You are on page 1of 25

TRAINING GUIDE

March 2014
Rev 1.0

Index
No
1
2
3
4
5
6

Topic
VLAN
Inter-VLAN Routing
L2 Redundancy and Configuration
Link Aggregation
Multi-chassis trunking
Virtual router redundancy protocol enhanced

Page
2
5
7
13
16
20

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

A. VLANs
VLAN is:

A subgroup within a local area network


A separate broadcast domain
A logical partitioning of a physical LAN into one or more Virtual LANs (VLANs)
Each VLAN has an ID
VLAN IDs (VID) can range from 1 4095
The default VLAN is 1
By default all interfaces belong to VLAN 1
VLAN 1 should only be used as a container for unused ports

VLAN without 802.1Q Tagging

Ports require dedicated uplinks for each VLAN between switches


There is no question where broadcast traffic went from port-to-port

VLAN - 802.1Q Tagging

VLAN tagging allows multiple VLANs to span switches over a single physical link
VLAN tagging is needed when a link is connected between any two switches carrying traffic from
multiple VLANs

In example below, Since both sides of the link must be configured for 802.1Q tagging, ports 4
and 14 are tagged so that they can be in multiple VLANs
The switch looks at the VLAN ID to determine which VLAN gets the forwarded frame

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

If a device is connected to a port in a single VLAN only, the port is untagged

Port-based VLAN

A port-based VLAN is a broadcast domain, composed of a subset of ports on a Brocade device


Traffic is bridged within a port-based VLAN and unknown unicasts, broadcasts and multicasts are
flooded to all the ports within the VLAN, except the incoming port
This is the most common type of VLAN
Create VLAN 10 and assign untagged ports 7 8 and tagged ports 14 15
SW-Switch(config)# vlan 10
SW-Switch(config-vlan-10)# untagged e 7 to 8
added untagged port ethe 7 to port-vlan 10
added untagged port ethe 8 to port-vlan 10
SW-Switch(config-vlan-10)# tagged e 14 to 15
added tagged port ethe 14 to port-vlan 10
added tagged port ethe 15 to port-vlan 10

Command show vlan will display all configured VLANs


FastIron(config)# show vlan
Total PORT-VLAN entries: 2
Maximum PORT-VLAN entries: 128
3

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

PORT-VLAN 1, Name DEFAULT-VLAN, Priority Normal, Spanning tree On


Untagged Ports: 1 2 3 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 15 16 17 18 19 20
Untagged Ports: 21 22 23 24 25 26
Tagged Ports: None
PORT-VLAN 2, Name [None], Priority Normal, Spanning tree On
Untagged Ports: 4 7 13
Tagged Ports: 14
Dual Mode Port
Configuring a tagged port as a dual-mode port allows it to accept and transmit both tagged
traffic and untagged traffic at the same time

Configuring a dual mode port:


SW-Switch(config)# vlan 10
SW-Switch(config-vlan-10)# tagged e 6 e 49
SW-Switch(config-vlan-10)# untagged e 34
SW-SW-Switch(config-vlan-10)# vlan 20
SW-SW-Switch(config-vlan-20)# tagged e 6 e 49
SW-SW-Switch(config-vlan-20)# int e 6
SW-Switch(config-if-e1000-6)# dual-mode 10
SW-Switch(config-if-e1000-6)# exit
4

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

B. Inter-VLAN Routing

Routing switch

Ports can be grouped together to form switched domains (L2 VLANs)


Virtual Ethernet Interfaces (VE) are created to route L3 traffic between VLANs
Switching among ports in a VLAN domain
Routing between VLANs

Configuring Routable VLANs


1. Configure port- based VLAN
2. Define Virtual Interface (VE)
3. Assign an IP address to the VE

SW-Switch(config)# vlan 10
SW-Switch(config-vlan-10)# untag ethernet 1/1 to 1/12
SW-Switch(config-vlan-10)# router-interface ve 10
SW-Switch(config-vlan-10)# interface ve10
SW-Switch(config-vif-10)# ip address 192.123.22.1/24
SW-Switch(config-vif-10)# vlan 20
SW-Switch(config-vlan-20)# untag ethernet 1/13 to 1/24
SW-Switch(config-vlan-20)# router-interface ve 20
SW-Switch(config-vlan-20)# interface ve20
SW-Switch(config-vif-20)# ip address 192.123.44.1/24

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

Show commands
SW-Switch#Show ip interface
SW-Switch#Show ip route
Summary

A VLAN is a logical partitioning of a physical LAN into one or more Virtual LANs (VLANs)
VLAN tagging allows multiple VLANs to span switches over a single physical link
Configuring a tagged port as a dual-mode port allows it to accept and transmit both tagged
traffic and untagged traffic at the same time

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

C. L2 Redundancy and Configuration

Brocade supports the following STP standards:

802.1D - Spanning Tree Protocol


802.1w - Rapid Spanning Tree (RSTP)
802.1s - Multiple Spanning Tree (MST)

Brocade supports the following STP enhancements:

Per-VLAN Spanning Tree


Single Instance Spanning Tree (SSTP)
Topology Group

STP

STP is defined in IEEE 802.1D


The spanning tree algorithm ensures a loop free topology by enabling a single path through any
physical arrangement of bridges
STP does the following:
Detects redundant links
Blocks redundant links
Allows for failover to redundant links
STP is enabled by default on Brocade Layer 2 code
STP is disabled by default on Brocade Layer 3 code
Without STP enabled, redundant links can cause endless loops, especially with broadcast traffic
Ethernet has no time out value on frames

With STP enabled, redundant links are blocked, and traffic is forwarded to its destination

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

802.1D Show Commands

Disabling and Changing Priority for STP

To disable STP globally:


SW-Switch(config)# no spanning-tree

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

To change bridge priority:


SW-Switch(config)# spanning-tree priority <value>

Bridge priority value range is 1 - 65535


Default priority value is 32768

Per-VLAN Spanning Tree (PVST)

Each VLAN has its own:

Instance of STP
Root bridge
Set of bridge priorities
BPDUs

PVST - STP Load Sharing

PVST can be used to load share Layer 2 traffic by sending traffic from different VLANs onto
different physical links
Traffic from one VLAN can be forwarded over another VLAN without causing a loop

VLAN 100

VLAN 201

Fast Port Span

Allows faster convergence on ports that are attached to end stations


On by default in Brocade switches
End stations cannot cause forwarding loops, they can safely go through the state changes faster
than STP
9

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

Performs the convergence on these ports in four seconds


Two seconds for listening
Two seconds for learning
Used in 802.1D only

Fast Port Span is automatically disabled if the switch detects any of the following conditions on a
port:
a)
b)
c)
d)

It has an 802.1Q tag


It is a member of a LAG
The switch detects more than one MAC address on the port
The switch sees an STP BPDU coming in on it

Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) - IEEE 802.1w

802.1w is an enhancement to the 802.1D Spanning Tree Protocol


Convergence in 802.1w is not based on any timer values
It is based on the explicit handshakes between directly connected inter-switch links to
determine their role
Convergence time is less than 3 seconds in most cases
Root bridge failure detection in 1 hello time interval
Default hello time is 2 seconds
Ports should be configured as edge ports if they are attached to end devices
These edge ports transition directly to the forwarding state
Admin point-to-point ports should be configured for switch-to-switch connections
RSTP maintains a view of the topology, including redundant links
This avoids timeouts if the current forwarding ports were to fail or BPDUs were not
received on the root port

10

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

RSTP Configuration

To enable RSTP:
SW-Switch(config-vlan-2)# spanning-tree 802-1w

To define the priorities:


SW-Switch(config-vlan-2)# spanning-tree 802-1w priority 16
SW-Switch(config-vlan-2)# spanning-tree 802-1w e1/2 priority 16

To define port parameters:


SW-Switch(config-vlan-2)# span 802-1w e 1/4 admin-edge-port
SW-Switch(config-vlan-2)# span 802-1w e 1/2 admin-pt2pt-mac

Topology Groups

A topology group is a group of VLANs configured together and assigned a single, shared instance
of STP, RSTP, VSRP, or MRP
Topology groups simplify configuration and enhance scalability of L2 protocols by allowing the
use of a single instance of an L2 protocol on multiple VLANs
Each topology group has a master VLAN, where the STP settings are defined
All other VLANs in the topology group are added as members
A topology group is one way around the limitations of Per-VLAN Spanning Tree
11

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

Useful in the case where there are more VLANs than STP instances available
Topology groups are proprietary to Brocade Ethernet devices
Any STP configurations made in the master VLAN will be automatically applied to all member
VLANs
A VLAN may only be a member of a single topology group

To configure a topology group, first configure the VLANs:

SW-Switch(config)#vlan 10
SW-Switch(config-vlan-10)#tagged e1 to 4
SW-Switch(config-vlan-10)#vlan 20
SW-Switch(config-vlan-20)#tagged e1 to 4
SW-Switch(config-vlan-20)#vlan 30
SW-Switch(config-vlan-30)#tagged e1 to 4

Next, define the topology group:


SW-Switch(config)#topology-group 1
SW-Switch(config-topo-group-1)#master-vlan 10
SW-Switch(config-topo-group-1)#member-vlan 20
SW-Switch(config-topo-group-1)#member-vlan 30

Summary

The spanning tree algorithm ensures a loop free topology by enabling a single path through any
physical arrangement of bridges
BPDUs are messages exchanged between switches in a LAN or VLAN to form and maintain a
loop free topology
A path cost is the accumulated port cost from the root switch to the other switches in
the topology
Per-VLAN Spanning Tree can be used to load share Layer 2 traffic by sending traffic from
different VLANs onto different physical links
A topology group is a group of VLANs configured together and assigned a single, shared
instance of STP, RSTP, VSRP, or MRP

12

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

D. Link Aggregation
Trunking = Link Aggregation

Trunking is another term for Link Aggregation


A trunk is a group of physical ports between two switches that acts as one logical link
Brocade manuals will often refer to LAGs as trunks

Link Aggregation allows an administrator to combine multiple Ethernet links into a larger logical
trunk known as a Link Aggregation Group (LAG)
The switch treats the trunk as a single logical link
The physical links must all be the same speed and duplex setting and must connect to the same
adjacent switch
LAG requirements may vary for different platforms, such as the number of links in the LAG,
specific port boundaries, etc.
Always check what is supported at both ends

LAG Benefits

Increased bandwidth
Increased availability
Load-sharing
Sub-second failover to the remaining links in the LAG

Types of LAGs

There are two types of LAGs:


Static
Manually configured aggregate links containing multiple ports
13

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

Dynamic: (802.3ad Link Aggregation)


Dynamically created and managed LAGs using Link Aggregation Control Protocol
(LACP)
The only real difference between a static and a dynamic LAG is how they are formed; once
operational, they functionally the same
They also use the same load sharing methods

Configuring Static and Dynamic LAGs

All interface parameters in a LAG must match, including:


Port tag type (tagged/untagged)
Configured port speed1 and duplex
QoS priority

Brocade switches support the use of static and dynamic LAGs on the same device2

Can use only one type of LAG for any given port
lag "Controller2" dynamic id 2
ports ethernet 1/1/5 to 1/1/6
primary-port 1/1/5
deploy
!
lag "MCT-ICL" static id 10
ports ethernet 1/1/7 ethernet 1/1/9
primary-port 1/1/7
deploy

Aggregate Link Keys

Every 802.3ad-enabled port has a key


The key identifies the ports that belong to the same LAG
Ports with the same key are called a Key Group
A default key is automatically assigned to an untagged port when link aggregation has been
enabled on it
Link aggregation keys must manually be configured for tagged ports

14

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

Display the Dynamic Link Aggregation

Summary

LAGs can be:

Static (manually configured), which do not use LACP


Dynamic, using LACP
LAG port members can be tagged ports, untagged ports, or dual mode ports
LAGs configured on chassis based systems can span port cards

A primary port must be configured


Primary port configuration is applied to all other members within the LAG

15

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

E. Multi-chassis Trunking

MCT is a technology that allows two MCT supporting switches to cluster together and appear as
a single logical device. Trunking is a technology that allows multiple links of a device to appear
as one logical link.

The combination of MCT and trunking allows for creating a resilient network topology that
utilizes all links in the network, creating an ideal network topology for latency sensitive
applications.

MCT terminology

MCT cluster: A pair of devices (switches) that is clustered together using MCT to appear as a
single logical device. The devices are connected as peers through an Inter-Chassis Link (ICL).
MCT cluster device: One of the two devices in an MCT cluster.
MCT peer device: From the perspective of an MCT cluster device, the other device in the MCT
cluster.
MCT cluster client: A device that connects with MCT cluster devices through static or dynamic
trunks. It can be a switch or an endpoint server host in the single-level MCT topology or another
pair of MCT devices in a multi-tier MCT topology.
Inter-Chassis Link (ICL): A single-port or multi-port 1 GbE or 10 GbE interface between the two
MCT cluster devices. It provides the control path for CCP for the cluster and also serves as the
data path between the two devices.
MCT VLANs: VLANs on which MCT cluster clients are operating. Any VLAN that has an ICL port is
an MCT VLAN, even though it does not have any clients.
MCT session VLANs: The VLAN used by the MCT cluster for control operations. CCP protocol
runs over this VLAN. The interface can be a single link or a trunk group port. If it is a trunk group
port, it should be the primary port of the trunk group. The MCT session VLAN subnet is not
distributed in routing protocols using redistribute commands.
MCT keep-alive VLAN: The VLAN that provides a backup control path in the event that ICL goes
down.
Cluster Communication Protocol (CCP): A Brocade proprietary protocol that provides reliable,
point-to-point transport to synchronize information between MCT cluster devices. It is the
default MCT control path between the two peer devices. CCP comprises two main components:
CCP peer management and CCP client management. CCP peer management deals with
establishing, and maintaining a TCP transport session between peers, while CCP client
management provides event-based, reliable packet transport to CCP peers.
Cluster Client Edge Port (CCEP): A physical port or trunk group interface on an MCT cluster
device that is connected to client devices.
Cluster Edge Port (CEP): A port on an MCT cluster device that belongs to the MCT VLAN and
connects to an upstream core switch/router, but is neither a CCEP not an ICL.

16

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

RBridgeID: RBridgeID is a value assigned to MCT cluster devices and clients to uniquely identify
them, and helps in associating the source MAC address with an MCT device.

How MCT works

The MCT initiates at a single MCT-unaware server or switch and terminates at two MCT-aware
devices.

Configuring MCT
This section provides basic configuration steps, which should be completed in the specified
order.

Step 1: Configure LAG.


Step 2: Configure the session VLAN and recommended keep-alive VLAN
Step 3: Configure the cluster
Step 4: Configure clients

After completing these steps, you can verify the configuration by running the show cluster
command
Step 1: Configure LAG

ICL LAG only supports static trunks.


To configure a static LAG, enter the following commands.
Brocade-1 (config)# lag MCT_lag1 static id 2
17

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

Brocade-1(config-lag-MCT_lag1)# ports ethernet 1/17 to 1/18


Brocade-1(config-lag-MCT_lag1)# primary-port 1/17
Brocade-1(config-lag-MCT_lag1)# deploy
Step 2: Configure the session VLAN and keep-alive VLAN
Enter the following commands.
device-1(config)# vlan 3001 name MCT-keep-alive
device-1(config-vlan-3001)# tagged ethernet 1/9
device-1(config-vlan-3001)# exit
device-1(config)# vlan 3000 name Session-VLAN
device-1(config-vlan-3000)# tagged ether 1/7 to 1/8
device-1(config-vlan-3000)# no spanning-tree
For routers, add the following commands.
device-1(config-vlan-3000)# router-interface ve 3000
device-1(config)# interface ve 3000
device-1(config-vif-3000)# ip address 10.1.1.3/24
Step 3: Configure the cluster

Configuration of the peer device involves the peer's IP address, RBridgeID, and ICL
specification. The cluster-id variable must be the same on both cluster devices.

The RBridgeID must be different from the cluster RBridge and any other client in the cluster.
device-1(config)#cluster SX 4000
device-1(config-cluster-SX)#rbridge-id 3
device-1(config-cluster-SX)#session-vlan 3000
device-1(config-cluster-SX)#keep-alive-vlan 3001
device-1(config-cluster-SX)#icl SX-MCT ethernet 1/7
device-1(config-cluster-SX)#peer 10.1.1.2 rbridge-id 2 icl SX-MCT
device-1(config-cluster-SX)#deploy

Step 4: Configure clients


Client configuration requires the client name, RBridgeID, and CCEP.
The client RBridgeID must be identical on both of the cluster devices.
device-1(config-cluster-SX)# client client-2
device-1(config-cluster-SX-client-1)#rbridge-id 200
device-1(config-cluster-SX-client-1)#client-interface ether 1/5
device-1(config-cluster-SX-client-1)#deploy
18

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

Displaying MCT information

Use the show cluster config command to display the peer device and client states.
device#show cluster SXR122 config
cluster SXR122 100
rbridge-id 100
session-vlan 1
keep-alive-vlan 3
icl SXR122-MCT ethernet 1/1
peer 172.17.0.2 rbridge-id 101 icl SXR122-MCT
deploy
client KL134
rbridge-id 14
client-interface ethernet 1/23
deploy
device#show cluster 1 client
Cluster 1 1
===================
Rbridge Id: 101, Session Vlan: 3999, Keep-Alive Vlan: 4001
Cluster State: Deploy
Client Isolation Mode: Loose
Configured Member Vlan Range: 100 to 105
Active Member Vlan Range: 100 to 105
MCT Peer's Reachability status using Keep-Alive Vlan: Peer Reachable
Client Info:
-----------Client: c1, rbridge-id: 300, Deployed
Client Port: 3/11
State: Up
Number of times Local CCEP down: 0
Number of times Remote CCEP down: 0
Number of times Remote Client undeployed: 0
Total CCRR packets sent: 4
Total CCRR packets received: 3
Some show commands for MCT troubleshooting
device#show cluster 1 ccp peer
device#show interface ethernet 7/1
device#show span

19

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

F. Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol Enhanced

VRRP-e is Brocades enhanced version of VRRP that overcomes limitations in the standard
protocol

All routers start as backup


The router with the highest priority becomes the master
If there is a tie for highest priority, the router with the highest interface IP
address becomes master
The VIP is a unique IP address on the same subnet as the VRRP-e routers
There is no concept of an owner IP address, as a real interface IP is not used
The elected master hosts the VIP address and answers ICMP requests
VRRP-e uses UDP (port 8888) to send multicast hello messages to the "all routers"
multicast address 224.0.0.2

VRRP-e Master Selection


All VRRP-E routers start as a backup and send hello messages to determine the master router
Router with highest VRRP-E priority becomes master
Master sends hellos as a keep-alive and responds to ARP and ICMP requests (i.e. ping)

20

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

Example of Multiple VRRP-e Virtual Routers

Configuring VRRP-e

To configure the first VRRP-e virtual router from the example on the privies slide1:
Router_A(config)# router vrrp-extended
Router_A(config-VRRP-e-router)# interface ethernet 1
Router_A(config-if-e100-1)# ip address 192.53.5.2/24
Router_A(config-if-e100-1)# ip vrrp-extended vrid 1
Router_A(config-if-e100-1-vrid-1)# backup priority 110 track-priority 20
Router_A(config-if-e100-1-vrid-1)# ip-address 192.53.5.1
21

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

Router_A(config-if-e100-1-vrid-1)# track-port ethernet 16


Router_A(config-if-e100-1-vrid-1)# activate
VRRP-e router 1 for this interface is activating

Verify VRRP-e Configuration Master


Router_A(config)# show ip vrrp-e
Total number of VRRP-Extended routers defined: 2
Interface ethernet 1
auth-type no authentication
VRID 1
state master
administrative-status enabled
Virtual MAC 02e0.5279.a401
priority 110
current priority 110
track-priority 20
hello-interval 1 sec
dead-interval 0 sec
current dead-interval 3.500 sec
preempt-mode true
virtual ip address 192.53.5.1
advertise backup: disabled
next hello sent in 00:00:00
track-port 16(up)

Verify VRRP-e Configuration Backup


Router_B(config)# show ip vrrp-e
Total number of VRRP-Extended routers defined: 2
Interface ethernet 1
auth-type no authentication
VRID 1
state backup
administrative-status enabled
Virtual MAC 02e0.5279.a401
priority 100
current priority 100
track-priority 20
hello-interval 1 sec
dead-interval 0 sec
22

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

current dead-interval 3.600 sec


preempt-mode true
virtual ip address 192.53.5.1
advertise backup: disabled
master router 192.53.5.2 expires in 00:00:03
track-port 12(up)

Troubleshooting VRRP-e
Router_A(config)# show ip vrrp-e
Total number of VRRP-Extended routers defined: 2
Interface ethernet 1
auth-type no authentication
VRID 1
state initialize
administrative-status enabled
Virtual MAC 02e0.5279.a401
priority 110
current priority 110
track-priority 20
hello-interval 1 sec
dead-interval 0 sec
current dead-interval 3.500 sec
preempt-mode true
virtual ip address 192.53.5.1
advertise backup: disabled
track-port 16(up)
Router_A(config)# show ip vrrp-e
Total number of VRRP-Extended routers defined: 2
Interface ethernet 1
auth-type no authentication
VRID 1
state backup
administrative-status enabled
Virtual MAC 02e0.5279.a401
priority 110
current priority 90
track-priority 20
hello-interval 1 sec
dead-interval 0 sec
23

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

current dead-interval 3.500 sec


preempt-mode true
virtual ip address 192.53.5.1
advertise backup: disabled
master router 192.53.5.3 expires in 00:00:03
track-port 16(down)

Optional VRRP-e Configuration


Non-preempt-mode
The non-preempt-mode prevents a VRRP-e router with a higher priority than a currently healthy
master from automatically taking ownership of the VRID
Preempt-mode is enabled by default allowing failback to a reinstated master to occur
automatically
Configured on each VRID
Router_A(config-if-e100-1-vrid-1)# non-preempt-mode
Slow start
By default, after a failover, if the master becomes available again it takes over as master
immediately
Slow Start timer causes a configured amount of time to elapse before the master is restored
This interval allows time for OSPF convergence when the master is restored
Single setting for all VRIDs entered in seconds
FastIron switches
FES(config)# router vrrp-e
FES(config-VRRP-e-router)# slow-start 30
Non FastIron switches
Non-FES(config)# vrrp-e slow-start 30

Summary

VRRP and VRRP-e provide redundancy to default gateways servicing hosts on the same subnet
Allows an alternate router path for a host without changing the IP address or MAC
address of its gateway
Reliability is achieved by advertising a virtual router as the default gateway
VRRP-e is Brocades enhanced version of VRRP that overcomes limitations in the
standard protocol
VIP can be any unused IP address within the same subnet
Can ping VIP regardless of who is master

24

BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

TRAINING GUIDE

2014 Brocade Communications Systems, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


ADX, AnyIO, Brocade, Brocade Assurance, the B-wing symbol, DCX, Fabric OS, ICX, MLX, MyBrocade, OpenScript, VCS, VDX, and Vyatta are
registered trademarks, and HyperEdge, The Effortless Network, and The On-Demand Data Center are trademarks of Brocade
Communications Systems, Inc., in the United States and/or in other countries. Other brands, products, or service names mentioned may
be trademarks of their respective owners.
Notice: This document is for informational purposes only and does not set forth any warranty, expressed or implied, concerning any
equipment, equipment feature, or service offered or to be offered by Brocade. Brocade reserves the right to make changes to this
document at any time, without notice, and assumes no responsibility for its use. This informational document describes features that may
not be currently available. Contact a Brocade sales office for information on feature and product availability. Export of technical data
contained in this document may require an export license from the United States government.

25