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1. The Construction ... ...

¯

The Hebrew way to express the idea of “my stomach hearts”, “her head hearts”, “your ears heart”, and so on, is by using the construction ... ... ¯ (koev le… ha…). For example: Daniel’s stomach hurts. Your (f.) head hurts. My legs hurt. It’s a pity for her. (literally: Her heart hurts). Notice that the verb ¯ (ko’ev, “hurt”) in these sentences conjugates according to the body part that hurts and not according to the person suffering. The table below demonstrates this point: ha-rosh ha-gav ha-garon ha-beten ha-yad ha-ozen ha-raglayim ha-shinayim ha-oznayim 2. Verb Conjugations – The Verbs and ¯ le… ... (le-Dani, le-Ruti… ... li lexa lax lo la ko’avot ¯ ko’evet ¯ , ) ko’ev ¯ . . . . ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ Ko’evet le-Daniel ha-beten. Ko’ev lax ha-rosh. Ko’avot li ha-raglayim. Ko’ev la ha-lev.

The conjugation of the verb (yashen, “sleep”) in the present tense does not correspond to any of the conjugations presented so far: / yeshenot / / yeshenim / / yeshena / / yashen / sleep

Lesson 21
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Another new conjugation is that of the verb ¯ (yaxol, “can”): / yexolot / ¯ / yexolim / ¯ / yexola / ¯ / yaxol / ¯ can

3. Abbreviated Words One way to abbreviate a Hebrew word in writing is to use inverted commas. For instance, (doctor, “MD”) is " . The pronunciation of the abbreviated written form of the title the word stays unchanged.

Lesson 21
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