Training Manual

KV-32XBR400

Troubleshooting the DX-1A Chassis
Models: KV-32XBR400 KV-36XBR400 KV-32XBR450 KV-32XBR450 KV-32HS10 KV-36HS10 KV-32HS20 KV-36HS20 KV-32HS30 KV-36HS30

Theory of Operation & Practical Troubleshooting Tips Course: CTV-32

Table of Contents
1. Introduction .......................................1 2. DX-1A Power Supply Troubleshooting ....................................2
Overview................................................................. 2 AC Switching and Standby .................................. 3 The Primary Switching Switching ....................... 4 The Secondary Supply ......................................... 6 Troubleshooting the Main Power Supplies ....... 6

5. High Voltage Converter Troubleshooting ...................................17
Overview................................................................ 17 Troubleshooting High Voltage Shutdown ......... 19 Troubleshooting High Voltage Regulation Errors ................................................. 20

6. Video Circuit Troubleshooting .......22
Overview................................................................ 22 Troubleshooting .................................................... 24 AKB Circuit Troubleshooting .............................. 24

3. Protect Circuit Troubleshooting .....9
Overrview ............................................................... 9

4. Deflection Circuit Troubleshooting ...................................12
Overview................................................................ 12 Horizontal Deflection Troubleshooting .............. 12 Pincushion Correction Circuit Troubleshooting .................................................... 13 Vertical Circuit Troubleshooting ......................... 15

7. CRT Alignment .................................27
Overview................................................................ 27 Beam Landing ...................................................... 27 Geometry............................................................... 28 Convergence Overview....................................... 31

1. Car Power Amplifier

Chapter 1 - Introduction
In July of 2000, Sony introduced a new television chassis design to be incorporated into the KV32/36XBR400 models. The chassis was known as the DX-1A and utilized the WEGA® flat display Trinitron® CRT. Although the WEGA® CRT appeared three years prior to the introduction of this model, the DX-1A chassis introduced some revolutionary design changes that would greatly improve the picture quality. Only the KW34HD1 high definition television was able to exceed the display resolution of the DX1-A The following year, the KV32/36XBR450, KV40XBR700 and KV32/36HS10/20/30 models were introduced. These models still used the DX-1A chassis with some minor add-ons and design changes but the same troubleshooting approaches can be applied across the board. The key circuit responsible for this dramatic increase in picture quality is known as DRC™ (Digital Reality Creation). Its primary function is to up-convert 480i resolution inputs to 960i. By using pattern recognition technology, the jagged edges produced by simple line doubling are greatly minimized. Even the horizontal resolution is virtually doubled by this circuit giving almost 4 times the resolution of a conventional NTSC display. The DX-1A was also the first direct-view model to offer High Scan capability, which allowed the unit to display 480p and 1080i resolutions. 720p resolution is not supported by this chassis. Another new circuit, also introduced, is known as MID™ (Multi-Image Driver). Since the unit scans at a fixed 33.75KHZ horizontal rate, the MID™ is responsible for manipulating 480p and 960i inputs to fit within the 1080i scanned raster. It is also responsible for mixing the various inputs for side-by-side display (known as Twin View™) along with a picture-in-picture capability for viewing the current broadcast of your favorite channels or viewing the content of all programmed channels at once while being able to view the main picture. High voltage and horizontal sweep are generated in separate circuits. This allows for the use of a regulation circuit that maintains high voltage at steady levels to minimize picture size fluctuations and maintain uniform brightness under varying beam current demands. The power supply circuits incorporate major design changes as compared to previous models. Four separate power supplies are used (standby, primary, secondary and high voltage). Although the amount of circuitry is greatly increased, each supply and its individual sections are able to operate independently. Once their operation is understood, they are quite simple to troubleshoot. The purpose of this manual is to review the pertinent circuits of the DX-1A chassis and apply some practical troubleshooting approaches. Any significant changes in the chassis as it evolved will be mentioned. For a more detailed explanation and layout of the circuits and features, refer to the DTV-02 training manual available in PDF format on the Sony service web site. CRT troubleshooting will also be discussed, along with tips on achieving good overall geometry and convergence.

1

2. DX-1A Power Supply Troubleshooting

Chapter 2 - DX-1A Power Supply Troubleshooting
Overview
As illustrated in Figure 2-1, all power requirements for the television are generated by three separate power supplies. The standby supply, located on the A board, is a simple analog design utilizing the AC input to drive a step-down transformer. An unregulated 15V and 7V source is generated along with a regulated 5V source. All of the switched power sources are divided between two relatively identical supplies known as the Primary and Secondary. The Primary supply is located on the A board and the Secondary on the D board. The Primary supply must be operational for the Secondary to function because the Secondary supply requires the PRI PRE 15V source from the Primary. This is very important to know when troubleshooting a dead set. Even though the unit may be displaying the symptoms of a dead set, the Primary supply may be operational and the Secondary may not. Since they are located on separate boards, it becomes necessary to quickly isolate where the problem is. This is very easy to accomplish and will be discussed in the troubleshooting procedures.

STANDBY 5V F6001 6A STANDBY P.S. STANDBY 7V STANDBY 15V IC6007 IC6003 DEGAUSSING CIRCUIT STANDBY 7V D721 S 01 AC OUT CN6013/ 1 2 CN6502 FRONT PANEL POWER (HA BD.) CN7003/
1 3

SOURCE

IC6010

SET 9V SET 5V SET 3.3V SOURCE

DCC COIL DGC COIL

UNREG. STANDBY 5V 11V 7V 5V

STANDBY 15V AC RELAY

D722

Q710

IC701 MAIN uCOM MAIN RELAY

IC6001 PRIMARY POWER SUPPLY PRI PRE 15V

C724 SET ON CN702/ 1 CN6504

POWER ON (HA BD.) CN6005/ CN6501
1

R6006

A BD.

2

5

CN6503

Q6527 RY6501 AC MAIN RELAY D6530

Q6530, Q6532 PROT. LATCH

OVP OCP +135V

AC RECT

D BD.

+200V IC6501 SECONDARY POWER SUPPLY +135V + 15V +24V AUDIO

MAIN RELAY

R6526

SOURCE

FIGURE 2-1 - POWER ON BLOCK

6.1DTV02

1/17/03

2

2. DX-1A Power Supply Troubleshooting

AC Switching and Standby
In Figure 2-2, the standby power supply is shown along with the AC input switching controlled by main relay RY6501. Note the additional relay RY6502. This relay closes about 200 milliseconds after the main relay RY6501 has closed and the Primary power supply begins to output voltages. A 3.3 ohm, 10W, inrush current resistor R6516 is bypassed. This is important to remember when troubleshooting a dead set. During the period RY6502 is open, the voltage drop across R6516 will forward bias D6532, turning on the optical isolator PH6501 and a high is sent to Q6529-B. Turn-on of Q6529 will be delayed by the charging of C6595. If RY6502 remains open for more than three seconds, Q6529 will turn off Q6528 and the oscillator in the Secondary supply will stop. When troubleshooting a dead set, it is very important to know if the in-rush current relay is engaging. If the degauss relay engages, there will be three relays engaging simultaneously, making it difficult to listen for the sound of individual relay clicks. A very effective method is to place the tip of your finger on RY6502 to feel if it is engaging. If the relay is engaging, the Primary supply is starting. It may be starting and then shutting down but the important thing is that the Primary supply is capable of starting up and therefore is not likely to be defective.

F6001 6.3A 250V
2 1

T6001
4

T6002
7

IC6011 STBY 5V STBY 7V STBY 15V D6020

CN6007

VD6001 C6029
1 1 2

8

9

CN6013

CN6502
2 1

D6530 AC RECT.+ R6516 RY6501 PSW(-) CN6503-1 R6528 AC RLY CN6504-1 R6532 Q6530 R6507
2 4

D6532 RY6502 SUB TV R6521 PH6501
1 3

Q6527 R6509

PRI 15V CN6501-5 Q6526 R6508 Q6528-8 VC-SW-2

Q6532 R6527 R6550 + Q6529 C6595

PROTECT CIRCUITS

FIGURE 2-2 - AC SWITCHING AND STANDBY SUPPLY

2CTV32 1549

12/10/02

3

2. DX-1A Power Supply Troubleshooting Troubleshooting
Most problems occurring in the AC input and standby circuits will result in a dead set. Use the following steps to quickly isolate the problem: Listen for a relay click: If any click is heard, the standby supply and microprocessor are probably OK. If no click is heard, observe the timer LED for one-second flashes. If flashing, the standby and microprocessor are OK. It is possible that the CPU is not outputting a relay high command but this is extremely rare. Suspect a defective RY6501 or relay drive circuit. Keep in mind that the main relay must receive a 15V “kick” from Q710 located on the A board (Figure 2-1). The relay is then held ON by standby 7V. If you cannot feel RY6502 engaging, the Primary supply is not operational. If a second click is heard more than 500ms later, the unit is going into protect. This will be covered in Chapter 3. Be careful not to confuse the degauss relay with a shutdown issue. If it engages (the unit has been off for more than 15 minutes), approximately seven seconds will have elapsed. Most protect events occur much sooner. Note: Measurements taken on the 7V standby line will vary from 7V to 12V on different sets that are working properly. Beware that the power switch (S01) on this chassis is a mechanical “push-push”. If the customer turns the unit off with the front panel switch, the remote controller will not be able to turn the unit on since the switch interrupts the standby 7V to the main relay.

The Primary Switching Supply
As mentioned in Chapter 1, the DX-1A chassis utilizes two independent power supplies to generate the necessary switched voltages for the circuits to operate. The Primary supply generates the lower level voltages while the Secondary generates the larger level operating voltages. Figure 2-3 illustrates the Primary switching supply. The Secondary supply is virtually identical and only differs on how it is turned on. It requires a functioning Primary supply to operate. IC6001 is an oscillator/driver IC. Square waves with a 50% duty cycle are output from pins 12 and 16. They are 180 degrees out of phase so that either Q6007 or Q6008 are on at any time. The only aspect that changes is the frequency of the drive pulses and this is how the power supply regulates the output voltages. Q6008 sends unregulated 340VDC through the Primary of T6003. The current exits into C6014 and onto hot ground via R6049 and R6050. When the output phases change from IC6001, Q6008 will turn off and Q6007 turns on. This will dissipate the energy in T6003 Primary and discharge C6014 for the next cycle. Pin 9 of IC6001 monitors the voltage drop across ground return resistors R6049 and R6050 for current monitoring. The normal voltage at pin 9 is zero. If the voltage reaches 0.2V or higher, the oscillator located inside IC6001 will stop. When the unit is turned on, rectified AC voltage is applied to pin 18 of IC6001 through R6059. There is no voltage drop across this resistor so 340VDC will appear at this point. This is the start voltage for IC6001. Another voltage that is crucial for IC6001 to begin operating is V Sense at pin 1. At 120VAC line voltage, approximately 2.7VDC is present here. The main purpose if this monitor line is to protect against low AC voltage. If the AC line voltage falls below 70VAC, the oscillator will stop. This is to protect the switching transistors from overheating since the supply will be operating at low frequency and the transistors will be on for a longer time. If the voltage at pin 1 reaches 8VDC or more, the oscillator will stop. Once IC6001 is driving the output transistors, secondary voltages will begin to develop. D6005 in the secondary will supply 15VDC (VC1) to pin 8 of IC6001 and the power supply will generate its own operating voltage. If this 15VDC voltage is not generated, the oscillator inside IC6001 will start and stop in continuous cycles for 55 seconds and then cease until the unit is re-powered. Note D6009 on the same output of the Secondary winding. This is the 15V source necessary for the Secondary supply to operate. Regulation is accomplished by monitoring the 7V line at IC6002 pin 1, which inverts at its output pin 3. If a rise in the 7V line were to occur, the voltage at IC6002 pin 3 would drop. It is connected to the cathode of the LED in PH6001. This would cause the transistor inside PH600l to pull down pin 2 of IC600l and the response would be an increase in frequency to reduce Secondary voltages. The opposite would occur if the 7V line were to decrease.

4

2. DX-1A Power Supply Troubleshooting

D6012 A BD. T6003 UNREG. 5V SOURCE AC RECT.+ FROM D6530 (D BD.) R6606 0.47 OHMS 340VDC R6059
18

D6013 UNREG. 11V SOURCE Q6008 VGH 16 N CH 160V Q6007 VGL 12 N CH R6043 R6049 C6014 D6011 UNREG. 7V SOURCE R6002 R6010 PRI PRE 15V (D BD.) D6009 D6005

R6007 R6008 VD

R6009

V SENSE
1

VS 15 IC6001 DRIVER MCZ3001D

3V R6011

TIMER VC1 VC2
6 8 10

OCP VB
14

F/B
2

9

C6064

+
1

1.86V D6003 + C6009 PH6001 OPTICAL ISOLATOR

R6050 IC6002 ERROR DET. uPC1093C

R6022 R6029
1

2

3

FIGURE 2-3 - PRIMARY POWER SUPPLY

7.1DTV02

1/17/03

5

2. DX-1A Power Supply Troubleshooting

The Secondary Supply
As mentioned previously, the Secondary supply is essentially the same except for how it is turned on. In Figure 2-4, the same IC is used. The start voltage at pin 18 is not used. The PRI 15V from the Primary supply is applied to pin 8 to immediately place IC6501 in full operating mode. V Sense at pin 1 is still monitored but is also used to determine whether the oscillator will run. A main relay high from IC701 pin 72 (not to be confused with AC RLY) turns on the LED inside PH6503 and its output at pin 3 turns on Q6528. This turns off Q6503 and allows the V Sense line at pin 1 of IC6502 to rise to its normal sensing voltage. With the V Sense line operational and 15VDC present at VC1 pin8, the Secondary oscillator will operate and supply the remainder of the voltages needed for the unit to operate. The only difference other than how the Secondary is turned on is the voltage that is monitored for regulation, which is the 135V line.
D6530 T6501 PIT GND AU + 24 TO AUDIO D6516 AC PRIMARY POWER SUPPLY DC
18

AC

R6526 0.1 OHM R6646 NO CONNECTION Q6507

D6515 N CH R6533 D6517 D6513

R6513
1

VD VGH 16 V SENSE

+200V SOURCE TO HV

Q6503 N R6504 R6552 OFF R6517 STANDBY 5V
1

VS 15 Q6506

R6598 135V SOURCE

Q6528 N

PH6503 3 OPTICAL ON ISOLATOR
2

VGL 12 IC6501 DRIVER MCZ3001D OCP 9 V B 14

N CH R6535 R6501 R6556 D6502 C6532 D6514
1

- 15V SOURCE + 15V SOURCE R6590
1

R6557

MAIN RELAY FROM MAIN uCOM IC701/72 (A BD.)

ON

Q6531 N VC2 10 F/B 2
8

4

PH6502 OPTICAL ISOLATOR

2

IC6503 CONTROL 4 DM-58
5

VC1

PRI PRE 15V CN6005/6 (A BD.)

START D BD.

FIGURE 2-4 - SECONDARY POWER SUPPLY

8.1DTV02

1/17/03

Troubleshooting the Main Power Supplies
As you can see, this power supply design is quite different from past Sony televisions. Previous types required that the switching transistors generate their own feedback to sustain oscillation. The oscillator/driver IC is capable of generating drive pulses without the need for feedback as long as 15VDC is present at pin 8 and the V Sense line voltage is within the proper range. The use of FET transistors provides for the ability to withstand rather large current spikes and greater immunity from thermal runaway. The over-current monitoring at pin 9 reacts quickly to this and shuts the oscillator down before damage can occur. If any of the secondary lines are shorted, the power supply will usually start up and immediately go into shutdown, unlike previous designs where the switching transistors would fail. Bear in mind that these switching transistors can fail due to dead shorts on the secondary lines. Regulator IC5008 located on the D board is known to fail and short the switching transistors in the Secondary supply by loading the +15V line.

6

2. DX-1A Power Supply Troubleshooting
The use of a variac in troubleshooting this power supply is not recommended except in cases where AC current must be determined for shutdown troubleshooting purposes. The oscillator will not even attempt to start unless the AC input voltage is above 70VAC. The power supply is able to generate full secondary voltages at this rate so it makes the use of a variac unnecessary. The following troubleshooting approaches are explained using the Primary supply. Secondary supply troubleshooting is identical and one only needs to substitute the corresponding component numbers. Troubleshooting a dead set: Once the standby supply and main relay have been ruled out by using the methods described earlier in this chapter, it is necessary to determine whether the Primary supply is functioning since the Secondary will not start without it. A simple check can be done to determine this. Since the Primary supply generates the SUB 7V source for the in-rush current relay RY6502, feeling the relay to determine if it is turning on is a very effective and time saving procedure. If the relay is engaging, the main supply is starting up. There is a possibility the main supply is starting and then shutting down. Monitoring AC current draw during this event will help determine if a legitimate over-current condition exists. Any readings in excess of 1A points to excessive current draw. Don’t forget to unplug the degauss coils when doing this. Note: Any time a second relay click is heard more than 500ms later, the unit is going into protect and the main relay is being latched off. This will be covered in Chapter 3. RY6502 not engaging: The Primary supply is not working. Since the unit is displaying symptoms of a dead set, it can be assumed the fault is not due to the in-rush relay protect circuit since this takes several seconds to engage and you will hear high voltage momentarily. Check for the presence of B+ at Q6008-D. An open fuse resistor R6606 will cause this symptom. Check Q6007 and Q6008 if the fuse is open. If B+ is present, check pin 18 for 340VDC and pin 1 for a voltage between 2.5VDC and 8VDC. If either is incorrect, look for open or increased value resistors. If pin 1 and 18 check OK, read the DC voltage at Q6008-G. It should be 160VDC ± 10V. If IC6001 has failed, either no voltage or a substantially lower voltage will be present. Failures in this IC have occurred and approximately 30VDC is read. If 160VDC or greater is read, check the drive pulse between Q6007 and Q6008 with an oscilloscope. If a 300VPP or greater signal is present, C6014 or the ground return resistors are open. RY6502 is engaging: If an AC current reading of 100 ~ 200ma is read, the Primary supply is probably OK. A simple check of any of the secondary voltages of the Primary supply will verify this. If OK, the Secondary supply is not running. Start by checking for 15VDC at pin 8 of IC6501 to make sure the PRI 15V is making it there from the Primary supply. Troubleshooting the remainder of the Secondary supply is the same as that described above for the Primary supply. Regulation problems: Since regulation is maintained by a closed feedback loop, isolating whether the failure is in the loop or the power supply is necessary. Since the error input at pin 2 of the Primary and Secondary oscillator IC is a varying DC voltage, isolation is quite simple. Regulation problems generally fall into two categories: Insufficient voltage or excessive voltage. The latter will cause the unit to go into protect mode. Excessive B+: The 7V source in the Primary supply and the 135V source in the Secondary supply are monitored for excessive voltage. Both lines are monitored by the main CPU at the same input. A failure in either one will cause the unit to shut down and flash the timer LED in sequences of three. It is simply a matter of reading both of these voltages to determine which one is at fault, if any. It is possible for the protect circuit to fail and cause a false shutdown. Assuming one of the sources is excessive, the regulation feedback loop can be easily tested. A failure of the 7V source in the Primary supply will be used as an example. The same procedure can be used in the Secondary supply. Looking back at Figure 2-3, IC6002 monitors the 7V line. Any increase will cause the voltage at pin 3 to rise. IC6002 acts as an inverter, so pin 3 will drop in voltage. PH6001 does not invert. Therefore, any drop in the voltage at pin 2 will cause a drop in output voltage at pin 1 going to pin 2 of IC6001. The lower this voltage goes, the higher the oscillator frequency will go, thus reducing secondary voltages.

7

2. DX-1A Power Supply Troubleshooting
By grounding pin 3 of IC6002, a quick analysis of the feedback loop can be done. If done on a normal working set, the 7V line would drop to around 5V. If the over-voltage problem goes away, it is now known that the fault lies around IC6002. Since this IC is very reliable, an increase in value of one or both of the input resistors (R6022 and R6029) is more likely. If the excessive voltage still exists, PH6001 or IC6001 may be at fault. Grounding pin2 of IC6001 will isolate the fault. A drop in voltage would indicate a faulty PH6001. A 470O resistor, R6047, connects pin 1 of PH6001 to pin 2 of the oscillator IC and should be checked. This is not shown in Figure 2-3. Low B+: This symptom is not common and it is even less likely to be caused by the regulation loop. Measure the voltage at pin 2 of IC6001. A normal voltage reading should be around 1.86V. If the voltage is significantly higher, the regulation loop is properly responding to the low voltage condition and telling the oscillator to drop in frequency. Either the oscillator is off frequency or there is insufficient drive coupling to T6003. Check the frequency of the drive pulses. Normal operating frequency is 80-85KHZ. If the frequency is significantly higher, replace IC6001. If the frequency is significantly lower, the IC is trying to raise the secondary voltages. Check C6014 for a decrease in value, as this capacitor is known for causing this symptom. If the voltage at pin 2 of IC6001 is lower than 1.8V, the regulation loop is causing the problem. Measure the DC voltage at IC6002 pin 3. It should read 2.5V. If less than 2.5V, PH6001 is defective. If more than 2.5 V, IC6002 is at fault. Shorted switching transistors: The circuit design protects the switching transistors very well. The oscillator has an extremely robust soft start circuit by raising the frequency to 200KHZ at turn on and dropping to approximately 85KHZ under normal operation. This reduces initial current by 50%. The OCP monitoring at pin 9 of IC6001 is also fast reacting, stopping the oscillator immediately at any sign of excessive current. If one or both of the transistors are shorted, line transients could have been the cause. Before starting the set with new switching transistors, take a careful look at the coupling capacitor, C6014, on the return side of T6003 primary. If this coupling capacitor leaks, there may be a crack on the top to indicate this and the new transistors will fail immediately if this is missed. It will be C6532 if you are working on the Secondary supply. Check for shorted secondary lines. Watch for a shorted IC5008 on the D board if the Secondary switching transistors have failed. If the Primary or Secondary switching transistors have failed and line transients are suspected, it is important to determine if the oscillator/driver IC(s) have also been damaged. There is a simple test to determine this. Remove the shorted switching transistors. If the failure has occurred in the Primary supply, place an oscilloscope probe on pin 16 of IC6001. Fuse resistor R6006 will be open and must be replaced or temporarily jumped with a resistor near its value. Power the unit up. You should see the oscillator starting and stopping in two-second intervals. This event will occur for about 55 seconds and then stop. If no oscillation is seen, check pin 18 for 300VDC and pin 1 for at least 2.4VDC and no more than 8VDC. If normal voltages are present, IC6001 has likely failed. The same test can be performed on the Secondary supply. If both the Primary and Secondary switching transistors have failed, you will need to supply an external 15V source to pin 8 of IC6501. In this case, the oscillator will run continuously since this supply does not use a startup voltage at pin 18 of the IC.

8

3. Protect Circuit Troubleshooting

Chapter 3 - Protect Circuit Troubleshooting
Overview
The DX-1A chassis monitors nine different circuits as part of its protection/ diagnostics feature. Of the nine, seven are monitored by the diagnostics circuits located inside the Main Microcomputer IC1701. AKB and WDT are not protection circuits. They are merely indicators of a malfunction. All but WDT will shut the unit down if a problem is detected. One unique change in the protection circuits of this chassis is the ability of an AKB error to shut the unit down. This will be discussed in Chapter 6. Two other protect lines are capable of shutting the unit down but have no ties to the diagnostics to indicate where the problem is. Most troubleshooting will involve using the flashing timer LED since the unit will shut down under most conditions. Any diagnostics events will be stored into NVM (non-volatile memory) and is useful for troubleshooting intermittent problems. The diagnostics page can be accessed by pressing the following buttons on the remote control in sequence: “DISPLAY’, “5”, “VOL-”, “POWER”. The following should appear on the screen: Self Check: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7. 8: +B OCP +B OVP V Stop AKB Low B H STOP WDT 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

The numbers on the left indicate how many times the timer LED flashed, which designates the probable cause of the event. The flashes on the LED will occur at one second intervals, followed by a three second separation period and repeat again. The numbers at the extreme right indicate how many times the problem occurred up to 99 events. You can see why this is beneficial for intermittent troubleshooting. It is always a good idea to clear the events before exiting and that can be done by pressing “8” “enter” on the remote. This is not the same as pressing these buttons in the service mode. It will only clear the events and not reset customer defaults. Beware that the service manual instructs you to enter the service mode to clear these and that is a mistake. You can do it right from this screen. Figure 3-1 illustrates a block diagram of the diagnostics circuits. A brief description of each event and the possible causes are listed below. +B OCP: Excessive current on the 135V line. In most televisions, this would clearly indicate potential problems in the high voltage/horizontal sweep circuits. However, in the DX-1A chassis, horizontal sweep and high voltage are generated in separate circuits. The high voltage stage has its own regulated power supply that is virtually identical to the ones found in the main primary and secondary supplies, but it uses the 200V source. The 135V source is dedicated to the horizontal sweep circuits only. A shorted horizontal output transistor Q5030, would trip the OCP circuit in the secondary supply, producing no diagnostics indicators and possibly damaging the switching transistors. The horizontal stage does generate the 200V CRT cathode bias along with the CRT filament voltage. Barring any problems in the horizontal deflection yoke, it would be likely that the problem lies in this area with the scan-derived 200V line being excessively loaded by a CRT driver.

9

3. Protect Circuit Troubleshooting
+B OVP: Another unique aspect of the DX-1A chassis is that two voltages are monitored by this circuit: The regulated 135V line from the secondary supply and the regulated 7V line from the primary. A quick check of these voltages at startup with a peak-hold DVM or DC-coupled oscilloscope is a quick way to isolate the source. V Stop: The vertical deflection circuit has stopped operating. This circuit is indirectly monitored by IC1701 via the I²C data line bus from video processor IC201 and will be covered in chapter 4. AKB: This is not a protect circuit. It is only an indicator that one or more CRT cathodes are unable to generate sufficient current to return a good feedback pulse. The AKB detect circuit may also have failed. It is common to see multiple events in this diagnostic feature along with registered HV failures. One of the unique features in the DX-1A chassis is the unit will actually shut down if an AKB event occurs. See the special section in Chapter 7 on AKB troubleshooting later in this manual. Low B: The regulated 5V source from the primary power supply located on the A board is monitored for low voltage. H Stop: Horizontal deflection has failed. Since the unit has a separate high voltage circuit, the set will shut down to protect the CRT. IC201 is also responsible for monitoring this and notifying IC1701. This will be covered in Chapter 4. WDT: This circuit is also not part of the protection for the set. It stands for “Watchdog Timer”. IC1701 contains a circuit that monitors data activity and if none is present for a certain period (101 seconds is assumed since the diagnostic page lists that number). Although a load on the clock or data line of the bus could cause this; other symptoms are usually present when this happens with a vertical failure being the most common. It is possible to see multiple events of this being displayed on the diagnostics screen in conjunction with vertical failures registered. The diagnostics page cannot be displayed if a constant data line problem exists because the CPU will not output OSD under these conditions. Non-registered Protection Circuits: As seen in Figure 3-1, Q8009, located on the D board, monitors the 200V line supplying the high voltage regulator for excessive current draw. A very important point to remember is, although it is labeled “200V OCP” on the schematic, it can also be turned on by excessive high voltage and/or flyback ABL current. Use of an AC amp meter is important to determine whether excessive high voltage or current is the cause if this line is causing the shutdown. It will not generate diagnostics indications. Details of this circuit will be covered in Chapter 5.

Very Important Note: Try not to become too dependent on the self-diagnostics in this chassis. They may not be reliable. As an example: Almost any over-current condition will cause the timer LED to blink six times, indicating a LOWB error. Even a failure of horizontal sweep will not produce the necessary seven blinks. For some reason the main µcom IC detects the loss of SW5V from the primary supply before the actual problem is detected. This situation also occurred in the RA-6 projection chassis. Try to approach troubleshooting in a more conventional manner and use the self-diagnostics as a secondary tool. Check the Sony Service web site (http://service.sel.sony.com) for up-to-date bulletins on shutdown issues.

10

3. Protect Circuit Troubleshooting

D BD.

UNREG. 3X 7V OVP

STANDBY LED

UNREG. 7V C BD. IC6007 5V REG. LOW B OCP 6X RGB TO CRT CN202/ CN9001
8

3X

+135V OVP D6018
7

D6017

SET 5V

2X

+135V OCP
8

0X Q8009 +200V OCP (HV)

0X POWER OFF LATCH D BOARD

CN6506/ CN703

IC701 MAIN uCOM

DATA/ CLK

IC201 Y/C CRT DRIVE

5X

IK SIGNAL WHITE BAL FAILURE V OUT LOSS H OUT OCP

7

4X
8

OSD RGB

1

CN203/ CN5505

7X

CN6504/ CN702 AC RELAY ON/OFF

D BD.

X

NUMBER OF TIMES THE STANDBY LIGHT BLINKS AFTER SHUTDOWN
10.1DTV02 10/4/00

FIGURE 3-1 - SELF-DIAGNOSTIC BLOCK

11

4. Deflection Circuit Troubleshooting

Chapter 4 - Deflection Circuit Troubleshooting
Overview
Since the DX-1A chassis generates high voltage in a separate circuit, failures in the horizontal sweep circuit should occur less frequently than in sets where the flyback is integrated. The vertical deflection circuit design is a carryover design from previous models. The horizontal deflection circuit is similar to those found in many televisions with the exception of a flyback transformer. It also incorporates a new pincushion correction design. Pincushion circuit failures can be quite frustrating at times but once there is a good understanding of its operation, practical approaches can be applied to isolate the cause. This will be covered in a separate section later in this chapter.

Horizontal Deflection Troubleshooting
As illustrated in Figure 4-1, the horizontal sweep circuit receives its drive pulses from IC201, located on the A board. What was once called the Y/C Jungle IC is now called the Y/C CRT Drive, but it functions in much the same way. Horizontal driver Q5028 switches a step-down transformer T5002 to provide adequate B-E current for the horizontal output Q5030. Rather than driving a flyback transformer, HOT T5001 is used along with the conventional horizontal deflection yoke. T5001 generates the 200V cathode bias for the CRT along with filament voltage. This is where shorts are most likely to occur, possibly damaging Q5030. In most cases the 135V over-current protect circuit will activate. Other possibilities include problems in the deflection yoke (rare) or a shorted winding in T5001. The switching power supplies used in earlier Sony televisions allowed for running the power supply at low AC levels with the main relay jumped but cannot be done in this chassis. Ringing T5001 with a SINE wave oscillator can be done to check for shorted windings but it must be remembered that this horizontal circuit is tuned to operate at 33.750KHZ. As of the writing of this manual, this circuit has been reliable and any failures of Q5030 have been due to failure of the transistor itself. One item to note in the lower right corner of Figure 4-1 are the horizontal pulses generated by Q5030. One of the destinations of these pulses is the high voltage circuit. The absence of H pulses will not allow the high voltage circuit to operate and are supposed to cause the unit to go into protect with the timer LED flashing seven times. Tests on this circuit have produced some interesting results, however. If the horizontal output transistor Q5030 loses operating voltage or the base drive pulse, the high voltage will remain on and the unit will scan a picture approximately two to three inches in width and will not go into protect. For some reason, Q5030 is able to generate 7VPP of horizontal output pulses and this is still enough to allow the HV to remain on and keep the protect circuit from engaging. If Q5030 shorts (opening fuse resistor R5013), the H protect circuit will engage.

12

4. Deflection Circuit Troubleshooting
MAIN 9V MID HS IC3413/4 SYNC SW. (B BD.) A BD. AFC-PLS Q5030/C H. PROT IC701/44 Y/C (A BC.) Q5004 OCP X201
61 55 33

HD IC201 39 Y/C CRT 40 DRIVE Q211 CXA2150Q
47 37

CN203/ CN5505
2

Q5035, Q5036, Q5026-7 H DRIVE

MAIN 12V

RGB VIDEO OUTPUT (C BD.) Q5016 200V REG. D5013

7

CN201/ CN5503

E/W DRIVE

135V IC5002, Q5003, Q5011 PWM CIRCUIT 102V
1 2

CRT HEATER T5001 HOT R5096 D5015
8

HOT C5035 100

+

+135V R5013 R5095
7 6

IC5006 6V REG. D5014

D5024

T5002 HDT R5142-4 N CH D BD.

Q5030 H OUT C5058 N

R5094

D5012 H DY

G2 TO C BD.

R5164 D5025

D5023 C5059 C5060 D5018 50V

Q5028 DRIVER

UNREG. 7V (A BD.) AFC-PLS TO: IC8001/8 HV CONV. IC5511/19 DQP CONT. IC5513/14 DY-CONV. IC201/39 Y/C CRT DRIVE
14DTV02 1/16/03

FIGURE 4-1 - HORIZONTAL DRIVE

Pincushion Correction Circuit Troubleshooting
In Figure 4-2, the circuits responsible for horizontal pincushion correction are shown. The DX-1A chassis utilizes two separate circuits to accomplish this. A PWM circuit controls the voltage level to horizontal output Q5003 via horizontal output transformer T5001. Additional pincushion correction is obtained by controlling the amount of ground return current of the horizontal deflection yoke through S-Correction transistor Q5031. This circuit is also controlled by a PWM circuit. IC5002 is a traditional PWM generating circuit. Horizontal drive pulses (used by H drive Q5028) are shaped into a SAW tooth reference signal and are applied to pin 6 of IC5002. A vertical-rate parabola signal, known as E/W, sources from IC201 pin 47 on the A board and is sent through IC5007 to be applied to pin 5 of IC5002. This will control the amount of time pin 7 of IC5002 goes high. The higher the parabola signal, the longer pin 5 of IC5002 will exceed the reference SAW tooth level at pin 6, thus, providing more voltage at the center of the vertical sweep duration and increased horizontal width. Control of yoke current return is accomplished in much the same way. IC5007 receives a reference SAW tooth waveform, also timed by the horizontal drive signal. Another vertical-rate parabola signal labeled as MPIN is applied to IC5007 pin 7. The level is this signal is controlled by the MPIN adjustment in category CXA2150D-2, items #3 and 4. The E/W signal for H output PWM is controlled by items #5 through 13 and is important to know when troubleshooting pincushion problems.

13

4. Deflection Circuit Troubleshooting
Most pincushion circuit failures manifest themselves as a complete loss of correction and will appear with insufficient or excessive horizontal width. All amplitude and phasing of both the PIN and S-Correction signal are controlled and processed by main µcom IC701 and video processor IC201. Losses, level changes and/or phase problems do not occur in these areas often and will usually not cause dramatic changes in picture width. Failures are most likely to occur in the circuits that amplify this correction signal. If the picture displays insufficient or excessive width and bowed-in sides, the following techniques can be applied:
12V IC5002
3 2

R5044 H DRIVE Q5026 R5042 EW IC201 PIN 47

Q5011 SAW
1

12V Q5001 IC5002

135V

+ – IC5001

R5013
6 5

– +

7

Q5003 PWM OUT

6 5

– +

7

Q5002 R5065 R5064 200V HEATER

9V Q5021 H PULSE MPIN IC201 PIN 45

R5017 R5005 Q5023 SAW
6 7

R5063 12V FROM T5002 HDT

Q5030 H OUT N

T5001 HOT

R5116 C5049

C5058 C5059

– + IC5007

1

H PULSE Q5037 Q5019 Q5031 S-COR Q5020 C5065 L305 HLC CN5002 C5060
1 2 3 4

HDY+ HDY-

R5161

FIGURE 4-2 - PINCUSHION CORRECTION

4CTV32 1558

12/23/02

Pin distortion with excessive width: Barring a shorted pin output transistor, this symptom can be troublesome at times for many technicians. Something is causing the output transistor to go into saturation and can be due to a loss of signal or a shorted/saturated device in the drive process circuits. What complicates this matter in the DX1-A chassis is the use of pin correction by voltage control to the horizontal output and the horizontal DY return. Isolation of these two circuits is the first critical step. Again, the assumption is that Q5003 or Q5031 are not shorted since technicians can locate this problem rather quickly with an ohmmeter. If the pin distortion is severe, the failure is likely in the PWM circuit controlling the voltage to Q5030 H out. Measuring the DC voltage at the collector of H out Q5030 is a good starting point. Since a majority of the correction is being done at this stage, the voltage should be slightly lower (by 2 to 3 volts) than the 135V B+ source. If the voltage is at B+ level, PIN out Q5003 is saturated. A good troubleshooting rule is to avoid “walking” through a circuit and checking components one at a time. PWM generator IC5002 should be checked next. Unless an operational amplifier is being used as a logic switch, the DC input and output voltages are usually not close to the supply voltage(s). In this case, IC5002 has a rail of 12VDC and ground. Either one of these potentials at the input and/or output indicates a problem. If the voltages at both inputs (in this case 3.7 and

14

4. Deflection Circuit Troubleshooting
2.3VDC respectively) and the output is either 12VDC or zero, either the IC has failed or amplifier Q5001 or highspeed turnoff Q5002 is either pulling up or loading down the output of the IC. If the SAW tooth reference waveform is lost at inverting input pin 6, IC5002 would output 12VDC and generate the wide picture with pin distortion. Any voltages near the supply voltage or ground potential indicate shorted buffers or amplifiers to that input or problems with the pull-up resistors or supply voltage. Minor to moderate pin distortion with excessive width could be caused by the S-Correction circuit and would be the area to check if the voltage at Q5030 is less than 135VDC. This is easily checked by grounding the gate of Q5031 and observing the reaction on the screen. If normal horizontal size is restored, the failure lies in the PWM amplifier stage of this circuit and the troubleshooting procedures mentioned above for the horizontal output PWM stage are the same. Pin distortion with insufficient width: Once again, check the voltage at the collector of Q5030. If it is lower than 132VDC, the PWM circuit at IC5002 is probably at fault. If it near 132VDC, the S-Correction circuit may be the cause.

Vertical Circuit Troubleshooting
The vertical circuit illustrated in Figure 4-3 is a design that has been used in Sony televisions for many years. IC201 on the A board generates a differential ± V drive to pins 1 and 7 of IC5004. Since vertical drive is sent from the A board to the D board, it is necessary to eliminate any common noise interference that might affect linearity. The use of an operational amplifier within IC5004 and negative feedback from the vertical deflection yoke return provides for a stable amplifier and near flawless linear operation. A ±15V supply rail powers IC5004 at pins 2 and 6. Pin 5 supplies drive to the VDY+. The return path to ground for VDY- is via R5046, R5052 and TH5001. A 1VPP vertical-rate SAW waveform is returned to the inverting input of IC 5004 pin 1 to control the gain of the amplifier. This waveform is also sent to IC201/pin 35 on the A board for vertical sweep loss protection. The unit will go into protect shutdown if this waveform is not present and the timer LED will blink in sequences of four. +15V to pin 6 passes through D5002. This isolates the +15V line during the retrace periods when the voltage at pin 6 spikes to +30 volts. During retrace, IC5004/pin 3 outputs a +30 volt spike that is coupled to pin 6 by C5019. This provides an additional current boost to the VDY and eliminates fold-over.
+15V

D5002

R5023

Q5005 VFBP TO MID

C5019 +
2 6 3

CN5503 FROM IC201
3 4

VDRV+ VDRV-

7 1 4

+ -

IC5004
5

L5001

CN5002
6 5

VDY+ VDY-

R5029 V PROTECT CN5505 PIN 7 -15V

R5053

R5127

TH5001

R5046

R5052

FIGURE 4-3 - VERTICAL DEFLECTION 15

4.3CTV32

1/23/03

4. Deflection Circuit Troubleshooting
No vertical deflection: It has always been common sense to suspect a shorted vertical output IC with this symptom. What makes this chassis unique is that the ±15V lines from the secondary supply are not fuseprotected in any way. There are no fuse links or resistors; even at the vertical output IC. The new power supply design in this chassis utilizes a soft start circuit that reduces initial current draw by 50% and the over-current protect is able to stop the power supply oscillator fast enough to prevent switching IC damage. Therefore, a shorted vertical drive IC5004 will not produce the usual diagnostics failure of four blinks of the timer LED. The unit will go into over-current shutdown without diagnostic indicators. If self-diagnostics indicates a vertical failure, the problem is not likely caused by a shorted vertical output IC. IC5004 may be defective, the vertical drive may be inoperative due to an open yoke or bad solder connections, or the vertical drive is not getting to the output IC. Checking pins 1 and 7 of IC5004 for a momentary burst of vertical drive before the unit shuts down is a practical method of determining if IC201 is able to generate vertical drive. If a momentary burst of vertical is observed on both pins, the failure lies in the output circuits. If not, IC201 is at fault. Hint: So far the most likely component to cause vertical failures is IC5008 on the D board. Main 5V from this IC is routed to IC201 on the A board. IC201 requires main 9V and 5V to operate. The loss of this 5V source causes IC201 to not output vertical drive. Many vertical output ICs have been replaced first without performing a few simple checks. Vertical size and/or linearity problems: Due to the design of the vertical output stage, problems of this sort are rare. Many technicians will read the ±15V lines. Bear in mind that although these lines come from a regulated power supply (in this case the secondary supply), the 135V line is monitored and kept stable. Any changes in current demand on this line will cause fluctuations in the oscillator frequency and, hence, fluctuations in the other lines. If the ±15V lines read 2 or 3 volts low, this is OK. The negative feedback feature of this output circuit will maintain correct vertical size. This is, of course, true to a certain point. If the supply rail drops too much, the amplifier will boost its gain to a point where the IC will use excessive current and it will fail. Try adjusting the vertical size in the service mode. If the data values change and there is no movement in size, the EEPROM may have a corrupted address and needs to be replaced. If the size varies with data changes, IC201 may be the cause. Before replacing IC201, it is suggested that the feedback line be checked with an oscilloscope. Since the vertical and horizontal windings of a deflection yoke are in close proximity, they will induce their magnetic fields into each other. The vertical feedback circuit will have a low-pass filtering device to keep out the horizontal component. In this chassis, it is C5010 on the –VDRV line. The feedback line should display a clean, vertical-rate SAW tooth of about 1VPP. If a large amount of horizontal rate signal can be seen, the vertical output amplifier’s inverting input will reduce gain since the RMS value of horizontal is much greater. This condition is rare but it is a 60 second test that can prevent many hours of troubleshooting and component replacement.

16

5. High Voltage Converter Troubleshooting

Chapter 5 - HIgh Voltage Converter Troubleshooting
Overview
The DX-1A chassis utilizes a high voltage converter stage independent of the horizontal deflection circuits. It generates the CRT anode and focus voltages. The distinct advantage of this circuit is that it provides stable high voltage (31.5KV) to the CRT, greatly minimizing brightness and picture size fluctuations found in televisions using a flyback/yoke combination. As illustrated in Figure 5-1, IC8002 supplies the necessary oscillator and drive pulses to a pair of transistors. They are designated as Q8013 and Q8014 although they are shown as a block with flyback transformer T8001. IC8002 is the same type of IC used in the primary and secondary power supplies as covered in Chapter 2. The same must-haves are needed, except that a 200V source is used to start the IC and power the FET outputs, and that the +15V source from the secondary power supply provides the VC1 operating voltage. The VSENSE input at pin 1 of IC8002 monitors the level of the 200V supply source from the secondary power supply. Normal voltage at this point is approximately 2.6VDC. It can also be pulled low by a loss of horizontal retrace pulses from the horizontal deflection stages via Q8001 and Q8002. Horizontal pulses are not used in any way to time the oscillator inside IC8002, which operates in the 200KHZ range. The pulses are only monitored to stop the oscillator and high voltage to protect the CRT from possible phosphor burns. Q8003 and Q8004 (shown in Figure 5-2), are part of the high voltage protection circuits to stop the oscillator if the high voltage level reaches 35.5KV or greater. Flyback current is also monitored for protection. This will be discussed shortly. Regulation is achieved by monitoring a sample of the flyback voltage through IC8003, IC8004 and photo coupler PH8001 into pin 2 of IC8002. Normal voltage at pin 2 is 1.8VDC. This is a critical test point for high voltage regulation troubleshooting as it determines the high voltage level. Deviations in this voltage will change the oscillator frequency to maintain steady high voltage. Any rise in the high voltage level will cause the voltage at pin 2 to drop and increase the frequency of the oscillator. The inverse is true should the high voltage drop. RV8002 provides adjustment for the high voltage level but it is sealed in epoxy from the factory so it is not adjustable. An extremely important point to remember about this HV regulator is that the DC voltage between Q8003 and Q8004 has no bearing on the level of high voltage. This is a frequency regulating supply and the voltage to the flyback will always be near one-half the supply voltage. Q8003 and Q8004 share 50% of the duty cycle so the DC voltage to the flyback is almost irrelevant when compared to the frequency of the oscillator, which has a tremendous impact on the resonant frequency of the flyback. Its normal operating frequency is approximately 200KHZ.

17

5. High Voltage Converter Troubleshooting
200V R8053
18 1

R8051 R8137 Q8014 VGH 16 VS 15 IC8002 VGL 12
8

200VPP 200KHZ L8002

200VPP 200KHZ HV
8

V SENSE

VD

R8145 T8001 FBT
17

DYNAMIC FOCUS T8002

VC1 FB
2

Q8013

10 14 3

1

HV STOP

OCP 9 R8049

ABL
5 6

R8050 +15V +15V
1

R8070 IC8004

+

-

7VDC 7 PH8001
4 3

R8069
2 3

IC8003 R8072
1 2

R8002 HV ADJ R8074

CN5506 TP PIN 2 TO HV PROTECT

R8073 D8014

R8144

4.36 TO 4.66 VDC

FIGURE 5-1 - HV REGULATION

5.2CTV32

1/21/03

Protection of the HV converter is monitored for three different abnormalities: Excessive HV, insufficient HV and excessive flyback current. Low high voltage: A sample voltage is monitored from T8001 by D8014. D8025 is a 33V zener diode and is normally on if the high voltage is 31.5KV or greater. Q8010 inverter will keep a low at D8020 and, thus, a low at IC8001 pin 7. If the high voltage drops below a specified level, the zener will release and allow pin 7 to go high. This will exceed the reference voltage at pin 6, allowing pin 1 to go high. Q8003 inverter will pull the VSENSE line at IC8002 low and stop the regulation oscillator, ceasing HV generation. The television will remain on with audio and no raster and the timer LED will be indicating five flashes for an AKB problem. Excessive high voltage: The same diode (D8014) is used to monitor for excessive HV via R8078. The threshold maintained at this point is controlled by RV8001, which is adjusted to provide a specified voltage when the unit is operating at its normal 31.5KV level. The test point is located at CN5506 pin 2. This is an 11-pin connector on the D board easily located at the rear with the back cover off. It is also used to interface with the data bus for EEPROM uploads and downloads. The voltage at this point should be 4.36 to 4.66VDC with normal high voltage and the threshold adjusted properly. This is another important test point for isolating high voltage shutdown. NOTE: Earlier versions of the KV32/36XBR400 models will have two variable resistors in the threshold adjustment (RV8001 and 8003). Later versions of these models and all subsequent models will only use RV8001 and fixed resistor R8127. Re-manufactured D boards of the earlier models will also have RV8003 change to a fixed resistor.

18

5. High Voltage Converter Troubleshooting
As mentioned earlier, the monitor line for excessive HV takes two paths. One is R8021 into pin 9 of IC8001. Pin 8 is also referenced to 5.1V so if the voltage at pin exceeds this reference, pin 14 will send a high to pin 11. IC8001 is powered by +15V thereby sending this voltage potential to pin 11 easily overcoming the reference of 5.1V at pin 10. The unit will go into complete shutdown since pin 13 of IC8001 is connected to the main relay latch circuit via D6027. The other path of the monitor line connects to pin 5 of IC8001. Pin 2 sends a high to inverter Q8004 to pull the VSENSE line low. There are certain conditions in which excessive HV will either stop the HV converter or latch the main relay. Although these protection paths might seem rather redundant, they actually form a multi-level stage of protection from several possible events. If the high voltage rises at a low to moderate rate, pin 5 of IC8001 will likely cause pin 2 to pull the VSENSE line down and merely stop the HV converter. There is a .1mf filter (C8016) on the monitoring line to prevent small spikes of HV from tripping both circuits. The output at pin 14, however, has a .22mf filter (C8002) to further delay reaction to HV spikes. If the HV level rises dramatically, C8002 will charger quicker and provide the necessary high to pin 11 to turn the unit off. Flyback current is also monitored in two locations. The first is at pin 7 of IC8001. Since ABL voltage drops as current increases, inverter Q8007 will eventually provide sufficient voltage to raise pin 7 enough to cause a high at pin 1 and the HV converter will stop. Another source of ABL monitoring occurs at pin 11 of IC8001. The reason for this arrangement is if pin 14 were to suddenly go high due to rapidly increasing HV, and flyback current were to rise in conjunction, this is when maximum X-radiation is emitted and damage to the converter stages is possible.

Troubleshooting High Voltage Shutdown
Figure 5-2 illustrates an overall block diagram of the converter stage and will be used to aid in diagnosing protect symptoms. Problems that occur in the HV converter circuits will usually result in no high voltage being generated or the circuit may start up and then cease operation. If the protect circuit engages, the result may be no raster or a complete shutdown of the set. Since none of the above failures is being monitored by the self-diagnostics circuits, traditional troubleshooting approaches must be performed in cases of no raster. The fist step, of course, is to listen for the sound of high voltage. This only confirms that the HV converter has started and it may or may not be staying on. Viewing for lit filaments has been a traditional method to determine if the HV stage was still on but the DX-1A chassis derives filament voltage from the horizontal deflection circuit. Continuous high voltage can be verified by placing an oscilloscope probe near the flyback transformer to see if it induces pulses to the scope’s display. Below are some possible scenarios and suggested approaches. Unit turns on. No sound of high voltage heard: The presence of audio can assist in this diagnosis since it can help to determine if the unit has not gone into shutdown. If it is heard and the timer LED begins to flash in sequences of five, the HV converter may not be working. Check Q8014-D for 200VDC. If it is not present, the problem lies in the 200V line of the secondary power supply. If present, check the gate or source of Q8014 for approximately 100VDC. If zero volts are read, IC8002 is missing VD at pin 18 (198V) or VSENSE pin 1 is below 1.5VDC or above 5.0VDC and the oscillator will not run. If the voltage at Q8014-G is substantially lower than 100VDC (usually about 30V), IC8002 has failed. Another cause of the above symptom may be a defective flyback T8001. If an open condition occurs in the windings, the symptom is extremely low or a complete loss of, HV output. The low HV protect circuit will engage and eventually stop the oscillator inside IC8002. A good test point is the output of L8002 going to pin 8 of T8001. The waveform at this point is normally a steady 200VPP SINE wave due to the filtering characteristics of L8002. If the flyback is faulty, the load on L8002 will disappear and the waveform will be a square shape with noticeable fluctuations in the frequency. This waveform distortion will occur for approximately 25 seconds and then disappear once IC8002 times-out.

19

5. High Voltage Converter Troubleshooting
High voltage is heard. Set does not shut down: The presence of audio will also assist in determining whether the unit has gone into shutdown. If high voltage is verified to be starting and stopping, the HV converter is being told to stop by pulling the VSENSE line at pin 1 of IC8002 low or the voltage at OCP pin 9 is exceeding 200mv. The problem can be excessive HV, excessive flyback current or the HV protect circuits may be malfunctioning. Plugging the unit into a variac and observing AC current draw is a valuable tool in isolating the cause. With the degauss coils unplugged, the set should draw less than 1 amp of AC current. If current draw is below 1 amp, there is excessive high voltage or the protect circuit is misfiring. Any readings significantly above 1 amp indicates excessive flyback current. Excessive flyback current occurring before a raster appears will almost always cause the unit to shut down since flyback transformers and loads on the secondary cause rapid increases in current. The ABL current monitoring at pin 7 of IC8001 is designed to protect against excessive CRT brightness and will stop the HV converter but not shut the set down. Check the voltage at VSENSE pin1 of IC8002. If the voltage rises to a level of approximately 1.6VDC and drops to zero within a couple of seconds, the protect circuits are stopping the oscillator. Since there are three transistors tied to this line, it must be determined which one is signaling a protect event. Q8002 turning on: Horizontal deflection has failed, or Q8001 or C8004 is open. Q8003 tuning on: HV level is too low or excessive current in T8001. Monitor AC current at turn-on to check ABL current. If normal (less than one amp), suspect a defective flyback or protect circuits. Q8004 turning on: HV level is exceeding 35.5KV or there is excessive flyback current. Check for excessive AC current draw. If normal (less than one amp), check HV level with accurate probe and peak-hold DVM or read voltage at CN5506 pin 2 for DC voltage not exceeding 4.66V. If excessive, troubleshoot HV regulator stage. Troubleshooting HV regulation failures requires care and specific steps since it is a critical circuit for safety. This will be discussed shortly. High voltage is heard. Set shuts down: Since the set is going into full shutdown, it is possible that a dramatic increase in HV or flyback current is occurring. Once again, the use of a variac will help determine if the cause is a high voltage or over-current condition. In most cases, excessive current will be the cause. Since the flyback only generates CRT anode and focus voltages, possible causes of over-current conditions are limited. T8001 is a likely suspect (shorted winding), or the CRT may be defective.

Troubleshooting High Voltage Regulation Errors
When troubleshooting high voltage regulation failures (where the high voltage is exceeding specified limits), presents an interesting challenge for the technician. The unit will be stopping the HV converter or shutting the set down. Overriding the circuit is out of the question since a critical safety issue is involved and damage to other components is likely. Even if one has a high voltage divider for a peak-hold DVM, you will only be verifying a true presence of excessive high voltage and it serves no further use for troubleshooting the cause. If you are using an analog HV probe, they are generally not able to respond quick enough to display the peak high voltage level before the protect circuits engage. The following suggestions should assist in isolating the source of the problem. Refer back to Figure 5-1 for a more detailed example of the high voltage regulation circuits. Verifying a “true” high voltage problem: For those of you fortunate enough to own a HV divider for your peak-hold DVM, the presence of excessive high voltage is easily obtainable. The normal operating level for high voltage is 31.5 ±0.2KV. The protect threshold is 35.5KV. Any peak readings near this level will confirm a high voltage regulation problem severe enough to engage the protect circuit. For those that do not have a divider, a DVM with peak-hold or an oscilloscope can be used to troubleshoot the problem. High voltage protection circuits must receive some sort of feedback representative of the HV level for protection monitoring and these voltages will be at much lower potentials so the components in the protect circuits can handle them. In the DX-1A chassis, a sample of the voltage level in the flyback is rectified by D8014. This sample voltage is sent to a voltage divider

20

5. High Voltage Converter Troubleshooting
network consisting of R8078, RV8001, and R8127 to ground and this sets the threshold for the protect circuits. In earlier versions of the KV23/36XBR400, an additional variable resistor (RV8003) is used but the purpose is the same. The voltage at the high side of this divider provides an accurate sample of the flyback voltage level assuming the fixed resistors have retained their value and the variable resistors are correctly adjusted. This point routes to a test connector on the rear of the D board (CN5506 pin 2). The voltage captured by a peak-hold DVM should read 4.36~4.66VDC. Any voltage exceeding this level indicates excessive high voltage or a failure of a component in the threshold components. The question now becomes whether the threshold circuit is “misfiring” the protect circuit or excessive high voltage is causing the problem. Pin 14 of T8001 supplies a sample of the high voltage to IC8004 pin 5. The normal voltage at this point is 7VDC. If the correct voltage is present, the HV level is OK and the problem is in the protect circuits. Any voltage captured by the peak-hold DVM above 8V is a good indication of excessive high voltage. The feedback loop must now be checked. By grounding pin 3 of IC8003, the LED inside PH8001 will be brightly lit and this should cause the internal transistor to pull pin 2 of IC8002 low and raise the frequency of the oscillator, thereby reducing the HV level. The voltage at IC8004 pin 5 will still need to be monitored since the unit will go into low HV shutdown if IC8002 is working correctly. If the feedback voltage drops substantially, PH8001 is OK and the fault lies somewhere between IC8003 and back to IC8004. Beware that HV adjust RV8002 is sealed in epoxy and it is possible for the glue to open the wiper contacts if too much of the glue seeped down during the assembly process. Intermittent HV problems are more common when this happens since the epoxy expands as the set warms up and will usually take about 20 minutes to occur. If this happens, authorization for a D board replacement must be requested since replacement of the regulator and threshold controls are not allowed at this time. If the sample line still rises substantially above 7VDC, PH8001 is not functioning or IC8002 is not able to operate at the correct frequency (198 to 202KHZ). Further isolation can be achieved by grounding pin 2 of IC8002. If the high voltage level drops, PH8001 is definitely at fault. If the problem still exists, change IC8002 or request authorization for a D board replacement. It is recommended that you replace the D board any time excessive high voltage has been confirmed.
SHUTDOWN LATCH Q6530,Q6532 +200V (FROM SECONDARY POWER SUPPLY) D8027 D8003 R8051 Q8009 OCP R8053R8055 D BD.

ON AFC PLS (Q5030/C Q8001 H OUT) H PULSES START KEEP C8004 HV CONV. DISCHARGED 0V

V OFF SENSE
1

VD
18

VC1
8

+ Q8002 C8004 100 OFF Q8004 OFF Q8003

IC8002 HV DRIVER MCZ3001D
2

CONVERTER TRANSISTORS FLYBACK T8001

HV TO PICTURE TUBE FOCUS VOLTAGE (PICTURE TUBE)

R8056 RV8002 HV EPOXY COATED D8002 D8005 Q8007 +15V R8016 D8004 5.1V 5.1V REF R8021

F/B

1.8VDc 7VDc

IC8001 OP AMPS NJM2901M
2

0V

IC8003, IC8004 PH8001 ERROR DET ABL D8020 + C8005 47 Q8010

Q8022-3, Q8018 DYNAMIC FOCUS AMP

B

+ -

5 4

5.1V REF. VOLT. D8004/C

D8025 DF DRIVE DQP CONTROL IC5511/11

1

A+ -

7 6

13

C

+

10 11

IC8001 OP AMPS C8002 NJM2901M R8006 .22mF 8 14 D+
9

R8078 RV8001 HV REF. ADJ. EPOXY COATED

D8014

IC8001 OP AMPS NJM2901M Q8008 ABL

D8007 R8044

R8042 C8016 .1mF

R8144 TO CN5506 PIN 2 4.36 TO 4.66 VDC R8127

FIGURE 5-2 - HV CONVERTER STAGE

5.1CTV32

1/17/03

21

6. Video Circuit Troubleshooting

Chapter 6 - Video Circuit Troubleshooting
Overview
The DX-1A chassis introduced several new concepts into the popular WEGA® models. The two major features were the ability to process incoming 480i NTSC resolutions and double the scan lines to 960i along with accepting 1080i HDTV resolutions and compressing the vertical size of the raster to simulate a 16:9 aspect ratio if needed. 480 progressive scan (usually found in higher-end DVD players) is also supported. Only 720p cannot be displayed. All 480i signals are routed to the DRC™ (Digital Reality Creator) where a microprocessor and pattern recognition circuits help to remove the jagged edges (aliasing) that would normally plague a simple line doubling. From there, the signal is sent as 960i to the MID™ (Multi-Image Driver). The Multi-Image Driver performs two significant tasks. The horizontal scan frequency of the DX-1A chassis is fixed at 33.75KHZ, which happens to be 1080i. This way, the HD signal can be routed in a near-direct path to the video processors and CRT driver stage. Since all other resolutions are converted to 960i, the MID places the 960 scan lines within the 1080 lines, leaving 120 unused lines (60 above and 60 below). Vertical size is increased to leave only the 960 active lines on the screen. This is done to minimize the increased cost of having a multifrequency scan circuit. The other function of the MID is to provide picture-in-picture (PIP) and Twin-View™ capabilities. Multi-channel viewing, favorite channel previewing and side-by-side viewing of two video sources can be achieved. All of this may seem to present a difficult challenge in troubleshooting but the ability to view multiple sources simultaneously can be used to one’s advantage in isolating a faulty stage. Figure 4-1 illustrates a very basic block diagram of the video path. Although lacking in detail, it provides an entire view of where each of the video signals pass through the circuits based on the input resolution and whether or not the multi-picture features are engaged. Consequently, it is a valuable tool in isolating where the failure is occurring. Since up to three circuit boards (not including the CRT drive board) are used, determining which board the failure lies on is critical. The main and sub tuner, along with video 1~4 inputs, accept 480i only. Video inputs 1, 2, and 3 have S video connectors along with composite whereas video 4 will only accept composite. Video inputs 5 and 6 accept component sourced only from 480i through 1080i. All video signals from the tuners and video 1 through 4 inputs that are selected as main video are routed to the BC board where the 3-D comb filter is located. Any source selected for sub video is comb filtered by IC3003. Keep in mind that even S video sources are routed through the 3-D comb filter for noise reduction of the Y component.

22

6. Video Circuit Troubleshooting
56

SUB Y SUB C

MAIN TUNER SUB TUNER VIDEO 1-4 MONITOR OUT

63

58

IC3110 SUB 23 YCT 24

22

Y CR CB

TO IC3001 B BD.

6

CV/Y IC3201 A/V SW
53 49

C V Y IC3003 SUB COMB FILTER

IC3501 3-D COMB FILTER BC BD. Y
46 48

A BD.

C
12 5 2

51 C

VIDEO 5-6 COMP. INPUT

Y CR CB

IC3048 22 YCT - 23 CB MAIN 24 CR

Y

13

Y 15 IC3002 3 14 CR YCT-SEL CB
1 4

TO IC3001 B BD.

IC3001 27 COMPONENT 26 J/F
25 1 2 3

CR CB Y IC3408 MID

YO-7 CRO-7 CBO-7 IC3303 DRC

YO-7 CRO-7

31

50 63

IC3304 A/D CONV.

YO CRO CBO-7 -7 -7 IC3410 D/A CONV.
46 42 4 6 5

A BD. R G B R G B IK IC701 MAIN UCOM
1 3 5 8 TO C BD.

FROM IC3002 AND IC3110 A BD. B BD.

Y
8 11 16 1 9

CR
14

CB
3 5 6

Y CB CR

IC201 Y/C CRT DRIVE
20 21 22

4

64 62 63 58

IC3414 YUV SW.

CN9001

FIGURE 6-1 - VIDEO PATH

6.1CTV32 1562

12/23/02

Once the luminance and chrominance signal has been separated (if needed), the main video enters IC3048. Two functions are performed by this IC. The YC signal from the comb filter is decoded and stripped down to component level. This is done to remove sync and the 3.58MHZ-encoding signal since they are needed and the signal is going to digitized for processing. The same procedure is performed to the sub video path by IC3110. The other purpose of is to allow the routing of component video from inputs 5 and 6 to be sent to the DRC if the sync source is 480i. YCT select IC3002 will determine whether the main or sub video will enter the DRC. Note: The video has now left the A board and into the B board. The B board is not considered repairable and must be replaced as a FRU. Once the video has entered the B board, it is A/D converted by IC3302 and line doubled by the DRC IC3408. It then continues to the MID IC3410 to be inserted into the fixed 1080i scan and on to IC3414 YUV switch. This YUV switch is what allows 1080i signal sources to head directly to the video process IC201 on the A board and is a valuable tool for isolating video failures if a 1080i source is available since it bypasses virtually all of the other circuits in the video stage.

23

6. Video Circuit Troubleshooting
IC3001 is important to note. When 480 progressive signal is applied to video inputs 5 or 6, the DRC must be bypassed. 960i and 480p used the same H sync frequency (31.5KHZ), so IC3001 must route this signal directly to the MID where it will be interlaced to 960i and inserted into the 1080i raster.

Troubleshooting
Locating the area where a video problem exists is quite simple since there are several paths the video can take. In a situation where no video is displayed it is obviously important to verify a true video processing failure. Verifying the presence of high voltage and the ability of the CRT to display a raster by turning the G2 voltage up is a proven first step. Check the timer LED to be sure it is not flashing in sequences of five, indicating an AKB failure. Engaging the OSD by changing channels or displaying the customer menu is also a good test. If OSD can be seen, it is good indicator IC201 is probably OK. This IC is replaced in many cases and found to not be the problem. Even if OSD can be displayed, there are more tests to do. Engaging the twin-view (P&P) is the most effective troubleshooting step. This should be done using 480i sources on both inputs and the main and sub tuner will suffice. One of two possible results will appear on the screen: Picture appears on right side of screen: The left side will have a border but no picture. This indicates the sub video path is functioning and entering the MID. It also indicates proper circuit operation from moving forward all the way to IC201. There is a problem in the main video path. This leaves several components as suspect including the 3-D comb filter on the BC board, IC3048, IC3002, IC3304 and the DRC IC3303. Another test to further isolate the cause is to apply a 480 interlaced component signal to video inputs 5 or 6. An interlaced source is necessary to keep the video routed through the DRC. If a picture appears, comb filter IC3301 is at fault. The BC board is difficult to service so an attempt should be made to get an authorization to replace it. If a picture still does not appear on the left side, the failure may still be on the A board at IC3408 or IC3002. Check for component signals exiting the A board to IC3304 on the B board and replace the B board if present. NOTE: When viewing the twin-picture mode in previous models utilizing DRC and MID, the DRC was bypassed, sending the main and sub picture directly to the MID. It was possible on these designs to obtain video in both the left and right side, which indicated a faulty DRC. In this chassis, any 480i source main video routes through the DRC and into the MID while the sub video enters the MID directly. In a normally operating unit, the left picture will always appear sharper since it has been processed by the DRC. No picture appears on the left or right side: The important clue to watch for is the presence of OSD. If the unit is in the tuner mode, the channel numbers should appear above where the two pictures should be. If a bluebordered box appears on either side (indicating the active box) the MID is outputting video. Either the main and sub video path have failed or the MID is receiving video and is unable to process it. Check for active component video exiting the A board to IC3304 on the B board. If present, replace the B board. If absolutely no video is present and a 1080i video source is available, apply it to video input 5 or 6. If video appears, IC 201 is OK. Since no OSD appeared in the previous step along with no video, the loss of sync for OSD and the MID would seem the likely cause. Video distortion or level problems: Many of the same procedures outlined above can be used to isolate these symptoms. Use the twin picture and different resolution inputs to isolate the board/components in the same way. Beat pattern distortions in both the main and sub video could be caused by power supply noise or high frequency ripple. HINT: If you suspect power supply ripple, hook the unit up to a variac and vary the AC voltage up and down. If the beat pattern changes as you do this, the problem is in the power supply since you are causing the regulator to change the frequency. If the distortion remains fixed, there is outside interference or a radiating component in the unit.

AKB Circuit Troubleshooting
The DX-1A chassis introduces an AKB monitoring circuit that functions quite differently than previous designs. Therefore, troubleshooting this circuit requires substantially different approaches. Although the video does not

24

6. Video Circuit Troubleshooting
blank as in many early designs, the unit will shut down and indicate the usual five-blink sequence on the timer LED. This only happens if there is a dramatic decrease or loss of the IK return signal. In many cases, normal failures that would engage the AKB circuit (such as weak CRT cathode emission) do not trip the AKB circuit. The missing color will be absent from the picture. Even it the filament voltage is disconnected from the C board, the unit will remain operating without displaying an AKB error if turned on by remote or the front panel power switch. If, however, the unit is in “power on memory” mode and turns on when AC power is applied, the AKB circuit will engage and shut the unit down. This is very important to remember. There may be an AKB problem and it will not be indicated. Another unique function in this chassis involves the DC offset variations on the RGB video drive signals from IC201 to the video drivers on the C board. In previous designs, a weak cathode could be located by setting the proper G2 cutoff level and observing the DC voltage at each cathode with no video input to the set. A normal cathode would read approximately 185VDC with a weak one reading 165VDC or less. If all three cathodes read 165VDC or lower, the CRT was gassy, G2 cutoff was set too low or the IK return line had a failure. In the DX-1A chassis, the cathode voltages remain at 185VDC ±5V even with low emission levels or G2 bias. Fortunately, even if the unit generates an AKB error and shuts down, it does not blank the video. About ten seconds will elapse before the set shuts down, giving adequate time to view the picture for signs of a missing color if a cathode is weak. If the IK return line is at fault, the picture will display much brighter than normal before shutting down. The only time AKB troubleshooting becomes difficult is when something causes a complete “no
Q9008, 9012, 9014 G2 REG. G2 1 200V 2 E 3 HG 4

GROUND HEATER +

RV9002 G2 ADJ R9083 Q9009

C BOARD

5

R E G E B E 12V IK E PW MUTE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

IC9001 RED OUT Q9010
2 3 5 6 8

G2 KR
12

7

HEATER

Q9011 R9041 12 V 12V

R9047 L9002

KG
11

KB
10

8

HEATER

IC9002 GREEN OUT
2 3 5 6 8

12V R9006 R9065 IC9003 BLUE OUT
2 3 5 6 8

R9051 L9003

R9052 Q9001 D6002 MA3091 R9042 L9084

R9012

FIGURE 6-2 - CRT DRIVE

6.2CTV32

12/23/02

25

6. Video Circuit Troubleshooting
video” condition. In this case, the AKB self-diagnostics will usually not engage. Even if the G2 cutoff is set too high or there is a problem with the 200V cathode bias voltage missing or too low, the unit will shut down and blink six times. This is very misleading since the switched 5V line (as indicated by the six blinks) has nothing to do with the problem. However, if the diagnostics history page is called up (DISPLAY, 5, VOLUME -, POWER), an AKB and LOWB event will be registered. Troubleshooting a no video condition: This involves the usual approach of verifying the presence (and continuance) of high voltage along with lit filaments. Turning up the G2 voltage verifies its presence and the ability of the CRT to display a raster and that the sweep circuits are operational. If these check OK, monitor the CRT cathodes with an oscilloscope set at V-rate and look for IK pulses at initial turn on. The pulses will appear at around 200VPP and drop dramatically in level within five to ten seconds as the cathodes warm up. The presence of pulses is a useful tool to indicate video process IC201 is outputting RGB and the CRT drivers are OK. Even if a video process failure were to occur inside IC201, the IK pulses will still appear at the cathodes and blanking pulses will appear within ten seconds. Check for incoming video to IC201 to isolate where the video is being lost by using the steps earlier in this chapter. Excessive brightness followed by shutdown: Even though this condition may be caused by an AKB problem, the unit will display a misleading LOWB (six blinks) diagnostics indication. If the brightness level is severe, a loss of 200V cathode bias or excessive G2 voltage is suspect. If both check OK, read the DC voltage at the IK return line at pin 9 of CN9001 on the C board. It should read approximately 3.5VDC. A voltage at or near zero volts indicates a shorted IK buffer Q9001 and/or shorted zener diode D9002. If the voltage reads 5.6VDC, one of the video drivers on the C board is leaking from output to ground. The IK outputs at pin 5 of each IC must be disconnected to isolate the faulty component. Note: If the 200V cathode voltage is missing, suspect a failure in the 200V regulator circuit located in the horizontal sweep circuit on the D board. This is illustrated in Chapter 4, Figure 4-1. R5096 will be open and Q5016 may be damaged. If this is the case, it is very important to check all three CRT driver ICs on the C board for a short to ground. Failure to do so will cause R5096 to open and possibly damage Q5016.

26

7. CRT Alignment

Chapter 7 - CRT Alignment
Overview
Ever since its introduction in late 1998, the Sony Wega® Trinitron® flat display CRT has introduced new challenges to the service technician. Producing a traditional CRT with a flat front has been a challenge for many manufacturers for many years. The additional beam travel required at the outer edges required some revolutionary design changes, mainly in the deflection yoke and focus circuits. Additional dynamic correction circuitry was later added to significantly improve beam landing, convergence and geometry to increase the quality of the picture. Many of the alignment procedures are the same as with previous CRT designs but required significantly more attention to detail when performed. This chapter will attempt to clarify some of these procedures and outline some of the newer circuits to assist in obtaining a good overall picture for the customer. Three main factors exist that will increase potential distortions in a CRT: Size, deflection angle and beam travel distance. The flat display is plagued by all three and explains why it is more difficult to align than a smaller CRT with a curved face. The larger the CRT, the more prone it is to beam landing distortion. The greater the deflection angle (mainly done to reduce the face to neck distance), the more geometry distortions (particularly pincushion) become an issue. Flattening the face of the CRT introduces focus issues predominately in the corners due to the natural arc of the scanned beam but also contributes to additional geometry and beam landing issues.

Beam Landing
Aligning purity on a Wega® CRT is relatively the same as earlier designs with a few exceptions. Many technicians were taught to use a red field from a pattern generator from start to finish because it is easier for the eye to spot purity errors with this color. This is also true for a flat display except when positioning the deflection yoke and adjusting the purity rings. Many were also taught to face the CRT north or south. These units should be faced east or west. Any correction magnets attached to the CRT bell should also be removed at this time. A green field is recommended with in-line guns since the green gun is in the center. The yoke should be pulled back to position this green field in the center. The purity rings are then adjusted to equalize the red and blue colors at the edges. It is important to focus on the edge colors rather than trying to center the green since all three of the colors are normally not displayed as a perfect rectangle and are usually tilted to the left or right. As an example: The red may be larger at the top and narrower at the bottom and the blue may or not be the same or could even be opposite. Once the red and blue sides have been equalized in overall coverage amount, a red field can now be input and the yoke slid forward to obtain the best purity across the entire screen. If you are fortunate, a completely red screen will be obtained. If not, note what area(s) cannot be landed properly. If either horizontal edge of the screen or more than one corner are affected, some slight lateral movement of the deflection yoke along with touching up the purity rings will usually produce good results. It is very important to attempt to achieve proper purity at the edges without having to resort to correction magnets. Inability to correct edges other than corners could indicate a magnetized aperture grill frame. Demagnetizing a Trinitron® CRT is not recommended. The CRT is “conditioned” at the factory by intentionally magnetizing areas of the CRT to aid in compensating for magnetic field interference. Many degaussing coils produce a strong magnetic field, which is capable of removing the magnetic conditioning. Only in cases where there is no other option than to replace the CRT should manual degaussing be done. The internal degaussing coil is quite capable of neutralizing magnetism caused by outside sources. If one or two corners are the only areas that cannot be brought pure, the use of correction magnets will solve the problem in most cases. Magnets that can be rotated once stuck to the bell are preferred (P/N 145209400). It is very important that any purity correction magnets be placed on the bell as far away form the yoke as possible while still being able to shift the beam landing. Magnets placed close to the yoke will do an excellent job of purity correction but will also distort the geometry in that particular corner. In rare cases, more than one magnet will be required but if you find yourself installing more than two in the same area with unsatisfactory results, the initial yoke/purity ring settings should be re-checked and if OK, the CRT will need replacement.

27

7. CRT Alignment
In cases where a previously untouched unit is displaying beam-landing problems in one corner, removing the back cover and placing a magnet in the appropriate corner is all that needs to be done. NOTE: There have been reports from the field where a television had been removed from a wall unit or particular location and aligned successfully only to have the purity shift when the set is placed back into its original location. If it is possible to place the unit in its intended location with the back cover removed and you can somehow reach inside and install purity magnets, the problem can usually be solved. In tightly enclosed locations, place a purity magnet in the affected corner and rotate it in small increments while sliding the unit in and out of its location. This may sound time consuming but there is no other alternative other than suggesting a new location to the customer (good luck). In cases where the purity shifts dramatically (especially in the center areas), something altering the magnetic field is nearby. Try repositioning any metallic items in the location (especially ferrous metals). In some high-rise apartments or offices, the metal framing of the building can make purity adjustments nearly impossible. This is especially true for the 40" models.

Geometry
An extremely important step to successful geometry and convergence alignment is proper positioning of the deflection yoke assembly. The vertical axis position is a critical first step to minimize bending, or “shoulder rolloff” at the top of the screen and will have an overall effect on other adjustments. Horizontal axis positioning is best done after static convergence has been centered. The yoke can then be moved side-to-side to minimize and/or equalize convergence errors at the right and left side of the screen to minimize the amount of dynamic convergence adjustments and to insure the static positioning is more centered in the range of the dynamic control. Always use new yoke positioning wedges. The deflection yoke in these sets is quite heavy and can knock the wedges loose in transit. A small amount of RTV glue placed at the ends of the wedges is also helpful. One important adjustment added to the DX-1A chassis is vertical pincushion correction to help minimize the “shoulder roll off” condition that was present in earlier models. This is adjusted electronically in the service mode. All geometry adjustments are symmetrical; in other words, they simultaneously affect opposite sides and/ or corners. Proper geometry is achieved by equalizing any distortions on the edges and then utilizing another appropriate adjustment or adjustments to “pull” the equal distortions together. If the left side of the center horizontal line on a crosshatch pattern tilts downward, the right side must either tilt the same or opposite direction and be relatively equal in the amount of tilt. If a single, isolated region has distortion, conventional geometry adjustments will not correct the problem. This is especially true in the corners. Most geometry distortions confined to a single corner are due to tolerances within the deflection yoke assembly. If it is minor and not noticeable without a test pattern, the picture is considered normal and within specifications. If it is easily noticeable under normal, active video conditions, a procedure can be tried to minimize the distortion before attempting a yoke replacement. Purity magnets placed on the CRT bell near the edge of the yoke have a pronounced effect on the geometry. By utilizing the adjustable purity magnet mentioned earlier in the beam landing section of this chapter, minor “hooks” and bends can be manipulated to improve the distortion. This will have an obvious effect on purity but an additional magnet can be placed in the same area, but further away from the yoke, to compensate and correct the induced purity error. Convergence in the particular corner will also be affected and the use of perm-alloy magnets (P/N X430631200) will be needed to compensate. This procedure requires some practice to master and is effective in better than half of the cases at successfully correcting the problem without a deflection yoke replacement. Below are some of the geometry adjustments other than size, linearity, and centering available in the service mode. Use the service manual to locate the appropriate adjustment groups and items. Pay particular attention to VCEN. This is not to be confused with VPOS (vertical position) that center the vertical position of the display. VCEN is used to center the vertical pincushion bow before VPIN is adjusted.

28

7. CRT Alignment

PIN (pin amp)

UCP (upper corner pin correction)

LCP (lower corner pin correction)

PPHA (pin phase)

29

7. CRT Alignment
VANG (AFC angle)

VBOW (AFC bow)

VCEN (vertical pincushion centering)

VPIN (vertical pin correction)

HTPZ (horizontal trapezoid)

30

7. CRT Alignment
LANG (line angle)

SLIN (horizontal S correction)

VSCO (vertical S correction)

Convergence Overview
The DX-1A introduces dynamic convergence adjustments in the service mode that was not found in the earlier XBR Wega® models. The new dynamic adjustments provide more control of the red and blue movement throughout the edges of the screen to achieve a better overall picture without the extensive use of magnets. The service manual provides adequately illustrated details of the normal reaction to be expected of each dynamic adjustment. Therefore, this portion of the chapter will focus more on tips, suggested steps and initialization adjustments, both static and dynamic. A full convergence is covered with the assumption that a CRT and/or yoke replacement has been performed (or someone else attempted an alignment). Touchups can be performed by omitting many of the steps to follow but it is always a good idea to get a good “feel” for what each adjustment is capable of for a better understanding. IIMPORTANT NOTE: If you must change the D board for intermittent or un-repairable conditions, the dynamic convergence data is stored on an EEPROM located on the D board (IC5501). In many cases, it is preferred to transfer the data from the old EEPROM to the new one, either electronically or by physically swapping them. It is not necessary to do this for the D board. Even if the old data is transferred, the component tolerances for the drive circuits are different for each board and you will have to re-converge the set anyway. Install the new board and perform the convergence adjustments. Static alignments will be minimally affected and only dynamic adjustments will need to be touched up.

31

7. CRT Alignment
If the CRT is replaced on a 36" or 40" model, the deflection yoke will be included, thereby minimizing many adjustment steps. On a 32" model, the yoke and CRT available separately, necessitating the initialization of some dynamic data settings. The following tips assume a CRT or yoke replacement on a 32" model. Any references to initializing or “centering” of data will mainly apply to those CRT sizes.

Convergence Tips
Once beam landing has been successfully achieved and the vertical yoke tilt axis properly set as mentioned earlier in this chapter, convergence alignment can proceed. Keep the vertical position of the yoke in place with a rubber wedge at the very top of the yoke but do not remove the adhesive cover at this time. The yoke position may need to be shifted slightly during the convergence procedure and when the final position is determined, the wedges should be firmly affixed with wedges at the 2, 4, 8 and 10 o’clock positions. A fifth wedge at the 12 o’clock position is not required but is recommended if the unit is going to be shipped or transported under rough conditions. If the unit is going to be aligned with the original CRT intact and exhibits moderate to severe convergence errors (especially on the corners) remove all purity correction magnets and perm alloy strips around the yoke. Face the unit east or west. If it has not been turned on for at least 15 minutes, apply power and allow the internal degauss circuit to de-magnetize. If less than 15 minutes have elapsed since the last power-on, wait for 15 minutes. Try not to manually degauss the set.

Figure 7-1 THL plate (can be on either side of yoke) Center the HSTAT control (RV9001) on the C board: This is very important. The next adjustments, VSTAT and BMC, involve using mechanical rings on the CRT neck. Depending on the rotation of these rings, they can also affect the horizontal movement of the red and blue. Once the vertical position of the red and blue is on the same horizontal plane, proper convergence of the read and blue can be horizontally brought together. Achieving proper static convergence is the most important step. Very small amounts of color shifts at the center of the screen will produce dramatic shifts at the edges. Increase VSIZ if needed: If the crosshatch pattern of the generator you are using is unable to display the top and bottom horizontal line within ¼” of the bezel, increase the VSIZ to bring them closer to the edge. This helps in viewing geometry and making necessary corrections during the alignment. Record the original VSIZ data so it can be restored at the end of the procedure.

32

7. CRT Alignment
Center RSAP and LSAP: If the yoke and/or the CRT have been replaced in a 32" model, or the D board replaced in any model, check these items in category D-CONV/CXA8070. The data range is 0-63. Set data to 30 for each. By centering the data, the quad-pole magnet assembly on the yoke can be moved forward and backward to equalize the separation of the red and blue on the right and left vertical lines at the edges of he screen. This allows for adequate range of the RSAP and LSAP dynamic convergence to correct. Adjust the HSTAT control to spread the red and blue if needed to help see and equalize the error.
LSAP RSAP

R B

R B

Once the separation has been equalized, they can be bought together with the dynamic adjustments. Adjust the XCV coil: The XCV coil is located on the yoke assembly as shown is Figure 7-2. It changes the vertical skew (X axis) of the red and blue on the horizontal lines.

YCH

TLV XCV coil

Figure 7-2 - Dynamic Adjustments Located on Deflection Yoke

R B

XCV coil adjustment

33

7. CRT Alignment
Center RUBW, RLBW, LUBW, and LLBW data: This allows for proper adjustment range as was performed for RSAP and LSAP. Set the data to 30 for each. They will be adjusted once static vertical convergence is done.
RUBW
B R

LUBW
B R

R

B

R

B

RLBW

LLBW

Adjust YCH and TLV (Also located on the yoke assembly in Figure 7-2).
YCH
B R

TLV

R B R B

Adjust all vertical dynamic settings first and then proceed to the horizontal. Return VSIZ to its original value. Select COPY2 and change data from 0 to 1 and press “mute”, “enter” to copy the data to the vertical compressed mode.

34

, WEGA, Trinitron and DRC are trademarks of Sony Electronics

CTV320203

©2002 Sony Electronics Inc. EMCS - A Service Company 1 Sony Drive Park Ridge, New Jersey 07656 Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited. All rights reserved

02/04/03

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