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Islam Barrage is a barrage on the River Sutlej in Vehari District of

the Punjab province ofPakistan.


Islam Barrage is used for irrigation and flood control.
It is about five miles south of Luddan on the Vehari-Hasilpur road (N
29 49' 0.01" E 72 33' 0.00").It was completed as Sutlej Valley Project
for irrigation of Nili Bar in 1927. 1650 feet long with design discharge
of 300,000 cusecs, it has two off taking larger canals which irrigate
689,000 acres of land in Southern Punjab and 700, 000 acres in the
former State of Bahawalpur. Mailsi Canal (5400 cusecs) arises from its
right Bank and Bahawal Canal (5400 cusecs) from the left. A third
smaller canal is called Qaim Canal (558 cusecs) also arising from the
left bank.
According to a report, Islam Headworks is in distress owing to aging,
design deficiencies, constructional defects, hydraulic and mechanical
problems, inadequate operation, maintenance and drastic changes in
river morphology as a result of implementation of Indus Water Treaty
of 1960. http://nation.com.pk/national/03-Nov-2010/Lack-of-fundsthreatens-Islam-Headworks
The major problem was inadequate flood passage capacity of barrage
in relation to flood intensities developed over a 100-year return period.
The aging process along with inadequate/deferred maintenance had
contributed to a general deterioration of different components of the
structure.

The poor structural state of the headworks has been documented to


be poor in June 1998, due to inattention, lack of interest, and the
operations of the headwork has suffered. Every September when the
flood level rise and India releases a large amount of water, it creates
havoc in areas downstream from the head works.
A feasibility study and detailed designs was prepared in 2008 to
rehabilitate the Headworks. However due to lack of interest,
inefficiency at the government level and absence of confidence/trust of
International Financial Institutions (IFIs) has contributed to postpone
the rehabilitation. World Bank (WB) has given verbal assurance for
financing the rehabilitation of Islam headworks but it would be only
after rehabilitation of another barrage (Jinnah). More recently the
Punjab government has obtained assurances from the World Bank
and the Provincial Government of Shahbaz Sharif has begun to take
interest in rehabilitation of the headworks. 2013 floods which caused a
significant damage throughout Punjab may have been an impetus in
leading to this more proactive policy.
According to a 2011 report River Sutlej at this point is the most
polluted river in South Asia. The combined unregulated discharge of
Urban and Industrial waste during its course through India and later
Pakistan is the most likely source of this problem.

Lack of funds threatens Islam Headworks


November 03, 2010

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ISLAMABAD - Absence of financing from both the central and the provincial
(Punjab) government and refusal from the International Financial
Institutions (IFIs) to finance rehabilitation and up gradation of Islam
headworks have raised grave questions as the headworks reportedly pose
a threat of serious damages in the event of high flood in the river.
Islam barrage, located about six miles north-west of Hasilpur town, was
constructed on river Sutlej during 1922-27 to irrigate vast area of 0.
689 million acres in the defunct state of Bahwalpur and 0.
7 million acres falling in Punjab as a component of Sutlej Valley Project
initially for feeding Bahwal Canal (5,400 cusecs) and Qaim Canal (558
cusecs) on the left bank and Mailsi Canal (5,400 cusecs) on the right bank.
Further, the command area of Bahawl canal is however composed of
mostly braickish zone.
The population benefiting from its canal system is nearly 0.
20 million falling in Bahawalpur district.
Well placed Official sources have informed that Islam headwork was in
distress owing to aging, design deficiencies, constructional defects,
hydraulic and mechanical problems, inadequate operation, maintenance
and drastic changes in river morphology as a result of implementation of
Indus Water Treaty of 1960.
The major problem at the headwork was inadequate flood passage
capacity of barrage in relation to flood intensities developed over a 100year return period.
They were of the view that the aging process along with

inadequate/deferred maintenance had contributed to a general


deterioration of different components of the structure.
The consultants engaged in June 1998 to assess the general health of the
infrastructure had declared the barrage to be unsafe and desired a priority
attention for its safe operation.
A former secretary irrigation Punjab and an expert on barrages on condition
of anonymity said that after the functioning of Indus Water Treaty, in every
September as dams in India filled with floodwaters then this floodwater
reached in Bhawalpur area and played havoc.
He further warned both the governments to avoid delay in rehabilitation of
this barrage to avert the risk of barrage failure in future.
He informed that after feasibility study of Islam headwork/barrage, detailed
designs was prepared in 2008 to rehabilitate them after the
recommendations of consultants but due to lack of interest, inefficiency at
the government level and absence of confidence/trust of International
Financial Institutions (IFIs) on present democratically elected government
contributed a lot to postpone the rehabilitation of this much needed
headwork/ barrage.
However, it was the responsibility of the central and provincial government
to mobilise and generate funds for the rehabilitation of this barrage, he
added.
However, Mian Israrul Haq, Chief Strategic Planning Irrigation Department
(Punjab) while talking to TheNation has informed that World Bank (WB) has
given verbal assurance for financing the rehabilitation of Islam headworks
but it would be after rehabilitation of Jinnah barrage almost in 2011.

He informed that WB had financed for the feasibility and design study of the
barrage but rehabilitation of Islam headworks was out of their port folio as
this year it was financing for Jinnah Barrage.
He further commented that politics and lack of curiosity on the part of IFIs
had postponed the fate of rehabilitation of Islam barrage to 2011.
It is worth mentioning to note that suitable scheme needs to be chalked out
for the safe passage of floodwaters as the barrage operation ran into
difficulty soon after its construction in 1927.
Even the geometry of existing training works is not adequate to face the
design flood flow discharge in the river and the retired flood embankments
needs massive up gradation and for safety assurance, provision of wetting
channels along the river side is essential on the pattern of other barrages in
Punjab.
Moreover, the operation defects are now being experienced quite
frequently on account of aging effects and deferred maintenance.
The manual operation of the gates is also becoming quite cumbersome in
the current environments.
The renovation of the gates system and up gradation of support facilities is
therefore immediately required.
Again, the pressure pipes installed at barrage have mostly gone out of
order or covered by road bridge deck after its reconstruction and widening.
Both manual and automatic data acquisition system should be installed at
the barrage to monitor the condition of subsoil flow and uplift pressure
being exerted under the downstream floor.

Panjnad River (Urdu/Punjabi Shahmukhi:


, Punjabi Gurmukhi ) (panj = five, nadi = river) is a river at the
extreme end of Bahawalpur district in Punjab, Pakistan. Panjnad River
is formed by successive confluence of the five rivers of Punjab,
namely Jhelum, Chenab, Ravi,Beas and Sutlej. Jhelum and Ravi join
Chenab, Beas joins Sutlej, and then Sutlej and Chenab join to form
Panjnad 10 miles north of Uch Sharif in Bahawalpur district. The
combined stream runs southwest for approximately 45 miles and
joins Indus River at Mithankot. The Indus continues into the Arabian
Sea. A barrage on Panjnad has been erected; it provides irrigation
channels for Punjab and Sindh provinces south of the Sutlej and east
of the Indus rivers.
Beyond the confluence of Indus and Panjnad rivers, the Indus river
was known as Satnad (Sat = seven) carrying the waters of seven
rivers including Indus river, which is believed to be in earlier times
the Saraswati/Ghaggar/Hakra river which eventually dried and
became a seasonal river due to seismic shifts in the glacial region
of Himachal Pradesh where it originated and later on Kabul river and
the five rivers of Punjab.

PANJNAD BARRAGE
OVERVIEW OF BARRAGE:

The Panjnad barrage is the last barrage constructed on River Chenab at downstream conflu
barrage was constructed in 1925 -1929 with design discharge of 450,000 cusec and upstream
million acres of Bahawalpur and Rahimyar Khan districts by diverting 11882 cusecs.

SALIENT FEATURES:
Barrage Data
Maximum designed capacity

700,000 cusec

Maximum recorded flood in 1973

802,516 cusec

Total width between abutments

3,400 ft.

Clear water way

2,820 ft. (47 bays of


60 ft. each)

Minimum U/S flood level R.L. 341.5

R.L. 341.50 ft.

Minimum D/S flood level

R.L. 340.30 ft.

Pond level - normal

R.L. 337.50 ft.


Off-Taking Canal Data

Panjnad Canal

Abbasia Canal

Abbasia Link Canal

Capacity (Cusec)

7,769

Crest level

R.L. 332.5

Floor level

R.L. 320.00

Full Supply Level (FSL)

R.L. 335.70

No. of bays

12

Width of each bay (ft.)

18 ft. each (2 Nos.)


26 ft. each (10 Nos.)

Capacity (Cusec)

1,064

Crest level

R.L. 330.00

Floor level

R.L. 320.00

Full Supply Level (FSL)

R.L. 336.10

No. of bays

Width of each bay (ft.)

20

Capacity (Cusec)

5,600

Crest level

R.L. 330.00

Floor level

R.L. 325.90

Full Supply Level (FSL)

R.L. 335.40

No. of bays

Width of each bay (ft.)

25

REHBILITATION AND UPGRADATION WORKS


o Extension of upstream floor and providing additional sheet
piles

o Providing 3" to 4" thick Layer of Shotcrete on the Existing


Barrage Floor
o Installation of Piezometers
o Providing Surveillance Cameras and Telecommunication
Network at the Barrage
o Rehabilitation of the Barrage and canal gates & hoists,
including Motorization of gates with local control
o Replacement of the Barrage Road Bridge Deck
o Construction/Rehabilitation of Infrastructure and Buildings

Priority need for Rehabilitation and Up-gradation of barrages


Punjab barrages play vital role in sustaining supplies to the irrigated lands in the
province.
These barrages are serving since last 50 to 110 years. Most of these structures have
outlived
their life and need rehabilitation. Irrigation Department has planned to rehabilitate and
modernize the century old barrages in a phased program. Taunsa barrage, the most critical
barrage was taken up first on priority during April 2005 with the financial assistance of
the
World Bank and the project has since been completed ahead of the schedule completion
date.
Similarly, Jinnah and Punjnad barrages on Indus River, Trimmu barrage at Jhelum and
Chenab River, Khanki at Chenab River, Balloki at Ravi River, and Sulemanki & Islam at
Sutlej River have been identified for prioritized investment.

Sutlej flows down to Bahawalpur but with


poisonous waters
Sutlej River is flowing down the Empress Bridge, near Bahawalpur, due to heavy
rains in northern India thanks to the early arrival of the monsoon. More water is
expected this year. Reports suggest that it was in high flood last week inHimachal
Pradeshand the waters had reached Ferozepur district of Indian Punjab on July 9.
The people in Bahawalpur districtare pleasantly surprised to see waters in the Sutlej

River, for it has become almost a dead stream due to Pakistan accepting Indias
exclusive rights over it through the Indus Basin Treaty of 1960. The water table on
its banks has sunk down to 120 ft which was available at 20 ft at times it used to
carry floods.
The waters of Sutlej River are harnessed through a number of dams and canal
headworks by India.Bhakra Dam is the major reservoir wherefrom canals carry its
waters to Punjab and Haryana. Indira Gandhi canal carries the waters of Sutlej as
far as Rajasthan. If something is left, it is diverted by Pakistan at headworks of Islam
and Sulemanki constructed under Sutlej Valley scheme in 1927. It is only rarely that
waters are released to reach Head Panjnad.
The waters of Ravi and Beas have also been added to Sutlej in India through link
canals and are being used for the agricultural purpose. Intensive cultivation and the
mushrooming of industry utilizing the agricultural produce in its catchment areahave
made the Sutlej the most polluted river of South Asia. The unrestrained use of
pesticides in agriculture and industrial waste being diverted to the river makes its
water E class in Doaba region.
The people in Farid Kot, who are using the waters of Sutlej to quench their thirst and
to cater to the needs of agriculture, are developing deformities. A report of Punjab
Pollution Control Board (PPCB) prepared after various tests on the rivers waters, at
various points in the 2010, rated Sutlej waters as A class (pure) at
Nangalheadworks, which become E class and D class (highly unfit for drinking)
respectively at the confluence of BudhaNullah in Ludhiana and East Bein or Chitti
Bein in the Doaba region.