belong to Nghi
Son peninsula).

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Untill year of 2010, NSEZ has 16 deploying projects, in which:

Projects such as NSRP, Nghi Son Thermal Electricity Plant, Shipyard, expanded Nghi Son Cement Factory, Cong
Thanh Cement Factory and Tinh Hai Resettlement are on site clearance and construction process;

Other projects such as Nghi Son port, island ecotourist area and industrial parks 1, 2 and 3 are going to site
levelling.

Projects will have been deployed in NSEZ up to 2010 are shown in Figure 2-18.
2.2.1.3 Forestry
The area of forest land in the project area is presented in Table 2.68.
Table 2.68 Protective Forest Area of Commune belong to Project Area
Type of Forest
Planting Forest (ha)
Protective forest (ha)
Mangrove swamp (ha)

Tinh Hai
106.78
31.8
-

Hai Yen
100.2
92.8
-

Mai Lam
369.46
-

Source: Report Economic-Social situation of commune, 2009

In general, the forest area in area of Mai Lam, Hai Yen and Tinh Hai communes is mainly planting forest on hills and
mountains and protective forest at coastal area. Mangrove in the radius of 10km of the project site is distributed along
lach Bang river banks which belong to area of Thanh Binh ward of Hai Thanh and Hai Binh commune, Yen Hoa ward
of Hai Ha and Hai Thuong commune.
Based on result of vegetation cover survey undertaken by CPSE in August 2008 and February 2009, Mangrove
ecosystem along Lach Bang and Yen Hoa river banks is very thin and short (maximum height in the range of 50-60cm),
dead mangrove trees appear at some areas and poor in species. The maximum width of mangrove is about 50-70m.
Preliminary estimation of managrove area is about 1.59 ha along Lach Bang river banks and about 7.2 ha along Yen
Hoa riber banks.
However, the project area is without mangrove. The shortest distance from complex site to Lach Bang river is about
1km and the longest distance is about 3km toward to the North.

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Figure 2-18

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2.2.1.4 Aquaculture and Fisheries

Mai Lam commune


- Total output of exploitation and aquaculture of commune is 7 tons in 2009. The aquaculture area of commune
is 152.24 ha and mostly at Kim Tuyen, Truong Thanh, Hai Lam hamlets. The culture objects are mostly white
shrimp, sugpo prawn, crayfish and freshwater fish.

Hai Yen commune


- The aquaculture area of commune is 1.8 ha. Currently, 12 households are feeding at small ponds, lakes.
Aquaculture production is small.
- Total boats of commune are 6 ones with capacity of about 6 HP/unit and mostly catch fish, squid, oyster and
arca. Total production of fish, squid is about 27 tons per year, oyster and arca is 110 tons per year. There are
256 households (391 persons) participating in catching fish, belong to Dong Yen, Trung Hau and Bac Yen
hamlets.

Tinh Hai commune


- The aquaculture area of commune is 53.5 hectares. The aquaculture area of the commune mainly
concentrated along Lach Bang river.
- Total boats in the commune are about 44 with capacity of 12HP/unit. Beach of the commune is smooth so
there are about 80-100 households catching at coastal and they have been catching all kinds of aquatic
products such as Acetes, squill-fish. In 2008, Acetes output was about 37 tons.

Hai Thuong commune


- Total output of exploitation and aquaculture of commune is 332.5 tons in 2008. The aquaculture area of
commune is 3-4 ha along to Yen Hoa river mouth and mainly extensive culture and raising objects are mostly
white shrimp, sugpo prawn and crab.
- Total boats of commune are 52 with capacity of about 12HP and 6HP. The boat is primarily catching fish at
nearshore and Silago sihama (ca uc), Leiognathus berbis (ca liet) (120 to 130 tons per year), shrimp (5-6
tons per year), cuttlefish (5-6 tons per year).

Hai Ha commune
- The existing of aquaculture area was 60ha concentrated along Yen Hoa river with low output.
- Total boats in the commune are about 189 with a capacity of about 40-90HP/unit. The boat is mainly coastal
catching with aquatic products such as shrimp, Acetes, squid and crabs. In addition, some boats catch away
from shore. Total output of exploitation in 2008 was 1,047.9 tons.

In general, the communes at the project area having aquaculture area are not so much and there are many small
aquacultural ponds along the Lach Bang and Yen Hoa rivers. Especially, at Nghi Son Gulf (near export berth of Nghi
Son Cement Factory), there are about over 479 fish-cages to feed fish such as Lutjanus.sp (Ca Hong), Cephalopholis
nigripinnis (ca Mu), Rachycentron canadum (ca Gio) and Lutjanidae erythropterus (ca Hanh).

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2.2.1.5 Salt industry


Salt production activity in the Project area and its vicinity in NSEZ mainly concentrates along Yen Hoa
river and is bounded by Nghi Son peninsula which is belong to Hai Thuong and Hai Ha communes with
area of 66.05ha and along Lach Bang river (near Lach Bang fishing port), Hai Binh commune with area
of 45.2ha. Communes locate in Project area (Mai Lam, Hai Yen and Tinh Hai communes) are without
salt production activity.
2.2.1.6 Tourist
Tinh Gia district has some famous tourist areas as:

Nghi Son island and Hai Thuong commune. With terrain full of obstacle and difficult of access, this place was used
as military base of feudal dynasties and was especially under the Tay Son Nguyen Hue dynasty.

Hai Hoa seashore belongs to Dong Hai hamlet and Giang Son hamlet, Hai Hoa commune; with distance of 2km to
the East from centre of Tinh Gia district. Hai Hoa seashore has 3 to 4 km length and 200 to 300m width.

Ngoc Hoang cavern belongs to Truong lam commune through Mu Cua mountain chain with 500m length. In
addition, there are Tien cavern and Ngoc Nu cavern.

Lach Bang river landscape tourism, this river is bending along Non Tien mountain before going to the sea.

2.2.2 Social Condition


2.2.2.1 Population
The Project belongs to Tinh Gia district, Thanh Hoa province and this project will affect 3 communes as Mai Lam
Commune, Hai Yen and Hai Tinh. Population of the communes located in the project is presented in Table 2.69.
Table 2.69 Existing population of the affected communes
Tinh Hai

Hai Yen

Mai Lam

937
3,603

1,315
6,917

1,216
4,311

1,352
7,510

1,216
4,399

1,325
7,509

2006
Household
Population

1,220
5,831
2007

Household
Population

1,432
6,476

Household
Population

1,394
8,261

2008
Source: Socio-economic situation report of commune, 2008

Affected households (HHs) in Mai Lam, Hai Yen and Tinh Hai communes are presented in Table 2.70.

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Table 2.70 Affected households


Tinh Hai
600

Number of households

Commune
Hai Yen
1482

Mai Lam
525

Total
2,607

Source: Due Dilligence Report NSRP, February 2010

In which:
1. Plant site (Area B):
Mai Lam commune:
Tinh Hai commune:
Hai Yen commune:

1907 Households, including:


525 Households
600 Households
782 Households

2. Harbour and onshore pipeline area (Areas E and J):

700 Households

Hai Yen commune:

700 Households

2.2.2.2 Transportation and Infrastructure


Road way
Existing road way infrastructure of NSEZ in general and Project area in particular includes main routes as follows:

Provincial Road 513 is the main way connecting National Road 1A to NSEZ and Nghi Son Port. Provincial Road
513 is 12.38km in length, 12m in width and made of asphalt. This road is being used for goods transport from Nghi
Son Port to National Road 1A;
Expansion road 513 to 34m in width for the section from Ho bridge to Nghi Sn Power Plant

Nghi Son Bai Chanh route is a part of road connecting Nghi Son town to Ho Chi Minh Highway with total length of
56 km; This route is under construction and the section crossing to Tinh Gia district is about 22km.

Road 2B is 27km in length and 5-6m in width. This road connects communes in Nghi Son area;

Route from National Road 1A to Lach Bang fishing port is 6km in length, 3.5m in width and asphalted. There are 12
small concreted bridges, 01 concreted bridge and 01 combined bridge in whole route;

Earth route from Hai Nhan to Mine D69 Truong Lam is 24km in length with 04 small bridges and 06 temporary
bridges;

Apart from above routes, there are some civil earth roads with width of 2-4m.

According to master plan of NSEZ up to year of 2015, works constructed and upgraded are as follows:

Provincial Road and inter-commune roads;


- Upgrade route connecting Nghi Son to Ho Chi Minh Highway with total length of 56 km;
- Construct road connecting Provincial Road 513 to Quynh Luu District, Nghe An Province;
- Upgrade roads between communes.

Urban traffic system


Traffic system of economic fuction area is set up based on connection roads between areas:

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Main road in North South axis connecting new urban to tax free area and Southern port;
Main roads in East West axis (connecting North South highway and Western industrial park to the
Refinery, duty-free and port areas);
National Road 1A plays role as urban traffic and divides NSEZ into two areas.

Eastern area of NSEZ:


- Construct main road running through Northern urban centre;
- There are some main routes connecting National 1A to the Refinery, duty-free and port area in the West to the
East;
- Connecting Eastern areas is a road in North South direction linking three areas of new northern urban center
- National 1A Nghi Son integrated port.

Western area
- Western areas connecting route will run parallel to National 1A and North South railway route.

Western and Eastern areas connected by East-West roads:


- Road connecting Nghi Son port to Cong Thanh Cement Factory;
- Road connecting port area to Western industrial park;
- Road connecting Northern urban to North-South highway;
- Construct more route connecting directly Nghi Son port to Noth-South highway with tunnel 3.4km in length
running through Xuoc mountain.

Railway
The Bac Nam railway through Tinh Gia district is about 25km length. There is a train station here which is an advantage
in transportation goods from North to South. Khoa Truong railway station will be upgraded in 2015, proving a new
station 1,200 metres long, by 100 metres wide equipped with four tracks.
Airway
Currently, the nearest airport is Vinh airport of Nghe An province. A Grade 3 airport will be built in Quang Loi community,
Tinh Gia district. The airport is about 80 km from site and about 23 km south from Thanh Hoa city. It will comprise a
single runway between 1,400 and 2,000 metres in length and 40 -50 metres wide, capable of carrying between 200,000
and 400,000 passengers per year.
Marine transportation
The deep water port system of Nghi Son located in key economic zone of the Northern central area. The port plays
particularly important role in promoting for Nam Thanh Bac Nghe economic region.

International maritime channel of Nghi Son port has the advantage of the Vietnam port system. Nghi Son port is
quite close to Asia Europe North America International navigation system. Especially in the North East Asia
area, Nghi Son port has the large advantages about connecting way in large ports such as Hong Kong, Cao Hung
(Taiwan) compared to other ports of Central and South area (Figure 2-19).

National maritime channel of Nghi Son port is the gateway to Central and North areas. Besides, it is important role
in connection the national waterway North-South system.

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Figure 2-19

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Harbour
Existing harbour system of NSEZ consists of PTSC Port and specific port of Nghi Son Cement Factory:

PTSC Port (previously named Nghi Son Integrated Port) is Type 1 port located in Nghi Son area, Tinh Gia district,
Thanh Hoa province (19o1820N, 105o4900E). It includes 02 berths. This port may serve 10,000DWT ships in
berth 1 and 30,000DWT ones in berth 2. Most of transported products in this port are cement, iron, steel, rice,
manure Exported goods from year 2005 to 2008 are 903,000; 985,000; 1,388,000 and 15,000,000 tons
respectively.

Specific port of Nghi Son Cement Factory in Hai Thuong commune, Tinh Gia district, Thanh Hoa province
(20o2042N, 105o4912E) include 01 berth. Capacity of this port is 2,000,000 tons/year and may serve
30,000DWT ships. Transported products are cement and materials used for cement production, such as coal,
gypsum and other additives Exported goods from year 2005 to 2008 are 1,100,000; 1,112,000; 1,362,000; and
15,852,000 tons respectively.

Up to year 2020, NSEZ will plan a harbour system including:

Upgrade PTSC Port to 05 berths and may receive 30,000 DWT ships.

Exported port of NSRP may receive 30.000DWT ships and SPM is able to receive 300.000DWTvessels.

Harbour of Nghi Son thermal electricity plant may receive 5 million tons coal equaling to plant capacity of 3,000 MW
and 01 million tons (600 MW).

Waterway
In the North of NSEZ, there is Lach Bang river running in East-West direction. At present, this river is not used for
transport due to its narrow width of 10m, depth of 0.5m, curve radius of 100 m. there is a bridge named Do Dua put
acrossing the river with traffic width of 10m, space height is lower than 2.5m and only small boats with capacity of 10tons
can run through by high tide period.
2.2.2.3 Power system
The existing of power system at Nghi Son economic zone includes:

National Grid 110-220KV belongs to North Central area which is power source for Nghi Son transformation
stations 220/110 KV 125mVA. The two transformation 110KV stations in project area are as follows:
-

110KV station at Tinh Gia

110KV station at Nghi Son cement Factory

The 220KV grid at Thanh Hoa Nghi Son is directly supplied power to 220KV Nghi Son transformation
station. This power grid linked to the power supply points and the Nghi Son economic zone.

2.2.2.4 Telecommunications
The telecommunication system of district consists of 36 post-offices and 10 public phones using card. There are 2.4
land-line phones per 100 people and 0.5 cell phone per 100 people. There are seven internet access points for the
whole district. In general, the telecommunication of Tinh Gia district has not yet been much developed.

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2.2.2.5 Land use status in NSEZ


Land use status in NSEZ area is presented in Table 2.71 and and Figure 2.20.
Table 2.71 Land use status in NSEZ
No.

Type of land

Total area (ha)

Rate %

1
2

Residential land
Land for office, public constructions

984.6
23.3

5.3
0.1

3
4
5
6

Land for non agricultural production


Land for public purpose
Land for sercurity
Land for religion, cultural/historical relics

352.8
1,410.3
613.4
2.7

1.9
7.6
3.3
0.0

Land for agriculture

10,092.0

54.2

8
9
10

- Agricultural production land


- Forestry land
Graveyard
Rivers/streams and specific surface water
Spare land

3,804.4
5,533.7
170.4
897.3
4,065.0

0.9
4.8
21.8

Source: NSEZ Management Board, 2009

NSRP is constructed in an even and flat area with a large proportion of agricultural land. The most notice is Coc
Mountain and Chuot Chu Mountain locating in the Southwest of Project area. These mountains are covered with forest.
Table 2.72 shows that lands in Project area as well as Tinh Hai, Mai Lam and Hai Yen communes are mainly used for
agricultural production.
Table 2.72 Land use status in Project area
Type of land
Total area
1 Production land
1.1 Agricultural land
1.2 Forestry land
1.3 Aquacultural land
2 Non-productive land
2.1 Residential land
2.2 Used for special purposes 1
2.3 Others
3 Spare land 2
Source: Due Dilligence Report NSRP, February 2010

Tinh Hai
ha
674.9
492.8
322.0
116.6
54.1
177.1
71.9
58.1
47.2
5.0

%
100.0
73.0
47.7
17.3
8.0
26.2
10.6
8.6
7.0
0.7

Affected communes
Mai Lam
ha
%
1,792.8
100.0
1,175.0
65.5
548.5
30.6
475.6
26.5
150.8
8.4
306.8
17.1
32.0
1.8
214.4
12.0
60.4
3.4
311.1
17.4

Hai Yen
ha
%
662.9
100.0
440.4
66.4
235.0
35.4
205.4
31.0
0.0
0.0
153.0
23.1
42.7
6.4
94.6
14.3
15.8
2.4
69.5
10.5

Land used for special purposes include constructions used for office, business service, production;
lands used for sercurity, national defence; land not used for agricultural production; land used for
public purpose (drainage system, pavement, harbour, ferry, parking, train station, irrigation, dike,
damp, electric supply system, communication, gas/oil/fuel pipeline, hospital, market, orphanage,
stadium, cultural constructions).

Spare land consists of: a) Unused delta land; b) Unused hilly land; c) rock mountains is not covered
with forest.

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Figure 2.20

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2.2.2.6 Affected area


According to investigation and assessment results of site clearance and compensation phase (2008-2009) [16], affected
area is about 394ha and presented in Table 2.73.
Table 2.73 Area affected by the Project
Site
Mai Lam
63
0
0
63

B. Plant site
E. Pipeline
J. Harbour
Total

Affected commune (ha)


Tinh Hai
117
0
0
117

Total affected area


(ha)
328
30
36
394

Hai Yen
148
30
36
214

Source: Socio-Economic Survey, 2008

2.2.2.7 Affected graves


In construction phase, there will be 1,915 graves affected by the project implementation. These graves will be moved to
cummunial graveyard presented in Table 2.74.
Table 2.74 Graves affected by the Project
Commune
Hai Yen
433

Tinh Hai
832

Number of grave

Total

Mai Lam
1,083

2,348

Source: Socio-Economic Survey, 2008-2009

2.2.2.8 Existing Potable Water Drainage and System


The existing potable water system
Currently residents in Nghi Son economy zone and its vicinity use raining water and drilling well for domestic use. Only
one cleaning water treatment station with capacity of 3,000 m3 per day is located at Tan Truong commune, but it only
supplies for Nghi Son cement plant.
Regarding the water supply, most of the Households (88%) use water from deep wells, shallow wells (55.1%) and rainy
water (33.9%) for their daily activities.
Table 2.75 Source of Drinking and Cooking water
Surveyed
HH
Total

443

Rain water Shallow well

Deep well

HH
150

HH
390

%
33.9

HH
244

%
55.1

%
88.0

Purchased
water
HH
%
0
0

Public tap Piped water


HH
0

%
0

HH
0

%
0

Source: Socio-economic Survey (2008-2009)

According to NSEZ master plan up to 2015, total required supply water taken from surface water of lake Yen My and
lake Muc river is 80,000 m3/day. Main works of NSEZ water supply system up to 2015 include:
Con Cat water pump station:
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Natural water pump station located at lake Con Cat has capacity of 25,000 m3/day so that it will pump water in this
lake to lake Yen My through plastic pipeline route with diameter of 600 and length of 4,000 m.

Yen My water pump station:


Existing water pump station at lake Yen My will be upgraded from 30,000 m3/day to 80,000m3/day. Then, water will
be routed to lake Dong Chua by plastic pipeline with diameter of 600 and length of 26,800 m.

Pump station - Level 1:


Existing level 1 pump station at lake Dong Chua will be upgraded from 20,000m3/day to 80,000m3/day.

Water plant:
Existing water plant at lake Dong Chua will be upgraded from 20,000m3/day to 80,000m3/day.

Water supply system:


Design as circle network type. Pipeline diameters vary from 100 to 800.

Water supply system master plan of NSEZ up to year of 2020 will be presented in Figure 2.21.

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Figure 2.21

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2.2.2.9 Drainage system and waste water treatment plant in NSEZ


Existing system
At present, NSEZ in general and Project area in particular, neither drainage system nor domestic wastewater plant have
not been constructed yet. Total domestic wastewater is discharged directly into channels and Nghi Son Gulf.
Planning
NSEZ drainage system will be designed to discharge separately (for rain water drainage system and collection and
treatment system of industrial municipal wastewater).
Drainage system include self-flow sewer with diameter of 300 800 mm, buried depth of 4m. Areas having buried
depth more than 4m will be installed transition pump stations. Locations of these stations are as follows:

Drainage basin 1 (residential area in the North-West of Lach Bang river): effluents are treated at wastewater plant
with capacity of 15,000 m3/day.

Drainage basin 2 (residential area in the South of Lach Bang river): effluents are treated at wastewater plant with
capacity of 6,500 m3/day.

Drainage basin 3 (residential area in the West of Tan Truong commune): effluents are treated at wastewater plant
with capacity of 2,500 m3/day.

Drainage basin 4 (residential area in Truong Lam Commune): effluents are treated at waste water plant with
capacity of 1,500 m3/day.

Drainage basin 5 (Industrial park in the East of National 1A, duty-free and Refinery areas): effluents are treated at
wastewater plant with capacity of 30,000 m3/day.

Drainage basin 6 (Industrial park in the West of National 1A): effluents are treated at waste water plant with
capacity of 25,000 m3/day.

Drainage basin 7 (Nghi Son port, Nghi Son Cement Factory, thermo-electric plant): effluents are treated at
wastewater plant with capacity of 25,000 m3/day.

Drainage basin 8 (eco-residential area and golf court): use dispersed drainage system. Waste water is treated

locally for each residential area by septic sludge or small scale wastewater treatment plant. Planned output is
about 2,000 m3/day.

Drainage system and waste water plant master plan diagram of NSEZ up to 2020 will be shown in Figure 2.22.

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Figure 2.22

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2.2.2.10 Solid waste collection and treatment system in NSEZ


Existing situation
Solid waste collection and treatment system in NSEZ has not been established yet. Most of solid wastes will be littered
to surrounding area. Industrial and domestic solid wastes generated from factories will be collected and treated by
sanitary contractor.
Planning

Domestic solid wastes will be collected by manual method combined with mechanics. Solid wastes will be
separated after collection into organic and inorganic waste before treatment process. Inorganic waste will be
transported to landfill. Organic waste will be processed by waste treatment plant to organic fertilizer.

Industrial solid wastes are classified into recycleable and unrecycleable solid wastes. Recycleable waste is
collected separately and processed onsite or transported to other recycle units. Unrecycleable waste will be
collected and transported to solid waste treatment plant served for NSEZ. Hazardous waste is collected and
treated properly in accordance with environmental requirement.

Solid waste treatment area:


-

Domestic solid waste will be transported to solid waste treatment area in Tinh Gia District (in the North of
NSEZ), planned area is about 10ha.

Industrial solid waste will be transported to solid waste treatment area in Truong Lam District. In treatment
area, a security landfill will be constructed for hazardous waste treatment purpose. Total area of this plant is
about 40ha.

2.2.2.11 Culture, Health and Education


There is health care station at each commune to meet the basic needs to examine and treat medically, emergency and
regular childbirth. Professional quality of doctors in the healthcare station has also been improved. Statistical data of
healthcare station in the communes are presented in Table 2.76.
Table 2.76 Statistics of Medical Station in the Project Area
Parameter

Hai Yen

Tinh Hai

Mai Lam

Healthcare station
Doctor
Nurse
Physician
Pharmacist

1
-

1
1

1
1

Source: Socio-economic situation report of commune, 2009

Tinh Gia district has 33 communes and one town with 106 schools in which 34 kindergarten, 37 primary schools, 35
secondary schools and 01 continuing education center.
In 2007-2008, the district has about 49,527 students and 2,490 teachers in kindergarten, primary school, secondary
school and continuing education center. The education quality, number of excellent student and teacher of the district
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have been improved. Each year, there were over 95% of students graduated. The district has 19 schools that meet
national standards (including kindergarten: 03 schools, primary school: 15 schools; secondary school: 01 school).
Education and training network of the communes of the project area has stable developed and widely distributed and
meet learning needs of people. Statistical data of school of the communes in the project area are presented in Table
2.77.
Table 2.77 Educational condition of the communes in the project area
Parameter

Hai Yen

School
Classes
Pupil
Teacher

1
120
9

Tinh Hai

Mai Lam

1
9
205
14

1
380
16

1
13
401
20

1
595
27

1
12
455
28

1
689
45

Kindergarten

Primary school
School
Classes
Pupil
Teacher

1
320
18
Secondary school

School
Classes
Pupil
Teacher

1
21
280
16

School
Classes
Pupil
Teacher

1
45
3,000
-

High school

Source: Socio-economic situation report of commune, 2009

2.2.2.12 Cultural Resources and Archaeology


In Tinh Gia district, there are no archeological relics, only historical heritages, charm landscapes are as below:
Tinh Hai fortress and Ninh citadel were built on Bien Sons island in Nguyens dynasty. In addition, on island
there is Ngocs well mentioned in My Chau Trong Thuys legend;

Tho Son citadel is located at Nguyen Binh commune. This citadel was built under the reign of Minh Mang;

Group of historical heritage and landscape at Lach Bang includes Quang Trung temple, Cue Latch temple
(worship Hong Nuong general), Dot Tien pagoda. This group is ranking certificated by Ministry of Culture;

Ba Lang church was built in 1893, this is called Gia To cultural art;

The temple of Bui Thi Xuan of Bui family is located at Hai Thanh commune;

Architectural stone monument worships Le Dinh Chau Prince.

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3.

Section
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT
The pre-construction, construction and operation of the Nghi Son Refinery and Petrochemical Complex
are likely to cause significant direct and indirect, positive and negative impacts on the receiving
environment. Many of the negative impacts can be avoided or reduced to acceptable levels, while
benefits derived from the project can be enhanced by adopting good engineering practices and
appropriate mitigation measures during the design, construction and operation periods.
As comment in Section 0 about Scope of the Project, Tinh Gia District PC, NSEZ Management Board
and NSPM are responsible for implementation of activities in pre-construction phase (including site
clearance, compensation and resettlement, capital dredging). In this phase, the material exploitation
activities for first stage of site leveling and stage II of leveling from +3.5m to +6m before constructing
the Complexs infrastructure were approved by NSEZ Management Board, in which there are 01
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) report for material exploitation activity and 01 Commitment of
Environment Protection (COEP) report for site leveling activity.
Although the pre-construction phase is out of scope of this EIA report, but according to Safety, Health
and Environment (SHE) requirements of International Finance Corporation (IFC), NSRP LCC has
carried out an investigation survey and prepared a separate Resettlement Due Diligence report for the
Project. Moreover, relocation and resettlement activities will cause long-term effects on the society.
Hence, effects on local community in compensation, relocation and resettlement period are also
mentioned and assessed in detail in this report.
Therefore, this chapter aims to find and assess the direct and indirect impacts that are likely to occur as
a result of construction and operation phases of the Nghi Son Refinery and Petrochemical Complex.
The significance of impact also depends on whether the affected environmental components have
already undergone modifications. Impact significance has been established by using the following
criteria:

The component is recognised by a law, policy, regulation, or official decision (e.g. a park,
ecological reserve, rare or endangered species, habitat for fauna or flora, archaeological site, or
historical site);
The risks to the health, security, and well-being of the population;
Intensity of the impacts (i.e. degree of perturbation of the environment affected and degree of
sensitivity or vulnerability of the component);
Magnitude of the impact (i.e., spatial dimension such length or area);
Duration of the impact (i.e., temporal aspect and reversibility);
Frequency of the impact (e.g., intermittent occurrence);
Probability of the impact;
Indirect effect on other components (i.e., interaction between the affected component and other
components);
Sensitivity or vulnerability of the component;

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Uniqueness or rareness of the component;


Durability of the component and the ecosystems;
Value of the component to the population.

This methodology considers the intensity of the impact which is an integration of the components
environmental value with its degree of disturbance used for determining the intensity and significance of
impacts are as follows: The degree of disturbance for a component defines the scope of the changes
that affect the component. The environmental value of a component is the synthesis of its ecosystembased value and its social value.
The approach used to assess environmental impacts of the project determines the intensity, extent, and
duration of the anticipated positive or negative impact. The main impact levels used in this report
include:
1. Severe environmental effect: Change in ecosystem or activity leading to long term damage (i.e.
lasting for 10 years and over) with poor potential for recovery to a normal state. Likely effect on
human health; long term loss or change to users or public finance.
2. Major environmental effect: Change in ecosystem or activity over a wide area leading to medium
term damage (lasting for over 2 years) but with the likelihood of recovery within 10 years. Likely
effect on human health; financial loss to users or public.
3. Moderate environmental effect: Change in ecosystem or activity in a localized area for a short
time, with good recovery potential. Similar scale of effect to existing variability but may have
cumulative implications; Potential effect on health but unlikely; may cause a nuisance to some
users.
4. Minor environmental effect: Change, which is within scope of existing variability but can be
monitored and/or noticed; may affect behavior but not a nuisance to users or public.
Areas affected directly by the Project will be limited by (a) the scope of effect of the Project stationary
constructions; (b) the scope of effect of the temporary works used in construction phase (transportation
road, camps, water supply system, waste water treatment system, pipeline, dredging and disposal area,
the harbour); Offsite areas are affected directly by emission of gas, noise, deposition of silt, fire &
explosion, waste water discharge or the traffic occurs beyond the Project area.
3.1

SOURCE OF IMPACT TO THE ENVIRONMENT

Based on project activities, the main sources of impact are defined by 2 phases of the Project as
follows:
Construction/installation phase
Operation phase
3.1.1

Impact Source Relating to Wastes

3.1.1.1 In construction phase


The source of impact during construction phase depends upon the type of construction activities, the
construction methods, construction equipment used, plant equipment fabricated onsite, chemicals /
materials used, source / amount of utilities and duration of work. The impacts in construction phase are
generated from following areas:
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Refinery and Petrochemical complex and supported utilities;


Harbor facility;
Onshore product pipeline system;
Seawater intake and outfall facilities including pipelines;
SPM and offshore crude oil pipeline to the Refinery from SPM location.

The quantities/composition of various waste streams such as air emissions, wastewater and solid
wastes will be mentioned in assessment. Therefore, Table 3-1 only identifies the sources, waste types,
and type of impact. In subsequent sections, the emissions with regards to air, wastewater, solid waste,
hazardous wastes, noise and accidental releases have been qualified.
Table 3.1 Impact source related to wastes in construction phase
No.

Source of impact

Activities of construction
equipments and engines

Operation of
Constructional equipment
and truck transportion

Generated wastes
Emission
Wastewater
Onshore constructions
Dust, CO, NOx,
SOx, VOC, CH4,
HC
Dust, CO, NOx,
SOx, VOC, CH4,
HC
Dust

Complex installation
activities

Tank installation

Dust, VOC

Washing facilities surface


before painting (depend
on used methods)

Dust (metal dust)

Painting activities

Welding and cutting


activities

9
10

Pipeline trenching and


installation
Non-destructive testing
(NDT)
Onshore cleaning and
hydrotesting (Pipeline &
tank system)

Radioactive ray
-

11

Workforce

12

Fuel spills

HC

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Noise, vibration, light,


public health

Residue oil

Noise, vibration, traffic


safety, public health

Empty drums,
papers, wood
scraps, plastic
containers, oily
& chemical
wipers

Noise, vibration, public


health, occupational
health and safety

Occupational health
and safety
Noise, public health,
occupational health
and safety

Wastewater

Fe2O3, SiO2,
K2O, CaO

Used paints,
brushes,
wipers

Welding rods

Spoil materials

Noise, heat,
occupational health
and safety
Ecology / Flora and
fauna
Occupational health
and safety

Wastewater

Marine environment,
Fisheries

Domestic
wastewater

Domestic
waste

Wastewater

Oily wastes

Dust, heat

Dust

Other impacts

Residue oil

Used materials

Dust, VOC

Solid waste

Occupational health
and safety

Social disruption,
employment, quality of
life, HIV/AIDS, public
health
Occupational health
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Source of impact

Emission

Generated wastes
Wastewater

Solid waste

Page 3-4
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Other impacts
and safety

Construction equipments
and engines

Pilling and construction


activities

4
5
6

Dredging activities at
intake channel and
breakwater
Ship/barge operation for
SPM and crude pipeline
trenching and installation
Pipeline Cleaning and
Hydrotesting
Workforce

Offshore constructions
Dust, CO, NOx,
SOx, VOC, CH4,
HC
Dust, CO, NOx,
SOx, VOC, CH4,
Wastewater
HC
Dust, CO, NOx,
SOx, VOC, CH4,
HC

Noise, Vibration
-

Dredged
materials

Marine environment,
Fisheries
Coastal water
environment
Marine environment,
Fisheries

Wastewater

Wastewater

Domestic
wastewater

Domestic
waste

Marine environment,
fisheries,
Social disruption,
employment, quality of
life, public health

Exhaust gases
In construction phase, exhaust gases are generated from diesel generators, engine-driven machinery
used for site work, welders/cutters and surface coating during equipment fabrication, transport vehicles,
fuel oil storage tanks, transporting truck, excavation, trenching and earthworks.
Waste water
The effluents usually create from vehicle washing, hydrotest water and sewage. In the rainy season, a
significant volume of storm water runoff also generates. In addition, used oil, paints, cleaning solvents,
etc., also form hazardous effluent during construction phase.
The effluent from equipment/vehicle washings contains mainly TSS and oil. Typically, these will be
discharged to the land with preliminary treatment for removing oil and grease. The effluents from
equipment/vehicle washings contain mainly TSS and oil. Typically, these effluents generated during
construction and commissioning phase will be treated and disposed in correct way by EPC Contractor
to ensure that final discharge of effluents is in compliance with Project Discharge Standards.
The cleaning and hydrotesting effluent generated from pipeline and tank-farm cleaning and hydrotesting
process is assumed the biggest volume in construction phase. Depending on cleaning and hydrotesting
alternative (use chemicals or not), estimation of this effluent is assumed based on the volume of biggest
tank and onshore pipeline system.
Estimation of domestic wastewater in the construction phase is based on average manpower of 21,862
(22,000 in round) persons and peak manpower requirements of 32,795 (33,000 in round) persons.
Anticipated construction period to mechanical completion is 36 months which equate to approximately
930 working days, based on a 6-day working week.
Estimation of effluent in the construction phase is given in Table 3.2.
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Table 3.2 Estimation of Effluent in Construction Phase


No.
1
2
3
4
5

Source
Raw water for concrete
Cleaning and hydrotesting water for tank testing
Cleaning and hydrotesting water for pipeline routes
Raw water for flushing
Domestic wastewater
Average (22,000 pers x 0.2m3/day x 930days)
Peak (33,000 pers x 0.2m3/day x 930days)
Source: Technical Doc. 3550-8710-PR-0003, REV A1 provided by FWL in April 2009

Volume (m3)
278,250
500,000
187,500
375,600
4,092,000
6,138,000

The sewage generated from site offices and constructional sites and camps will contain both total
suspended solids (TSS) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD).
Solid Waste
Solid wastes usually generate from construction debris, excavated soil, packaging materials, scrap
metals from construction and equipment fabrication, vehicle/equipment maintenance waste, etc. The
excavated soil from onshore pipeline route can be used for pipeline backfilled; the others are often
segregated and stored in roll-off containers at waste yards managed by the EPC contractor. Besides,
there is a volume of domestic waste generated by 33,000 workers. The estimation of these wastes is
given in Table 3.3.
Table 3.3 Non-hazardous wastes in construction phase
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

Waste type
Sand/Soil from excavation soil
Packing waste card board
Packaging waste wood
Packaging waste-thermocol
Drums/container (uncontaminated)
Glass
Used PPE (uncontaminated)
Paper waste
Office furniture
Office electronic wastes
Compostable food and canteen waste
Domestic sewage
Total

Generation rate (Ton/year)


6,141
50
300
20
4
40
50
150
5
5
>10,000
70 m3/day*
16,835

Source: Technical Doc. 3550-8150-PH-0002, REV D1 provided by NSRP LLC in December 18, 2009

Domestic solid waste especially from the camps are collected and stored in waste skips and disposed
to local landfill.
Hazardous waste
Solid and liquid hazardous wastes will be generated from equipment maintenance and lubrication,
surface coating, on-site fabrication, empty containers of paints/solvents/oils and accidental spills. These
wastes typically include used lube oil, batteries, empty drums of paint/solvent/additives, floor sweepings
from material storage yard, oily sludge, contaminated soils from spills, off-specification materials,
electrical and mechanical components, etc. Most of these cannot be recycled or disposed off -site.
Estimation of hazardous wastes in construction phase is listed in Table 3.4.
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Page 3-6
Final Report

Table 3.4 Hazardous wastes in construction phase


No.

Waste type

Description

Quantity (Ton/year)

Oily waste

Engine, transformer oil, waste fuel, waste lube oil, cooking oil

21

Oily
container/drum

Oil filters, empty chemical drums, maintenance waste-gease, oil,


cotton waste, rags, etc

Used batteries/
cartridges

Dry batteries, Li, Cd, batteries, Lead acid batteries/acid, toner, used
photocopy cartridges, used fluorescent tubes, aerosol
containers/cans, used smoke ionic detectors, refrigerant Residues,
Pigging residues,

12

Contaminated
materials

Solvents/ paints/ thinners residue, sealants/mastic, spill absorbents,


contaminated soil, contaminated insulation, mineral wool material,
used PPE

33

Lab and medical


wastes

Medical /clinical/first aid waste, laboratory waste e.g. expired


chemicals

6
Radioactive waste Radioactive waste
Source: Technical Doc. 3550-8150-PH-0002, REV D1 provided by NSRP LLC in December, 2009

<1

These wastes will be handled safely and stored in skips, drums and containers at the waste yard. They
are then transferred to the authorized treatment contractor by EPC Contractor in accordance with
Decision No.155/1999/Q-TTg dated 16th July 1999 issued by the Government on hazardous waste
management regulation.
Sources of accident
In construction phase, accidental impact sources at construction sites result mainly from oil spills during
routine loading/unloading, transportation and use of hazardous materials. The cleanup of such spills
generates oil-contaminated sands, floor sweepings and general debris. For instance, where
compressed gas cylinders or welding gases are used, there is a likelihood of such impact sources
during storage and transport activities.
3.1.1.2 Source of impact in operation phase
The sources of impact related to wastes in operation phase include air emissions, liquid effluents, solid
wastes and hazardous wastes generated from the process units along with the utilities, tank farm
system and marine facilities.
3.1.1.2.1 Emission gas
Flue gas from stacks
During the operation phase, air emissions of the Nghi Son Refinery and Petrochemical Complex are
emitted through point source stacks of process units and utilities. There are totally 19 stacks from
various process units and utilities. Based on FEED document [Ref 10], the assumptions and estimated
emission rate from refinery stacks (process headers) are in compliance IFC HSE Guidelines for the
Petroleum refining, emission from stacks located in the aromatic section and naphtha and aromatic
complex are compliance with IFC HSE Guidelines for Large volume petroleum based organic
chemicals manufacturing and boiler and gas turbine stack emission are compliance with IFC HSE
Guidelines for Thermal power plants. In the normal operation, emissions rates of NOx, SO2, CO and
PM from point source stacks are given in Table 3-5.
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Page 3-7
Final Report

Table 3.5 Emission concentration of pollutants at the point source stacks in the operation phase - NSRP
NOx
(mg/Nm3)

SOx
3
(mg/Nm )
No.

Source name

Fuel type

%S

Flue gas
flow (Nm3/s)

CO
(mg/Nm3)

PM10
3
(mg/Nm )

Project
standard
(1)

Concentration
of SOx at
point source
stack

Project
standard
(1)

Concentration
of NOx at
point source
stack

Project
standard
(1)

Concentration
of CO at point
source stack

Project
standard
(1)

Concentration
of PM10 at
point source

120

450

167

800

150

50

50

SRU Stack

Fuel gas

0.0058

32.57

150

FGD Stack

HSFO

0.909

262

400

65

400

50

800

150

50

50

133

400

400

400

300

800

800

50

50

RFCC-Co Boiler Stack

HSFO

0.909

GT HRSG Stack 1

Diezel+LPG

0.04

193

400

20

152

152

800

150

50

50

GT HRSG Stack 2

Diezel+LPG

0.04

193

400

20

152

152

800

150

50

50

HMU Reformer Stack

Fuel gas

0.0058

69.18

400

20

450

60

800

150

50

50

CDU Stack

Fuel Oil

0.24

22.28

400

400

450

450

800

150

50

50

0.83

400

20

450

167

800

150

50

50

ETP-Incinerator

Fuel gas

0.0058

RHDS Stack 1

Fuel gas

0.0058

5.07

400

20

450

167

800

150

50

50

10

RHDS Stack 2

Fuel gas

0.0058

5.07

400

20

450

167

800

150

50

50

11

NAC-1-42 H101

Fuel gas

0.0058

39.14

100

20

300

124

800

150

20

20

12

NAC-2-49 H101

Fuel gas

0.0058

12.54

100

20

300

171

800

150

20

20

13

NAC-3-44 H201

Fuel gas

0.0058

49.53

100

20

300

171

800

150

20

20

5.1

100

20

300

124

800

150

20

20

14

NAC-4-47 H101

Fuel gas

0.0058

15

NAC-5-46 H101

Fuel gas

0.0058

7.14

100

20

300

124

800

150

20

20

16

NAC-6-40 H101

Fuel gas

0.0058

4.3

100

20

300

171

800

150

20

20
50

17

KHDS1

Fuel gas

0.0058

1.43

400

20

450

167

800

150

50

18

KHDS2

Fuel gas

0.0058

1.82

400

20

450

167

800

150

50

50

19

GOHDS

Fuel gas

0.0058

4.11

400

20

450

167

800

150

50

50

Source: Technical Document provided by FWEL, June 2010


Note: (1) Project standards are taken from Section 0 - Table 0.2, this standard is considered and selected strictly between Vietnamese Standard and IFC EHS guideline

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

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Page 3-8
Final Report

The values from Table 3.5 show that all concentrations of pollutants (SOx, NOx, CO and PM10) at the
point source stacks of the NSRP are within project standards which are considered as more stringent
than the Vietnamese standards and IFC EHS guidelines.
Emission gas from flare system

In the case of general power failure, discharges from all relief valves (except acid gas service) are
routed to the HC flare system. Flaring gas will be routed to the HC purge flare / HC flare by maintaining
the different head in the HC purge flare seal drum and HC flare seal drum. Emission rate from HC flare
/HC purge flare system are given in Table 3-6.
Table 3-6 Emission rate from flare in normal and emergency cases
Flare Name

Case

HC FLARE

ESD GPF of Island 1


GPF of Island 2
HC PURGE FLARE ESD GPF of Island 1
GPF of Island 2
Max H2S release (SRU 3-down)
Normal operation
Project standards

Emission concentration (mg/Nm3)


NOx
SO2
CO
PM
323
1,758
44
98
531
28
214
89,236
1,166
50
97
10,568
528
29
84
315,076
457
50
58
316
450
400
800
50

Source: FWEL, October 2009

In normal operation, there is no emission of SOx and PM10 at HC purge flare. The emission
concentrations of NOx and CO are within the project standards.
In emergency cases, the emission concentrations of NOx and PM10 at both HC flare and HC purge
flare are still within project standards. However, the emission concentrations of SOx and CO exceed
project standards, especially in the case of maximum H2S release of SRU 3-down.
VOC from storage tank system

The fugitive emissions from NSRP are mainly from the storage tanks. The storage tanks include the
crude oil, intermediate, final product fuel oil and plant inventory storage tanks. The emissions from
these tanks mainly contain VOC and their emission rates are given in Table 3-7.
Table 3-7 Emission rate of VOC from storage tank system
Source
Vertical fixed roof tank

Internal floating roof


tank

Description
Refinery FO tank
Utility fuel oil tank
Ship loading fuel oil tank
GO HDS feed tank
RHDS diesel tank
GO premium tank
GO (Ind) tank
FRN tank - CFRT
Desulphurised heavy naphtha
Reformate tank

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

Number of
tanks
1
3
1
4
2
3
2
2
1
1

VOC emission rate


(kg/tank/year)
455
15
15
2,846
4,144
5,723
9,048
2,846
1,937
2,379
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Source

External floating roof


tank

Ventilated internal
floating roof

Description
Light reformate tank
Heavy reformate tank
Heavy aromatics tank
RC/ DSRC tank
Crude tanks
Alkylate tank
Heavy FCC naphtha tank
Gasoline 92 tank
Gasoline 95 tank
SR slop tank
Cracked slop tank
Jet tank
Kerosene tank
Total

Number of
tanks
1
1
1
6
8
2
2
2
2
2
1
3
1
52

Page 3-9
Final Report

VOC emission rate


(kg/tank/year)
1,603
520
1,192
192
2,376
2,057
394
8,812
8,812
4,482
2,018
111
111
140,511

Source: FWEL, October 2009

3.1.1.2.2 Wastewater
In the operation phase, the process effluents comprise spent caustic, benzene contaminated
wastewater, water from sour water stripper and various overhead receivers, boiler blow down and
backwash from process units, which is collected through the drain system. The continuous oil
contaminated wastewater is collected from oily water equalization tank, equipment areas and tanker
loading areas and is routed to the drain system. The cleaning wastewater comes from various process
and utility areas. Accidentally oil-contaminated surface water (AOC) including surface run-offs (rain
water, wash down) are collected from project areas with a risk of contamination. Therefore, Specific
wastewater streams are collected in dedicated systems before passing to the effluent treatment plant
(ETP), including:

Dedicated collection of benzene contaminated water (BCW) in a closed system to prevent


atmospheric emission of benzene

Dedicated collection of spent caustic effluent for flow balancing and prevention of atmospheric
H2S emissions

Water from crude oil tank bottom will be routed to a dedicated API separator to remove gross
oil content.

The sanitary effluent generated from administrative building and offices is collected separately, pretreated and routed into the biotreatment stage of the ETP. Total amount of sanitary water is about
14m3/h from refinery and 0.7m3/h from Jetty area. So, total amount of sanitary water in operation phase
is about 14.7m3/h.
The total quantity of process wastewater from various process units including utilities and sanitary is
about 600 m3/hour. The ETP consists of a two stage oil/water separation unit along with third stage
biological treatment.
Cooling water will be seawater taken from Nghi Son bay at the coastal. After cooling circulation, about
5-20% of cooling water will be routed to FGD for desulphurisation purpose. The neutralized effluent
from the desalination plant is estimated of 564 m3/hour which will also be potentially discharged to the
sea through the outfall facilities.
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Page 3-10
Final Report

Estimation volume of effluents generated from refinery complex is summarized in Table 3-8.
Table 3-8 Quantity of NSRP effluents in operation phase
No.
1

Source

Flow rate (m3/h)

Sea water intake

128,200

Total effluent outlet

129,364

Peak ETP outlet (including industrial effluent and domestic effluent)

600

Peak RO/IX Reject/Regent

564

Power FGD outlet

23,000

Cooling water

105,200

Source: Technical Document provided by FWEL, October 2009

3.1.1.2.3 Solid waste


Non-hazardous solid waste
Solid wastes during the operational phase include hazardous and non-hazardous wastes. Nonhazardous solid wastes include packing materials, used electrical fittings, domestic waste from
residential camp, canteen waste, STP sludge, waste paper, printer cartridges, metal scrap, used spare
parts and cans, drums and containers of non-hazardous materials.
These wastes are stored at designated waste storage areas at the facility and finally disposed off at
approved dumpsites or sold to potential authorized buyers for recycling (e.g. waste paper, packing
materials, metal scrap and printer cartridges). A suitable waste management facility for storage of solid
wastes will be located at the plant boundary.
Hazardous solid waste
When the project comes into operation phase, hazardous wastes from various process units are mainly
spent catalysts, spent absorbents, spent de-sorbents, replacement of inert materials, oily sludge, waste
chemicals, containers of hazardous materials, incineration ash, etc. Liquid hazardous wastes include
spent caustic waste oil / paints / solvents and chemicals. The estimated quantities of significant
hazardous wastes are given in Table 3-9.
Table 3-9 Quantity of hazardous wastes in operation phase
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Source
Spent catalyst
Spent hydrotreater catalyst
Spent solid phosphoric acid catalyst
Spent catalyst (CR3S) sulphur recovery unit
Spent catalyst (TG 107) from SCOT section
Spent adsorbents
Spent catalyst replacement

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

Unit
MT
MT
MT
MT
MT
MT
Ton/year

Quantity
1,110.8
153.2
224.6
140
70
17.323
1,760

Notes
Once in 04-05 years
Once in 04 years
Once in 02 years
Once in 05 years
Once in 05 years
Once in 04 years
Annual
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ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


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No.
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

Source
Replacement of inert material
Spent adsorbents
Spent adsorbents
Spent desorbents
Spent desorbents
Spent caustic
Catalyst grading materials (from HDS reactors)
Teal oil liquid waste
Hydrocarbon drains
Spent selective hydrogenation catalyst
Clay treater sludge
Clay treater sludge (from BT clay treater)
ETP sludge
Incineration ash from ETP

Unit
Ton/year
Ton
Ton
Ton
Ton
m3/year
Ton
m3/year
m3/year
Ton
Ton
Ton
Ton/year
Ton/year

Quantity
52
603
1.3
1116
2.63
1,632
49
280
146
10
154
103.6
5,204
2,100

Page 3-11
Final Report

Notes
Annual
Once in 04 years
Annual
Once in 20 years
Annual
Weekly (34m3)
Once in 04years
Regular
Regular
Once in 04 years
Every 06 months
Every 02 years
Regular
Regular

Source: Technical Doc.3550-8150-PH-0002 REV D1 provided by NSRP LLC - December, 2009

Total amount of sludge is about 25,080kg/day in normal case and 57,360kg/day in peak case.
These wastes will be stored in designated and protected hazardous waste storage area of the Refinery.
The hazardous waste storage area will be typically part of the waste management facility, which will be
planned and located at the site for storage of non-hazardous and hazardous wastes.
3.1.1.2.4 Accidental impact sources
Accidental impact sources from the refinery include gaseous and liquid sources. The gaseous impact
sources include fuel gas/LPG leakage from the supply/process pipelines and LPG leak from the storage
tanks due to corrosion or external damage.
The liquid impact sources include spills or leakages from crude oil/intermediates/final products/fuel oil
storage tanks, product export pipelines, oil spills from SPM, crude pipeline and shipping collision.
The significance of the above leaks depends on the quantities (inventory) of material contained, type of
leak (small / medium leak or rupture) and the location of leak (onsite /offsite). The hazard identification
(HAZID) or hazard and operability (HAZOP) studies have been undertaken by FEED consultant for this
project. The quantitative risk assessment (QRA) of potential hazards and consequences of accidental
impact sources is carried out by FEED Contractor.
3.1.2

Impact source not related to wastes

Non-waste impact sources in construction phase are mainly generated by:

Complex construction and installation of equipments;


Tankfarm construction and installation;
Harbor construction (including hard jetty, product jetties, breakwater, turning basin and access
channel through sea route);
Offshore and onshore pipeline construction;

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Final Report

Unload and transport materials and super size & super weight equipments;
Breakwater construction;
Pilling and construction activities harbor;
SPM and Crude pipeline trenching and installation;
Anchoring activities of laying barge and supply vessel.

In the operation phase, main impact sources not related to wastes are generated from following
activities:

Operation of the complex;


Product distribution road;
Crude and product storage area;
Offshore pipeline maintenance;
Offloading crude at SPM;
Loading products at harbour
Shipping activities.

The impact sources not related to wastes from project phases are given in Table 3.10.
Table 3.10 Impact sources not related to wastes from construction and operation phases
Impact sources not related to waste
Refinery

Impact

Marine facilities

CONSTRUCTION PHASE
- Foundation treatment and installation of - Breakwater construction
equipments
- Pilling and harbor construction activities
- Foundation treatment and tankfarm
- SPM and crude pipeline trenching and
installation
installation
- Welding and cutting activities
- Anchoring activities of laying barge and
supply vessel
- Onshore pipeline installation
- Intake and outfall construction

Social issues
Noise & vibration
Seawater environment
Biological environment

OPERATION PHASE
- Product distribution road
- Onshore pipeline maintenance
- Crude and product storage area

Pipeline maintenance
Offloading crude at SPM
Loading products at jetties
Shipping activities

- Noise & vibration


- Seawater environment
- Shoreline erosion

The above-mentioned activities will cause impacts to society, noise & vibration, sea water, biology and
shoreline erosion in project phases.

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3.2

Page 3-13
Final Report

IMPACTED OBJECTS

3.2.1 CONSTRUCTION, INSTALLATION AND COMMISSIONING PHASE


In order to ensure the efficiency of cost and environmental sustainable development, NSRP LLC has considered safety
and environmental standards since the FEED preparation phase. All design options strictly comply with standards of
Vietnam and World Bank.
According to site philosophy for main project components, process units will be arranged in an optimum way to reduce
used natural resource. From environmental point of view, it shows that:

Arrangement of high heat and pressure process units at the centre of the Plant will mitigate negative impacts
on surrounding residential area;

Crude oil tankfarm, product tankfarm and pipeline joint areas will be located in the Northeast of the Complex.
Product tank and sphere tank area will be in the Eastern fence of the Plant to reduce the length of product
pipeline to the harbor;

Wastewater treatment area is sired between product tank area and process units in order to collect and treat
effluents easily;

Intermediate tank, waste storage, crane and administrative areas are located nearby the West fence of the
Complex and Coc mountain;

The control house is sited close the administrative area and near the process units;

The flare will be put in the Southeast corner of the Complex;

The arrangement of SPM at 33.5 km far from the shore does not need to dredge maintenancely. Crude oil
tanker will approach SPM easier and may go in and out from any directions and especially reduce
environmental impacts on marine resource (coral reef) around Me island;

Crude oil pipeline is installed in the North of Me island and far from coral reef area to mitigate impact during
construction phase and potential risk of oil spillage;

Product berth construction is considered to the stability of the seashore and near the Complex to reduce
product pipeline length and potential risk of marine transport activities;

For Thanh Hoa Province, product berth construction in the East of the Complex will be an advantage for
broaden Nghi Son harbor system in the future. This is safe and easy for management and operation of the
Nghi Son harbor. Especially, the operation of the harbor will not cause any disturbance to the traffic of local
people living in Nghi Son island;

Breakwater construction in the North harbor will reduce effect of sea wave, current and sedimentation loading
in the initial phase of the construction, especially heavy modules transport.

3.2.1.1 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF ONSHORE FACILITIES


(REFINERY AND SUPPORTED FACILITIES)
The environmental components affected by the onshore implementation of Nghi Son Refinery and
Petrochemical Complex concern mainly air quality, noise and vibration, water resources, soil quality,
flora and vegetation, fauna and wildlife, aquatic habitat, cultural resources, land and natural resources,
livelihood activities, population, health and safety, etc. In addition, the project impacts on global
environmental issues like greenhouse gases and biodiversity are also considered.
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Page 3-14
Final Report

The works assessed in this part include:

The complex site (area B);


Onshore pipeline system (area E) including crude, product, cooling intake, outfall pipelines.

3.2.1.1.1 Air quality


Project activities
During the construction phase, dust will be generated due to earthwork activities and exhaust gases
from constructional equipment and truck movement at site.
Potential impacts
Dust
The potential impacts on air quality during construction phase of the refinery are the generation of dust
from earthwork activities, transportation, site movement of vehicles on unpaved surfaces and the
engine exhaust from construction equipment, vehicles at the construction sites and labor camps.
Dust is considered as major adverse impact due mainly to earthworks for site improvement, site
excavation for foundation and surface polishing of tank system. The movement of 586 equipment
(dump trucks, excavators, bulldozer, roller/compactor, grader, piling, etc.) will create a lot of dusts in the
dry season (December to May) and cause dust pollution to Project area and the vicinity as similar as
mentioned in pre-construction phase. Moreover, people living along provincial road 513 will be also
affected by dust.
The steel welding and cutting activities, polishing tank surface and spraying paint on tank and pipeline
system will generate a great quantity of dust, VOC and oxide metals (Fe2O3, SiO2, K2O). These
substances will directly affect on health of on-site workers and local effects to air quality at working site.
In general, dust generated from construction activities of the Complex and supported utilities will directly
impact on on-site workers at the Project area. The Project is located in NSEZ but it is too near
residential area. Therefore, in construction phase, dusts do not only affect on the project area but also
affect on residential area and nearby communes. Impact level is assessed as moderate for 03 years of
construction and installation.
Emission gas
The major exhaust gases consist of PM, NOx, SOx, CO and VOC. Based on number of constructional
equipment, volume of used fuels and constructing time, estimation of exhaust gases are given in table
3.11.

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Page 3-15
Final Report

Table 3.11 Estimate exhaust gases from construction equipment in construction phase
Equipment
Cranes
Mass transportation
buses (60 seats)
Heavy equipment
Earthmoving equipment
Other cars & trucks
Total
Notes:

Number of
equipment
(pc)
40
122
40
284
100
586

Exhaust gases (Ton)

Used fuel
(Ton)

TSPb

COc

SO2a

NOXd

VOCe

3,152
4,340

13.6
18.7

44.1
60.8

0.019
0.026

220.6
303.8

12.7
17.4

2,846
17,178
1,581
29,096

12.2
73.9
6.80
125.1

39.8
240.4
22.1
407.4

0.017
0.101
0.009
0.175

199.2
1,202
110.7
2,037

11.4
68.7
6.3
116.4

Used fuel is assumed for 515 working days


Specific weight of Diesel is 0.85 ton/m3
a: S content is taken of 0,3%W.
b,c,d,e: 4.3; 20S; 70; 14 and 4 for TSP, SO2; NOx; CO and VOC respectively.

Fugitive emissions from earthmoving equipment, crane and heavy machines will release combustion
gases like TSP, NOx, SO2, CO and VOC which will impact local ambient air quality. Based on
estimation exhaust gases from 586 construction equipments and vehicles, the total exhaust gases is
estimated to be 2,037tons of NOx, 407tons of CO, 125tons of TSP, 116tons of VOC and 0.175tons of
SO2. All these gases created from movement sources will be easily dispersed in an open and flat
terrain. Therefore, the impact of exhaust gases is considered as minor for three construction years.
The painting activity is potential source of VOC release into environment, especially under sunshine in
the dry season. In practice, the painting activity is carried out in different locations of the Complex, so
the VOC will easily disperse into the air with very low concentration and affect insignificantly on the
environment. Moreover, NSRP LLC will suggest the EPC Contractor apply international painting
standards to ensure that VOC concentration comply with Vietnamese and International requirements.
Hence, impact level of painting activity is assessed as minor.
Noise and vibration
Project activities
Noise generated on construction site will come from sources which vary in nature and intensity. The
most significant noises are produced by heavy equipment operating on the site, such as compressors,
pneumatic and hydraulic tools, excavators, loaders, graders, bulldozers, shovels, and hammers. Other
noise sources can include trucks traveling to and from the site, the loading and unloading of materials,
and sirens and backup warning signals. There is also noise produced by engines (i.e., valves, air
cooling and exhaust systems), as well as vibrations generated by tools. Moreover, poor equipment
maintenance (e.g., loose parts and poor lubrication) can create vibrations and, consequently, increase
the noise level. The use of dynamite is also a significant noise source on construction sites.
Primary receptors for construction-related noise and vibrations include site employees and residents
and structures in the communes near to the construction site.
Potential Impacts
Noise is a concern for project workers and local communities, especially in the early morning and
nighttime site work activities. The typical noise levels expected from the various construction machines
are presented in Table 3.12.
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Table 3.12 Noise level in construction phase


Noise source
Heavy cranes
Mass transportation
Heavy equipment
Earthmoving equipment
Others
Total
Source: 1:
2:

Number of equipment1
40
122
40
284
100
586

Expected noise level2 (dBA)


115
75
125
115
72-74

FWL, April 2009


Refer to Vietnam construction standards

The heavy equipments used in construction and installation works, diesel generators, pilling machines,
roller/compactors, etc. and the road transportation will cause noise impact on the workplace as well as
the vicinity and access roads. It is likely that at certain locations close to the noise sources within the
work site, the noise levels will be in excess of 85dB(A) which is required the personnel on-site to wear
ear protection devices.
The construction activities on-site are likely to affect the ambient noise levels, especially near
residential areas. For construction equipment with a typical level of 85 dBA at 15 m, the expected noise
level is approximately 49 dBA at 1 km distance from the source and 43 dBA at 2 km distance.
Simultaneous operation of multiple pieces of heavy equipment can increase noise level by up to 10
dBA. The noise from a construction work site may have a significant impact on residence located within
1 km of construction activity and could exceed IFC noise guidelines.
Noise levels for a typical haul truck are 85 dBA at 15 m with the average velocity of 80km/h, the
forecasted equivalent noise level is LAeq 1h: 50 dBA at a distance of 400 m from the road, in
compliance with IFC residential daytime noise guidelines but exceeding residential nighttime guidelines.
Noise from transport vehicles will be only transient for a given location and can be considered as a
nuisance during daytime and night-time along the transportation access.
During the night-time when the ambient noise levels are low, the level of perception to noise is more
sensitive and impact more significant.
Moreover, the direct driving a great quantity of concrete piles for foundation consolidating will generate
noise but also cause strong vibrating within the project area. It is noted that the noise and vibration
caused by pilling drivers are most long lasting, stretching and make uncomfortable (reverberation
effect) to local communities within first year of construction period, especially at night-time.
Thus, noise generated from construction equipment will directly affect to health of construction workers
and nearby communities. Impacts level is assessed as moderate and uninterrupted during working
process.

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3.2.1.1.2 Surface water


Impact by construction/installation of intake water and outfall effluent system
Project activities
The water intake from the sea is installed at the seashore and located on the north of export jetty.
Related to intake installation, some works, such as installation of crest breakwater, intake channel, will
be implemented.
The outlet location will be 6 km from shoreline. The outlet system consists of main pipeline and diffuser
pipes which have some number of ports. Whole outlet system will be buried under seabed with ports
which are 1 m higher than the surface of seabed.
Potential impacts
Intake channel with 350m in width and 70m in length will be dredged to designed depth in order to ensure supplying
enough sea water for cooling purpose. The dredging activities will impact to 24,500m2 seabed and generate a significant
quantity of dredged materials.
Wastes from dredging activity and above-mentioned earthwork will be discharged at approved site by the authority or at
disposal site of capital dredging materials in the construction phase.
Turbidity will be increased during intake installation near shore. The construction of outlet system will
strongly cause the seabed disturbance and increasing turbidity of coastal water. However, construction
activities are done in a short time, therefore adverse impact level is considered as short-term and
moderate.
Potential water pollution due to onshore cleaning and hydrotesting activities
Project activities
Cleaning and hydrotesting activities will be undertaken after completing installation tank system and in
plant pipeline system. It is planned to use freshwater and some chemicals as oxygen scavenger,
corrosion inhibitor, biocide and dye. Preliminary estimate shown that hydrotest volume is about
500,000m3 which will be retained in settling pond to remove particulates and recycle for one by one
tank testing. At last, cleaned and hydrotested wastewater will be treated through on-site effluent
treatment facilities before discharging into the environment.
Potential impact
The discharge of treated cleaning and hydrotest water into coastal water might cause oxygen depletion
and high turbidity around the outfall area. In practice, the hydrotest water will be diluted quickly by
effects of sea waves and tide. Therefore, the impact level is assessed as minor within 1-2 weeks.
Effect of sanitary wastewater discharge
Project activities
During the construction phase, a large number of employees are mobilized to the site. The average
number is about 22,000 persons and the peak period will be 1.5 times higher (33,000 persons).
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Approximately 6,600 m3 of domestic wastewater per day will be generated during the peak period of
construction activity (Table 3.2). This sewage will be treated in a dedicated effluent treatment system
and discharged subject to the storm water channel to the sea.
Potential impact
The potential impacts which may be associated with the sanitary effluent discharge are to reduce water
quality in receiving waters due to high BOD and COD and dissolved oxygen (DO) depletion around
outfalls due to bacterial digestion. This might also cause eutrophication due to increased organic
loading (algal blooms) and resultant localized anoxia.
NSRP LLC will ensure that effluent treatment design standards are set in the environmental design
basis, so that the treated effluent from the construction camps will not be discharged into a highly
sensitive as Lach Bang watershed.
On this basis, the discharge of sanitary effluent from the camps will cause a moderate adverse
environmental impact. Impacts will last throughout the construction phase (3 years), but its magnitude
will be most significant during peak construction operations. Any adverse impacts to local water quality
as a result of the discharge may also be offset by the cessation of raw sewage disposal into water
environment following relocation of discharge site.
Effect of storm water discharge
Project activities
Large volumes of turbid storm water will be generated at the worksite, particularly following excavation
work, pipeline trenching and backfilling.
Potential impact
At the end of site leveling period, Dap Ngoai canal will be tiredly backfilled. In order to drainage water for the area from
Chuot Chu mountain foot to the road 513, NSEZ management board had constructed a drainage creek along road
513 to Lach Bang river.
According to calculation, maximum volume of runoff storm water at the Plant site is about 143,514 m3/h.
In order to prevent inundation to nearby community, the Project has designed a drainage channel in the
North of the plant to drain off all volume of runoff storm water in the surface of the Plant. Runoff storm
water in the South will be drained through a drainage system constructed by NSEZ Management Board
along Road 513. Therefore, all of water run off in the project site as well as rain water around Chuot
Chu mountain foot area will be totally drainaged out and do not cause effect to nearby populated area. Impact
level of runoff storm water is assessed as minor.
3.2.1.1.3 Groundwater
Project activities
The water requirement during the construction phase is taken from Nghi Son water supply plant.
Preliminary quantity of water needed for domestic demand of 33,000 workers in the construction phase
is approximately 6,600 m3/day in average and 9,900m3/day in peak daily demand. Total average
demand over construction phase (930days) is about 6,138,000 m3.
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In addition, raw water for mixing concrete, flushing and tank cleaning and hydrotesting are estimated of
1,153,850m3. Water used for these activities will be supplied by NSEZ.
If wastewaters generated in the construction phase are not treated properly, it will be a potential risk of causing
groundwater pollution.
Potential impacts
Pipeline trenching, site upgradation and consolidation activities might impact to groundwater regime of
surface layer from Chuot Chu mountain to Lach Bang river. Impact level is assessed as minor due to
trenching depth is in the range of 1m in minimum and 4m in maximum.
The discharge treated hydrotest water to the coastal water is assessed as minor after controlling
content of contaminated substances. The significant potential impact to groundwater contamination in
this phase is from sanitary wastewater due to having peak number of workers. As planned, the EPC
contractor will provide toilets at the site and camps to collect and treat domestic wastewater on site.
Therefore, the impact level to groundwater quality is assessed as small in a short period.
3.2.1.1.4 Soil environment
Project activities
The EPC contractor will implement construction activities such as establishing infrastructure, transport, temporary
storage and installing machines, equipments, works, process units. The contractor will use many materials and
chemicals in construction and pre-commissioning phase. Besides, in the peak of construction phase, the Project may
mobilize maximum workers up to 33,000 persons.
The EPC contractor may need more land to set up camps for workers, assemble and temporarily store a great number
of equipments, materials
Potential impacts

Soil disturbance

Total area for onshore constructions is 394 ha. Most of land acquired for the Project (65%) is low production agricultural
land (1 paddy crop and 1 onland product crop). The Project area is only about 2.2% of total NSEZ area (18,612 ha).
However, foundation treatment activities, building infrastructure and installing units will cause strong disturbance to soil
structure from agricultural to industrial land. Impact level is assessed as moderate in construction phase.

Potential soil pollution caused by wastes

Estimated generation rate of non-hazardous solid wastes in construction and installation phase is about 16,835
tons/year (Table 3.3), in which 59.5% is compostable food and canteen waste (10,000 tons/year), 36.6% is sand/soil
waste from site preparation (6,141 tons/year) and 3.9% is others such as packing waste, glass, furniture, domestic
waste Estimation of domestic sludge generated from construction site and camps is about 70 m3/day. This is
potential source of soil pollution if there is not suitable or enough collection and treatment equipments. Therefore, if
mitigation measures for soil environment are applied strictly, impact level is assessed as minor in 3 construction years.

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Hazardous wastes generated in construction phase are mainly contaminated materials, oily waste and used
batteries Estimated generation rate of hazardous waste is about 79 tons/year (Table 3.4), in which 41.8% is
contaminated waste (33 tons/year), 38% is oily waste (30 tons/year), 15.2% is used batteries (12 tons/year), 3.8% is
laboratory waste, and less than 1.2% is radioactive waste (less than 1 ton/year). All these wastes will be classified onsite and stored in safe containers.
Besides, process of cleaning steel plate surface for tank system installation will create a number of metal slags.
Estimated generation rate is about 100 tons/year. Since high pressure cleaning process is often carried out outdoor,
slag will be dispersed on the ground and hardly to be collected absolutely. Especially in rainy season, these slags will
infiltrate into ground to make the soil contamination. Impact level is assessed as moderate during tanks and pipeline
system installation.
3.2.1.1.5 Biological environment
Flora
Project activities
The site clearance, trenching and pipeline installation activities will occupy 30 ha residential, agriculture
land and coastal protective forest. This area will be used for onshore pipelines system including: two
48 crude pipelines, 13 product pipelines, one intake cooling pipeline and one outfall pipeline and other
supported pipelines connecting from Harbor to tank area.
EPC contractor may need more land for their accommodation camps, site gathering, assembling and
temporary storage a large quantity of equipment, materials, etc., so more number ha of vegetation and
flora will be affected.
Potential impact
Based on Biodiversity assessment report for the project area and the vicinity [7] of national biological
specialists, August 2008, approx. 70% of pipeline route area (area E) is residential land with fruit trees
and 30% remained area is protective forestry which is typical by Casuarinas equisetifolia with the age of
5-10 year old. Estimation of affected coastal protective forest is about 35,000 m2 (3.5ha) and quantity of
cut down trees is approx. 2,916 trees. The onshore pipeline construction will required permanent
vegetation clearance on 30 ha residential area, product land (peanut, sesame) and coastal protective
forest (3.5 ha).
In practice, at onshore pipeline area, there is not any rare species and vegetable cover is mainly fruit
trees and crops. Affected protective forest is limited in a small area (350m in length and 100m in width),
the significance of this impact is assessed as minor.
Fauna and wildlife
Project activities
The site clearance, trenching and pipeline installation activities will occupy 30 ha of residential,
agricultural land and coastal protective forest.

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Potential impact
Based on field survey to project site in February 2009, some distributed birds as white herons were
observed in Area N and sub-soil disposed area. The biological survey results for area E and its vicinity
(October 2009) shown that these areas are mainly considered as residential and agricultural
ecosystem. These ecosystems are not supported any threatened species.
The presence of 33,000 workers may affect threatened fauna species through local market food
supplies or restaurant. However, since full accommodation will be provided for most of these workers
and then reduce the potential impact on the threatened fauna species. The significance of this adverse
impact is assessed as minor and short-term.
3.2.1.2 Offshore Construction (Harbor, Breakwater, Pipeline and SPM)
3.2.1.2.1 Air environment
Project activities
It is assumed that the number of equipment mobilized for construction marine facilities will be about
10% of quantity of equipment and trucks estimated for the plant site.
Typical equipment for onshore construction consist of excavator, rock hammer/breaker, bulldozers,
wheel loader, trucks for backfill materials (rock and sand) transport, survey equipment, anchors, winch
or sheaves etc.
During offshore construction/installation of crude pipeline and SPM, approximately 42 vessels or
equipment packages with capacity of 100 to 200 tones and 37 vessels or equipment with capacity over
200 tones will be required.
Offshore construction activities should be completed within a period of 36 months.
Potential Impacts
Site preparation harbor, breakwater, access routes and material transportation activities will cause
negative environmental impacts on air quality, including dust arising from site preparation, construction
activities, transportation and exhaust emission from the operation of diesel generators, construction
equipment and heavy trucks.
1. Dust
Earthworks associated with breakwater and harbor construction will require large quantity of material
including sand. Furthermore, the construction of the harbor and breakwater will be affected by sea
winds, so the activities of site leveling and truck movement for loading spoil sand, stones and
construction materials will generate a significant quantity of dust that will impact on labors working at
the project site and local people living along Tinh Hai and Hai Yen beach.
The fine particulate might affect the respiratory system of Contractor employees at the project site and
can cause asthma, pneumonia and bronchitis. These activities will have a significant direct impact on
project labor and local people living in the vicinity.
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In summary, dust generated from constructional activities will cause significant direct impacts on
labours working in the project sites and to local residents living in the vicinity. These impacts will last for
duration of the construction works (36 months). The significance of this impact is considered to be
major during the first two years and will gradually be reduced to minor effect in the third year of the
construction and installation phases.
2. Emission exhaust
The onshore based construction of harbor, breakwater, crude pipeline and SPM system will use typical
construction equipment including excavator, rock hammer/breaker, bulldozers, wheel loader, trucks for
backfill materials transport, survey equipment, anchors, winch or sheaves etc. The operation of these
machines/equipment will emit to the environment significant quantities of exhaust gases.
Based on total number of construction equipment for the whole project and the scope of marine
construction activities, it is assumed that the equipment used for marine construction is about 10% of
the ones used for plant construction. Estimated volume of emission gas generated from equipments
used in harbor and breakwater construction phase is presented in Table 3.13.
Table 3.13 Estimated volume of emission gas generated from equipments used in harbor and
breakwater construction phase
Equipment
Crane
Truck
Heavy equipment
Soil/stone transport device
Others
Total
Notes:

Quantity
4
12
4
28
10
58

Used fuel
(ton)
315
434
285
1,718
158
2,910

TSPb
1.35
1.87
1.23
7.39
0.68
12.51

Emission gas (ton)


COc
SO2a
NOXd
4.41
0.02
22.05
6.08
0.03
30.38
3.99
0.02
19.95
24.05
0.10
120.26
2.21
0.01
11.06
40.74
0.17
203.7

VOCe
1.26
1.736
1.14
6.872
0.632
11.64

Used fuel is assumed for 515 working days


Specific weight of Diesel is 0.85 ton/m3
a: S content is taken of 0,3%W.
b,c,d,e: 4.3; 20S; 70; 14 and 4 for TSP, SO2; NOx; CO and VOC respectively.

Exhaust gases emitted in construction/installation and pre-commissioning phase of the offshore pipeline includes
emission gas of ship engines, generator, welding machine, crane and other equipments on the pipeline installation ship,
pulling ship, pipe carrier and supply boats. Components of exhaust consist of CO, CO2, NOx, SOx, dust and unburnt
HC. These exhausts may increase concentration of pollutants in the air.
As planned, there will be 42 ships/devices with capacity of 100 200 tons and 37 ships/devices with capacity of 200
tons. Ships taking part in installation of crude oil pipeline within 12 months include laying barges, pipe carrier and service
vessels. Estimated amount of DO used for laying barge and equipments is about 18 tons/day; pulling ship is 0.85
ton/day; pipe carrier is 0.85 ton/day and supply boats is 0.17 ton/day. Fuel used for ships includes fuel used for ship
engines and fuel used for onboard devices. According to calculation method of United Kingdom Offshore Operators
Association (UKOOA) [17], estimated exhaust from the operation of installation ships is presented in Table 3.14.

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Table 3.14 Estimated exhaust gases generated from constructional ships/barges


Vessel

Used fuel
(ton)

CO2b

COc

5,616
265
53
265
6,199

17.971
0.849
0.170
0.849
19.838

0.0590
0.0028
0.0006
0.0028
0.065

Laying barge
Pulling ship
Supply boats
Pipe carrier
Total
Note:

Amount of exhaust (ton)


NOxd
SO2a
0.223
0.0105
0.0021
0.0105
0.246

0.010
0.0005
0.0001
0.0005
0.011

CH4e

VOCg

0.001
0.00003
0.00001
0.0000
0.001

0.007
0.0003
0.0001
0.0003
0.008

Used fuel is assumed for 312 working days (26 day/month x 12 months)
a: S content is taken of 0,3% W.
b, c, d, e,g: 3.2 for CO2; 0.0105 for CO; 0.0397 for NOx; 0.6 for SO2; 0.00011 for CH4 and 0.0013 for VOC

Above results show that:

Exhausts from harbor and breakwater installation equipments are mainly NOx (203.7 tons), CO
(40.7 tons), TSP (12.5 tons), VOC (11.6 tons) and SOx (0.02 ton) for 3 construction years. These
pollutants will disperse quickly at construction sites and do not cause any significant impact on the
air environment.

Amount of exhaust gases from offshore pipeline installation process are small and mainly from
laying barge. This emission may cause some temporary impacts on coastal activities. However,
since due to the natural dispersion on the sea condition, the impact level in offshore pipeline
installation/construction is expected to be a minor.

3. Noise
Project activities
As mentioned in this report, quantity of construction equipments used for marine harbour and breakwater is about 58
including cranes, heavy equipments, transport trucks, etc.
The piling of large numbers of steel and concrete piles by pile hammers and the activities of
excavators, vibro-rollers, vibro-tampers, concrete mixer, and welding machines will generate noise and
vibration during the construction period.
Transportation of material, sands, cement, stones for construction or rehabilitation of road access,
construction of breakwater, jetty and harbor will involve heavy machinery that will impact the population
living near the project area but also the transportation routes.
Potential Impacts
Operation of above machines will cause noise and vibration at harbor area, especially the pile driver.
Excessive noise will cause nuisance, interfere with hearing/ conversation, cause fatigue, increase heart
rate and reduce sleep quality. The direct piling of steel and concrete piles to the seabed will disturb to
local people in the vicinity.

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Excessive noise will affect on hearing and nervous system. Noise generated from construction
equipments in radius of 15 m [18] is estimated as follows:
-

Bulldozer:
Diesel compressor:
1.5-ton pile driver:
Concrete mixer:

93dB
80dB
75dB
75dB

If distance from the hearer to the machine increases/decreases twice times, noise level will
increase/decrease 6 dB. Moreover, at spacious area, the noise will increase due to reflex sound from
vicinity works. Effect levels of noise are presented in Table 3.15.
Table 3.15 Effect levels of noise
Noise
45dB on night and 60dB on day
70 80dB
95 110dB
120 140dB

Effect
Not affected
Tired
Harmful
Potentially causing injury

Source: [18]

Among harbor and breakwater construction equipments, the noise of pile driver lasts longest and is the
most disturbance to local community. That driving concreted piles directly into seabed not only make
noise but also strong vibration at harbor area. Affected area will be defined in radius of 200m around
harbor location. According to [19], the noise from construction activities will cause negative impacts on
the workers if:

Continuous noise (more than 1 hour) is 10dB higher than allowable standard for area and time in
day.

Sudden noise is 15dB higher than allowable standard for area and time in day within less than 1
minute compared with impact threshold.

So, the noise generated from harbor and breakwater construction equipments and varying in range of
75 93 dB will cause direct effect on health of labour force working for the Project and local community
in radius of 200m, especially at night. The impact level of noise is assessed as moderate during
construction phase.
For activities of offshore pipeline and SPM installation, construction machines and engines, operations
of welding, ship engine and crane will make noise and disturb the atmosphere on the ship installing
crude oil pipeline and SPM. Total noise of these equipments in a defined space onboard will directly
affect on workers, cause nervous and tired.
3.2.1.2.2 Surface water
The construction of marine facilities including harbor, breakwater, crude pipelines and the dredging
activities will have significant impacts on the environment and social aspects. The presence of this oil
and gas production and transport facilities on the coast in a relative non-industrial area may be source
of important impacts.
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Installation of SPM and crude pipelines


Project activities
Single point mooring (SPM) construction activities include setting up a pipeline end manifold (PLEM)
system on the seabed below the SPM, inter-connecting hoses and two 48" sub-sea crude pipelines
connecting PLEM with the crude oil tank farm.
Potential impacts
The installation of the PLEM system and anchor buoy leg mooring on the seabed will also cause
moderate local disturbance of the sediments as well as obliteration of small areas where the PLEM
system and leg mooring sit on the seabed. The presence of the PLEM and leg mooring will result in
sediment disturbance and redistribution around the facilities. These impacts are expected to reduce
significantly after installation of SPM and pipelines are completed.
During subsea pipeline construction activities, the barge is moored using eight anchors. Each anchor
cable typically consists of wire rope over one kilometer long carried on eight single drum winches. The
pipeline needs to be protected against mechanical damage and for stability reasons. Therefore, the
pipeline shall be buried within a pre-excavated trench. This will ensure that the pipeline will not become
exposed due to erosion, be stable in the surf zone and be protected from fishing vessel or tourist boats.
Two 48" sub-sea crude pipelines run parallel for 33.5km from SPM to landfall point with the interval of
43m. For safety purpose, onshore and coastal pipeline will be buried at least 1m underground.
Supposing that trenching and pipeline installation process will disturb the interval between 2 pipelines
(43m) and their moving toward two sides (25m) and on each 1 km, laying barge must anchor 2 times
with 8 anchors/time and each anchor will create a 3 m2 hole on the surface of the seabed. Therefore,
total seabed area affected directly by pipeline installation is estimated as about 2,279,608 m2.
As above-mentioned, the seabed topography of the project area is relatively flat and its gradually
sloping toward to offshore in which there are some little rough areas. The seabed sediment is mainly
sandy clay. Therefore anchoring of laying barge, pipeline trenching and burring activities will cause
strong disturbance to the seabed and organic matters, make temporary un-stability of bottom
sedimentation loading, and increase considerably of the suspended solid and pollutants within some
kilometers from construction site by sloughing seabed sediment along the pipeline route. Especially for
the shallow water which is considered to be higher sensitive coastline than the offshore. The impact
level is considered as major in the nearshore and moderate in the offshore during construction period.
It is important to note that fishing activities are taken place in Nghi Son bay. The SPM area and pipeline
route beyond the Eastern of Hon Me Island should be an exclusion zone for fishing activities. However,
illegally used explosives in the fishery may form hazards to the pipelines and SPM. Also, mooring
activities of local fishermen may be high potential risk for the SPM. Therefore, the interactions between
fishing and protection activities of marine facilities can be raised due to the need for fishermen to
understand and avoid pipelines in terms of damage liability. Because the potential for gear to become
damaged or miss harped when crossing the pipeline as well as the potential for heavy fishing gears to
damage the weight coat of the pipeline.

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Harbor construction

Project activities
It is assumed that about 1,400 piles will be piled.
Harbor construction will be carried out from the shore, progressing seaward to the various berths in
order to take advantage of land bases access and support. Based on the scale of the harbor, a large
quantity of steel and reinforced concrete piles (1,400 piles) will be piled into the seabed to the required
depth on the parent stone (25 to 35.5m). All piles are locked together to prevent soil erosion behind the
harbor and suffered jetties. Concrete piles are installed by temporary bracing system just after finishing
the piling work in order to fix the piles and hold up concrete casing system. Estimation of seabed area
directly affected by piling in front of the harbor is about 41,060 m2.
Potential impacts
Impact caused by sand deposition at harbor area
In order to assess deposition at harbor and access channel areas, NSRP LLC has used sedimentation model of the
marine consultant, Royal Haskoning [20], based on reference to mass of deposited silt, change of depth and silt
depositing velocity at access channel area of Nghi Son cement port in the period 2000 2008. Mean water depths of
the approach channel to the cement port show that:

2000: 13 m
2006: 11 m
2008: 10 m

According to these figures, the annual siltation rate varies between 0.3 and 0.5 m/year. With an estimated area of the
cement port approach channel of 1 Mm2, the annual siltation volume would vary between 0.3 and 0.5 Mm3. According
to above data, following estimates of dredging quantities related to the Nghi Son Port (south of the peninsula) is as
follows:

2002: 2,0 million m3


2006: 0,6 million m3
2008: 2,0 million m3 (including a deepening of the approach channel to allow for 30,000 DWT
vessels)

According to these figures 600,000 m3 of sediment has accumulated in four years in this approach channel, thus on
average 150,000 m3 per year. With an estimated area of 300,000 m2, the annual siltation rate amounts to 0.5 m per
year.
If stable factor is 2.05 and annual volume of deposit is about 100,000 m3/year, estimated volume of
deposit at access channel of NSRP will be about 205,000 m3/year (Table 3.16).

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Table 3.16 Quantity and deposition rate at NSRP access channel


Run
ID

Sedimentation of cement
port approach channel
[m3/yr]

1
48,000
2
69,000
3
50,000
4
50,000
5
68,000
Source: NSRP-LLC, June 2010

Sedimentation of NSRP
approach channel and
harbour basin [m3/yr]
99,000
141,000
100,000
97,000
138,000

Ratio of NSRP and


cement port approach
channel sedimentation
[%]
206%
204%
200%
195%
203%

The simulation modeling of deposition at harbour and access channel is carried out with the expansion basin the
harbour in the future. This basin is longer than one in construction phase but the width is the same.
The presence of breakwater will create a barrier that waves cannot pass and current velocity will decrease significantly.
As the result of this, deposition at harbour basin is nearly equal to zero.
Therefore, some conclusions regarding the sedimentation and erosion pattern can be made (Figure 3.1) as follows:
The majority of the sandy infill of the NSRP approach channel takes place in the shoreward half of it.
The maximum siltation rate in the approach channel is about 0.2 m/yr, occurring in the bend.
The siltation of the harbour basin is limited to the southern part at a rate of 0.1m/yr.
After one year, the ratio of sandy siltation of the NSRP and cement port approach channels is more or less
independent of the parameters settings, viz. varying between 194 and 206%.
- During the year, however, this ratio varies considerably.
- Given a fixed ratio of 205% and an observed annual infill of the cement port approach channel of 100,000
m3/yr, the annual sandy siltation of the NSRP approach channel amounts to 205,000 m3.
- A scour hole develops over a relatively large area (approximately 11 km2) due to contraction of the current
around the tip of the breakwater. The depth of the scour hole remains restricted to a few decimeters only.
-

Figure 3.1 Sedimentation (red) and erosion (blue) pattern after one year morphological simulation time
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Impacts caused by clay deposition at dredging area

Besides sand/silt deposition, annual deposition of fine particulates is about 0.2 m/year.
A distinction is made between the initial operational phase and a future extension phase. The main difference between
the two is the area of the harbour basin. The harbour basin at the start of operation has an area of approximately 0.7
million m2 whereas in the future extension phase it will have an approximate area of 1.7 million m2 (Table 3.17).
Table 3.17 Volume of the annual infill with fines
Phases

Area of the
harbor basin
[million m2]

Initial operational phase


Future extension

0.7
1.7

Area
approach
channel
[million m2]
1.2
1.2

Area
subject to
fine infill
[million m2]
1.3
2.3

Siltation
rate
[m/year]
0.2
0.2

Annual
siltation
volume
[m3/year]
260,000
460,000

Source: [20]

With a further extension in the form of the construction of a breakwater south of the NSRP approach channel extending
towards the cement port approach channel the infill with fines will be reduced but will not become zero. Tidal filling of the
port basin will bring considerable amounts of fine suspended material into the harbour basin which will partly settle
around slack water.
It is therefore advised to account in that phase of the project for an infill with fine sediment similar to the infill in the initial
operational phase (140,000 m3/yr harbour basin only). Note that this volumetric infill is spread over a much larger area
than in the initial operational phase thus resulting in a smaller siltation rate of about 0.1 m.
The infill of the NSRP dredged areas with fine sediment in the initial operation phase is estimated at 260,000 m3/year. In
a future extension phase the harbour basin is enlarged thereby increasing the annual infill with fines to 460,000 m3.
These volumetric infill volumes are based on a siltation rate of 0.2 m/year.
In summary, activities of pile driving, harbor construction, harbor and access channel dredging will take
away sea bed sediment layer and make a strong disturbance to water environment at harbor area.
According to research and assessment of sand/silt deposition, it shows that activities of harbor
construction and dredging will make changes of deposition at harbor area and access channel. The
impact level is assessed as major and short-term.

Impacts of breakwater construction

Project activities
Two breakwaters will be built at NSRP harbor, low-crested breakwater and harbor breakwater. The
function of the harbor breakwater is to reduce the downtime for small vessels under operational
conditions. The low-crested breakwater is to create a settlements basin before the water intake
structure and to prevent sediments to enter the intake structure.
The construction of the harbor breakwater will be carried out at the north of the harbor and will have a
total length of 1,800 m. The low crested breakwater for the intake structure will be constructed likewise
the northern breakwater. The seabed levels range approximately from CD -5.5m to CD +1.0m at the
foreshore. The upper elevation of the breakwater structure is +9m height and construction will comprise
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of a rock core with a protective rock or concrete layer. The total volume of materials used for
construction of the breakwater is 300,000 m3.
Breakwater construction is required soil excavation for toe stability down to -5.5m under the seabed
with area of 110 m in width and 1,800 m in length. Total seabed area affected by breakwater
construction is about 198,000 m2.
Potential impacts

Impact of breakwater on current regime

In order to assess impact of breakwater of the harbor on current regime, NSRP LLC has used FINEL2D model to
calculate and simulate current regime at harbor area and its vicinity. This model runs based on wave equations and
average depth of Tokin Gulf and specifically calculates for shallow water area at Nghi Son Gulf (Figure 3.2).
This model is very suitable for modeling current at estuaries, sea and coastal areas. Besides, FINEL2D model also
calculates sediment loading and predict movement of sand, silt or combined model and changes of sea/river bed.

Figure 3.2 FINEL2D model for Tokin Gulf


The computational grid consists of nearly 70,000 elements varying in grid size from 5 km to 500 m.
Model set-up standards are referred from Svasek standard values as follows:

Mesh size: 5 km2 to 100m2


Uniform Chezy friction factor: 90 m/s
Eddy viscosity: *Not used *
Density of sea water: 1,030 kg/m3
Gravitational acceleration: 9,81 m/s2
Corriolis effect: not applied
Wind force: not applied

Calculations are modeled for a tidal period from spring tide (Figure 3.3) to neap tide (Figure 3.4).
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H. A1-1 Current on spring tide - 6 hours before high water

H. A1-3 Current on spring tide - high water

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H. A1-2 Current on spring tide - 3 hours before high water

H. A1-4 Current on spring tide - 03 hours after high water

Figure 3.3 Current at spring tide NSRP harbor area


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Spring tide

Spring tide - 6 hours before high water (H.A1-1 Figure 3.3): The tide is generally moving in a northsouth direction. There is evidence that the approach channel is causing some refraction to the
currents, but this is not a strong effect.
Inside the harbour the currents are very weak, with a large almost stagnant area stretching from the
root of the main breakwater to the roundhead. South of the quayside there is a slow moving
anticlockwise eddy.
North of the main breakwater, the breakwater gives rise to another slowly moving anticlockwise
circulation, which due to the geometry of the main breakwater. At the intake channel the current
vectors show that the movement of water is into the intake with a velocity of approximately 0.1m/s.
Across the sea area the velocity of the tidal currents ranges from 0.03m/s to 0.3m/s.

Spring tide 3 hours before high water (H.A1-2 Figure 3.3): current speed is about 0.0 0.2m/s. At this
stage in the tide cycle the tide is at or around slack water. The currents across the area have
generally lessened, although there is localized acceleration of flow mid-point and roundhead of the
main breakwater.
The anticlockwise circulation to the south of the harbour is weakening as is the water circulation to
the north of the main breakwater. Water circulation in the harbour is very slow and the current
vectors show no clear directionality.

At high water (H.A1-3 Figure 3.3): the direction of the currents has changed from north to south indicating that
the tide has switched from flood to ebb flow. Within the harbour, just off the roundhead there is a noticeable
clockwise eddy moving at approximately 0.15m/s.
To the north of the main breakwater the currents follow the coastline moving at between 0.1m/s to
0.12m/s. The breakwater alignment causes an acceleration of the currents along its seaward face
with velocities reaching 0.36m/s at the roundhead.
The currents across the area are generally between 0.0m/s and 0.33m/s, with some currents in the south east
corner reaching 0.42m/s. These do not affect the harbour or operation of the intake.

Spring tide 03 hours after high water (H.A1-4 Figure 3.3): modeling strong movement toward the South of
tidal currents. The ebb tide is fully developed, and along the northern face of the main breakwater the currents are
accelerated to between 0.24m/s and 0.33m/s.

The slowly moving/stagnant water in the harbour reduced in size as a result of an increase in the
size of the clockwise circulation to the south of the breakwater roundhead. Across the area the tidal
currents range between 0.0m/s to 0.42m/s.

Spring tide 06 hours after high water: To the north of the main breakwater and intake channel, the
tidal flow has slowed considerably, with only a weak southerly movement along the coastline
illustrated.
Directly in the lee of the main breakwater there is growing area of very slowly moving water with no
clear directionality indicated. The size of the clockwise circulation has also increased. It is also
noted that the harbour approach channel does not appear to affect the currents as they move
across it. Tidal currents do not exceed 0.24m/s.

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H. A1-5 Current on neap tide 06 hours before high water

H. A1-7 Current on neap tide High water

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H. A1-6 Current on neap tide 03 hours before high water

H. A1-8 Current on neap tide 03 hours after high water

Figure 3.4 Current at neap tide NSRP harbor area


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Neap tide:

Neap tide 06 hours before high water (H.A1-5 Figure 3.4): The tide is moving in a northerly direction
and so is on a rising or flood tide. In contrast to the anticlockwise circulations, the Northern eddy is
located away from the coastline and above the outer half of the main breakwater arm. The eddy
moves faster on its seaward (northward moving) edge, where velocities are approaching 0.1m/s,
whereas the inner (southward moving) edge moves at approximately 0.05m/s. This is because the
breakwater exerts a greater influence over the tidal currents on the neap tide than on the spring tide.
The southerly anticlockwise circulation is of a similar size and form to that of the spring tide,
although the velocities are approximately 50% of those noticed on the spring tide.
In the harbour the current vectors are indistinct, but the general perception is one of a very slowly
moving anticlockwise rotation of the water body. The approach channel to the harbour does not
appear to attract flow, hence the flood tide continues uninterrupted in a northerly direction.
Movement into the intake channel is at a rate of 0.05m/s to 0.1m/s, which is at the lower end of the
design range 0.1m/s 0.5m/s.

Neap tide 3 hours before high water (H.A1-6 Figure 3.4): There is a small anticlockwise circulation
approximately 2 km east south-east of the breakwater round head.
The flow patterns inside the harbour are not well defined and appear to meander north, which is
consistent with this stage of the tide being at or around slack water.
To the north of the main breakwater the anticlockwise rotation has widened. The velocities are
generally less than 0.05m/s. Flow through the intake channel is around 0.06m/s to 0.08m/s.
To the north and south of the main breakwater there are large areas of very slow water movement
that are hugging the coastline. This condition does not last for long as the tidal currents pick up
again towards high water. The lower current velocities on the neap tide are as a result of the
smaller neap tidal range.

Neap tide - At high water (H.A1-7 Figure 3.4): Across the area the current velocities are between
0.01m/s and 0.5m/s. north of the main breakwater the anticlockwise circulation is weakening and
the direction of the current vectors indicates that the tide is changing from flood to ebb.
South of the breakwater the current vectors show a clear change from food to ebb. Velocities in the
intake channel are 0.05m/s to 0.08m/s.

Neap tide 03 hours after high water: The ebb flow is now well established. Where the currents flow
around the breakwater roundhead, the currents are accelerated to approximately 0.12m/s.
In the lee of the breakwater the flow is weak and towards the root of the breakwater, before being
directed south by the alignment of the quay wall (H.A1-8 Figure 3.4): velocities in the intake channel
are 0.06m/s to 0.1m/s.

Neap tide 06 hours after high water: The tidal flow is still strongly moving south, with localized
acceleration of currents around the breakwater roundhead. A small, weak, clockwise eddy is also
present immediately off the roundhead.

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From the South of the harbor, there is a large slowly moving body of water hugging the coastline with
velocities no higher than 0.01m/s.
In addition, dredging activity for beakwater construction will generate a significant quantity of dredged materials. Quantity
of dredged materials and diging activities will be determined in detailed basis design stage.
Dredged materials and spoil materials will be discharged at designated site approved by the authority or at dumping site
of capital dredged materials in preconstruction phase.
In general, constructing breakwater will destroy structure of the shoreline and change wave and current regime at
harbor area. Impact level is assessed as moderate and long-term.
Impact of hydrotest water
Project activities
After the pipeline and the installations of all tie-ins completed, the crude pipeline will be cleaned and
hydrotested. Following activities carried out during testing and pre-commissioning:

Flooding and gausing for metering internal pipeline diameter;


Pipeline cleaning and hydrotesting;
Dewatering
Drying and cleaning pipeline.

Sea water will be used for crude pipeline cleaning and hydrotesting. Estimation of cleaning and
hydrotesting volume is about 187,500 m3. It is planned to use some chemicals for sea water treatment
with the adequate measured amounts related to the volume of water being pumped by dosing pumps.
The flow rates and volumes pumped for each chemical are measured and recorded.

Oxygen scavenger, to remove dissolved oxygen from the seawater so as to prevent corrosion
inside the pipeline;

Biocide, to prevent the growth of organisms and bacteria;

Corrosion inhibitor(s), to prevent or reduce attack by chlorides and other potentially harmful
components of seawater related to the metallurgy of the pipe (or its lining);

Dye, colored and normally fluorescent under ultra-violet light (such as "fluorescence") which
aids divers in tracing the location of any leaks.

Potential impacts
It assumed that cleaning and hydrotesting water will be treated and then discharged at SPM location
about 33.5 km offshore. The water depth of this site is about -27 m and bottom sediment is sandy clay.
The use oxygen scavenger (as ammonium bisulphate) for cleaning and hydrotesting process will cause
local oxygen depletion phenomenon around discharge site due to the oxidization of sulfite ion (SO32-)
into sulfate ion (SO4-2). The generation of sulfate ion does not affect to marine environment because it
is available in high content in sea water. During testing, part of biocide and inhibitor will remain inside
the pipe thus amount of chemical discharged following the hydrotest water will be reduced.
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The discharge of cleaned and hydrotested water containing seawater and small amount of chemicals
into the marine environment may increase pH value, suspended solid in the water column and disturb
of water surface layer. Considering high dilution ability, the environmental impact is assessed as minor
in the vicinity of the discharge point.
In practice, hydrotest water will be discharged into moving sea water environment and strong mixing
under continuously wave and tidal effects. That means at pipeline outlet, hydrotest water will be
immediately diluted with seawater. So, the hydrotest discharge will cause temporary and local oxygen
reduction at the area surrounding discharge site and the effect level is assessed as small and locally
during the discharge period (about one week).
Domestic Wastes from Barges/Vessels
Project activities
During crude pipeline construction, it assumes that at least one constructional barge with full equipment
for installing pipeline will be used, one barge for supplying pipes and two supply boats for supporting
fuels, foods and others for pipeline construction barge.
Potential impacts
The solid wastes generated from the offshore pipeline construction activities and redundant materials
such as metals, welding rods, paper, plastic boxes, oily cloths, etc., with small quantity will be collected
separately and transported by support vessels to the shore for further treatment. Moreover, the manual
procedures during installation and transportation will be done in accordance with technical standards
proposed in order to minimize the potential material strewing. The impact related to solid waste coming
from construction activities will be negligible.
All domestic waste from kitchen (such as food, fruit peel) will be collected and discharged directly to the
sea. Indecomposable waste will be collected in separate drums and transported by support vessel to
the shore and disposed at the stipulated disposal site. The significance of domestic waste considering
the technical standards on water quality is assessed as negligible.
The sanitary generation on board is estimated as small and will be collected to septic tank system for
treatment before discharging to the sea. The impact level is assessed as minor to sea water.
3.2.1.2.3 Land and Terrestrial Ecology
Flora
Project activities
Site clearance for onshore harbor will be done on about 36 ha coastal protective forest.
Potential impacts
Predominant tree in the coastal protective forest is Casuarina equisetifolia in the age of 5-10 year old
with diameters in the range of 10-25 cm. The density of the coastal protective forest is about
50trees/100m2. The number of Casuarina equisetifolia is estimated at approximately 150,000 trees. The
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impact level is considered as moderate since this forest was used for protection and is also a source of
material for Hai Yen Commune.
The construction crude pipeline will be carried out at the distance of 6.7 km far from Hon Me Island and
will not cause any impact to onshore flora on Hon Me island.
Fauna
Project activities
Using 36 ha coastal protective forest may be the source of impacts on coastal fauna ecosystem.
Potential impacts
Based on assessment report of existing biodiversity of terrestrial fauna project area [8], there is
absence of rare and endangered species living in the project area (coastal protective forest). The
species composition of the vertebrate fauna in the project area is relatively poor and most of species
found are common ones (birds, etc.). The construction of the harbor will affect 36 ha of potential fauna
habitat of common species living in coastal forest and sandy beach. These species might migrate to
coastal forest stretching along the coast. Therefore, the significance of this impact is assessed as
minor.
The taking materials from borrow pits and quarry sites for the construction of breakwater, jetty and
harbor platform may affect potential habitat used by rare or endangered species. These species will
move away from the excavation sites to search new habitats nearby. The significance of this impact is
assessed as moderate and permanent.
3.2.1.2.4 Marine ecosystem
Project activities
Activities that will have impacts on the marine environment are the construction of crude pipeline (33.5
km), SPM, breakwater and harbor.
Potential impacts
The trenching, installation and backfilling activities for 33.5km pipelines and SPM will cause disturbance
of 2,279,608 m2 of seabed area. These activities will scratch the seabed surface and rouse available
pollutants in bottom sediment, change the distribution of the sediment grain size causing the local
disturbance to benthic community.
The soil excavation for breakwater toe stability will take out all seabeds benthic in the area of
198,000m2 and pilling activities for harbor construction will cause strong seabed disturbance in the area
of 41,060 m2. These activities will burry and smother the benthic organisms, even though destroy
bivalve species living in harbor area.

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3.2.2

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Final Report

OPERATION PHASE

3.2.2.1 Operation of Onshore Facilities (the Plant and support facilities)


3.2.2.1.1 Air environment
1. Emission from stacks and flares
Project activities
Air quality is affected by various sources of emission such as stacks, incinerator, flare, tanks, etc.
Potential impacts
The emissions from these sources are considered by conducting dispersion modeling for prediction of
impacts on air quality. The following are the sources considered for dispersion modeling:

Process heaters (CDU, HMU, RFCC, GOHDS, KHDS, N&AC, SRU);


RFCC Boilers;
Boiler emission gas treatment system;
Gas turbines;
ETP Incinerator;
Flares.

To satisfy national standards and IFC requirements for stationary point source, FEED consultant has
considered optimum stack height, flare height and emission rate of each pollutant as follows:

Optimum stack height was determined using GIIP, HMIP D1 Method and BREEZE AIR
SCREEN3 developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The
stack height selected is in compliance with the ambient air quality standard in isolation from
other emission sources in the area.

Air emissions from refinery stacks (Process heaters) are in compliance with Vietnamese
standards and IFC EHS Guidelines for "Petroleum Refining". Air emissions from the stacks
located in the Aromatic section of Naphtha and Aromatic Complex are compliance with
Vietnamese standards and IFC EHS Guidelines for "Large Volume Petroleum Based Organic
Chemicals Manufacturing". Boiler and GT stack emissions are in compliance with to
Vietnamese standards and IFC EHS Guidelines for "Thermal Power Plants".

In order to meet projects point source emission limits, all gases from RFCC boiler and emission gas
treatment system are routed to DeSOx and DeNOx system before discharged into the atmosphere. Low
and ultra-low NOx burners are recommended for heaters of process units, utilities and waste
incinerator. Therefore, input data of emission rate used for dispersion model are accounted for applying
mitigation measures.
At in start-up and shut-down periods, emission from stack does not meet the project standard,
however it happens in short time so the effect on ambient air quality is negligible. Therefore, in start-up
and shut-down case is not put into consideration of air emission modeling.
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To assess air quality, the Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System (ADMS) from CERC (Cambridge
Environmental Research Consultants) with the United Kingdom Meteorological Office, National Power
plc and University of Surrey is used. The first version of ADMS was released in 1993 and the current
model is ADMS version 4.
Principle of ADMS may be summarized as follows:

The air dispersion modeling was carried out using ADMS 4, a new generation Gaussian plume air
dispersion model capable of modeling dispersion in the atmosphere of passive, buoyant or slightly
dense, continuous or finite duration releases from single or multiple sources.

ADMS uses the atmospheric boundary layer and the reciprocal of the Monin-Obukhov length to
characterise the atmosphere. The boundary layer is defined by measurable physical parameters
obtained from meteorological data, which allows for a more realistic representation of the changing
characteristics of dispersion with height and time. This results in a more soundly based prediction
of the concentration of pollutants than previous generation dispersion models.

The model takes into account emissions from the source, location of nearby buildings, topography
and meteorological data for the local area. The model will then provide a predicted concentration of
the substance of interest at a specified point. The process is re-iterated for a large number of
meteorological conditions and at a large number of receptor points to build up a prediction of the
long-term mean and short-term peak concentrations over the area of interest.

ADMS 4 is a new version of Gauss atmospheric dispersion model with two parameters used to
define characteristic of atmospheric boundary layer as follows:
- The boundary layer depth, and
- The Monin-Obukhov length.
Rather than in terms of the single parameter Pasquill-Gifford class.

Dispersion under convective meteorological conditions uses a skewed Gaussian concentration


distribution (shown by validation studies to be a better representation than a symmetrical Gaussian
expression). The ADMS4 is used in many countries in European, Asia, Australia, North America and
the Middle East.
For the NSRP, ADMS is computed for the maximum ground level concentrations of NOx, SO2, CO and
PM10. These emission results will be added with baseline data of each pollutant before assessing the
compliance to project standards.
To verify the compliance with the ambient air quality standards from stacks and flares, a full-scale air
dispersion modeling is studied as follows:

Emission from 19 stacks and combined case for all stacks are considered in the operation
case; and 1 HC flare in normal operation;
Emission from HC flare and HC purge flare in the emergency case;

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The emission from each source and combined sources are modeled and the concentrations from
combined sources at specific distances are added together to topography and contour maps to obtain
the overall ground level concentrations.
The ADMS Model requires hourly meteorological data for calculating the ground level concentration of
pollutants. The hourly meteorological input data within three years (2005-2007) from Tinh Gia
Meteorological Station is used for the modeling. This is a National Meteorological Station located at
19.5oN; 105.8oE which is about 15.65km far from the Nghi Son Refinery Plant toward to North and
Northeast direction.
The complex elevation and impact of all mountains terrain in the radius of 7.5 km for air dispersion is
considered and applied by the Grid dimension 500m x500m as Figure 3.5. All topography data for
computed area with the 7.5km radius are made as input file of the ADMS model.

Figure 3-5 Terrain condition of NSRP in ADMS model


Summary of emission input and output results for point sources system are given in Table 3.18 and
Table 3.19.

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Table 3.18 Input data of ADMS model in normal operation case For NSRP
Stack #
DESCRIPTION OF
POINT SOURCE

Coordinates of point
source as VN2000
Fuel used
Fuel
Details

SRU
FGD
Stack
Common Stacks for
name
stack
Boiler

3
RFCC Co
Boiler

Ref. #

X 601

DeNox 50

H-101

East
North

580180
2141315

580082
2140371

580459
2140822

Title/type Fuel gas

Sulphur

in %

Quantity

in Kg/Sec

HSFO

HSFO

0,0058

0,909

0,909

0,635

18,145

1,061

HHV
Mj/Kg
44,12
39,571
Heat input in MW
28
718
Dry standard
NM3/sec
flow
32,57
262,00
73,00
329,00
Flue gas Actual flow m3/sec
Details
Exit Vel.
m/sec
7
15
Temp.
in 'K
571
343
Oxygen
in %
3
3
Diameter
in m.
3,6
5,3
Stack
Recomm.
details
in m.
50,00
100,00
Height
mg/NM3 50,00
50,00
PM
gm/ sec 1,629
13,100
mg/NM3 120,00
65,00
SO2
Emission
gm/ sec 3,908
17,030
Data
mg/NM3 167,00
50,00
NOx
gm/ sec 5,439
13,100
mg/NM3 150,00
150,00
Co
gm/ sec 4,886
39,300
[1] Low [1] FGD
System
Nox
Burners
[2]DeNOx
Emissions Control Measures [2] Stack System
height =
[3] Stack
50m
height =
100m

39,571
42
133,00
176,00
7
338
3
5,7
100,00
50,00
6,650
400,00
53,200
300,00
40
800,00
106,400
[1] FGD and
DeNOx
[2] Stack
height =
100m

Gas
Gas Turbine
Turbine
HRSG-2
HRSG-1
110 A001

HMU

CDU Stack

110 A-002

193,00
339,00
15
460
15
5,4

10

11

ETP
NAC-1
RHDS-1 RHDS-2
Incinerator
Common

13

14

15

16

NAC-2

NAC-3

NAC-4

NAC-5

NAC-6

69,18
125,00
7
423
3
4,8

580052
2141142

580110
2141154

581035
2140748

580770
2140822

580819
2140580

580967
2140846

19

KHDS-1 KHDS-2 GOHDS


H-001

H-002

580544
2141116

580523 580554
2141112 2141222

20
HC Purge
Flare

H-01

Fuel Oil

Fuel Gas

0,24

0,0058

0,0058

0,0058

0,0058

0,0058

0,0058

0,0058

0,0058

0,0058

0,0058

0,0058

0,0058

1,881

0,07

0,417

0,417

3,219

1,059

4,073

0,419

0,587

0,354

0,118

0,15

0,338

43,053
81

44,12
3

44,12
18,4

44,12
18,4

44,12
142

44,12
45,6

44,12
179,7

44,12
18,5

44,12
25,9

44,12
15,6

44,12
5,2

44,12
6,6

44,12
14,9

22,28
38,00
7
423
3
2,6

0,83
2,00
7
530
3
0,6

5,07
11,00
7
500
3
1,4

5,07
11,00
7
500
3
1,4

39,14
74,00
7
440
3
3,7

12,54
22,00
7
440
3
2,0

49,53
90,00
7
423
3
4,0

5,10
10,00
7
440
3
1,3

7,14
13,00
7
440
3
1,5

4,30
8,00
7
440
3
1,2

1,43
3,00
7
500
3
0,7

1,82
4,00
7
500
3
0,9

4,11
9,00
7
500
3
1,3

Fuel Gas

580784
2140775

18

580930
2141050

Fuel Gas Fuel Gas Fuel Gas Fuel Gas

581058
2140630

17

580604
2141323

581729
2140824

Fuel Gas Fuel Gas Fuel Gas Fuel Gas Fuel Gas Fuel Gas

12,7
322
0,58

65,00
65,00
45,00
50,00
50,00
50,00
50,00
50,00
9,650
9,650
3,459
1,114
20,00
20,00
20,00
400,00
3,860
3,860
1,384
8,910
152,00
152,00
60,00
450,00
29,336
29,336
4,151
10,024
150,00
150,00
150,00
150,00
28,950
28,950
10,377
3,341
[1] Low Nox Burners [1] Ultra - [1] Low
Low Nox Nox
[2] Stack height = 65m Burners Burners

30,00
50,00
0,041
20,00
0,017
167,00
0,138
150,00
0,124
[1] Low
Nox
Burners

50,00
50,00
50,00
50,00
50,00
20,00
0,254
0,254
0,783
20,00
20,00
20,00
0,101
0,101
0,783
167,00 167,00
124,00
0,847
0,847
4,853
150,00 150,00
150,00
0,761
0,761
5,871
[1] Low [1] Low [1] Low
Nox
Nox
Nox
Burners Burners Burners

50,00
50,00
20,00
20,00
0,251
0,991
20,00
20,00
0,251
0,991
171,00
171,00
2,144
8,469
150,00
150,00
1,881
7,430
[1] Low [1] Low
Nox
Nox
Burners Burners

30,00
30,00
30,00
30,00
30,00
30,00
180
20,00
20,00
20,00
50,00
50,00
50,00
0,102
0,143
0,086
0,072
0,091
0,205
1,00
20,00
20,00
20,00
20,00
20,00
20,00
0,102
0,143
0,086
0,029
0,036
0,082
0
124,00 124,00 171,00 167,00 167,00 167,00
0,632
0,885
0,735
0,239
0,304
0,686
3,00
150,00 150,00 150,00 150,00 150,00 150,00
0,765
1,071
0,645
0,215
0,273
0,616
14,000
[1] Low [1] Low [1] Low [1] Low [1] Low [1] Low
[1] Stack
Nox
Nox
Nox
Nox
Nox
Nox
height =
Burners Burners Burners Burners Burners Burners 180m

[2] Stack
height =
50m

[2] Stack
height =
30m

[2] Stack [2] Stack [2] Stack


height = height = height =
50m
50m
50m

[2] Stack [2] Stack


height = height =
50m
50m

[2] Stack [2] Stack [2] Stack [2] Stack [2] Stack [2] Stack
height = height = height = height = height = height =
30m
30m
30m
30m
30m
30m

[2] Stack
height =
45m

Source: Document provided by FWL, June 2010.

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

12

010-SK-001 190-A-215 20-H-101 20-H-201 42-H-101-4 49H101 44H-201A/B 47H101 46H-101 40-H-101

580358
580045
580045
2140782
2140610
2140625
Diesel/L
Diesel/LPG Fuel Gas
PG
0,04
0,04
0,0058
0,533+0,
0,533+0,08
5,689
08
43 /
43 / 46,28
44,12
46,28
155
155
251
193,00
339,00
15
460
15
5,4

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Page 3-41
Final Report

The stack height stated above are based on emission levels estimated and modeled during the FEED
stage of the Refinery Project. These values shall be re-assessed with the emission information from the
Vendor and the revised height shall ensure the compliance to the Vietnamese and IFC Guideline
requirements. Final stacks height will be determined using updated input data during EPC phase.
Table 3.19 Emission input data of flare system in emergency case

Source
name

HC
FLARE

HC
PURGE
FLARE

Location
(VN2000)
Case
Northing

Easting

2140834

581727

2140824

581729

GPF OF ISLAND
1
GPF OF ISLAND
2
GPF OF ISLAND
1
GPF OF ISLAND
2
MAX H2S
Release

Total
flue
gas
flow
rate
(Nm3/s)

Velocity
(m/s)

Exit
Temp.
(oK)

Heat
Releases
(BTU/hr)

1,064

79

575

3,774

178

231

Emission rate

SO2
g/s

NOx
g/s

CO
g/s

PM10
g/s

44,865,206,523

344

1,871

47

377

47,324,135,403

368

2,005

104

154

520

5,780,168,548

20,624

50

269

12

397

154

377

4,497,203,156

4,196

39

210

12

56.84

38

333

566,919,714

18,225

4.85

26.41

2.78

Source: FWL, November 2009

Impacts from point source emission in normal operation


Emission results of NOx, SO2, CO and PM from individual stack and combined all stacks in the case of
normal operation are given in Table 3-20.

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Page 3-42
Final Report

Table 3-20 Maximum ground level concentrations of air pollutants from point sources in normal operation
Emission Results of SO2

Point source
SRU
FGD
RFCC
GT1
GT2
HMU
CDU
ETP
RHDS1
RHDS2
NAC-1 42-H-101
NAC-2 49-H-101
NAC-3 44-H-201
NAC-4 47-H-101
NAC-5 46-H-101
NAC-6 40-H-101
KHDS1
KHDS2
GOHDS
HC Flare
Combined source (*)
Project Standard

Source ID
S1
S2
S3
S4
S5
S6
S7
S8
S9
S10
S11
S12
S13
S14
S15
S16
S17
S18
S19
F1
All

1 hour
Maximum Ground Level
Conc.+
Conc.
Distance
baseline
(g/m3)
(m)
(g/m3)
8.66
15.66
697
16.88
23.88
1,945
86.32
93.32
1,309
2.07
9.07
915
2.08
9.08
930
3.33
10.33
515
55.14
62.14
590
0.83
7.83
446
1.22
8.22
545
1.25
8.25
499
2.35
9.35
683
2.03
9.03
217
2.28
9.28
116
2.09
9.09
458
2.37
9.37
434
2.15
9.15
387
1.20
8.2
460
1.16
8.16
477
1.45
8.45
404
0.00
7
118.41
125.41
7,264
350

24 hour
Maximum Ground Level
Conc.+
Conc.
Distance
baseline
(g/m3)
(m)
(g/m3)
2.32
9.32
664
3.60
10.6
2,640
23.95
30.95
1,512
0.38
7.38
1,592
0.38
7.38
1,605
1.04
8.04
482
10.81
17.81
389
0.17
7.17
446
0.35
7.35
328
0.31
7.31
272
0.66
7.66
654
0.45
7.45
331
0.84
7.84
541
0.62
7.62
387
0.82
7.82
352
0.60
7.6
387
0.27
7.27
460
0.25
7.25
477
0.37
7.37
404
0.00
7
34.21
41.21
1648
125

Notes: - Baseline of SO2: 7g/m3


- (*) combined source is the highest concentration in year of 2005, 2006 and 2007.
NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

Annual
Maximum Ground Level
Conc.+
Conc.
Distance
baseline
(g/m3)
(m)
(g/m3)
0.17
7.17
640
0.26
7.26
2,110
1.73
8.73
1,010
0.03
7.03
4,089
0.03
7.03
3,709
0.06
7.06
512
1.16
8.16
465
0.02
7.02
563
0.03
7.03
473
0.02
7.02
479
0.05
7.05
686
0.05
7.05
391
0.06
7.06
573
0.06
7.06
477
0.07
7.07
453
0.06
7.06
535
0.03
7.03
467
0.03
7.03
320
0.04
7.04
392
0.00
7
2.76
9.76
908
50

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Point source

SRU
FGD
RFCC
GT1
GT2
HMU
CDU
ETP
RHDS1
RHDS2
NAC-1 42-H-101
NAC-2 49-H-101
NAC-3 44-H-201
NAC-4 47-H-101
NAC-5 46-H-101
NAC-6 40-H-101
KHDS1
KHDS2
GOHDS
HC Flare
Combined source (*)
Project Standard

Source ID

S1
S2
S3
S4
S5
S6
S7
S8
S9
S10
S11
S12
S13
S14
S15
S16
S17
S18
S19
F1
All

Page 3-43
Final Report

Emission Results of NOx


1 hour
24 hour
Maximum Ground Level
Maximum Ground Level
Conc.+
Conc.+
Conc.
Conc.
Distance
Distance
baseline
baseline
3
3
(m)
(m)
(g/m )
(g/m )
(g/m3)
(g/m3)
12.05
21.05
697
3.22
12.22
664
12.99
21.99
1,945
2.77
11.77
2,641
64.90
73.9
1,309
18.01
27.01
1,512
15.72
24.72
915
2.89
11.89
1,592
15.83
24.83
930
2.88
11.88
1,605
10.00
19
515
3.12
12.12
482
62.03
71.03
590
12.16
21.16
389
6.77
15.77
446
1.38
10.38
266
10.26
19.26
545
2.90
11.9
328
10.48
19.48
499
2.58
11.58
272
14.56
23.56
683
4.11
13.11
654
17.34
26.34
217
3.88
12.88
331
24.16
33.16
116
7.14
16.14
541
12.92
21.92
458
3.82
12.82
387
14.69
23.69
434
5.06
14.06
352
18.35
27.35
387
5.12
14.12
387
9.89
18.89
460
2.23
11.23
460
9.80
18.8
477
2.13
11.13
477
12.17
21.17
404
3.11
12.11
404
17.39
26.39
1541
4.79
13.79
398
175.11
184.11
7264
41.32
50.32
1415
200
100

Notes: - Baseline of NO2: 9g/m3


- (*) combined source is the highest concentration in year of 2005, 2006 and 2007
NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

Annual
Maximum Ground Level
Conc.+
Conc.
Distance
baseline
3
(m)
(g/m )
(g/m3)
0.23
9.23
641
0.20
9.2
2,111
1.30
10.3
1,010
0.21
9.21
4,088
0.20
9.2
3,709
0.18
9.18
512
1.30
10.3
465
0.62
9.62
563
0.21
9.21
473
0.21
9.21
479
0.32
9.32
686
0.40
9.4
391
0.50
9.5
573
0.40
9.4
474
0.46
9.46
453
0.52
9.52
535
0.25
9.25
467
0.23
9.23
320
0.37
9.37
392
0.25
9.25
1,691
4.55
13.55
931
40

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Point source
SRU
FGD
RFCC
GT1
GT2
HMU
CDU
ETP
RHDS1
RHDS2
NAC-1 42-H-101
NAC-2 49-H-101
NAC-3 44-H-201
NAC-4 47-H-101
NAC-5 46-H-101
NAC-6 40-H-101
KHDS1
KHDS2
GOHDS
HC Flare
Combined source (*)
Project Standard

Source ID
S1
S2
S3
S4
S5
S6
S7
S8
S9
S10
S11
S12
S13
S14
S15
S16
S17
S18
S19
F1
All

Page 3-44
Final Report

Emission Results of CO
1 hour
8 hour
Maximum Ground Level
Maximum Ground Level
Conc.+
Conc.+
Conc.
Distance
Conc.
Distance
baseline
baseline
3)
(g/m3)
(m)
(g/m
(m)
(g/m3)
(g/m3)
10.82
3,010.82
697
7.91
3,007.91
635
38.96
3,038.96
1,945
22.84
3,022.84
2,619
172.63
3,172.63
1,309
120.72
3,120.72
789
15.52
3,015.52
915
8.16
3,008.16
2,902
15.62
3,015.62
930
8.17
3,008.17
2,917
25.00
3,025
515
18.21
3,018.21
84
20.68
3,020.68
590
13.05
3,013.05
138
6.08
3,006.08
446
4.27
3,004.27
423
9.22
3,009.22
545
6.75
3,006.75
376
9.41
3,009.41
499
6.99
3,006.99
343
17.62
3,017.62
683
13.34
3,013.34
98
15.22
3,015.22
217
11.48
3,011.48
217
21.20
3,021.2
116
15.34
3,015.34
169
15.64
3,015.64
458
11.75
3,011.75
458
17.78
3,017.78
434
15.25
3,015.25
434
16.10
3,016.1
387
11.75
3,011.75
387
8.90
3,008.9
460
6.25
3,006.25
460
8.80
3,008.8
477
6.14
3,006.14
217
10.93
3,010.93
404
8.62
3,008.62
222
81.15
3,081.15
1,541
52.85
3,052.85
1,147
295.28
3,295.28
7,264
182.81
3,182.81
1,102
30,000
10,000

Notes: - Baseline of CO: 3,000 g/m3


- (*) combined source is the highest concentration in year of 2005, 2006 and 2007.

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

24 hour
Maximum Ground Level
Conc.+
Conc.
Distance
baseline
(g/m3)
(m)
(g/m3)
2.89
3,002.89
664
8.30
3,008.3
2,641
47.90
3,047.90
1,512
2.85
3,002.85
1,592
2.84
3,002.84
1,605
7.80
3,007.8
423
4.05
3,004.05
389
1.24
3,001.24
266
2.61
3,002.61
328
2.32
3,002.32
272
4.97
3,004.97
654
3.40
3,003.4
331
6.27
3,006.27
541
4.62
3,004.62
387
6.12
3,006.12
352
4.49
3,004.49
387
2.01
3,002.01
460
1.91
3,001.91
477
2.79
3,002.79
404
22.35
3,022.35
398
73.68
3,073.68
1,648
5,000

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


NGHI SON REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX

Page 3-45
Final Report

Emission Results of PM10


Point source

Source ID

Conc.
(g/m3)
0.97
2.77
2.99
0.95
0.95
2.60
1.35
0.41
0.87
0.77
0.66
0.45
0.84
0.62
0.82
0.60
0.67
0.64
0.93
1.60
9.68

24 hour
Maximum Ground Level
Conc.+ baseline
(g/m3)
23.97
25.77
25.99
23.95
23.95
25.6
24.35
23.41
23.87
23.77
23.66
23.45
23.84
23.62
23.82
23.6
23.67
23.64
23.93
24.60
32.68
150

Distance
(m)
664
2,641
1,512
1,592
1,605
482
389
266
328
272
654
331
541
387
352
387
460
467
404
398
1,898

SRU
S1
FGD
S2
RFCC
S3
GT1
S4
GT2
S5
HMU
S6
CDU
S7
ETP
S8
RHDS1
S9
RHDS2
S10
NAC-1 42-H-101
S11
NAC-2 49-H-101
S12
NAC-3 44-H-201
S13
NAC-4 47-H-101
S14
NAC-5 46-H-101
S15
NAC-6 40-H-101
S16
KHDS1
S17
KHDS2
S18
GOHDS
S19
HC Purge Flare
F1
Combined source (*)
All
Project Standard
Notes: - Baseline of PM10: 23 g/m3
- (*) combined source is the highest concentration in year of 2005, 2006 and 2007.

NSRP LLC- CPSE/SNC Lavalin

June, 2010

Conc.
(g/m3)
0.07
0.20
0.22
0.07
0.07
0.15
0.14
0.05
0.06
0.06
0.05
0.05
0.06
0.06
0.07
0.06
0.08
0.07
0.11
0.08
0.98

Annual
Maximum Ground Level
Conc.+ baseline
(g/m3)
23.07
23.2
23.22
23.07
23.07
23.15
23.14
23.05
23.06
23.06
23.05
23.05
23.06
23.06
23.07
23.06
23.08
23.07
23.11
23.08
23.98
50

Distance
(m)
641
2,111
1,010
4,088
3,709
512
465
563
473
479
686
391
573
474
453
535
467
320
392
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The results in Table 3.20 show that:

The higher concentrations from the above modeling calculation are combined with the baseline
concentrations of these pollutants (7g/m3 of SOx; 9g/m3 of NOx; 3,000g/m3 of CO and 23
g/m3 of PM) to estimate the maximum ground level concentration of the pollutants.

With having FGD and Desulphurisation system, the SOx emission results in 01-hour, 24-hour
and annual of individual stacks are much lower than project standards (PS) of 350 g/m3 in 1hour, 125 g/m3 in 24-hour and 50 g/m3 in annual from 4 to 45 times. In combined case, SOx
emission is 3 - 5 times lower than project standards in both 1-hour, 24-hour and annual. The
maximum ground concentration of Sox is in the range of 908 - 7,264 m (Appendix IV, Figure
IV.1 to Figure IV.6).
In normal operation, there is no emission of SO2 through HC purge flare.

With having Low and ultra-low NOx burners, NOx emission results in 1-hour, 24-hour and
annual of all individual stacks are lower than Project Standards from 2.7 to 12.7 times. NOx
generated for 1-hour, 24-hour and year of HC flare are lower than Project Standards from 4.3
to 7.6 times.
In combined case of 19 stacks and 1 HC Flare, NOx emission results in 1-hour, 24-hour and
annual are lower than Project standards from 1.1 to 3 times. Maximum ground concentration of
NOx in 1-hour (184.11ug/m3) is not much lower than allowable limit (200ug/m3). Maximum
ground concentration point of NOx locates in range of 931 7,264m from the stack base
(Appendix IV, Figure IV.7 to IV.12)

CO emission results in 1-hour, 8-hour and 24-hour of individual stacks are lower than Project
Standard from 1.6 to 10 times. CO emission in combined all stacks and HC purge flare are well
within project standards and lower than the project standards from 1.6 to 9 times. The
maximum ground concentration of CO is in the range of 1,102 - 7,264m (Appendix IV, Figure
IV.13 to IV.18).

PM10 emission results in 24-hour and annual of individual stacks in normal operation are lower
than Project Standard from 2.2 to 6.4 times. In combined case for all stacks and HC flare, the
maximum ground concentration of PM10 is lower than the project standards from 1.5 t0 4.6
times. The maximum ground contents are in the range of 1,898 - 2,334m (Appendix IV, Figure
IV.19 to IV.22).

In briefly, the maximum ground concentrations of SO2, NOx, CO and PM10 accounted for
individual stack and 1 flare as well as combined case of all stacks and flare are very low and
well within the applicable of National Technical Regulation QCVN 05:2009 and World Bank/IFC
standards. In normal operation, HC purge flare is working for maintaining purpose. Therefore,
there is no emission of SO2 and emission results of NOx, CO and PM are negligible.

Generally, the maximum ground concentrations from individual stacks SRU, CDU, ETP,
RHDS1, RHDS2, NACs, KHDS1, KHDS2 and GOHDS are within plant boundary in the range
of 84 - 680 m from the stack basement. The maximum ground concentrations of FGD, RFCC,
GT1, GT2 stacks and HC purge flare stacks are in the range of 900 to 4,088m in the downwind

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direction of the stacks site. The sites having maximum ground concentrations are fell mostly
within the confine of the refinery site of Coc Mountain and some mountain nearby as Chuot
Chu, Tran and Xuoc Mountain which are away from the residential areas. Therefore, impact
level from point sources in the normal operation is assessed as minor to air quality.

The emission concentrations results stated above are based on primary stack height, emission
levels estimated and modeled during the FEED stage of the Project. These values shall be
reassessed with the emission information from the Vendor and the revised height shall ensure
the compliance to the Vietnamese and IFC Guideline requirements.

Impacts from point source emission in emergency case


Table 3-21 Maximum ground concentrations of air pollutants
from flares in emergency case

Case
HC Purge gas flare GPF island 1
HC flare GPF island 1
HC Purge gas flare GPF island 2
HC Purge gas flare max H2S

ERPG (1,2,3)*
Note:

1 hour - SOx
Maximum Ground
Level
(ppm)
14.28
0
2.91
29.03
0.3
3
15

1 hour - NOx
Maximum Ground
Level
(ppm)
0.035
0.074
0.027
0.008
1
15
30

1 hour - CO
Maximum Ground
Level
(ppm)
0.186
0.405
0.145
0.042
200
350
500

ERPG (1,2,3)*: ERPG1, ERPG2, ERPG3

The modeling results from Table 3-21 show that:

In emergency cases, the maximum ground concentrations of 1-hour NOx and 1-hour CO are
much lower than the Emergency Response Planning Guideline 1 (ERPG1) value (Appendix IV,
Figure IV-23 & Figure IV-30). It means that no adverse health effects to individuals.

Under emergency conditions, SOx emission is only occurred at HC Flare. The maximum
ground concentrations of SOx from GPF of island 1 is within the Emergency Response
Planning Guideline 3 (ERPG3) values (15ppm) and maximum ground level concentrations of
SOx from GPF of island 2 is within the ERPG2 (3ppm). But emission results of SOx in the Max
H2S case are unaccepted with two times higher than ERPG3 (Appendix IV, Figure IV-31 &
Figure IV-32).

In emergency cases, radiation intensity at sterile radius: 6.31 kw/m2 (API recommendation). A
minimum sterile radius of at least 60 m shall be required to avoid injury to personnel due to the
possible emission of burning liquid droplets. Radiation intensity at property boundary 3.18
kW/m2.

In practice, the maximum flaring time in the case of max H2S is happened in very short time.
But health effects might occur to project employees and communities nearby.

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Impacts of VOC from tank system


Fugitive emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from the Complex have been estimated from
hydrocarbon loss. The estimated quantities of fugitive emissions are based on storage volumes from
tank system.
VOC emissions from tank farms are controlled due to inherent design features, e.g., installing floating
roof tanks, vapor recovery systems, nitrogen blanketing, etc. Considering all the above measures, the
facility wide VOC emissions are very small. Total VOC loss is approximately 141 tons/year (see Table
3.7), compared with 9,6 million tons of crude oil/year. The ratio of VOC tons and crude oil million tons is
14.69 compared with the Benchmark of IFC Guideline on Petroleum refinery from 120 to 300. The VOC
emission will be well within acceptable limits. And therefore, the impacts level is considered as minor.
Impacts of green house gas (GHG)
The Complex is designed to use energy efficiently by using energy saving technology such as energy
optimum method in CDU, energy recovery in preliminary heaters to reuse heat from emission gas,
saving energy between units and using energy saving devices.
A heat exchange network is designed to optimize recovered heat, reduce operation cost and increase
operational ability of process units. Input temperature of the CDU heater is at maximum value due to
taking advantage of heat from stacks and it achieves target of heat sources efficient using.
The operation of process units will generate a significant amount of CO2 into the environment that will
contribute green house effects.
Total volume of CO2 generated from the Complex operation is about 5.9 million tons/year. However, in
comparison with statistical data of green house gas in the United States (1990-2007), total CO2
generated from burning of fossil fuels in 2007 was about 5.7x1012 tons, so CO2 emission level of the
Project is insignificant in comparison of the ones of the global.
2. Noise and vibration
Project activities
Process equipment such as compressors, pumps, heaters, blowers, flare, boilers, turbines, etc. will be
major noise sources during the operation phase. The truck loading will also be a generation of noise at
plant site as well as along their route to the Complex.
Potential impacts
As mentioned in Section 1, project noise level standards are based on the most stringent limits from
local Vietnamese and IFC guidelines. So the noise generated by the equipment shall not exceed the
noise limits for any of the conditions of operation, including turndown, start-up, shut-down and
commissioning of the equipment. The equipment must comply with the most restrictive of the specified
work area or sound power level criteria. Sound pressure level limits apply at 1m from the process
equipment surface and at 3m from vent or on nearest platform (Table 3.22).

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Table 3.22 Noise Level in the Operation Phase


Noise Source
Centrifugal compressors
Centrifugal and axial
Fired heaters and boilers
Gas turbines
Air cooled exchangers
Cooling tower
Pumps, gears,
Blowers, agitators/mixers
Equipment fitted with acoustic enclosure
Operating vents
Emergency vents
Valves and piping components
Other noise sources located outdoors
Noise sources located inside process
Flare

Work Area Code


G1
R1
G1
G1
G1
G1
G2
G1
R2
G1
R2
G2
G2
G3

Noise Limit dB(A)


85
95
85
85
85
85
82
85
110
85
110
82
82
79

G1

85

Source: FWL, October 2009

Based on Table 3.22, the noise generated equipments at the Refinery will be kept at value of 85 dB(A).
Equipment fitted with Acoustic Enclosure and Emergency Vents will be at 110 dB(A). The flare will be at
85 dB(A) during emergency operations, but start up noise will be less than 85 dB(A). Therefore, the
noise generating from machines, equipment and process units will be limited inside the plant boundary
and cause directly to project workers only. The impact level is considered as minor and long term.
NSRP LLC is defined the design Noise level standard for construction to meet relevant standards
during operation. Detail assessment will be carried out during detail design phase. However, during
detail engineering, EPC Contractor will carry out the assessment to make sure that noise levels meet
Project Standard.
3.2.2.1.2 Water Quality

Impact of continuous water intake

Project activities
The Refinery and Petrochemical Complex will require continuous supply of large volume of sea water
(Max 42.8 m3/s) for cooling purpose.
Potential impact
The automatic filters between 2 and 3 times per day will generate high suspended materials in the
released water. In the case of discharging water from the backwash cycle into the outfall sump, it will
cause the exceeding (>30mg/l as PS) of suspended solid content at the outfall site.
The maintenance dredging of the intake channel may affect to coastal water quality within the four week
plant maintenance cycle. However, this activity is small in comparison with the dredging activities for
harbor area and the impact level is minor and limited locally in intake channel only.
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Optimum effluent outfall and thermal impacts

Project activities
Project operation will need to discharge a maximum condition at 154,000m3/h to Nghi Son coastal
water including cooling water, treated industrial and sanitary effluent, FGD effluent and RO effluent with
and maximum temperature of 40oC.
Potential impacts
In order to estimate the thermal impact caused by effluent discharge, NSRP LLC has used the CORMIX
model to predict dilution and thermal dispersion abilities of cooling water [11]. Summary of principle of
the CORMIX model is as follows:

CORMIX is a USEPA-supported mixing zone model and decision support system for
environmental impact assessment of regulatory mixing zones resulting from continuous point
source discharges. The system emphasizes the role of boundary interaction to predict steadystate mixing behavior and plume geometry.

The CORMIX methodology contains systems to model single-port, multiport diffuser discharges
and surface discharge sources. Effluents considered may be conservative, non-conservative,
heated, brine discharges or contain suspended sediments.

CORMIX can predict mixing behavior from diverse discharge types ranging from power plant
cooling waters, desalinization facility or drilling rig brines, municipal wastewater, or thermal
atmospheric plumes. CORMIX can also be applied across a broad range of ambient conditions
ranging from estuaries, deep oceans, swift shallow rivers, to density stratified reservoirs and
lakes.

Some special hydrodynamic features of CORMIX include:

Makes complete near-field and far-field plume trajectory, shape, concentration, and dilution
predictions and visualizations.

Includes plume boundary interactions, including dynamic near-field attachments.

Models conservative, non-conservative, and heated pollutant types.

Alerts user when plume encounters regulatory mixing zone constraints, including Toxic Dilution
Zone CMC and CCC values.

Application to steady, unsteady ambient currents/tides, or stagnant ambient conditions.

In order to select optimum effluent outfall location and assess thermal effects to Nghi Son Bay
seawater, US Environment Protection Agencys CORMIX model has been used by NSRP LLC to
determine near-field initial dilution and the number and spacing of the discharge ports. It also describes
the modeling of the thermal plume in the far-field zone to determine the outfall length required to meet
the environmental and process criteria. Input data for thermal modeling are given in Table 3.23.

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Table 3.23 Input data for thermal modeling


Condition
Rate of discharge to receiving waters

Value
154,000 m3/h or 42.78 m3/s

Distance of riser ports above seabed

1.0 m

Orientation of discharge ports

Horizontal

Temperature of discharge water

40oC

Salinity of discharge water

31 ppt

Density of discharge water

1,015.02 kg/m3

Ambient current velocity

0.02 m/s

Wind speed at sea surface

2.0 m/s

Ambient water temperature

31oC

Ambient water salinity

31 ppt

Ambient water density

1,018.39 kg/m3

Source: FEED Document No. 9T7151/R082 provided by FWL, October 2009

Near-field modeling is used to obtain an estimate of the dilution of the effluent within the near-field
mixing zone. The discharge layout combinations are considered for 9 cases (L1 L9), number of pipes,
number of risers, number of ports, velocity of nozzle at different water depth in the range of 4 - 6m
(Table 3.24). The results of COMIX modeling are given in Table 3.25.
Table 3.24 Discharge layout combinations
Number of
port (nozzles)
on each riser
L1
5
25
2
L2
5
25
2
L3
5
12
4
L4
5
12
4
L5
5
12
4
L6
3
25
2
L7
3
25
2
L8
3
12
4
L9
4
12
4
Source: FEED document No. 9T7151/R082 provided by FWL, October 2009
Discharge
layout

Number of
pipes

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Number of
risers

Interval
between
risers
10
20
10
20
40
10
20
40
20

Velocity at
nozzle (m/s)
2.42
2.42
2.52
2.52
2.52
4.04
4.04
4.20
3.15

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Table 3.25 Results of CORMIX Model Runs

Test Cases
L 1 + AC 1
L 1 + AC 4
L 2 + AC 2
L 2 + AC 3
L 2 + AC 4
L 3 + AC 1
L 4 + AC 1
L 5 + AC 2
L 5 + AC 3
L 6 + AC 1
L 6 + AC 4
L 7 + AC 2
L 7 + AC 3
L 7 + AC 4
L 8 + AC 2
L 8 + AC 3
L 9 + AC 5

Initial
local
Dilution

Initial local
temperature
excess (C)

Dilution at
100m
distance

6.3
9.5
13.0
14.3
15.6
3.7
5.9
12.2
13.4
4.4
6.6
9.0
9.9
10.8
8.4
9.3
15.2

1.43
0.95
0.69
0.63
0.58
2.46
1.52
0.74
0.67
2.04
1.36
1.00
0.91
0.84
1.07
0.97
0.59

6.35
9.53
13.06
14.40
15.70
3.72
5.95
12.26
13.49
4.40
6.62
9.02
9.92
10.83
8.43
9.32
15.36

Overlapped
Temperature
temperature
excess at
excess at 100m
100m distance (C)
distance (C)
1.42
6.10
0.94
4.72
0.69
3.44
0.63
3.15
0.57
2.85
2.45
12.25
1.51
6.55
0.73
3.65
0.67
3.35
2.04
6.12
1.36
4.07
1.00
2.99
0.91
2.73
0.83
2.50
1.07
3.20
0.97
2.90
0.59
2.35

Source: FEED document provided by FW in October, 2009


Notes: AC1 to AC4: water depth at 4m; 5; 5.5m and 6m
L1 to L9: discharge layout with different pipe number, riser number, port number and different velocity at nozzle

The results show that at water depth of 4m none of the 8 discharge layouts comply with the World Bank
guidelines due to Overlapped temperature excess at 100m distance (C) is higher than 3oC. At a
water depth of 5m, only layout 7 complies with the guideline. At water depth of 5.5m, both layouts 7 and
8 comply with the guideline and at a water depth of 6m Layout 9 complies with the guideline.
The initial local dilution of layout 7, 8 and 9 at water depth more than 5m is rather good. Dilution of
these layouts is in the range of 9.92 10.83 times at the distance of 100m. Therefore the following
recommendations may be made:

The outfall should have a minimum of 3 diffuser pipes


Each diffuser section should be 440m long with12 risers or 480m long for 25 risers
The diffuser sections should be located in a minimum water depth of 5.5m

In order to assess the thermal plume caused by effluent discharge, CORMIX model for far-field effect is
undertaken for satisfying two following criteria:
1. The temperature of the water at the edge of a scientifically defined mixing zone shall not
exceed 3oC above the temperature of the ambient water; and
2. The temperature of the water at the intake shall be no more than 0.5oC above the ambient
water temperature for 100% of the time.

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The first criteria is required in order that the benthic flora and fauna are not adversely affected, whilst
the second is a process requirement dictated by NSRP Consultant (Foster Wheeler Energy Ltd.) and
effectively means that there shall be no recirculation of the warmer discharge water into the intake.
The model is run for five outfall length scenarios (Table 3.26).
Table 3.26 Modeling Scenarios
VN-2000 Coordinates

Model
scenario

Outfall length
(km)

Easting

Northing

Discharge
flow (m3/s)

1
2
3
4
5

2.5
3
3
4.5
6

584778.958
585271.010
585271.010
586766.958
588608.056

2142821.628
2142860.380
2142860.380
2143248.525
2143631.635

42.8
42.8
42.8
42.8
42.8

Temperature
of discharge
(oC)
40
40
37
40
40

From the discussion of the plume movement across a spring and neap tide, it is possible to see a
pattern emerging. On spring tides the currents disperse the excess heat more effectively. On neap
tides, due to the limited tidal range and therefore lower current velocities, there is a gradual build-up of
excess heat in the sea water. This is then flushed, to a degree, by the spring tides that follow on.
Figure 3.7 shows a graph of the time series of excess temperature against time. The scenarios
examined are clearly identified. For the 2.5km (pink line) and 3km (green line) outfalls the pattern of
peaks and troughs is similar. The peaks represent the neap tides where the excess temperatures are
highest. The troughs represent the spring tides when the currents are fastest and the advection and
dispersion is at its most effective. By inspection it can be seen that the peaks i.e. the excess
temperatures on neap tides, are increasing over the first three cycles. This process also applies to the
spring tides i.e. the troughs. This suggests that whilst the receiving waters are efficient at dispersing
heat from the discharged cooling water for a short while after discharging starts, there is a gradual
build-up of residual heat in the water.
The same pattern is seen when the time series of the 4.5km (blue line) and 6km (orange line) outfalls
are plotted. For the 6km option the thermal plume model has been run for approximately 2 months
model time. The increase in residual heat in the water is more gradual, but after 2 months the curve is
beginning to move down again. The more gradual shape of the excess temperature time series curve
for the 6km outfall is believed to be as a result its location and distance offshore. Thus, whilst the depth
of water and the distance play a part the degree of flushing inshore induced by a flood spring tide is
much weaker. A similar pattern is shown for the 4.5km outfall option; although it is evident that whilst
the operational criteria is met for much of the time, excess temperature does eventually exceed the
0.5oC limit.

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Figure 3.7 Time series plot of excess temperature at intake channel


On the basis of the two months simulated data for the 6km outfall (without eddy diffusivity) a continuous
distribution function (cdf) has been plotted. This shows that even against the relaxed process criteria,
the excess temperature is at or below 0.1oC for approximately 33% of the time.
Including eddy diffusivity for the 2.5km and 3km outfalls would not induce sufficient mixing to be of
benefit. It is also unlikely that it would lower the residual build-up sufficiently to make a 4.5km outfall
viable in terms of the process criteria. At 6km the model results show that the process criteria can be
met, but that it is possible that a residual build-up of excess heat could occur. The recommendation
therefore is that the discharge outfall should be further optimised to between 4.5km and 6km.
In summary, some conclusions of the modeled results are as follows:

An outfall discharging 2.5km offshore does not meet either the environmental criteria or the
process criteria, as the temperature of the receiving waters at the intake channel is in excess of
the 3oC limit imposed by the World Bank IFC guidelines.

An outfall discharging 3km and 4.5km offshore meets the World Bank IFC guidelines, but does
not meet the process requirements.

An outfall discharging 6km offshore meets both World Bank IFC guidelines and operational
criteria. Notwithstanding this an examination of the temperature excess time series at the
intake suggests that there is the potential for a long term build-up of residual heat in the sea
water.

Therefore, on the basis of the model simulations, the 6km outfall is adopted for NSRP.

For the outfall discharging 6km offshore, the thermal dispersion result are summarized in Figure 3.8
and Figure 3.9 including:
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At 6 hours before the spring tide high water, the plume traveling north but with the tail of the
plume spread out to encompass the coral beds and sensitive fishing grounds at the Hon Me
Archipelago. The temperature around the archipelago is between 0.2oC and 0.4oC above the
ambient temperature (E1Figure 3.8).

At 3 hours before high water the plume has moved further north and has almost cleared the
Hon Me Archipelago (E3Figure 3.8). At high water the tide is turning and the plume is shown
moving south again on an ebb tide. The outer edge of the plume is skirting the edges of the
archipelago, but the temperature excess is well within the allowable range of 3oC. The
temperature at the intake channel is at or below the operational requirement.

At 3 hours after high water (E4Figure 3.8) the ebb flow is well developed. The western edge of
the plume is shown approaching the main breakwater roundhead but is not affected by it. At 6
hours after high water the plume passes between the Hon Me Archipelago and Nghi Son Island
(E5Figure 3.8). It does not reach the main breakwater.

On the flood cycle of the neap tide, the plume extends north and makes contact with the
coastline and also extends south to surround the Hon Me Archipelago at the coastline. At the
site of the discharge the excess temperatures rise as a result of the much lower tidal currents
and weaker advection and dispersion. Where the plume makes contact with the coastline and
the archipelago the temperature is well within the environmental requirements (E6-Figure 3.9).

As the tide moves towards the neap high water the shape of the plume changes but the excess
temperatures around the islands and at the coastline to the north does not increase (E6 to E10
Figure 3.9). Indeed through out the neap tidal cycle there is little movement at the edges of
the plume; the main activity being near to the discharge where excess temperatures above 8oC
are predicted. The different sea water temperature at the area around Hon me island is in the
range of 0.6 0.8oC only, within allowable environmental limit of the IFC.

Briefly, the modeling of the thermal plume is undertaken for a worst case condition of 154,000 m3/h of
cooling water discharge, 40oC of cooling water temperature at the outfall and 31oC of receiving
temperature (sea water). The worst case conditions have been considered and conditions on site would
likely be better than predicted. In practice, the discharged cooling water volume is less than the
modeled value (68.3%) and it will be mixed together with 18.7% of other treated effluents before routing
to the outfall.
By above the serious consideration of dynamic current, outfall layout, outfall length scenarios and
thermal plume effect, the thermal impact level of effluent discharge is considered as minor and long
term.

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Figure 3.8 Thermal Plume Plots Outfall 6km, Discharge 40C Spring Tide

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Figure 3.9 Thermal plume plots outfall 6km, discharge 40C Neap tide

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Impacts of continuous effluent discharge


Project activities
When project comes into operation phase, following effluents need to be discharged to the sea:

Treated ETP effluent for industrial and sanitary wastewater


Treated FGD effluent for desulphurisation (De-SOx)
Cooling sea water
RO reject effluent

In the operation phase, drainage systems are built to collect separately different effluents generating
from site-wide and process units including clean process water (CPW), clean storm water (CSW),
accidentally oil contaminated wastewater (AOC), continually oil contaminated wastewater (COC) and
sanitary wastewater. In addition, specific wastewater streams are collected in dedicated systems before
passing to the ETP, including:

Dedicated collection of Benzene Contaminated Water (BCW) in a closed system to prevent


atmospheric emission of benzene.

Dedicated collection of Spent Caustic Effluent for flow balancing and prevention of atmospheric
H2S emissions.

Potential impact
All above-mentioned wastewater drainage systems other than the CSW system and PCW system are
routed to appropriate effluent treatment Plant (ETP). Clean storm water (CSW) shall be assumed to
comply with the necessary standard for direct discharge to the sea via the North Trapezoidal Channel.
The reject and regeneration streams from Demineralised water plant, after pH neutralisation, are
considered clean for direct discharge via the seawater return line.
Quality of the treated water will strictly comply with the Project standards presented in Introduction
Section - Item 0.2.2.3. These project standards are considered based on Vietnamese standards and
IFC EHS guideline values for petroleum refining facilities, large scale organic chemical manufacturing
and petroleum based polymer manufacturing. The project standards are more stringent than the
national technical regulation on industrial wastewater (QCVN 24:2009/BTNMT) for discharge of treated
effluents to coastal water.
After treated, effluent is routed to treat waste water storage basin. At here, waste water will be tested
before blended with sea water to discharge. If not meeting the Standards, effluent will be routed back to
storage tank and treated at oily waste water treatment system. The storage tank may contain maximum
volume of fire water during 6 hours or waste water for 24 hours. As estimation, volume of this storage
tank is 17,220m3.
In the ETP, industrial and sanitary effluents will be pre-treated separately before routing to integrated
treatment tank for further treatment (detail ETP will be mentioned in mitigation measures).
In order to assess how effluents impact to receiving resource - seawater, the summary of water intake
and outlet are presented in Table 3.27.
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Table 3.27 Maximum water intake and outlet of NSRP in the operation phase

Parameters

Peak ETP
outlet

Peak
RO/IX
Reject/
Regent #

FGD
outlet
(max.
assumed)

Minimum
dilution at
outfall
zone
(assuming
8 times)

Cooling
water

Sea
water
intake

Water
outlet

23,000

105,200

128,200

129,364

40
6
1
10
30
0.005
0.0139

40
6.74
0.735
1.917
30
0.005
0.0139

30
6.74
0.735
1.917
10.5
0.005
0.0139

40.00

31

3.67
30.00
0.005
0.04

2
13
0.005
0.016

Amount (m3/h)

600

Temp (deg.C)
pH
BOD
COD
TSS
Cadmium
Hydrocarbon
Chromium
(total)
Chromium (III)
Chromium (VI)
Copper
Zinc
Iron
Cyanide Total
(Free)
Cyanide CNLead
Nickel
Mercury
Vanadium
Phenol
Benzene
Benzopyrene
Vinyl chloride
Di chloroethane
AOH
Sulphide (S2-)
T-Nitrogen
NH4
T-Phosphorus
Coliform
DO
FAs
Mn

40
6 to 9
25
72
30
0.009
4.5

564
Ambient
<40
6 to 9
0
0
30
0
0.5

0.5
0.05
0.5
2
3

0.25
0
0
0.5
2
2.5

0.25
0.05
0.005
0.0136
0.188

0.02
0.005
0.0136
0.188

0.02
0.005
0.0136
0.188

0.06
0.01
0.03
0.211

0.1
0.09
0.1
0.45
0.009
1
0.2
0.05
0.05
0.05
1
0.3
0.45
10
9
2
4,500
9
0.09
0.9

0.1
0.09
0.05
0.45
0.005
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.25
10
9
2
4,500
9
0.09
0.9

0.007
0.0043
0.001
1
0.001
0.001
0.62
0.038
0.0143
55
5.84
-

0.007
0.0043
0.001
1
0.001
0.001
0.62
0.038
0.0143
55
5.84
-

0.007
0.0043
0.001
1
0.00100
0.001
0.62
0.038
0.0143
55
5.84
-

0.008
0.00
0.00
1.00
0.002
0.00
0.704
0.119
0.032
95
-

Costal
water
Standard

QCVN10:
2008/BTNMT

0.0249

0.0055
0.0156
0.1906

0.0071
0.0044
0.0010
1.0000
0.0011
0.0010

0.6294
0.0470
0.0163
59

30
6.5 to 8.5
4
50
0.005
0.1
0.1
0.05
0.5
1
0.1
0.005
0.02
0.002
0.001
0.01
0.5
1000
>=4
1.5
0.04
0.1

AOH: Adsorbable Organic Halogens


calculate "< values" as minimum analysis limit values
Offshore (K number points) DO data is applied for Sea water DO
'# Assuming peak flow - Normal flow shall be 313 m3/hr.

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The results in Table 3.27 show that each waste water treatment properties (ETP and FGD) are satisfied
with Industrial waste water discharge limit. The combined discharge mode has much advantage for
both economic and environmental point of view. The most contribution is cooling water (81.32%) while
ETP treated effluent is a minor (0.46%) which is diluted about 215 times before discharging at the
outfall. For FGD treated effluent, its contribution is about 16.78% and be diluted about 5.62 times at the
outfall. Consider COD loading from treated effluent (ETP and FGD) of NSRP (Table 3.28), total loading
is rather small of 273.2 kg/h.
Table 3.28 Estimate COD loading from NSRP in operation phase
Effluent stream
Maximum treated effluent from ETP
Maximum RO effluent
Maximum treated effluent from FGD
Cooling water
Total Treated effluent discharge

Flow rate
m3/h
600
564
23,000
105,200
129,364

0.46
0.44
16.78
81.32

COD level
mg/l
72
0
10
1.92

100

% Flow

COD loading
kg/h
43.2
0
230
201,6
474.8

According to the document of FEED, most effluents of the Complex are treated at ETP and meet
industrial waste water standard of the Project. Effluent from demineralization unit and desulphurization
system are separately treated and meet industrial waste standard of the Project. Cooling water is
considered as clean effluent and without treatment. Domestic wastewater at harbour area is treated to
meet project standards for domestic wastewater. Then, these effluents are blended and discharged into
the sea. This blending action make effluents from the Refinery have the same properties with receiving
water source (the sea water).
As mentioned in the report, effluent is discharged via several smaller diffuser pipes branching off the
main discharge line above 1m on the seabed that point towards the surface. The diffuser pipes
enhance the dispersion plume and outfall location is 6km far from the shoreline. Based on CORMIX
Model Runs [Ref.11] effluent will be diluted at least 8 times at the 100m distance outfall zone. The
calculation shows that almost pollutants (COD, TSS, Cd, Zn, Hg, NH4+, As, Coliform, etc.) from treated
effluent meet coastal water standard QCVN 10:2008/BTNMT. Some pollutants as Oil, Iron, Cyanide
and Phenol are slightly higher than the costal water standards (QCVN10:2008). The main reason is that
their baseline concentrations of Nghi Son bay are really higher than the ones in the allowable limits of
QCVN 10:2008/BTNMT. On the other hand, the above estimation is based on maximum discharging of
ETP while normal operation of ETP is 350m3/h only. Therefore, the impact level of effluent discharge
will not cause significant impact to coastal sea water quality.
3.2.2.1.3 Groundwater environment
Project activities
During the operation phase, water supplied for the Complex will routed from Nghi Son water supply
plant, so the groundwater will not be affected.
A significant amount of hazardous waste managed, stored and disposed or leaked will cause a potential
risk of groundwater contamination.

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Potential impact
All hazardous materials, chemicals and waste materials will be contained in proper vessels /storage
facilities with adequately designed containments to prevent any impact sources or spills on the land and
subsequently to groundwater. Appropriate methods of handling and transportation will be established
for hazardous materials and wastes. There will be no underground storage tanks at the facility and the
material loading and unloading areas will be designed with proper enclosures on paved surfaces. In
addition, the process effluents and sewage will be treated onsite at adequately designed ETP facilities
to meet the regulatory requirements for recycling and disposal standards. Therefore, the potential for
groundwater contamination is insignificant.
The potential causes for groundwater contamination are the disposal of solid and hazardous wastes on
land and accidental spillages of hazardous materials (oils, chemicals, paints, cleaning solvents, etc.).
All solid and hazardous wastes will be properly collected, segregated and stored in appropriate storage
areas. Recyclable wastes such as metal and wood scrap will be sold to scrap buyers, as feasible. Other
non-hazardous wastes will be disposed off to approve landfill sites. Therefore, potential impacts due to
discharge of handling of solid / hazardous wastes will be minimized by implementation of measures as
above.
3.2.2.1.4 Soil environment
The normal operation of NSRP complex will not cause any additional impact to soil environment due to
modern technology and cemented plant surface. However, potential impacts may be created from
hazardous materials, hazardous wastes storage and handling and accidental releases only.

Effect of leakage from storage tanks

Project activities
The handling and storage a significant hazardous wastes inside boundary might be a potential risk of
soil contamination. The estimated type and amount of the waste are show in Table 3.9.
Potential impacts
The potential leakage might occur at pipe joints, valves, loading arms, etc. The leakages are usually
small and only limited at working area. In practice, Crude oil and products are stored and handled in
closed systems and involve the use of insulated storage tanks and lagged and trace-heated transfer
lines. Exposure to fuel oil is therefore limited, except on tank filling and during maintenance operations.
In addition, each tank is surrounded by bund system; any crude/product release will be kept inside the
bunds.
Commercial caustic flakes/ beads are received in 25 kg bags by road trucks in the refinery complex.
The bags are unloaded and stored in the Refinery warehouse or in dry enclosed space. Solid caustic
feeding package is provided for automatic handling, opening and unloading the caustic bags into the
concentrated caustic preparation tank. Caustic flakes are safely unloaded into the tank using a solid
caustic feeding package. Therefore, the potential risk of caustic leakage is small and impact level is
assessed as minor to soil environment.

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Effect of hazardous wastes storage and handling

Project activities
The handling and storage a significant hazardous wastes inside plant boundary might be a potential risk
of soil contamination. Based on Table 3.9, regular hazardous wastes are oily wastes (426m3/year),
sludge from ETP (5,204 tons/year), ash generated from incinerator (2,100 tons /year), spent
replacement materials (1,760 tons /year), spent catalysts (1,110.8 tons in every 4-5 years), spent
absorbents (17.32 tons in every 4 years), spent desorbent (1,116 tons in every 20 years), catalyst
grading materials (49 tons in every 4 years), spent caustic (1,623 m3/year), etc. from different process
units.
Potential Impacts
The release/fall out hazardous wastes may pollute not only soil environment, but also ground water.
However, NSRP LLC will establish waste management plan in which hazardous material/waste
disposal may be introduced for easy identification, ensuring responsibilities, right disposal destination
and tracking. So, the significance of these impacts is considered as moderate during the operation
phase.
3.2.2.1.5 Marine ecosystem

Impact by continuous intake water system

Project activities
The Refinery and Petrochemical Complex will require continuous supply of large volume of sea water
(Max 42.8 m3/s) for cooling purpose.
Potential impact
Cooling water intake can impact aquatic organisms basically in two ways including:

The first is entrainment, which is taking of small organisms with the cooling water including
plankton, fish eggs and larvae, etc. In practice, intake water is taken from intake channel (in
between breakwater and low crested breakwater) where sea water is already settled down.
Moreover, the phytoplankton community of Nghi Son bay was not diversity and community indices
was classified as bad level, but The zooplankton community was relatively diverse and diversity
indices was relatively high (Table 3.29). However, the intake volume is small in comparison with
Nghi Son bay capacity and the affected organisms are insignificant with the reproductivity of the
open bay as Nghi Son sea.
Table 3.29 Summary plankton and benthos in Nghi Son bay
Parameters
Number of species
Density
Biomass (g/m2)
Diversity indices H(s)

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Phytoplankton
43
8.8 x 108 cells/m3
Bad levels

Zooplankton
59
915 ind./m3
Relatively high

Benthos
156
351.7 ind./m2
9.45
Rather good
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The second way is impact to aquatic life such as fish, cuttle-fish, shrimp through entrapmentimpingement. This is the blocking of larger entrained organisms that enter the cooling water intake
by some type of physical barrier. According to distribution ground of the Research Institute of
Marine Products in Hai Phong on fishing, shrimp, cuttle-fish grounds, there is only cuttle-fish ground
at nearshore area where cooling water intake channel situated. However, the intake channel is
installed at the seashore with 350m in length, 70m in width and -7.92 in depth. It is designed with
the purpose of taking water slowly and reducing fine particles to the intake system and screens.
This design also prevents aquatic species entering to the system. Moreover, there are two levels of
screens, screen 25mm and screen smaller than 3mm, to prevent rubbish. These screens also have
functions to avoid small fish entering to the system. Therefore, potential impact to aquatic life is low
and the environmental impacts of intake water are considered as minor.
Impact by effluent discharge

Project activities
The Refinery and Petrochemical Complex is required continuous discharging a large volume of
effluents (Mean of 129,364 m3/h and Max of 154,000 m3/h) in which 105,200m3/h is cooling water;
23,000m3/h is from treated FGD effluent, 600m3/h is treated effluent from ETP and 564 m3/h is from RO
unit.
Potential impacts
The effluent discharge including cooling water will impact in different ways. In some respects, mainly in
improving the growth rate, an increase in temperature may even be advantageous. The discharge has
some unfavourable effects because it attracts fish and thus causes indirectly food shortage,
deterioration of the condition.
The primary effects of thermal pollution are direct thermal shock, changes in dissolved oxygen and the
redistribution of organisms in the outfall. Because water can absorb thermal energy with only small
changes in temperature, most aquatic organisms have developed enzyme systems that operate in only
narrow ranges of temperature. These stenothermic organisms can be killed by sudden temperature
changes that are beyond the tolerance limits of their metabolic systems.
Based on thermal dispersion plume (Figure 3.8 and Figure 3.9) at outfall 6km, at the spring tide, the
plume traveling north about 5-6 km and the tail of the plume spread out to encompass the coral beds
and sensitive fishing grounds at the Hon Me Archipelago. The temperature around the archipelago is
between 0.2oC and 0.4oC above the ambient temperature. That means thermal plume will not cause
significant effect to aquatic habitat and coral reef around Hon Me island.
On the neap tide, the plume extends north and makes contact with the coastline and also extends south
to surround the Hon Me Archipelago. At the site of the discharge the excess temperatures rise as a
result of the much lower tidal currents and weaker advection and dispersion. That means thermal plume
will cause significant effect to aquatic habitat in the range of 300m surrounding the outfall. But the
thermal plume in the coastline and the archipelago varies in range of 0.6 0.8oC and is well within the
environmental requirements (3oC). Therefore, the impact level is considered as small at the outfall
and minor to coastal aquatic habitat and coral reef around Me island.

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3.2.2.2 OPERATION OF THE OFFSITE FACILITIES (HARBOR, BREAKWATER, CRUDE PIPELINE


AND SPM)
3.2.2.2.1 Air environment
1. Emission gas
Project activities
When the project comes into operation phase, the main sources of air quality impacts caused by
marine facilities are from unloading activity of crude oil at the SPM and loading of petroleum products
at the jetties.
For loading process, petroleum products will be transferred to the product tank farm to export via 7
berths and directly loaded to the vessel. Gasoline and Diesel will be dispatched via the ocean berths,
while Jet fuel, fuel oil, benzene, paraxylene and partly Gasoline and Diesel will be dispatched via the
coastal berths. For safety reason, LPG will be loaded in indicated berth.
Potential impacts
The loading of above liquid products will generate significant quantities of hydrocarbon vapour, these
activities will cause long term and significant effects to the environment. However, volatile products like
Gasoline, Benzene and paraxylene generating volatile organic compound (VOC) will be recovered in
common return vapor recovery system. Displaced vapour from ship will be returned to the shore via a
vapour return piggybacked to a loading arm. The recovered liquid will be re-injected into gasoline
product loading line stream of metering package. After completion of loading, the loading arm/manifold
will be purged with nitrogen into the out board section of the loading arm. Any remaining material in the
loading line and manifold will be drained into slop drums. For the LPG, displaced vapour from ship will
be routed back to the mixed LPG spheres. Non-volatile products like Jet fuel and Fuel oil are loaded to
the ships through respective loading arms. These above activities shall control and reduce VOC
released to the environment. Therefore, impact level to air environment is considered as minor during
operation phase.
Due to the nature and frequency of emissions from the jetty vent it is concluded that releases from this
source are insignificant. As such, these emissions will not be included as part of the air dispersion
modeling for offsite facilities.
Loading solid sulphur product has potential risk of dust exposure. Sulphur forming unit and solid
sulphur bulk storage are located at the jetty, therefore dust formation is significantly minimized while
conveying. Impact level is considered as minor.
Offloading of crude oil at SPM will generate a small amount of hydrocarbon. However, since the SPM is
located 33.5 km offshore, hydrocarbon generated will be well dispersed and only minor environmental
impact is anticipated.

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2. Noise
Project activities
During operating phase, main sources of noise are from the operation of equipment, truck movement,
shipping activities (engines and whistling) and maintenance dredging.
Potential Impacts
Noise impact generated from harbor and shipping activities are peak noise coming from metal contact
or foghorn. These noise events will be occasional. Therefore, the significance of the noise impact
during the operation is assessed as minor.
3.2.2.2.2 Water environment
Impact of crude offloading at SPM
Project activities
Crude offloading process will be carried out at SPM from tankers 300,000 DWT to the Refinery crude
tank farm. Floating hoses are used to transfer crude from the ship to the SPM and a pipeline end
manifold (PLEM) is sited on the seabed below the SPM for connecting horses to the SPM. The SPM is
tied to the Refinery crude tank farm by a double 48" submarine unloading pipeline.
Upon an incident to the SPM in which it is not operational the transfer of crude oil to the Refinery will be
carried out by ship-to-ship transfer to 30,000 DWT vessels offshore from the refinery and shuttled into
the harbor for unloading. In order that the Refinery output is not affected two 30,000 DWT vessels are
required.
Potential impacts
According to NSRP marine consultant, the chance that the wind and wave height of a severe typhoon
pass the SPM terminal is small but realistic and conditions differ significantly from the 100-year return
environmental conditions.
Based on feedstock for the Refinery, there are a maximum of 33 parcels of transported crude from the
Kuwait to Nghi Son Bay with an interval between parcels of 10 days. The offloading of large crude
tankers at the SPM will take approximately 24 hours/ship. For the tanker arriving at the SPM, the cut off
time for berthing is 1.5 hours before sunset. Therefore, berthing occupancy of tanker at SPM might be
more than two days. The crude offloading from large ships at Nghi Son Bay will take place for year
round.
Area used for normal offloading operation at SPM and support activities will permanently occupy 31ha,
while normal crude pipeline operation seems not cause significant effect to seawater quality. However,
these above-mentioned activities might cause high potential risk of oil spill at SPM and on crude
pipeline system, especially of ship to ship transfer by 30,000DWT vessel in the case of incident to the
SPM.
In the case of accident of SPM, all crude oil from tanker will be loading by 30,000DWT ships. It is estimated that there
are about 10 times loading crude from 300,000 DWT tanker to 30,000DWT ships. Crude will be transported to the
harbour and then continue loading by pipeline system to plants tankage system.
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The above-mentioned activities of crude loading and transportation will cause high potential risk of oil leakage at SPM
area, increase shipping density and increase shipping collision at harbour area. Depending on oil spill tier, affected area
might be a partly or all Nghi Son coastal area. Impact level depends tolally on oil spill level.
The detail of oil spill scenarios will be mentioned in the oil spill response plan report. In the case of oil
spill occurs at SPM or crude oil pipeline, spilled oil will drift to Nghi Son bay and shoreline in the first
day and its impact level will be considered from significant to severe, due to SPM and crude pipeline
system locations are too close to the shoreline. The significance of the impact will depend much on
spilled time and tier scale, spilled oil might affect further to Southern direction (in the Northeast
monsoon) or to Northern direction in the Southwest monsoon.
Impact of product loading at jetties
Project activities
It is planned that 95% of the refinery products will be distributed by ship. The products will be routed by
pipeline from product tank farm and loaded directly into vessels/tankers through loading arms at the
ocean /coastal berths. The berths turnaround times for the ocean berths and the coastal berths are
estimated at 22 and 16 hours respectively.
It is estimated that about 92.71% of refinery products will be exported via the coastal berths and about
6.29% are exported via ocean berths. Total number of tanker/vessels (1,000 10,000 DWT) will be
1,179 ships/year (Table 3.30).
Table 3-30 Berth occupancy in the operation phase
Product
LPG
RON 92
RON 95
Jet
Kerosene
Premium Diesel
Regular Diesel
Fuel Oil
P-X
Benzene
Poly-propylene
Sulphur
Total (Liquid Product Berth)
Total (Solid Loading Berth)
Total

Mass exported (T/SD)


158
3,610
3,610
1,709
6,043
4,029
1,849
693
1,074
740
21,701
1,814
23,515

No. of ships per year


44
142
142
168
238
158
135
84
40
28
1,111
68
1,179

Source: NSRP LLC, November 2009

The loading time is in the range of 3-7 hours for vessel 3,000 tons, from 5-11 hours for vessel 5,000
tons, 4-5 hours for vessel 10,000 tons and 12-14 hours for ocean ship 30,000 DWT. It is estimated that
8 vessels may occupy the channel at any one time. All the vessels in the channel must be traveling with
a minimum gap of 15 minutes between vessels. Total berth occupancies are in the range of 33-54% for
the coastal berths, about 10-29% for ocean berths and about 5% for LPG berth. The harbor topsides is
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capable to load several tankers with the same product at the same time or one Ocean tanker and two
Coastal tankers can be loaded with one product at the same time.
Potential impact
The product loading activities at the harbor will impact to water quality by tankers/vessels propellers
and mooring. Other potential impacts include the effects of anti-fouling paints, the types used for
vessels to undergo cleaning in the harbor. The estimated area affected by activities at the area of
harbor, access channel, breakwater and cooling sea water intake channel is about 193 ha.
During routine loading operations, small leakages of oil products may occur at the harbor due to human
error, for example. These include the tightening of equipment performance and compliance
requirements for tank structural components, valves, and plugs, supporting and anchoring devices and
other fittings. The impact level is considered as small and be limited in the harbor area.
Since the Project harbor is constructed nearby the specific port of Nghi Son Cement Factory (in the
South) and sea way transport route leading to PTSC Port will cut across the Project area of crude oil
pipeline and access channel, so the vessel density at this area will increase significantly and also
cause high risk of collision between ships. Although NSRP has given effective mitigation and
prevention measures to minimize potential risks, impact level of this activity is assessed as moderate
during operation phase of the Project. Total effects caused by vessels activity will be mentioned in
detail in Item 3.2.3.
It is important to note that the density shipping activities at harbor and access channel might cause
high risk of ship collision and oil spill. The density of petroleum products is generally lower than that of
water, so in the case of product spillage into the sea; the product itself is extremely volatile at ambient
temperature and always floats on the surface. Since it is quickly dispersed into the air, the risk of longterm environmental impact to sea water quality will be significant. Oil spreading and assessment will be
analyzed in detail in the separately report named Oil Spill Response Plan for NSRP.
Impact of periodical maintenance dredging
Project activities
Maintenance dredging activities will be carried out after 4 years for the harbor and access channel and
last for 06 months. Estimation of maintenance dredged volume is approx. 2.9 million m3 in which 0.7 M
m3 in the harbor area and 2.2 million m3 in the access channel. It is planned that dredged materials will
be disposed at the same dumping location in the construction phase, 6.7 km away from the South of
Hon Me Island). Initial dredging activity for the first stage of the Project will be carried out, assessed and
chosen dumping location by NSPM.
Potential impact

Choose dumping location

As mentioned in Section 2, sea bed sediment at harbor basin is much diversified from very loose to
dense, fine sand to silt sand. At some locations, mud is status of loose / soft clayey sand. At 2 m under
the sea bed, the sediment layer is very hard, including stiff to very stiff clay. Above types of dredged
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sludge are not suitable for site leveling of the Project or other onshore projects. Hence, the optimum
option is dumping at location out of the Project area.
Dumping location must meet requirements of environmental protection and safe for vessel activity. The
dumping site in this phase is considered as follows:
- Water depth must be suitable in order not to prevent vessels transportation;
- Appropriate distance between the access channel and SPM so that flow of sediments will not
impact on dredging site;
- Main direction of wastes movement;
- Enough space for receiving dredged sludge;
- The transport distance from the harbor is minimum to reduce emission gas and dredging cost;
- Minimize negative impacts on marine ecosystem, especially the area of coral reef at Me island;
- Avoid or limit to dump at fishing grounds;
According to research/consideration of dredging for marine constructions [12], 04 positions considered
to choose as dumping site are as follows:
-

Position I: the South West area of Me island;


Position II: the North West area of Me island;
Position III: the area between Nghi Son island and Me island, near small islands;
Position IV: the area locates near the South West islands of Me island.

Analysis of sea bed features and dredged sludge receiving ability and environmental impacts of 4
positions are presented in Table 3.31 and Figure 3.10.
Table 3.31 Comparison of proposed dumping sites
Proposed dumping sites

Criterion
Water depth

II

III

IV

-20 m

-15 m

-11 m to -13 m

-15 m

Distance from
dredging site to
the harbor

18.5 km along route A


19.1 km along route B

12,5 km away from the North area


11.2 km away from the South area

9,2km

10,7km

Sea bed
topography

- Rather even and flat


- There are 02 narrow
water areas with -18 m in
depth

- Natural hole with depth of -21m


- The South natural hole with
depth of -27.4 m

- Natural hole with depth


of -19.8 m

- Natural hole with


depth of -21.2 m

Receiving ability

- Receiving area of 9km2


- Maximum receiving
volume of 18 millions m3

- Receiving area of 1 km2


- Maximum receiving volume of
3 millions m3

- Receiving area of 0.65


km2
- Maximum receiving
volume of 2.3 millions
m3

- Receiving area of
0.58 km2
- Maximum receiving
volume of 3.6 millions
m3

Environmental
sensitivity

- Low
- Not affect on coral

- High
- Affect on coral

- High
- Affect on coral

- High
- Affect on coral

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Figure 3.10 Selectable dumping sites


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Above comparison results show that position I locating 6.72 km away from the South West of Me island (Figure 3.11) is
the most suitable for the Project. Moreover, in comparison with dumping site proposed by Thanh Hoa Port Authorities in
February 2009, position I is further from the seashore and more suitable or following reasons:

Away 8.7 km from nearest pipeline; 6.72 km from Me island; 6.3 km from Dot island and 8.7 km from Mieng
island;
Direction of sediment dispersion is the South, so the dumping site must locate in the South of the harbor and
corridor of the pipeline;
Do not affect on ecosystem of coral around Me island;

Figure 3.11 Proposed dumping site


According to calculation, volume of dredged sludge at dumping site is not higher than 1/10 of the sea level. Therefore,
maximum allowable height of deposited sludge at dumping site must be 2 m. Due to dispersion of the sediment by time,
an area in size of 3.0km x 3.0km with filling height of 2m may receive 18 millions m3. Beside advantage of space for
dumping, this position also has an enough depth to mitigate impact of dredged sludge on current and disperse sludge
by time. Moreover, 02 narrow water areas with -18m in depth will make impact of dumping more sludge insignificant. In
order to keep balance of height between dumping site and surrounding area, dumping site must limit filling height of
-18.0m.
Current depth is about -19m in the West and -20m in the East compared with dumping site, average filling height is only
about 1.5m. Therefore, with dredging frequency of 04 years and dumping sludge volume of 2.9 millions m3, it is
necessary to have a dumping site in size of 1.4km x 1.4km.

Effect of dumping activity

Dredging (and dumping) activities at any scale may cause impact on water environment. Movement of the current will
stir the sediment layer and increase turbidity in a large area. This will make the sediment layer be dispersed significantly.
Calculation of 2.9 million m3 sludge by sludge dispersion model is carried out on the supposition that it must be
discharged 800,000 m3/month. Since dredging activities will be done for each 4 year in any month in year, the model is
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run for whole 12 months. The results show that maximum thickness at dumping site varies in range of 2.66 4.48m.
Affected area with sludge thickness of 0.1m is about 160,000 220,000m2 up to time of dumping. Affected area of
sediment layer with thickness of 01m is about 27,000 80,000m2 (Table 3.32 and Figure 3.12)
Table 3.32 Seabed area affected by dredging sludge
Month

Affected area (m2)


Material thickness of 0.1m
Material thickness of 1m

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

158,438
158,438
184,844
158,438
158,438
184,844
211,250
184,844
158,438
158,438
158,438
158,438

52,813
26,406
26,406
26,406
26,406
26,406
79,219
26,406
52,813
26,406
52,813
52,813

Maximum thickness at
dumping site
(m)
4.07
4.54
4.48
4.17
4.09
4.48
2.66
4.67
4.12
3.95
3.80
3.54

Dredging activities will strongly disturb the top sediment layer. These activities cause temporary instability for the sludge
deposition process. Due to the strong disturbance, some particulates are suspended and some are re-deposited. These
activities will increase organic content and nutrients (N, P v S-2) together with inorganic constituents (Na, Ca, K) in
water. When outside sediment layer is removed, the anaerobic inside will be exposed. In this condition, all benthos are
destroyed or dispersed.
In dredging process, suspended solid content will locally increase. Activities of the dredger ship take place in the sea.
This will increase temporarily suspended solids and affect mainly on the top of water column. Dumping process will
make the turbidity, pollutants and BOD increase, but concurrently decrease dissolved oxygen (DO) in water. This
impact may last for 6 to 12 months.
Impact level is assessed as moderate and short-term during dredging and dumping process.

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January

March

May

July

September

November

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Figure 3.12 Diagram of dredged sludge dispersion


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Impact by harbor effluent discharges


Project activities
Sources of effluent within harbor will consist of the following streams: clean water, oily water and
sanitary effluent.
Potential impact
Typically storm water run-off from non-process or unused areas where there is no potential to pollute
water-run-off is classified as clean effluent. Clean effluents are collected to gravity drainage systems
and in open ditches at the harbor. Clean effluents normally have low or negligible content of pollutants
and meet the discharge limits. Therefore, this effluent can be discharged, untreated, direct to sea. The
discharge of clean effluents directly to the sea at the harbor will not pollute seawater.
Sanitary effluent generated is based on an estimated flow of 300 liters/person/day. It is anticipated that
the number of employees will be 42 persons and an allowance of 12 additional persons. The estimation
sanitary volume is about 16.2 m3/day. The maximum daily pollution loads before treatment as a long
term average is given in Table 3.33.
Table 3.33 Maximum daily pollution loads
Case
Flow
Pollutants
BOD5
TSS
NH4+-N
Total Phosphor

Maximum daily load


16,200 kg/day
kg/day
3.24
3.78
0.43
0.16

ppmw
200
233
27
10

Source: Technical Document No. 3550-8110-PS-190-0180 - REV D1 Provided by FWL, November 2009
Notes:
The pollution loadings are based on typical daily allowances per person: 300l/day of water, 60 g/day of BOD, 70 g/day
of SS, 8 g/day of NH4+-N & 3 g/day of Phosphorus.
Normal flows are likely to be lower than the peak identified above but the pollution load is likely to be as identified for
extended periods of time thus the sewage strength is expected to normally be substantially higher than that indicated
above for the peak flow.

This sanitary effluent will be treated by sewage treatment package at the harbor and then routed to
project outfall. The treated wastewater will meet discharge standards of the project (see Item 0.2.2.3).
The sludge will be transferred to the secondary treatment stage (biological) of the refinery effluent
treatment plant (ETP). So sanitary effluent generated from harbors topsides will not cause direct impact
to seawater. Project activities will be updated during EPC phase.

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Impacts of wastewater and solid wastes from vessels


Oily wastewater
In the operation phase, there are about 33 very large tanker (300,000 DWT) transporting crude oil from Kuwait to SPM
every year. These ships are equipped preliminary oily separator. Cleaning and runoff water sweeping oil sticking on the
surface floor around the equipments will be collected and treated by the oil separator to ensure that oil content in treated
wastewater must less than 40 ppm before discharged into the sea (offshore area beyond 12 nautical mile). On the other
hand, the projects crude tanker will only operate offshore at SPM which is 33.5 km far from the shore with frequency
ship to SPM is one per every 10 days. Moreover, volume of oily wastewater from tanker is small and the mixing ability of
the environmental receiver is very well, so discharging treated oily wastewater will cause insignificant impact on marine
environment.
At product export berths, there will be about 1,179 ships of 1,000 30,000 DWT every year going in and out, in which
93% of them are 1,000 10,000 DWT ships. As planned, the NSRP harbor will only receive double hull ships or having
2 containing holds, not for ships having ballast water. Moreover, according to the MARPOL signing progress, all these
ships must have certification of the Vietnam Register of shipping before berthing in the harbor. The operation process of
these tankers at the harbor will generate a small volume of oily runoff water since oil stains are swept away from the floor
of the ship by rain water. This oily wastewater will be preliminarily extracted the lower layer because oil is lighter than
water and will float on the surface. The above oily water layer will be collected and routed to a separate tank and treated
periodically (when the tank is nearly full) by the onboard oil/water separator or a licensed company outside the harbor.
Therefore, the NSRP harbor will not receive oily wastewater from product vessels and impact level on sea water
environment is assessed as insignificant.
Domestic wastewater
Domestic wastewater generated onboard of crude tankers and product ships will be collected and preliminary treated
before discharging into the sea. However, number of screws working on these specific ships is not much. Therefore,
discharging treated domestic wastewater from ships will cause insignificant impact on the marine environment.
Solid waste
Domestic rubbish from canteen area as waste food generated from each ship is not significant. All amount of rubbish
will be crushed into small pieces less than 25 mm in size and discharged directly into the sea without treatment. It is
noted that small pieces of rubbish ( 25mm) should not be discharged nearshore due to effects on ship activities at the
harbor.
Normal operation of crude tankers and product ships will generate frequently amount of solid waste. These solid wastes
are mainly non-hazardous waste as domestic rubbish and a small amount of hazardous waste as oily rag, batteries
As planned, all solid wastes generated onboard will be classified at source into separate bins before transporting to
temporary storage area at NSRP harbor. At the harbor area, hazardous waste will be transported to specific storage
area of the Complex and treated together with hazardous wastes of the Complex. Non-hazardous wastes will be
transported and treated properly by a licensed treater company; and NSRP LLC will be responsible for hiring this
company in accordance with current regulations. Therefore, impact level of solid wastes generated from ships on sea
quality at Nghi Son gulf is assessed as minor.
Amount of solid wastes generated from these tankers will be defined by the EPC Contractor in the detailed design
phase of the Project.
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3.2.2.2.3 Soil and groundwater environment


Project activities
Main activities caused potential soil impact are operation of 2km onshore pipeline, pipeline pigging and
maintenance and solid wastes management at the harbor.
Potential impacts
Onshore pipeline system and loading activities
Product loading at harbor will not cause significant impact to soil environment due to loading activities
are operated on the harbor structure.
Normal operation of crude and product pipelines connecting from Refinery and Petrochemical Complex
to harbor will not cause soil pollution. In the case of occurring onshore pipeline failure/rupture, spilled
oil/product will cause soil contamination along the pipeline right of way. In practice, pipeline tracks are
buried at minimum of -1m in depth and isolated with the vicinity by fence and will be supervised by
NSRP LLC. On the other hand, onshore oil spill/leakages are usually minor and easy to handle.
Therefore, the impact level is considered as minor.
During the periodic pipeline pigging, any deposit or fluids inside the pipeline will be discharged to the
tank ahead at the pig receiving station in the plant. Therefore, the level impact of maintenance pigging
on soil contamination is considered as negligible.
Solid wastes
Solid wastes generated from normal operation of jetty area are in small quantity. Most of the nonhazardous solid wastes are coming from the 42 persons working at Jetty Area Control / Admin Building.
Domestic wastes from Jetty are estimated at 45.9kg/day which will be regularly collected and disposed
by an accredited local Urban and Public Hygiene Company.
3.2.2.2.4 Marine Environment
Project activities
Main activities caused potential impact to marine habitat at this phase are offloading crude oil at SPM
through pipeline system, product loading at jetties and maintenance dredging and material dumping.
Potential impacts
As above mentioned, normal offloading crude oil at SPM through pipeline system and product loading
at jetties will be at high potential risk of oil spill. In the case of oil spill occurs, the main threat posed to
living resources by the persistent residues of spilled oils and water-in-oil emulsions is one of physical
smothering leading, in cases of severe contamination, to death through the prevention of normal
functions such as feeding, respiration and movement. As damage is caused by physical contact, the
animals and plants at most risk are those that could come into contact with contaminated water.

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Maintenance dredging and material dumping activities will cause similar impacts as ones in the
construction phase. However, the presence of contaminated sediments may be higher due to effluent
discharges from industrial activities. The potential effects of these changes on marine life are:

Cause the removal of benthic animals at the dredge site.

Temporary increases in the level of suspended sediments in the water column which can give
rise to increased turbidity, and the possible release of oxygen depleting substances (organic or
anaerobic sediments), nutrients and contaminants.

Temporary reduction of algal/plant growth due to increased turbidity.

Disturbance to sensitive benthic animals and fish due suspended sediments, which may cause
temporary disruption of migration of fish.

Temporary disturbance of marine animals from the depletion of oxygen due to release of
organic-rich material.

Nutrient enrichment possibly causing increased food supplies/algal blooms.

Uptake of contaminants by marine life possibly causing direct toxic effects or effects further up
the food chain.

Smothering of benthic animals and plants due to resettlement of suspended sediments.

The overall effect of maintenance dredging on the hydrodynamics and geomorphology of a site has all
the complexity of a capital scheme but the impacts are less magnitude. In many cases the magnitude of
dredging related alterations may fall well within the range of naturally occurring phenomena and
probably impose little or no additional stress to marine features (IADC/CEDA 1998). For maintenance
dredging, the extent of these environmental affects is near-field and temporary generally only lasting as
long as dredging operations are taking place (ABP Research R707 1997; IADC/CEDA 1998).
However, the presence of contaminated sediment may increase the impact of the maintenance
dredging at the disposal site. The impact level is considered as significance.
3.2.3

CUMULATIVE IMPACT DURING OPERATION PHASE OF ONSHORE AND OFFSHORE


CONSTRUCTIONS ON OTHER PROJECTS IN THE LOCAL AREA

Cumulative impact assessment of NSRP is based on overall development background of other projects in the local
area. The Complex is constructed in Nghi Son economic zone (NSEZ), other industrial activities in NSEZ include:

Petroleum Technical Services Corporation (PTSC) and Vinashin shipyard factory are in site leveling phase. PTSC
Port is 7 km away from the South of the Project. Current PTSC port mainly serves for domestic import/export of
construction materials and cargo. The appearance of 5 new harbors will increase risk of ship collision and cause
significant impacts on the environment and society.

Nghi Son Thermo-electric Plant with capacity of 1,800 MW locating in front of the PTSC Ports include Nghi Son 1
Plant (600 MW) and Nghi Son 2 (1,200 MW) and 6km away from the Project. The Plant will use 14 tons of
coal/hour, the feedstock is from coal mine in Hon Gai, Quang Ninh province. Coal will be transported to the Plant by
seaway and kept in the coal storage area. Operation of the Plant is a significant air pollution causing source. New
product export berth of the Plant will increase risk of ship collision.

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Nghi Son cement factory is 5 km far from the Project area. The factory locates near Road 513 but its jetty is built at
Nghi Son Gulf. This jetty is near the harbor of NSRP, so ship activities of Nghi Son cement factory and NSRP may
increase risk of ship collision.

In future, there will be a new harbor of NSEZ locating near the harbor of NSRP. This new harbor may prevent the
sea traffic since it is too close to the harbor of NSRP. Due to this high potential risk, the new harbor of NSEZ will
have a complete different access direction.

PTSC Ports and Nghi Son Thermo-electric Centre locate behind Chuot Chu Mountain with its height of 157m and is 6
7 km far from the Project area. On consideration of distance between projects and practical topography condition,
emission gas and waste water dispersion of the Project will not cause cumulative impact on environmental constituents
at Project area.
However, growth of ship activities due to the development of trade ports and fishery activity will increase environmental
risks, especially the oil spills. Therefore, it is necessary to assess cumulative impact between NSRP and other projects.
Most of cumulative impacts will affect on:
Habitat;
Biological diversity.
Although Nghi Son Cement Factory locates in NSEZ, this will not cause cumulative impact on air quality because:

According to EIA report of Nghi Son Cement Factory, SOx is not generated from the Factory since it is
absorbed during cement production process. Average ground concentration of NOx is under allowable limit of
TCVN (0.19 0.22 mg/Nm3). Average ground concentration of cement dust is in range of 0.19 0.21 mg/Nm3
at distance of 600m from the stack base. Therefore, affected area is limited in the area of Nghi Son Cement
Factory.

Nghi Son Cement Factory is 5 km far from NSRP and behind Chuot Chu Mountain.

Operation and appearance of harbor constructions of different projects will generate cumulative impacts due to the
increase of sea traffic and high potential risk of ship collision.
According to Thanh Hoa Port Authorities, Nghi Son integrated port (PTSC Port at present) may receive 10,000 DWT
ships at berth 1 and 30,000 DWT ships at berth 2. The capacity of the port is about 900,000 1,400,000 tons/year with
cargo such as rice, cement, iron, steel, fertilizer and coal. International ships going in and out Nghi Son integrated Port
are mainly from Japan, Thailand, Malaysia and China. More than 80% of ship activities in Thanh Hoa province
concentrate at Nghi Son gulf with density of 830 997 ships/year. Access channel routing to Nghi Son integrated Port,
Vinashin shipyard factory and Nghi Son thermo-electric plant is from the South of Bien Son mountain and 9 km far from
NSRP. Therefore, ship collision incident may occur in area from Buoy 0 to Nghi Son integrated Port, oil slick may affect
directly on Nghi Son gulf and NSRP harbour. Polluted area may spread out if the incident occurs in time of March to
August (Southwest monsoon). In this case, Me island, Nghi Son cement port, NSRP harbor and Thanh Hoa coastal
area will be affected.
Nghi Son cement port is 1 km far from the South of NSRP harbor. 3 specific ships used to transport coal from Quang
Ninh Province to the jetties name Development (12,000 DWT), Helitech (7,000DWT) and San Ho (14,000
16,000DWT); and a large ship (17.000 27.000DWT) used to transport clinker from Japan, plaster from Thailand and
cement to Hiep Phuoc Port (HCMC). The capacity of the Port is about 1,100,000 1,300,000 tons of cement, clinker
and coal per year. At present, density of vessels at Nghi Son Cement Port is low and there is no any ship collision
incident. However, the access channel of this port is used flexibly for ships from the North (China, Quang Ninh)
passing access channel of NSRP harbor and ships from the South will also pass Me island. Hence, there will be
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potential risk of ship collision when NSRP Harbor comes into operation phase. In case of incident at Cement Port or
NSRP Harbour, oil will drift to Nghi Son coastal area and Me island in the first day in both monsoons.
In normal operation, frequency of ship going in and out NSRP Harbour is about 1,179 ships/year; and 150 186
ships/year for Nghi Son Cement Port. Risk of collision will be higher when a new trade port of NSEZ is constructed and
operated near NSRP harbor (in the North). Based on consideration and assessment of ship activities at all harbors,
situation and sea traffic at access channel, cumulative impact is assessed as significant.
Tankers at SPM may collide with ships going in and out Nghi Son integrated Port, Nghi Son Cement Harbor, future Port
of the Thermo-electric Plant and Trade Port of NSEZ. Main risk to aquatic environment is oil spill accident from SPM,
crude oil pipeline or ship collision at harbor or access channel of Nghi Son Cement Port. Although the frequency is low,
the result is serious and unchangeable. These cumulative impacts will affect on biological diversity, especially coral,
aquatic environment Cumulative impact level is assessed as major and long-term.
3.2.4

SOCIO-ECONOMIC IMPACT ASSESSMENT

Development of NSRP will affect on many aspects of the local communitys living including change of
landuse, job opportunity and issues caused by the development. The main impacts mentioned in this
item include:
Land acquisition;
Compensation and resettlement;
Training and recruitment plan;
Job change and local supply opportunity.
NSEZ Management Board is responsible for resettlement of affected people in NSEZ. However, NSRP
will carry out a due diligence of resettlement activities in the Project area in accordance with
requirements of IFC.
3.2.4.1 Impacts caused by land acquisition
Total acquired area for the Project is 394 ha in the area of Hai Yen, Mai Lam and Tinh Hai Communes.
Most acquired land (65%) is agricultural.
Around 2,607 HH (9,000 persons) will be affected by the Project. Among these APs, 687 HH will lose
most of their land and their main houses and they have to relocate in another location. Three
resettlement sites have been designed to accommodate these relocated APs.
Table 3.34 Scope of land acquisition

Project components
Plant Site (B)

Total

Productive
land
HH
ha

HH

ha

1,907

328

1,398

Residential land Relocate


HH
ha
d HH
289
509
39
456

Loss of
graves
2,348

Mai Lam

525

63

468

52

57

11

53

1,083

Tinh Hai

600

117

450

105

150

12

101

832

Hai Yen

782

148

480

132

302

16

302

433

700

66

469

2,607
Total
Source: Resettlement Due Diligence report, February 2010

394

1,867

Pipeline and Marine Facility (Areas E & J)

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289

740

39

231

N/A

687

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During the first survey, most of the HHs in the plant site were losing a significant part of their land
(86.7% lost more than 30% of their total holdings) and 42% of HH who lost agricultural land declared
that their remaining land was no longer viable.
As already indicated, all the APs already relocated in Mai Lam Commune had lost all their residential
land.
Table 3.35 Affected land in the plant site and in the borrow areas
Location
Plant site
Already relocated
APs in Mai Lam

Number
of
surveyed
HH
105
25

0-10%

Affected area/Total area (%)


11-30%
31-60%

>61%

HH

HH

HH

HH

3.8

10

9.5

38

36.2

53

50.5

0.0

0.0

0.0

25

100.0

Source: Resettlement Due Diligence report, February 2010

Table 3.36 Viability of remaining agricultural land


Location
Plant site
Already relocated APs in Mai Lam

Number of
surveyed
HH
105
25

Yes
HH
61
0

Remaining land viable


No (too small)
%
HH
%
58.1
44
41.9
0.0
25
100.0

Source: Due Diligence Surveys (2008-2009)

3.2.4.2 Impact caused by graves relocation


In the Project area, graves locate mainly under the foot of Chuot Chu (area of borrow pits), Coc mountains and rice
fields (the Plant site). Some graves are buried in the middle of rice fields or near home.
Compensation rate for removing graves: APs had to move graves to new cemeteries. According to
APs, the compensation for graves, between 800,000 VND and 3,600,000 VND, doesnt reflect
replacement cost. Most APs hire workers to move their graves. They said that the cost of workers is
higher than the compensation proposed. The disturbance or loss of graves could potentially result in
social and cultural disruption of traditional burial customs as well as traditional beliefs based on their
relationship of ancestors to living beings. According to consultation with affected communes,
compensation rate for graves relocation is lower than practical cost.
Situation of new cemetery in Mai Lam commune: a new cemetery was built in Mai Lam commune.
However, APs and local authorities are very unsatisfied with the way it was built. Most of the relocated
graves stones have fallen down, and are inclined due to the poor and careless construction of the new
cemetery, which didnt follow the approved design.
The project will affect 1083 graves in Mai Lam commune, 433 graves in Hai Yen commune and 832
graves in Tinh Hai commune. Local authorities have compensated and moved all affected graves to
cemetery of each commune. However, considering the number of affected graves and the belief of the
people the significance of this impact is assessed as major.
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3.2.4.3 Impact caused by compensation and resettlement


The responsibility of implementing the resettlement of affected people in NSEZ belongs to Tinh Gia
District and NSEZ Management Board. However, NSRP is doing a follow-up of the current resettlement
activities in the project area.
According to the Due Diligence Resettlement Report prepared in February 2010, around 2,607 HH
(9,000 persons) will be affected by the project. Among these APs, 687 will lose most of their land and
their main houses and will have to relocate in another location. Due to the number of households
affected by the Project, the significance of this impact is serious.
Resettlement activities started in early 2008 for this project and are ongoing. The resettlement activities
focused first on the plant site and utilities where compensation payments were made to households
who had agricultural land and graves affected by the NSRP. APs in the plant site have now been fully
compensated.
Due to change in the design, some new areas (areas E & J) are now under the project. A new
resettlement site in Tinh Hai commune has also been developed.
Due to this situation, the status of resettlement activities for the various components of the project is at
different stages. Below table indicates the status of resettlement activities up to May 2010.
Table 3.37 Status of resettlement activities by commune, up to May 2010
Commune
Mai Lam

Status of resettlement activities


Plant Site: all compensation paid
54/57 HHs have already moved and handed over their land; 3
HHs have moved to other locations.
All graves already removed

Hai Yen

All compensation paid


104/302 HHs received land and building home in the RS.
Graves: 433/433 graves already removed

Tinh Hai

Impacts
63 ha affected by NSRP;
525 HHs
57 HHs to be relocated
1,083 graves need to be
relocated
The plant site (B)
148 ha affected
782 HHs
302 HHs to be relocated
433 graves need to be
relocated
The pipeline and harbour
areas (E & J)
66 ha affected
700 HHs to be relocated
231 graves need to be
relocated
117 ha affected
600 HHs
101 HHs to be relocated
832 graves need to be
relocated

Being investigated in detail

Plant site
- All compensation paid;
- 83/101 HHs received land and building home in the RS.
Graves: 780/832 graves already removed

Source: Investigation result, May 2010

Three resettlement sites are constructed to relocate people affected by the Nghi Son Refinery Project.
They are: Mai Lam, Tinh Hai and Xuan Lam-Nguyen Binh RS. Two RS, Mai Lam and Tinh Hai, are
located within the NSEZ and Xuan Lam-Nguyen Binh RS is located outside the NSEZ. All three RSs
conform to the Master Plan of the NSEZ. In general, affected HHs are satisfied about the RS, except for
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Mai Lam RS due to environmental condition and distance from the previous land to the new RS. These
HHs are willing to deliver their land to the project and relocate temporarily or live with their relatives. A
new RS will be built for HHs living in Tinh Hai Commune.
The RS construction process is not the same for all the RS. Tinh Hai RS will be built later since local
people want to move to a new RS. Up till May 2010, there are 104 of 302 HHs in Hai Yen Commune
and 83 of 101 HHs in Tinh Hai Commune received land and constructing home in the new RS.
The process for plot allocation to APs is as follows:

Priority is given to APs who were located in profitable/convenient locations of their former
resident places;
Other APs are chosen randomly for their plots.

The size of plots in each RS varies. Two main types of land plots with the size of: (i) 5 x 20 m; (ii) 10 x
18 m. Priority to allocate to agriculture households who will have to change their occupation from
agriculture production to non-agriculture production. In addition, some plots have a size of 70 m2.
Affected HHs will have option to build themselves their houses but following the regulation of house
building under urban area issued by department of construction.
The assistance policy for moving and relocation of APs applied for Nghi Son Economic Zone was
issued by Thanh Hoa PPC by Decision No.2531/2008/QD-UBND dated 18 August 2008. The
assistances are as follows:

Assistance for life stabilization and production stabilization


Assistance for house rental
Education assistance
Training allowance
Progress bonus
Assistance for individual relocation

The residual impact on socio-economic conditions of the affected households related to the loss of
residential land is strong according to the first Public Consultation of November 2008 and Due Diligence
Resettlement Survey.
1. Resettlement
Resettlement site development and suitability constituted one of the most difficult issues in the Project.
The construction of resettlement sites was severely delayed. NSEZMB planned to finalize all the RS by
the end of April 2009. As of the date of the preparation of this report (May 2010), there are many HHs
received land and are building their homes in the RS.

Mai Lam RS
The resettlement site in Mai Lam Commune was not found to be satisfactory for APs in Mai Lam
Commune nor by local authorities due to environmental reasons. Therefore, all APs in Mai Lam
Commune refused to be relocated in the proposed RS and chose to be relocated by themselves.
Currently, 54 HHs among 57 HHs from Mai Lam commune have already relocated; 03 HHs moved
outside the NSEZ.

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Tinh Hai RS
APs in Tinh Hai commune refused the proposed location of the RS in 2008. A new RS was again
proposed to them in 2009 by NSEZ and it has been satisfied APs. Two public meetings were
organized in July 2009 by NSEZ. Now, the RS is nearly completed and there are 83 HHs building
their houses in this RS.

Late construction progress of RS


APs worry about the delays in relocation. They will move to the RS only when the infrastructures in
the RS are fully completed. NSEZ promised the completion of the RS for April 2009. However, in
October 2009, no APs had been relocated.
As indicated above, the stabilization allowance, intended to cover expenses and loss of income
during the transition period (currently for 6 months). So APs are asking for the extension of this
allowance if the RS is not completed after 6 months. In practice, in the end of year 2009, Thanh
Hoa PPC has decided to extend period of stabilization allowance up to 60 months with 30kg of
rice/person/month, it is even better than their expectation.

Size of lots of land in RS


APs found the size of land in the RS (200 m2) is too small. APs are asking for 500 m2 plots of land
to be able to have a garden for growing vegetables and fruit trees.
APs want to combine two types of land plots in the RS: one for housing and one for business. In the
design of the RS, the locations of business and residential plots are separated. HH want to get two
plots at the same location to be able to take care of their business during the night.

Plots of land in RS only for residential land with houses


Some APs did not agree with the new Resolution No.128/2009/NQ-HDND of the Thanh Hoa
Peoples Committee on the moving and relocation policy applied for the Nghi Son Economic Zone;
Article 3, Clause 2 of this resolution stated that to obtain a plot of land in an RS, HHs have to meet
the three following conditions:
-

HH with residential land (with existing houses on it) to be acquired by the Project;
HH should have permanent registration;
HH have to move their place of residence to the RS.

2. Replacement cost survey


A replacement cost survey was conducted in the Project area. Local authorities, affected persons and
non-affected persons were met. To assess if the compensation prices paid to APs (based on Thanh
Hoa PPC prices) meet replacement costs, a replacement cost survey was conducted. This survey
focused mainly on residential land because compensation prices for this type of land are the most
contested by APs.

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Residential land
Compensation rates established by Thanh Hoa PPC for residential land are below market rates for
all locations and for all communes. This confirms the opinions of APs. However, APs are offered
land for land compensation (plot in an RS). If they choose land for land compensation, they will not
be affected by the low compensation rates for residential land.

Productive land
Compensation rates for agricultural land, according to PPC rates, are 22,000 VND/m2 in Thanh
Hoa Province. However, this rate was raised from 22,000 to 55,000 VND/m2 for the Project area by
Decision No.1151/2008/QD-PPC dated 28/04/2008 amending and adjusting some prices for
agricultural land in Nghi Son Economic Zone. This new rate for agricultural land is satisfactory to
Aps.
In 2010, following Decision No.4366/2009/QD-UBND issued to reflect the new Decree 69/CP
issued by the GoV, the compensation rate for agricultural land has to be multiplied by 1.5.
Therefore, the new compensation rate for agricultural land will be 82,500 VND/m2.

House
The investigation showed that the prices of construction materials have increased considerably due
to the 25% inflation rate (it may be lower now). The prices for construction materials are 30 to 45%
more than 6 months ago. Therefore, local authorities as well as affected people require the PPC to
compensate by applying Decision No. 1048/QD-UBND dated 22nd April 2008 but following the
inflation rate. The new compensation rates of Thanh Hoa PPC in Decision No.345/Q-UBND dated
25th January 2010 have been increased and equal to current market price.

3. Compensation
To assess the process of resettlement and compensation, a due diligence survey was conducted for
the plant site. 105 HHs were surveyed at the plant site to assess the process of resettlement and
compensation.
In 2008, at the time of the survey for APs in the plant site, APs had only been compensated for
productive land and not for structures. Also, at this time no APs had been relocated. This is the reason
why the new due diligence survey among the 25 already-relocated HH was conducted in October 2009.

Satisfaction with compensation


During the first survey in the plant site, APs were generally satisfied with the compensation they
had received for agricultural land (62%) and for trees/crops (51.4%). This showed that
compensation prices for agricultural land generally met market prices.
However, among the already relocated APs in Mai Lam Commune, all the APs complained due to
the low compensation rates for residential land. The amount they received was not sufficient to get
a similar plot of land in the same area.

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Table 3.38 Satisfaction with received compensation

Location

Number of
surveyed
HH

Plant Site
Already relocated
APs in Mai Lam

105
25

Satisfied with compensation


received for land
Yes
No (too low)
HH
%
HH
%
65
61.9
40
38.1
0

25

100

Satisfied with compensation


received for fruit trees/crops
Yes
No (too low)
HH
%
HH
%
54 51.4
51
48.6
25

100

Source: Resettlement Due Diligence Report, February 2010

In the plant site, some APs (19 %) complained to local authorities with no results. Most of the APs
(75.2%) attended public meetings organized by local authorities. For already relocated APs, all the APs
surveyed complained to local authorities.
It should also be noted that in the plant site, although almost all APs (98.1%) were compensated before
the start of the civil work, 3 APs declared that they were compensated after the start of the civil work.
However, for the already relocated APs, all APs declared that civil works started before the
compensation. The result of the due diligence survey conducted with 25 of 75 relocated APs in Mai
Lam showed that all 25 surveyed APs complained that they did not receive full compensation and
allowances before handing over the site to the Project. Three new allowances: an accommodation
allowance (VND 12.0 Million per HH), support for purchasing construction material (VND 10.0 Million
per HH), and a training allowance have still not been paid to APs. This was confirmed during the public
meeting held in January 2010.
Table 3.39 fully compensated before start of civil works

Location

Number of
surveyed HH

Fully compensate before civil works?


Yes

No

HH

HH

Plant Site

105

103

98.1

1.9

Already relocated APs in Mai Lam

25

25

100

Source: Resettlement Due Diligence Report, February 2010

4. Change in source of income


Because many HH lost their productive land, which was their main source of income, several HH have
to change occupations. In the plant site, agriculture was the main source of income for 81% of the APs
before clearance; now only 61% have this main source of income. Several APs became workers and
were hired by companies or by individuals. Secondary sources of income became the first source of
income for some APs.
Among the already compensated APs, most of surveyed HH (23/25) are still working on agricultural
land while two are now hired laborers.

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Table 3.40 Source of primary income before and after clearance for already relocated APs
Hired
Surveyed Agriculture Trading Services labor Wages Forestry Aquaculture Government
HH
HH % HH % HH % HH % HH % HH % HH
%
HH
%

Source of
primary
income

Before
clearance
After clearance

25

24

96

25
22
88
Source: Resettlement Due Diligence Report, February 2010

Table 3.41 Source of secondary income before and after clearance for already relocated APs
Source of
primary
income

Hired

Wages
Surveyed Agriculture Trading Services labor
HH
HH % HH % HH % HH % HH %

Before
clearance
After clearance

25

25
1
4 1 4
Source: Resettlement Due Diligence Report, February 2010

Forestry

Aquaculture Government

HH

12 48

16

20

13 52

12

HH

HH

Others

HH %

5. Impacts on living standards


Nearly half of the APs in the plant site declared that they are in a worse situation than before the
clearance. At the time of the survey, APs in the plant site were in a transition period. They had received
cash compensation but they had also lost their source of income. For some HHs, they had never had
so much money and their living standards have risen, at least temporarily. An article published in June
2008 on Vietnam News showed that some APs in the Nghi Son economic zones made extravagant
purchases. However, most of the APs didnt see any change in their living standards while 45%
estimate that their living standards are worse now. APs have been asking for some programs to help
them change occupations.
In 2009, this situation became even worse. 24 among the 25 already-relocated HH in Mai Lam
Commune declared that their living standards were worse now due to the absence of a restoration
program. They no longer have productive land for cultivation and they have also used part of the money
they received from compensation for daily expenses. This situation has lasted for one year and a half
now.
Table 3.42 Impacts on living standards
Location
Plant Site
Already relocated
APs in Mai Lam

Number of surveyed
HH
105
25

Same than before


HH
%
51
48.6
1

4.0

Living standards
Better
HH
%
7
6.7
0

Worse
HH
47

%
44.8

24

96.0

Source: Resettlement Due Diligence Report, February 2010

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Main concerns of APs already compensated are follows:

Compensation price for residential land too low


As indicated above, APs are not satisfied with the price of compensation for residential land. This
was confirmed by the replacement cost survey. Prices are from 2 to 3 times lower.
Almost all relocated APs in Mai Lam commune also complained about lower compensation prices
for residential land. They were fully compensated in July 2009 with the compensation rate for
2009. All APs have already received compensation but they are still complaining about the lower
rate for residential land. Because they chose to relocate individually, the compensation received
for residential land was not sufficient to buy a piece of land similar to the one they lost outside the
NSEZ.
However, for APs relocated in an RS, the compensation will be land for land, so APs will not be
affected by the low rate of compensation for residential land. In addition, the RS are provided with
services that APs dont benefit from at their current location (piped water, sanitation). The objective
of the DRC is to move all the APs into an RS.
APs in Mai Lam also complained that the compensation rate they received in 2009 for residential
land was much lower (640,000 to 800,000 VND/m2) than the one issued in 2010 for Hai Yen
(1,035,000 to 1,418,000 VND/m2). APs from Mai Lam were the first ones to be relocated and
compensated.

Compensation price for structures too low 1


Compensation rates for structures were established at the beginning of 2008. In 2008, the rate of
inflation was high and by the end of 2008, compensation rates for structures didnt reflect market
prices. However, the due diligence survey conducted in October 2009 among 25 HHs showed that
most of them (17/25 HHs, about 68%) were satisfied with the compensation rates for structures.

Compensation for remaining land


APs, especially in Hai Yen Commune, will be relocated in Xuan Lam Nguyen Binh RS located 18
km away from their previous land. Some of the APs have remaining agricultural land not affected
by the project. However, this land will not be acquired by the project. For APs who will be relocated
far away, it will be quite impossible to cultivate the land due to the expenses linked to traveling.
They are asking the authorities to acquire the remaining land.
Relocated APs for Mai Lam Commune also required the Project to acquire remaining agricultural
land.

Concern about their future source of income, especially during the transition period

We should note that since the survey (August 2008), the rate of inflation has increased from 20 to 35% in
Vietnam due to the financial crisis.

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During the first survey in August 2008, it was assessed that some APs who had already been
compensated had lost their productive land for more than 6 months and were waiting for relocation
in the RS. Relocation can take several months during which APs have no income. They have
money due to the compensation they received. However, they cannot start any new activity
because they are waiting to move. In addition, some APs misused the compensation they
received.
It is necessary to provide assistance to APs regarding managing money and ensuring that APs
use the money properly.
APs received an allowance for the transition period for 6 months to provide for loss of income.
However, it is not known how long the transition period will last. If the transition period lasts more
than 6 months, it will be necessary to extend the transition allowance until the RS is ready.

Jobs in the industrial zone


APs want training to be able to be employed in the industrial zone. They want the NSEZ and
NSRP to tell them in which field they should be trained to be able to be employed.
Older APs are very worrying about their future. According to persons met, it will be difficult for
them to find new jobs.

Re-establishment of livelihood
In the plant site, in 2008, most of the HH would have preferred land for land compensation for
residential land (57.3%). Land for land means a plot of land in one of the 3 serviced resettlement
sites. In the pipeline and marine facility areas, most of the HH prefer cash compensation. The RS
situation in 2009 (delays, environmental problems) probably incited APs to make their own
arrangements.
Table 3.43 Preferred Form of Compensation
Location

Number of
surveyed
HH

Preferred Form of Compensation


Replacement land
Cash Compensation

HH
%
171
98
57.3
Plant site
267
72
27.0
Marine facility
14
3
21.4
Pipeline
452
173
38.3
Total
Source: Resettlement Due Diligence Report, February 2010

HH
73
99
11
183

%
42.7
37.1
78.6
40.5

Other
HH
0
96
0
96

%
0
36.0
0.0
21.2

3.2.4.4 Impact on training and recruitment plan of NSEZ


1. Nghi Son economic zone (NSEZ)
Land acquiring for NSEZ development will make thousands of farmers loss agricultural land. In the
NSEZ, there are about 16,780 HHs (65,861 persons) and 44,593 laborers living in 12 communes of
Nghi Son Economic Zone. On this, 11,786 laborers are looking for a job. Among these 11,786 laborers,
2,551 have been trained and 9,235 are unskilled.

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NSEZ Management Board conducted a survey on the labor force in the 3 communes affected by the
project (Hai Yen, Tinh Hai and Mai Lam) and 2 communes (Hai Thuong and Hai Ha) in the vicinity in
April 2008. According to this survey, the number of laborers with training interest is 7,682, of which:

791 laborers have aspiration to follow high vocational college;


2,573 laborers have aspiration to follow intermediate vocational college; and
4,318 laborers to follow primary vocational college.

The survey also shown 1,366 trained laborers are looking for a job, of which:

01 person graduated university;


57 persons graduated higher vocational college;
398 persons graduated intermediate vocational college; and
910 persons graduated primary vocational college.

The above laborers are now working in different provinces in the South. However, if the refinerypetrochemical complex and other industrial factories need laborers then most of them have to be
retrained.
At present, a center of vocational training college is located in Tinh Gia District. This center is
connected with other vocational colleges at different levels from central to provincial.
Other vocational centers such as Truc Lam Higher Vocational College, Vinashin Shipbuilding College,
and Licogi College of high vocational economics have training programs for laborers who are willing to
work in Nghi Son Economic Zone and Refinery and Petrochemical Project.
2. NSRP LLC
NSRP LLC will implement traning courses for its own employees after recruitment. However, NSRP
LLC will also partially sponsor training programs implemented by local authorities for APs via its
proposed Social Support Program (SSP).

Construction Phase
During the construction phase (2010-2013), 10,000 to 15,000 workers will be required. Most of the
jobs will require specific skills (specialists, engineers, etc.). However, the Project will also need
between 2,000 and 3,000 unskilled workers. This will constitue job opportunity for local people and
especially affected persons.
The construction period will also create a great demand for various services (food, accommodation,
entertainment services, etc.) in order to serve the workers. The construction will generate a 2-3
billion VND turnover/day. Local people and APs could also benefit from this demand by providing
these types of services.

Operation Phase
During the operation phase (from 2014), about 1,000 skilled and unskilled employees will be
employed.
In the middle of 2010, the company will start to recruit and train its staff in Vietnam and overseas.
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Priority will be given to local people if the recruitment requirements are met.
The different types of workers needed are presented in Table 3.44. Workers will be hired only if
they meet the company requirements, such as work experience, English ability, academic
background, etc. The recruitment will be spread over the construction period from 2010 to 2013.
Table 3.44 Tentative recruitment plan for Operation phase
No

Occupation

Qualification

Number
(person)

Graduated

English
(IELTS)

Engineer

450

University

4-5

Operator

180

College

Technician

40

Helper

College
High
School

Non-Technical Staff

100
80

Background
Chemical Engineering, Chemical,
Mechanical, Electrical, Civil, etc
Chemical Engineering, Chemical,
Mechanical, Electrical, etc
Chemical, Mechanical

University

Economics & Management, Applied


Mathematics, etc

Source: NSRP-LLC, May 2010


Note 1: Evaluation: Entrance Examination & Interview
Note 2: More than 5 years work experience will be required for Occupations 1, 2, 3 and 5

Table 3.45 Period of recruitment during operation phase


2010
No

Occupation

1-3

4-6

Engineer (450)
Operator (180)
Technician (40)
Helper (100)
Non-technical
staff (80)

1
2
3
4
5

7-9

2011
10-12

10

20

1-3

40

2012

4-6

7-9

4-6

7-9

80

Operation
70 70
90
90
90

90

20

10-12

1-3

20

2013
10-12

1-3

4-6

7-9

10-12

40
100
20

Source: NSRP-LLC, May 2010

NSRP will subcontract some services (outsourcing). This will also constitute a source of jobs for local and
affected people. Both skilled and unskilled workers will be required as presented in the following tables.

Table 3.46 Need for skilled workers of contractors


No

Occupation

Number (person)

Recruitment plan

Maintenance work

500

Fire Fighting

30

Marine works

20

From March 2012

Clinic

15

From September 2012

From March 2011

Source: NSRP-LLC, May 2010


- Basic Qualifications will be decided by the contractors
- The number hired will be decided by the contractors.
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Table 3.47 Need for unskilled workers of contractors


Occupation

No

Rough Number

Security

30

Canteen

30

House keeping

20

Recruitment plan

From September 2012

Source: NSRP-LLC, May 2010


Note:
- No special qualifications will be required basically
- The number hired will be decided by contractors.

NSRP Project has the potential to create a major significant positive economic impacts on workers
employed during construction as well as their families. This impact will benefit to the local communities
nearby the NSRP Project but will also be extended to other communities in Tinh Gia District, Thanh
Hoa and Nghe An Provinces as well as other regions in Vietnam.
During the construction phase, the Project will create about 20,000 skilled workers and 3,000 unskilled
workers. The construction period will also create a great demand for various services (food,
accommodation, entertainment services, etc.) in order to serve the workers. Local people and APs
could also benefit from this demand by providing these types of services.
In operation phase, NSRP will create 1,000 direct jobs for skilled and unskilled workers. Besides, there
will be 650 indirect jobs through contracts between NSRP and service suppliers.
When the Project comes into operation phase, it will meet more than 40% of total fuel demand of the
country contributing to ensure national energy security and make a foundation for development of
petrochemical industry and other services The Project will contribute to national budget hundreds of
million US dollars every year through taxes.

Support other training programs


NSRP LLC will have partial financial support for some training courses organized by local
authorities through community support activities. The main purpose of the program is to improve
living standard of local community through social projects. The support will be carried out based on
the consultation of local authorities and people. Community support plan may be training, social
activities and contributing to communitys fund.
However, NSRP LLC will not organize training courses for those applying for jobs before
recruitment. NSRP LLC will train only for recruited employees.

3.2.4.5 Land and natural resources


NSEZ has been established in 2006 by a Government Decree to develop the economic potential of
Thanh Hoa Province. NSEZ covers 18,612 ha on 12 communes. The purpose of this economic zone is
to attract more investment projects to the province. Thanh Hoa Province has invested significantly in
NSEZ to develop infrastructures since 2006. The infrastructures comprise traffic-road works, wave
control dykes, deep-water ports, seaport, raw water supply system, resettlement areas, access roads
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etc. Following this Decree, the NSEZ has prepared a Master Plan for the development of the economic
zone including the construction of a Refinery and Petrochemical Complex and port facilities.
NSRP Project will have permanent impacts on the land use, property, and plantations in the Project
Area. Land and natural resource impacts will arise mainly from land take for construction of the refinery
and petrochemical complex (328 ha), the pipeline and road infrastructure (30 ha), and the port facilities
(36 ha), but also from the quarry, borrow pits and disposal area. A total of 394 ha of land will be
required for the Project. Three communes, Hai Yen, Mai Lam and Tinh Hai will be affected by land take.
Agricultural land constitutes the most important land use for these three communes followed by
Forestry land. Land use impacts will affect mostly agriculture, forest planted and residential lands. Key
impacts addressed in this section are therefore:

Loss of agricultural land;


Lost of residential land.

The loss of agricultural and residential lands represents the strongest impacts fell by the affected
population based on the first and the second Stakeholder Meeting and Public Consultation event hold
respectively on 4th and 5th November 2008 and 27th and 28th January 2010 for the NSRP Project. Most
of the mitigation and compensation measures are already implemented by the Government of Vietnam
through Thanh Hoa Province People Committee, Tinh Gia District People Committee and Nghi Son
Economic Zone. Recommendations to reduce the impacts associated with land take have been
proposed in the Due Diligence Resettlement Report (February 2010) and will be summarized in this
section of the EIA Report. Only the remaining significant impacts will be presented in that section since
some of the issues (for example: loss of plantation) have been solved by Tinh Gia District Authorities
and agreed with the affected peoples.
3.2.4.6 Loss of agricultural lands to other uses
Project activities
During the pre-construction phase some agricultural lands have been permanently appropriated for the
Project. This area will be used for permanent infrastructure as plant site, pipeline, accommodation for
workers, storage area.
Permanent agricultural lands (including agriculture, forest, marshes) affected by the Project account for
394 ha which represent 75% of the total affected land by the Project. Farmers will see their annual
income significantly reduced by this land take.
Potential impacts
According to the Due Diligence Resettlement Survey, carried out in August-September 2008 amongst
105 households surveyed and affected by land take for the Plant site; 50% of the households surveyed
have lost more than 60% of their agricultural land, and 36% between 31 and 60%. For 58% of the
Households, the remaining land is too small to be viable. Impacts from loss of agricultural land may
include:

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Loss of annual and perennial crops;


Decrease agricultural production due to decrease of agricultural land.

No other land agricultural lands are available in the same commune or the same district to replace all
the affected farmers. More than 73% (Plant Site) of the affected people have agricultural activities as
their main source on income so the impact on the APs will be very strong. Considering the number of
households affected from the loss of agricultural land by the Project and the importance of this
economic activity on their income, the significance of this impact is significant for the affected farmers.
3.2.4.7 Loss of forestry land
Project activities
During the pre-construction phase, some forestry lands are going to be permanently appropriated for
the Project. Forestry lands affected by the Project are located in three communes Hai Yen, Mai Lam
and Tinh Hai, on Chuot Chu mountains. Forestry lands will serve as borrow pits for the current Project
as well as other industrial projects in NSEZ.
Permanent forestry lands affected by the Project account for 199 ha which represent 20.6% of the total
affected land by the Project. The three affected communes have a total of 800 ha of forest planted
lands. Most of the planted forests belong to public owners as Tinh Gia District Forest Company.
Potential impacts
According to the Due Diligence Resettlement Survey carried out in February 2009 amongst 105
households affected by land take for the Plant site and other infrastructure, only one percent of the
Affected Households have Forestry as their primary source of income and two percent as their
secondary source of income. On the other hand, the three affected communes will lose 25% of their
forestry lands.
Since very few households having forestry land as their primary or secondary incomes have been
affected by the Project, this adverse impact is assessed as significantly minor.
3.2.4.8 Loss of residential land
Project activities
During the pre-construction phase some residential lands are going to be permanently appropriated for
the Project purposes. Residential lands affected by the Project are located mainly in three communes
Hai Yen, Mai Lam and Tinh Hai. Residential lands will mainly be used for the plant site, the marine
facilities and the pipeline.
The three affected communes have a total of 146.6 ha of residential lands. Residential lands affected
by the Project account for 39 ha which represent 8% of the total affected land by the Project.
About 90% of APs in the project area have a LURC (Land Use Right Certificate). Some are still waiting
for the issuance of the LURC. No APs without any rights on their land have been found.

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Potential impacts
According to the Due Diligence Resettlement Report prepared in December 2009, around 2,695 HH
(9,000 persons) will be affected by the project. Among these APs, 687 will lose most of their land and
their main houses and will have to relocate in another location. At the time of the report, clearance
already took place in the plant site and APs have been compensated for their productive land.
Structures were not yet compensated.
Due to the number of households affected by the Project, the significance of this adverse impact is
major.
3.2.4.9 Livelihood activities
Project activities
Project development implies the loss of agricultural, forest planted and residential lands. Construction of
the refinery and petrochemical complex and associated facilities will interrupt the economic activities of
households that reside in the Project area and will be displaced but also for families who utilize land
and resources that will be acquired for NSRP LLC.
Potential impacts
Land clearance for the construction of the refinery and petrochemical complex and associated facilities
will affect 2,695 households (9,000 persons) including the relocation of 687 households that will be
directly affected by economic displacement within the Project area. Most of these households will be
permanently impacted by the Project.
In the project area, the average HH monthly income is around 4,200,000 VND. It is higher than the
average income in the North Central Coast (2,100,000 VND) and for all of Vietnam (3,200,000 VND).
However, from an area to another the household income varies from 2,900,000 to 5,700,000 VND. The
secondary source of income contributes to around one third of the total average HH income.
According to the Department of Labor, Invalids and Social Affairs of Thanh Hoa Province, (DOLISA),
those living in urban areas who earn VND 450,000 per capita per month (around 2,500,000
VND/HH/month) or less are considered poor. In rural areas, the threshold is 350,000 VND per capita
per month (around 1,800,000 VND/HH/month). Average income in all project areas is higher than the
poverty line.
One of the main concerned related to resettlement is the ability of the affected households to reestablish household incomes and livelihoods following economic displacement. Most of the project
affected people are involved in farming (61%) and aquaculture (13%) which represents their main
source of income.
3.2.4.10 Education
Each affected commune has its own primary school. Secondary schools can be found in the district
town (Tinh Gia).

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Within 3 years from the date of handling over the site to the project, all pupils from primary school to
high school who have to move and relocate in the resettlement sites will receive 100% of educational
fees and other contributions. So, impacts on education is considered as minor.
Children whose families resettled have to change their school. This move is affected to their study.
However, from now on, they have more time for study (instead of helping their parents in agricultural
works). Adults will recognize that increasing your knowledge is the best way to find out a job so that
more and more people will take part in vocational courses. NSRP Project is a lever to develop NSEZ
economic therefore NSEZ industrialization develops step by step. Job opportunities are increased
gradually for them to do. Kid gardens, schools and vocational centre will be opened to satisfy their
studying demand.
3.2.4.11 Disruption/Damage to Infrastructure and Services
Project activities
NSRP and its contractors will utilize the existing infrastructure and services present in NSEZ. There will
be heavy vehicles on national, provincial and district roads coming to the Project Site. Most of the
earthworks for site leveling carry out by the NSEZ are on going and will be partly completed when the
NSRP will take over the site.
Potential impacts
Prior to the establishment of the Refinery and Petrochemical Complex, NSRP LLC and its contractors
will need to use local infrastructure and services, especially roads and power lines. Since the Project is
located within NSEZ most of the infrastructure and services are adequate and can be used for such
project.
Disruption of existing infrastructures by the Project will adversely cause short term moderate impact to
the local population as well as industrial activities (Nghi Son Cement Factory) and Nghi Son Port
activities.
3.2.4.12 Gender
In accordance with Vietnams Law on Gender Equality, effective July 2007, and the recent decree for
the implementation of law on gender equality (N70/2008/ND, 4 June 2008), the Project interventions
should contribute to promoting gender equity and opportunities for women.
Constitution and law of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam has defined gender equity is an important part
of social equity. Constitution 1992 has affirmed All male and female citizens have equalitarian right on
every field of politics, economy, society, culture and in the family. All actions of differentiation and
abusiveness dignity to the women are strictly forbidden.
Project activities
In Viet Nam, females are generally responsible for a variety of tasks related to household as children
education, family health, water supply, agricultural activities and income generation.

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According to Due Diligence Resettlement Surveys 2008-2009, no significant differences for the level of
education, between men and women head of households, have been noticed. Most of men and women
have a relatively fair level of education (mainly lower secondary). Few women have been identified as
head of households in the Project area.
At the local level, the focal role of gender is undertaken by the Womens Union (WU), there is
organizational structure operated widely from central to provincial, district, commune and village levels.
The WUs of different levels are authorized to officially represent women's interests and voice in national
and local decision-making processes; it receives regular financial support from the state. Women
among affected HH are strongly involved in the WU: more than 90% of women surveyed are involved in
the WU.
Women in the Project area join in all economic activities (agriculture, aquaculture, salty production and
forestry). Moreover, they are also responsible for housework and breed cattle for home economics.
Potential impacts
There are many job opportunities for local women in the construction phase which contributes to
improve and keep stable income source.
Refinery and Petrochemical Development including associated facilities will result in the residential
relocation (or physical displacement) of 687 households (2,800 people). Most of the relocated
households are located in Mai Lam, Hai Yen and Tinh Hai Communes.
Given their large responsibilities in regard to the family, women will be greatly affected specifically by
the relocation of households.
3.2.4.13 Indirect employment and local procurement opportunities
Project activities
NSRP LLC and its contractors will rely on numerous vendors and service providers to meet the daily
operating needs of the Project and also the domestic needs of its employees. In addition, the Project
will induce secondary/tertiary economic activity due the immigration of people from outside the Project
area who will require housing, food, and other supplies.
Potential impacts
Construction of the NSRP Project will create a range of sustained indirect economic opportunities at
local, provincial and national levels. Local sourcing of goods and services will result in revenues for
local businesses and entrepreneurs, provided they can offer sufficient quality and reliability and can
meet Project standards, particularly on health, safety and environment.
There is a risk that local people could be excluded from direct employment benefits because of low
education and technical skill levels. The recent experience from Nghi Son Cement Factory shows that
very few local workers have been employed permanently at the site. The Socio-economic survey
carried during the Due Diligence Resettlement Survey indicates that more than 70% of the surveyed
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households are interested to find a job in Nghi Son economic zone. In the same time, more than 77% of
the surveyed households want to be trained to get a new job.
The period corresponding to the end of the construction phase and the start of the operation could be
difficult for the local communities since the workforce will be reduced by more than 70%.
3.2.4.14 Fisheries
In coastal communes and Nghi Son peninsula, most of residents are living by fishery (80-90%). The
remaining is salt-making, aquaculture, trading and agriculture. According to the statistical data from
local authorities, total fishing boats along coastal areas is given in 3.48.
Table 3.48 Number of fishing boats of coastal communities
No
1
2
3
4
5

Coastal commune
Hai Thuong
Hai Yen
Hai Ha
Tinh Hai
Nghi Son

Number of boat/ship
52
6
189
44
217

Capacity (HP/unit)
6 12
6
40-90
12
40-90

Source: Commune People Committee, 2009

In Nghi Son commune, there are 479 floating fish-cages (4,780m2) to feed typical fish such as
Lutjanus.sp (Ca Hong), Cephalopholis nigripinnis (ca Mu) and Lutjanidae erythropterus (ca Hanh) are in
Nghi Son sea area.
Potential impact
In the construction phase, the marine construction activities of SPM, crude pipeline, harbor, breakwater,
intake water, outfall system as well dredging activities will significantly reduce fishing areas and disturb
local fishing. The total surface area prohibited for fishing activities is 298 ha at Nghi Son bay. It is noted
that the harbor construction will occupy nearshore fishing ground of local fishermen (see figure below).
In addition, the project shipping activities for the transportation of construction materials, construction
barges at the harbor will increase the shipping density at Nghi Son bay and might interrupt fishing boat
access of local fishermen living in Nghi Son commune. The impact level is assessed as medium.

In operation phase, crude oil offloading at SPM and product exporting at jetties will cause long-term
impact on local fisheries. Crude oil offloading by offshore pipeline takes at least 24 hours and there are
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33 large ships mooring at SPM per year. In case SPM is out of work, crude oil from 300,000 DWT ship
will be transferred to 30,000 DWT ship, then led to the harbor. This activity makes number of vessels in
this area (from SPM to the harbor) more increase.
Appearance of sub-marine constructions such as PLEM and 33.5 km paralleled pipelines may be
affected by anchoring of fishing boats or using illegally mines which usually occur in Nghi Son gulf.
As designed, intake channel with 350m in width and 70m in length is constructed between two
breakwaters. Therefore operation of intake system of the project will not cause any effect to shipping
activities in the area.
The presence of effluent discharge system on the sea bottom at the distance of 6km far from the shore
will not cause effect to shipping activities in the area due to all discharge system is buried under the sea
bottom at suitable depth and only discharge outlets are installed at distance of 1m above sea bottom.
However, the presence of discharge outlets on the sea bed and marine facilities will decrease 193ha
surface water of coastal fishing area.
There is no aquacultural activity at project area and location of fishing cages of Nghi Son commune is
toward to the south about 5-6km far from project area. Therefore, normal operation of marine facilities,
intake and discharge system do not cause effect to aquacultural area.
In the case of oil spill occur, it is potential severe impact to shallow water and fishing activities of Nghi
Son gulf and the vicinity. The unloading crude at SPM and regular product loading at harbour will cause
long tern impact to fishing activity in the area.
At Nghi Son gulf, high density of crude and product tankers going in and out of harbour will disturb local
fishing boats and cause high potential risk of shipping collision between tanker and fishing boats. The
impact level is considered as major and long term.
3.2.4.15 Access restrictions and diversions
Project activities
The Project will require acquisition of land and access roads used by local communities for daily
activities and access to services. Directly affected people will be compensated for the loss of lands,
assets and income related to land acquired for the Project; however there will be restrictions to access
within the project area during the construction activities.
Project construction activities will loss access route connecting from Hai Binh and Tinh Hai to road 513,
causing difficulties for local economic development and job opportunities of Hai Binh and Tinh Hai
people. These areas of the EZ will not be connected to the center of EZ until new road is built to
replace.
Potential impacts
The Project construction activities will result in changes in access routes in Tinh Hai, Hai Yen and Mai
Lam Communes. At least, one of these routes is important for the local population and deserves the
centre of Hai Yen, Tinh Hai and Hai Binh Communes, given also access to the south to Hai Thuong,
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Hai Ha and Nghi Son Communes. This road is also a short cut to reach Tinh Gia Town, the centre of
the district, by reducing the distance by 4 km.
Two earth roads given access to agricultural lands for the local population will also be located within the
Refinery site.
The significance of this adverse impact is major for the local population since they will loss direct
access to the centre of their communes and services (school, health centre), affect economic activities
along the road (businesses) and increase travel distance to get access to their current economic and
social activities. Moreover, it may be quite difficult for the population living north of the Project to get
access rapidly to employment for NSRP Project during the construction.
There is a positive impact to this situation. The traffic in Hai Binh village should be reduced and
especially for heavy vehicle. Road safety should then be indirectly improved in this village.
3.2.4.16 Impact on health
Health Impact Assessment is considered for the workers and community as follows:
Workers who work in projects onshore and offshore
Community living nearby the Project.
Mai Lam, Hai Yen and Tinh Hai communes with around 1,582 households will be affected by the
project. Among these affected persons, about 1,004 households will lose most of their land and their
main houses and will have to relocate in resettlement location. The rest will be impacted by the project
activities during the construction phase,
Project activities
The immigration of thousand of workers for the construction period and construction activities is the
main source of health impacts
Potential impacts
The displacement of those currently living on the site could lead to health impacts associated with
disruption to their communities and the loss of agricultural land and the loss of income. The inward
migration of large numbers of workers and their family into the area are likely to increase the risks of
infectious disease, gastro-intestinal illnesses, injuries, traffic accidents and psychological disorders
including stress. There will also be health impacts associated with the greater demands on the areas
infrastructure and the general increase in affluence. The physical processes of construction and
operation of the Complex will create impacts on traffic, air quality, waste management and water quality
that will in turn result in potential human health impacts.
In the absence of appropriate mitigation, the overall risks to health from infectious diseases are likely to
be significant for both workers and the local community. The proposed mitigation measures to limit the
spread of infection among workers, control vector populations, provide clean water, implement high
standards of food hygiene and address the risks associated with STDs will substantially reduce the
risks to health. The impact of infectious illnesses on the health of some workers and some members of
the local population would still be significant but risks of contracting a serious infectious illness will be
low for most individuals.
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The non-infectious illnesses arising from the Project are likely to include stress, substance abuse,
violence and possible occupational illness. These effects will arise during the construction phase and
continue into the operational phase of the Project, at lesser extend, although the exact effects will
evolve as the workforce and nature of operations change.
Stress, substance abuse and violence are likely to be of greatest importance during the construction
phase. These effects will be largely controlled by planned mitigation measures. Some individuals are
particularly prone to these types of ill health and although the risks of significant effects are minor for
most of the population, they will be moderate for a small proportion of both workers and local residents.
3.2.4.17 Impact on poverty
Project activities
Poverty levels in the Project area are relatively high. According to The Department of Labor, Invalids
and Social Affairs of Thanh Hoa Province, (DOLISA), in 2007, among the 7,704 households in the 5
communes in which there are three effected communes by project, 2,299 (29.3%) are poor households.
The poverty incidence has however decreased from 33% to 29.3% between 2006 and 2007. In the
whole district the poverty incidence was 26% in 2007.
The project is expected to create an average of 22,000 jobs during the construction period and around
33,000 for the peak of the construction period. In addition, the Project will contribute indirectly to create
100,000 jobs in the Project area through business development. These activities will require many unskill workers
Potential impacts
The creation of a large number of jobs during construction activities of the Project should contribute
greatly to the reduction of poverty not only in the affected communes but also in NSEZ (12 communes)
and Tinh Gia District.
3.2.4.18 Economic activities
Project Activities
The Complex will enhance the development of a series other industries such as production of
construction materials, light industry, production of home appliances, transportation, tourism, services,
etc., and will create many kind of jobs for 150,000 to 200,000 jobs during the operation period.
NSRP will rely on numerous vendors and service providers to meet the daily operating needs of the
Project and also the domestic needs of its employees. Project employees will likely enjoy a high income
level which will contribute to the demand for local products and services.
Potential Impacts
The implementation of Refinery and Petrochemical Complex will create a range of sustained indirect
economic opportunities at local, provincial and national levels. Local sourcing of goods and services will
result in revenues for local businesses and entrepreneurs, provided they can offer sufficient quality and
reliability and can meet Project standards, particularly on health, safety and environment.

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In construction phase, the Project will create about 20,000 jobs for skilled workers and 3,000 jobs for
unskilled worker. Local services such as food, entertainment, accommodation will also develop to
supply for demand of these work force. This is an opportunity for local people to change job from
agriculture to industry and other services.
In operation phase, NSRP will create 1,000 direct jobs for skilled and unskilled workers. Besides, there
will be 650 indirect jobs through contracts between NSRP and service suppliers.
In construction and operation phase, NSRP will recruit a number of skilled workers and foreign
engineers for operating the plant. However, the quantity of these employees are limitted to ensure
creating job opportunities for national and local employees. NSRP LLC commits to strictly obey the
Vietnamese labor Law in recruiting project employees and will not recruit non-skilled foreign people for
NSRP.
When the Project comes into operation phase, it will meet more than 40% of total fuel demand of the
country contributing to ensure national energy security and make a foundation for development of
petrochemical industry and other services The Project will contribute to national budget hundreds of
million US dollars every year through taxes.
3.2.4.19 Infrastructure and Service
Project activities
NSRP will utilize the existing infrastructure and services present in NSEZ during the operation.
However, most of the import/export activities will be done through the new harbor facilities. There will
also be additional heavy vehicles on national, provincial and district roads coming to the Project Site
and going to the consumers.
Potential impacts
The Project will aim to result in no reduction in the quality, quantity or availability of existing local
infrastructure. The Refinery and Petrochemical Complex will operate its own power plant as well as
water supply and water treatment system. Moreover, NSRP will operate its own port for product export.
Importation of oil from Kuwait will come directly from the sea through a Single Point Mooring Station
and a pipeline system.
Minor adverse impact is anticipated for the operation period due to the increase of traffic on local roads,
Provincial Road 513 and National Highway 1A.
Improvements to roads and provision of new community infrastructure such as school are expected to
offset any long-term impacts associated with infrastructure and services that may arise from the Project.

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POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL ACCIDENTS CAUSED BY PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION

3.2.5.1 Fire and Explosion


Potential source
Fire & explosion risks including the accidental release of syngas (containing carbon monoxide and
hydrogen), oxygen, methanol, and refinery gases from process operation will cause serious accident,
even catastrophic accidents. Potential sources of fire and explosion of NSRP are identified from as
follows:

Process units: CDU, LPG Recovery and Treatment Unit; KHDS, GOHDS, RHDS, RFCC, PPU,
SHU and Ind Alk, HMU, HCDS, NAC;
Storage Tanks and pumping system;
Fuel gas system;
Berth Area;
Spheres;
Propane loading;
Fuel Gas system.

Potential impacts
Based on the Coarse Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) report for NSRP Refinery and
Petrochemical Complex Project - August 2009 [13] undertaken by ABS Consulting Limited, the
explosion risk to the workers is dependent on the protection afforded by various building as is thus
dependent on building types. All the occupied buildings at this site have very low explosion risk. The
over-pressure results are all lower than the anticipated damage from a 10-4 per year explosion
scenario. Operator Shelter in the Jetty Area falls within the ALARP range for which mitigation should be
considered to reduce the risks to as low as reasonably practicable. All the other occupied buildings are
considered to be exposed to negligible risk from fire and explosion events.
For the buildings at the site, there are a number of buildings at the site that require risk reduction
measures. This includes 13 buildings where risk mitigation must be undertaken and 19 buildings where
risk mitigation should be considered, and implemented as necessary, in order to demonstrate that the
buildings risk status is ALARP. Even though the explosion risk at NSRP is low, it is recommended that
best industrial practice should be used and building classification not be downgraded based on the
results of this risk assessment
For the societal risks, the village is considered to have approximately 320 dwellings with 5 people each
on average. The construction of the dwellings is assumed to be basic, affording little protection from
fire or toxic gas ingress. The F-N curve shows that the societal risks to the village population from the
NSRP are unacceptable (Figure 3.13).

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Figure 3.13 F-N Curve (Road users and villagers)


Notes:

The risk levels in the F-N curve are represented as follows:


- Red Region: Unacceptable;
- Yellow & Green Region: Acceptable according to UK HSE document R2P2 definition;
- Green Region: A conservative acceptability criteria used by some companies.

For the local commune to the East of the site (Area C)


The risk to the village population, both in terms of individual and societal is unacceptable. Assuming
that the site location has been decided, the risk from the NSRP site to the village population are
such that reasonable measures of reducing risks to an acceptable level could be impractical. The
Societal risks can be reduced by reducing the population and reducing the frequency and
magnitude of hazards from the site. However, the risk assessment here does not take account of
the fact that the village is in the middle of wooded area which is susceptible to fire escalation. In
light of this relocation of the village to a safer place should be given a serious consideration.

For the Road to the South of the plant (Area B)


The societal risks, excluding the village to the east (Area C) are shown to within the acceptable
band of values. This implies that the numbers of fatalities at the road from hazards from NSRP site
are not likely to be excessive. However the Individual Risk is greater than the acceptance criteria
for the general population and therefore risk reduction measures should be considered where cost
effective.
The Location Specific Individual Risk (LSIR) shows that the maximum LSIR at the 513 road area is
5x10-3/year. The occupancy ratio considered for the 513 road is 0.006 based on the traffic moving
at 60 km/hour and any one individual traveling twice a day, six days per week across the site on
this road. Therefore, the maximum individual risk at the road is 3x10-5/year which corresponds to
the ALARP region based on the risk tolerability criteria.

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In order to mitigate these risks, NSRP will establish an Emergency Response Plan for different
scenarios and mobilize human resource as well as response equipment to avoid/prevent environmental
risk and societal risks.
When spheres containing LPG and Propylene are in danger, all gases in the spheres will be released
and routed to HC Flare system to burn for safe of the Plant.
3.2.5.2 Toxic gas leakage
Potential source
Potential sources for toxic gas release are from following process units: CDU, SWS, ARU, SRU, RFCC,
GOHDS, KHDS and RHDS unit.
Potential impact
During the operation phase, workers may be exposed to chemical hazards (through inhalation, or
contact with chemical or catalysts). The risk of caustic and chloroethane in process may result in
occupational health for workers such as personnel injury, cancer, odor nuisance, etc. The chemical
hazards during process activities cause Workers occupational health.
Based on Toxic Gas (H2S) Dispersion modeling results for the 150mm hole size run by ABS Consulting
Limited [Ref.13], the ERPG-2 and 3 contours to the Amine Acid gas on the SRU unit considering a
150mm hole size release is presented in Figure 3.14.

Figure 3.14 ERPG-2 and ERPG-3 Contours to the Amine Acid Gas on the SRU Unit
In the case of H2S release at the ERPG-3 on the SRU unit, the health risk distance to project workers is
in the range of plant boundary and Coc Mountain. While at the ERPG-2, health risk distance is over
plant boundary in the range of 1,702m.

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3.2.5.3 Hydrocarbon Spills


Potential source
When project comes into operation phase, offloading crude at SPM, presence of crude pipeline under
sea water, loading refinery products at harbor and shipping activities are the main sources of oil/refined
product spills. Following oil spill scenarios are chosen for oil drift modeling:
1. Oil spill at SPM
2. Crude pipeline interruptive
3. Shipping collision at access channel or at harbor area
During the loading/unloading period the tanker will be connected to only one line, meaning that the bow
of the vessel will normally always point towards the current. This again means that any oil spilled will go
along the hull of the vessel, so any boom formation should be positioned at the stern of the vessel. Also
it is essential to have an assisting vessel stand-by with environmental equipment during
loading/unloading procedure. The stand-by vessel can, by the use of an anchor or similar, deploy some
booms behind the tanker to prevent spreading of the leaked oil. However, a second vessel will normally
be required for emergency oil spill response operation.
Potential impacts
Owing to location of scenario 2 and 3 are very closely to shore and only location of scenario 1 is 33.5
km offshore. So in the case of oil spill occurred, spilled oil will be easy to drift to shore. The detail oil
drift modeling result will be mentioned and discussed in separately OSCP report.
If oil spill occurred at SPM with Tier II, spilled oil might drift as follows:

In Northeast monsoon (October to March), spilled oil will drift to the shoreline of Nghi Son bay
in the first day toward to the south direction (Figure 3.15). All Nghi Son bay will be affected by
spilled oil in the first and second day. Spilled oil might drift to Nghe An shoreline at the forth or
fifth day depending on wind and wave states.

In the Southwest monsoon (May to July), spilled oil will drift toward the vulnerable resources in
Me island and shoreline of Nghi Son bay in the day 1 and then toward to the North (Figure
3.15). Spilled oil may reach shoreline of Ninh Binh after 4-5 days and Thai Binh shoreline after
8-9days with about 60% of remained oil.

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Figure 3.15 Oil drifting in the case of oil spill at SPM in October and July
Figure 3.15 shows that in the case of oil spill occurred at SPM all Nghi Son bay will be affected by oil.
The impact level much depends on oil spill tier and response measures. Generally, the main threat
posed to living resources by the persistent residues of spilled oils is one of physical smothering leading,
in cases of severe contamination, to death through the prevention of normal functions such as feeding,
respiration and movement. Some species affected by contacting with polluted marine water surface, are
organism living at coastal area, coral reef around Me archipelagoes and floating fish cages aquaculture
located in Nghi Son bay.
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The amount of recoverable plants and animals after oil spill incident as well as time for environmental
balancing depend on the point of time that the incident occurring and its recovery level, as well as the
restoring capability of each species. Species has a capability of rapidly reproducing and growing can
repopulate an area rapidly when pre-spill conditions are restored, in contrast with slowly growing
species which can just recover the quantity after many years. Summary of spilled oil to sensitive marine
resource is as follows:

Plankton
When oil spill incident happened, polluted oil can directly impact on planktons due to the different
oil sensitivity of specific species or indirectly affect on a special species. The coastal area is easier
to affect by drifting oil than other areas, in particularly the area where sand and mud are affected by
low tide. While plankton (phytoplankton and zooplankton) living in submerged tidal areas are
capable to suffer unfavourable conditions in a short time. They can die if affecting by toxic oil
compounds or suffocating by oil and emulsions.
This problem will lead to the risk of shortage of natural nutrient resources for aquatic organisms as
well as lacking of important food source for aquacultural area by extensive and improvement
extensive aquacultures. In addition, many algae and zooplanktons, which are very abundant in this
rainy season and used as food for young fishes and shrimps in breeding season, were died or
disappeared.

Larvae, Fish Eggs and Young Fish


Contrary to adult fish, larvae, fish eggs and young fish are very sensitive and vulnerable to oil spill.
An important caution should be taken into account is that if the incident happened in spawning
season of many aquatic species from April to June (Pham Thuoc). At this time, prawn and fish
parents usually come to coastal area, in particularly estuaries for breeding. Thus, polluting oil
causes serious and permanent damages to prawn and fish ecosystem in the region makes
exhaustion the natural post larva and fingerling source in the future.

Benthic
High quantity of suspended solid in water will increase the speed of the oil coagulation and
settlement process. Light refined products containing high quantity of toxic substances can affect to
mussel, sea urchins and sea worms. The penetration of oil into sediments can cause long-term
effects in several years, and is capable to create death and infectious diseases to high economic
value species. Oil settlement process can make benthic suffocating.
When being affected by oil, benthic can loose consciousness so that they are removed out of rock
surface or drift out their caves. At that time, they are easy to become food for predators, or to drift
to unfavourable living conditions areas. The complete recovery of the regular balance can take
many years.

Coral reef
Oil spills from harbour and access channel will cause major impact to coral reefs, since spilled oil
can spread quickly to tidal beaches, floating fish cages and water area surrounding islands. The
magnitude of the damage depends on volume of spilled oil. As result, such accident could kill

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shrimp and fish. Fishing grounds will be lost or fish will migrate to other area due to oil pollution.
Coral reefs and organisms will be serious affected.
In the case of oil spills occurs at pipeline route and SPM in the northeast monsoon, spilled oil will
cause strongly impact to coral reef at Hon Me islands.

Sea-birds
Sea birds living in this area can be affected at locations where oil drifted in large quantity, but
effects will not be serious because almost of sea birds are sea sparrows, a bird species rarely
contact with oil spill on the sea surface.
However, polluting oil can affect to some kinds of bird living at bayside and estuaries such as
storks, herons, etc. because food and the surface are polluted. They would have to eat oil
contaminated food or staving to death when staying at this tainted ecosystem.

3.2.5.4 Ship Collision


It is important to note that the shipping activities at harbor and access channel in construction and
operation phases might cause high risk of ship collision and oil spill. The density of petroleum products
is generally lower than that of water, so in the case of product spillage into the sea; the product itself is
extremely volatile at ambient temperature and always floats on the surface. Since it is quickly dispersed
into the air, the risk of long-term environmental impact to sea water quality will be significant. The detail
oil spreading and assessment will be mentioned in detail in Oil spill Response plan.
3.2.5.5 Pipeline Rupture or Leakage
The main causes of pipeline rupture and leak are corrosion (internal and external), construction
damage, weld failure, incorrect operation, and third damage party like ship anchors and bottom trawls.
Although partly pipelines are generally buried and incidents are relatively rare, they cannot be
considered as fit and forget. Unless inspected and maintained, all pipelines may eventually suffer from
leaks or ruptures. Engineering studies have identified 22 types of threat to the integrity of a pipeline,
which are recognised in the American engineering code. Grouped into nine threat classes, these are:

External Corrosion;
Internal Corrosion;
Third Party Damage;
Stress Corrosion Cracking;
Manufacturing Defects;
Construction Defects;
Equipment Failure;
Incorrect Operation;
Weather Related / Ground Movement.

Some of these threats are considered to be time dependent (for instance, corrosion; a small area of
corrosion could grow over time to cause a failure) while some are time independent (for example, Third
Party Damage; a pipeline being struck by equipment during building construction near an established

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pipeline would be characterized as a random event not dependent of the build-up of a condition over
time).
In the worst case, crude pipeline is broken during unloading crude at SPM. Affected area and impact level are
mentioned in item 3.2.5.3. Response scenarios will be presented in separately report of oil spill response plan.
3.2.5.6 Radioactivity
There are some activities related to radioactivity such as carrying out NDT (Non-destructive Testing) for
tank, bullet, etc. Radioisotopes used by specialist EPC Contractor or Sub-contractors and these
activities may cause hazard to employee and public due to exposure to high level of radiation. Activities
radioactivity detected flaws of materials are RT (Radiographic Testing), PT (Liquid Penetrant Testing),
MT (Magnetic Particle Testing) and UT (Ultrasonic Testing).
Radiation exposure may arise to injury or serious illness to workers during the Construction phase.
Since it is always carried out by trained and skilled employees, the significance of the impact is
considered as moderate.
The recommendations made by NSRP are given to EPC Contractor for Handling and usage in
accordance with Vietnamese Decree No. 50/1998/ND-CP dated July 16, 1998, Vietnamese Standards
(TCVN 6866:2002): Radiation protection Dose limits for radiation workers and public and Circular No.
04/2008/TT-BLDTBXH dated February 27, 2008 guiding procedures for registration and verification of
machines, equipment and supplies subject to strict labour safety requirements.
With handling and usage of radioactivity in accordance with Vietnamese regulatory requirements, the
residual impact of radioactivity during construction phase is assessed as minor.
3.3

EVALUATION OF DETAILED AND CONFIDENCE LEVEL OF THE ASSESSMENT

3.3.1

Determination of impact significance

The assessment considers project-related impacts that are positive, negative, direct, indirect,
cumulative, synergistic, reversible, and irreversible. The significance of an impact depends on the
intrinsic value of the affected ecosystem component(s) (i.e., sensitivity, uniqueness, rareness, and
reversibility) and also on the social, cultural, economic, and aesthetic values attributed to the
component(s) by the population. The significance of impact also depends on whether the affected
environmental components have already undergone modifications. Impact significance has been
established by using the following criteria:

The component is recognised by a law, policy, regulation, or official decision (e.g. a park,
ecological reserve, rare or endangered species, habitat for fauna or flora, archaeological site, or
historical site);
The risks to the health, security, and well-being of the population;
Magnitude of the impact (i.e., spatial dimension such length or area);
Duration of the impact (i.e., temporal aspect and reversibility);
Frequency of the impact (e.g., intermittent occurrence);

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Probability of the impact;


Indirect effect on other components (i.e., link between the affected component and other
components);
Sensitivity or vulnerability of the component;
Uniqueness or rareness of the component;
Durability of the component and the ecosystems;
Value of the component to the community

This methodology considers the intensity of the impact which integrates the degree of perturbation and
environmental value criteria used for determining the intensity and significance of impacts are the
following: The degree of perturbation assesses the magnitude of the modifications brought to the
structural and functional characteristics of the affected component. The environmental value indicates
the relative importance of the project-affected component and reflects both intrinsic and social values.
The significance of impacts considers also the extent of an impact that indicates the distance or relative
area over which an impact will apply and the proportion of the component that will be affected, and the
duration which specifies the temporal dimension of the impact
3.3.2

Assessment Method

Following methods are used for assessment for NSRP project:


1.

Statistical method: is used to treat the environmental analytical data, and the meteo-hydrological
and socio-economic data;

2.

Model method: is used to calculate and stimulate the air emission processes, the wastewater and
the thermal dispersion caused by project activities. Some mathematic models are used for
preparing this report including:

3.

To assess air quality, the Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System (ADMS) from CERC
(Cambridge Environmental Research Consultants) with the UK Meteorological Office,
National Power plc and University of Surrey is used by FWL. The first version of ADMS was
released in 1993 and the current model is ADMS version 4.

To assess thermal effects to Nghi Son Bay seawater, US Environment Protection Agencys
CORMIX model has been used by FWL.

To assess explosion risk to the workers and community, Fire risk (BLEVE) model is used to
predict to affect the neighboring village. Coarse Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) has
been undertaken by ABS Consulting Limited for NSRP Refinery and Petrochemical Complex
Project.

To assess oil spill effect in the Nghi Son bay, an oil drifting model is undertaken by CPSE to
calculate different oil spill scenarios from project marine facilities.

To assess dredged material dumping by used mud and fluid dispersion model of Kverner
Engineering A.S, Environmental Sandefjord, Norway. This model is carried out by CPSE for
maintenance dredged material dumping every 4 years.

Field survey and measurement method: is used to take samples, measure on site and analyze at
the laboratories (air, water, soil, sediment and biology samples) at the project area. Moreover,

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this method is used to survey vegetation cover, take the photographs and interview in the field
trips for colleting the existing environmental and socio-economic situation;
4.

Social investigation method: is used to interview the authorities, departments and local residents
at the project area;

5.

Comparative method: is used to evaluate environmental quality of air, soil, water, sediment, and
biology on the basis of comparison with current Vietnamese and International environmental
standards.

Above methods are used in order to quantify environmental characteristics of the project area as well
as forecast impacts of air emission, wastewater and cooling water discharged to receiving environment.
Confident level of these methods can quantitative evaluate during project implementation.
Almost Environmental impacts and risk assessments for NSRP are quantified by calculating and
modeling based technical data and surveyed studies.

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Section

4.

MITIGATION MEASURES FOR NEGATIVE


IMPACTS, PREVENTION & RESPONSE
ENVIRONMENTAL INCIDENTS
4.1

MITIGATION MEASURES IN FEED DESIGN PHASE

To ensure safety for local community and labour force working in the Plant; create good condition for operation phase
and maintenance process; reduce risk and mitigate negative impacts in case of incident, etc. NSRP-LLC has
considered energy saving technology as well as plot plan philosophy in optimum way and measurements as follows:
Ref. No.

Mitigation measures

1. Apply saving energy technology

FT1

FT2

FT3

FT4

Energy recovery:
Preliminary heater to recover heat from off gas;
Air preheater
Pressure recovery turbine
Low grade heat recovery
CDU pinch analysis
Heat integration
Hot rundown (charge)
Inter-unit integration
Energy conservation equipment
High efficiency H-Ex
Variable speed motor
Others:
LLP off gas recovery system
H2 recovery from off Gas
Apply common facilities

2. Safety
FS1

Plot is planned in accordance with main wind direction. Administrative and control houses are not put at the
downwind direction in comparison with process areas in order to avoid toxic substances generated from these
areas.

FS2

Process units having high temperature and pressure are arranged at centre positions of the Refinery to mitigate
negative impacts on local community.

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Ref. No.

Mitigation measures

FS3

The facilities which need the chemical or catalyst on stream should be located along to the road to be able to access
the vehicle easily.

FS4

Administrative and product export area will be located in front of provincial road 513 in order to transport easily without
passing through the Refinery area.

FS5

Crude oil and product tanks should be located in the North-East direction of the Refinery to reduce pipeline length
between tanks and from SPM/harbour to tanks.

FS6

LPG tank should be located far from process unit to reduce fire & explosion risk.

FS7

Flare systems are designed to burn all maximum amounts of HC and acid gas in case of incident. Height of the flare
is 180m and enough to keep thermal radiation in range of the Refinery in emergency case.

FS8

Road is built around process area for access of fire truck.

3. Environment
FE1

Apply energy saving technology to reduce amount of green house gas.

FE2

Emission gas generated from process units and sphere tanks will be burnt in the flare in order to avoid releasing
directly into environment.

FE3

Guard basin is built to contain maximum effluent for 6 hours fire fighting or wastewater for 24 hours in case of incident
in ETP to reduce negative impacts on environment.

FE4

SPM should locate far from Hon Me island and crude oil pipeline is sited in the North of this island to mitigate impacts
in construction phase and oil leakage.

FE5

Plants will be grown around the Complex and some suitable locations so that green area must be at least 10% of
total Project area in accordance with Vietnamese Standards

4.2

MITIGATION MEASURES FOR ONSHORE FACILITIES (REFINERY AND


PETROCHEMICAL COMPLEX AND SUPPORTED FACILITIES)

4.2.1

Construction Phase

NSRP-LLC has prepared project HSE policy and conducted all mitigation measures during construction
phase to minimize adverse impacts in construction phase on environment and social economic
activities of local people. Mitigation measures for separated objects are shown in following sections.
4.2.1.1 Air Quality
Air & dust emissions during the construction phase will be minimized by implementing the following
measures:
Ref. No.

Mitigation Measures

CA1

Daily water spray road and site of the Complex to reduce dust;

CA2

Usually sweep rock/soil litered in material transport road;

CA3

Introduce a site speed limit (20 km/h) to trucks and other vehicles for reducing dust;

CA4

Well ventilation for working areas created dust and exhausted gas such as welding, paint spraying,
warehouse and supply safety individual equipment suitable for workers as hamlets, masks,
protective clothes

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Ref. No.

Mitigation Measures

CA5

At paint spraying area, workers must be equipped with specific protective clothes, anti-toxic mask
and oxygen cylinder in special case;

CA6

Do not use chemicals containing forbidden substances, such as asbestos;

CA7

Choose worldwide used paint to ensure that VOC content meet national and international
requirements;

CA8

Low sulphur fuels to be used for vehicle;

CA9

On-site roads to be paved with dust free material to reduce dust generation;

CA10

Paving roads between washing facilities and site exits;

CA11

Cover materials of all free dusts during off-site road haulage;

CA12

Road maintenance; grading and compacting road surfaces to prevent uneven running surfaces,
which create both noise and dust;

CA13

Install wheel washing facilities at appropriate positions from the site entrance within site boundary;

CA14

Limit vehicle age and/or condition and vehicle maintenance to reduce fuel use and poor air quality
due to vehicle emissions;

CA15

Routing haul routes away from sensitive areas (schools, protective forest, etc.) wherever possible;

CA16

Ensure that dust generation from construction roads is managed; control conformity of covering
canvas over material transport vehicles, speed limit and water spraying on transport road;

CA17

No open burning of wastes to be undertaken;

CA18

Take proper measures for polishing tank surface to reduce dust problem. Limit use sand spraying
method.

4.2.1.2 Noise and vibration


Noise generated from construction equipments will directly affect to health of construction workers and
nearby communities. Impact level is assessed as moderate but uninterrupted during working process.
The following mitigation measures will be applied:
Ref. No.

Mitigation Measures

CA19

Notify Hai Yen, Mai Lam and Tinh Hai residents prior to commencement of the construction phase.
The notification should include the type of works being undertaken, the duration of the proposed
works and a contact address as necessary;

CA20

Ensure that all Contractors on site have effectively controlled noise levels from equipment. Effective
noise controls include:
Regular inspection and maintenance all vehicles and construction equipment working on-site;
Installation of sound suppressive devices (such as mufflers) on all mechanical plant as
necessary;
Where practicable, vehicles and machinery that are used intermittently should not be left idling
for long periods of time

CA21

Excessively noisy activities will be conducted between 6:00am 18:00pm if they are likely to cause
any nuisance to local residents;

CA22

Equipment used on-site will be the quietest reasonably available;

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Ref. No.

Mitigation Measures

CA23

Equip ear-protection devices for workers at working site.

CA24

Haul routes for construction traffics entering and leaving the site will be selected to ensure noise
levels at noise sensitive receptors are kept at a minimum;

CA25

Enforce speed limits in relation to road conditions and location of sensitive receptors (such as
schools, population areas, etc.);

CA26

The adjacent residents will be notified prior to any noise events or noisy operation outside 6:00am
18:00pm from Monday to Sunday

4.2.1.3 Soil quality


Solid wastes generate from construction activities might cause impact to soil quality. Following
mitigation measures are proposed including:
Ref. No.

Mitigation Measures

CB1

Construction wastes will be handled and disposed of in accordance with Governmental Degree
155/1999/Q-TTg (16/7/1999) on hazardous wastes management regulations.

CB2

Waste storage area should not be located near sewer or outfall system to avoid cause air pollution
and generate odour;

CB3

Temporary storage of wastes at site designated areas. Hazardous wastes to be fully contained and
stored undercover within retention bunds in order to avoid any leakage into the area;
Hazardous solid wastes must be collected to labeled drums named Hazardous wastes and stored in temporary
roofing storage house inside the complex boundary before transfer to treater who has given license of treating
hazardous wastes.

CB4

Provide documentation in detail with dates of delivery and quantities of consignments, as well
as instructions on the safe storage, use, collection and disposal of materials and waste
products prior to transfer to the disposal places in accordance with Governmental Degree
155/1999/Q-TTg (16/7/1999);

CB5

Put waste baskets at each constructional section with at least 3 differrent coloured and labelled
baskets to collect hazardous waste, non-hazardous construction wastes (Iron, steel, wooden ends,
etc) and domestic waste at construction site;

CB6

Restrict access to hazardous waste storage area.

CB7

Minimize generated wastewater and reuse as much as possible. Minimize using Hazardous
chemicals; segregated and stored in secondary containment.

CB8

Conduct refueling in designated area with secondary containment as far as practicable.

CB9

Where in-situ refueling required, follow procedures to reduce spillage.

CB10

Environmental awareness training compulsory for site construction workers.

CB11

Material Safety Data Sheets will be provided for all hazardous materials, in both English and
Vietnamese languages, and stored or displayed in appropriate locations.

CB12

Access to hazardous materials will be restricted and notification of volumes and routine inspections
of storage facilities will be made.

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The waste will be separated into hazardous and non-hazardous:


1. Hazardous wastes
Hazardous wastes generated during construction phase such as: paints, solvent, oil filter end, residue
oil, waste oil, welding rods, etc. will be collected and stored in the special safety drums which are
marked clearly to stringent controls.
Beside, the project owner will strictly control contractor to ensure that collection, transportation and
treatment measure are complied with Vietnam regulation as well as project standard. Detailed
hazardous waste management & treatment of each source during construction phase is summarized in
Table 4.1.
Table 4.1 Hazardous waste management & treatment during construction phase
No.

Waste type

Engine,
Transformer
oil

Waste fuel

Oil filters

Empty
chemical
drums

Waste lube oil

Cooking oil

Estimated
quantity
(Ton/year)

Handling, storage, and


transportation

Treatment and disposal

To be collected in to drums, labeling,


and transfer to designated Hazardous
waste storage area prior to offsite
transportation to approved / licensed
Lube oil recycling agencies.

Hire for used lube oil recycling through


approved /Licensed Lube Oil Recycling
Agencies. Requirements of Basel
Convention to be followed in case of
transboundary movement of wastes.

To be collected in drums/tanker,
labeling and transfer to designated
hazardous waste storage area prior to
offsite disposal to approved Units/
Plants (e.g. cement manufacturer, etc.)
having adequate facilities to utilize
NSRP waste oil/ tarry material/

In-house use or offsite disposal to


approved Units/ Plants (e.g. cement
manufacturer, etc.) having adequate
facilities to utilise NSRP waste oil/ tarry
material/ sludge without causing any
harm to environment

To be collected in to HDPE bags/


drums, labeling, and transfer to
designated Hazardous waste storage
area prior to offsite transportation to
approved / licensed Hazardous waste
treatment and disposal facilities

Appropriate treatment of Hazardous


waste e.g. Incineration, etc., followed by
suitable landfill both through approved/
licensed Waste Management Facility

Labeling, drums to be transferred to


designated hazardous waste storage
area prior to offsite disposal.

In-house use or offsite disposal to


approved Used Drum Handling Facilities
with
adequate
facilities
to
decontaminate drums prior to its further
use

To be collected in to drums, labeling,


and transfer to designated Hazardous
waste storage area prior to offsite
transportation to approved / licensed
Lube oil recycling agencies.

Hire for used lube oil recycling through


approved /Licensed Lube Oil Recycling
Agencies. Requirements of Basel
Convention to be followed in case of
transboundary movement of wastes

12

To be collected in to drums, labeling,


and transfer to designated domestic
waste storage area prior to offsite
transportation to approve / licensed
cooking oil recycling or incineration
agencies.

Hire for used cooking oil recycling


through approved /Licensed Oil
Recycling / incineration Agencies

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No.

Waste type

Dry Batteries
e.g., Li, Cd,
batteries

Lead acid
Batteries/ acid

Medical
/Clinical/ First
aid waste

10

Solvents/
paints/ thinner

Estimated
quantity
(Ton/year)

Handling, storage, and


transportation

Treatment and disposal

<1

Used dry battery waste (Ni, Li, Cd,) to


be separately collected in plastic bag,
labeled and stored in a designated
storage area or Hazardous waste
storage area.

Waste to be disposed to approved


recycling or hazardous waste disposal
facility

Wet/ Lead acid to be separately


collected in puncture resistant plastic
bag / drums, labeled and stored in a
designated storage area or Hazardous
waste storage area

Waste to be disposed to approved Lead


acid battery recycling or hazardous
waste disposal facility

Medical waste to be collected in plastic


bag labeled and sealed. Sharps to be
placed in puncture resistant container
Both container/ bag to be stored under
control of medical staff

Medical waste to be incinerated at


approved medical waste incineration
facilities and incineration ash to be
disposed to the licensed / approved
secured landfill facility.

Paint residue or dried paint/ thinner to


be collected in waste storage
containers/bag, labeled and stored at
designated storage or Hazardous
waste storage area

Waste to be disposed to approved


Hazardous waste disposal facility

Waste to be collected in waste storage


containers/bag, labeled and stored at
designated storage or Hazardous
waste storage area.

Waste to be disposed to approved


Hazardous waste disposal facility

Spill absorbent (contaminated with


hazardous material) waste to be
collected
in
waste
storage
containers/bag, labeled and stored at
Hazardous waste storage area

Waste to be disposed to approved


Hazardous waste disposal facility

10

Contaminated soil waste to be


collected
in
waste
storage
containers/bag, labeled and stored at
Hazardous waste storage area

Waste to be disposed to approved


Hazardous waste disposal facility

residue

11

12

Sealants/
mastic

Spill
absorbents

13

Polluted soil

14

Asbestos
scrap/waste

Asbestos scrap/wastes to be collected


in waste storage containers/bag,
labeled and stored at Hazardous
waste storage area

Waste to be disposed to approved


Hazardous waste disposal facility

15

Used
Fluorescent
tubes

<2

Used fluorescent tube to be collected


in puncture resistant container, labeled
and stored at area designated for its
storage

Waste to be disposed to approved


waste land fill facility

16

Aerosol
containers/
cans

<1

Empty /used aerosol cans to be


collected in a puncture resistant
container, labeled and stored at area
designated for its storage

Waste to be disposed to approved


waste land fill facility

17

Used smoke
ionic detectors

<1

Used smoke detectors to be collected


in a separate container, labeled and
stored at area designated for its
storage

Waste to be disposed to supplier or


through approved smoke detector waste
disposal facility

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No.

18

Waste type
Used
Photocopy
cartridges

19

Oil residue,
cotton waste,
rags, etc.

20

Waste residue
from air
conditioner
/refrigerator

21

22

23

Pigging waste
pipe cleaning

Contaminated
insulation
material

Laboratory
waste

24

Radioactive
waste

25

Chemical
contaminated
PPE

Estimated
quantity
(Ton/year)

Handling, storage, and


transportation

Treatment and disposal

<1

Used cartridge to be collected in a


separate container, labeled and stored
at area designated for its storage

Waste to be disposed to supplier or


approved waste disposal facility

To be collected in to HDPE bags/


drums, labeling, and transfer to
designated Hazardous waste storage
area prior to offsite transportation to
approved / licensed Hazardous waste
treatment and disposal facilities

Appropriate treatment of Hazardous


waste (e.g. Physical, Chemical,
Biological or thermal oxidation, etc.)
followed by suitable landfill both through
approved/ licensed Waste Management
Facility

To be collected in to HDPE bags/


drums, labeling, and transfer to
designated Hazardous waste storage
area prior to offsite transportation to
approved / licensed Hazardous waste
treatment and disposal facilities

Appropriate treatment of Hazardous


waste (e.g. Physical, Chemical,
Biological or thermal oxidation, etc.)
followed by suitable landfill both through
approved/ licensed Waste Management
Facility

To be collected in to HDPE bags/


drums, labeling, and transfer to
designated Hazardous waste storage
area prior to offsite transportation to
approved / licensed Hazardous waste
treatment and disposal facilities

Appropriate treatment of Hazardous


waste (e.g. Physical, Chemical,
Biological or thermal oxidation, etc.)
followed by suitable landfill both through
approved/ licensed Waste Management
Facility

To be collected in to HDPE bags/


drums, labeling, and transfer to
designated Hazardous waste storage
area prior to offsite transportation to
approved / licensed Hazardous waste
treatment and disposal facilities

Appropriate treatment of Hazardous


waste (e.g. Physical, Chemical,
Biological or thermal oxidation, etc.)
followed by suitable landfill both through
approved/ licensed Waste Management
Facility

Laboratory waste to be collected in


separate
puncture
resistant
bags/drums, labeled, and stored at
designated storage facility near
laboratory or at Hazardous waste
storage area

Waste to be disposed to approved


Hazardous waste disposal facility

<1

To be carefully collected in to HDPE


bags/ drums, labeling, and transfer to
designated Isolated radioactive waste
storage area prior to offsite
transportation to approved / licensed
radioactive waste disposal facilities

Used radioactive equipment / waste to


be transported back to supplier for safe
disposal of the radioactive material.
Transportation and disposal to comply
with
national
and
international
requirements pertaining to radioactive
waste management.

12

Used PPE (contaminated with


hazardous material) waste to be
colle