New Media Training Institute at Creating Change  Thursday, February 4, 2010      Contents    1. NMTI Information  2. NMTI Schedule  3. NMTI Speakers and Presenters  4. Bios  5. Materials  a. Mobile Commons  b. New Organizing Institute  6.

Evaluations                                               

 

New Media Training Institute at Creating Change  Thursday, February 4, 2010  NMTI Information 
  Thank You  GLAAD thanks the Gill Foundation and Gill Action for making the New Media Training Institute possible.  GLAAD  would also like to give a special thanks to AT&T for your invaluable help with NMTI.      GLAAD also thanks our incredible speakers and presenters: Jed Alpert, Heather Cronk, Scott Goodstein,  Christopher Hoyt, Jen Nedeau, Gregory Rae, Julia Rosen and Fred Sainz.  Thanks to New Organizing Institute  Trainings and Events Coordinator Nick Gaw.  Thanks to GLAAD staff and fellows for all of your work on NMTI:   Rashad Robinson, Allison Palmer, Amanda Morgan, Anna Wipfler, Brendan Davis, Dannie Tillman, Adam Bass, April  Domino, Elliot Imse, and GLAAD President Jarrett Barrios.      Finally, GLAAD thanks the staff of the Creating Change Conference and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force  (NGLTF).    NMTI Location   Sheraton Dallas Hotel (@sheratondallas on Twitter, "Sheraton Dallas Hotel" on Foursquare.com)  400 North Olive Street, Dallas, TX  State Rooms 3 & 4, Conference Center Third Floor  214‐922‐8000      NMTI Twitter Information  Include the NMTI hashtag #NMTI as well as the Creating Change hashtag #cc10 in your tweets so that everyone  can follow easily.  Twitter info for our speakers can be found on the Speakers and Presenters page.      Video  The lunch presentation, "Learning from Obama Campaign Successes and Making the Most Out of New Trends,"  may not be recorded in its entirety.  If you are interested in recording parts of the other sessions, please first get  permission from the session's speaker or trainer.      Questions during the training  Please find these GLAAD staff members during the training: Allison Palmer, Rashad Robinson, Dannie Tillman and  Adam Bass.  You can also email questions to palmer@glaad.org or call/text 323‐497‐4124.  If you have questions  about the hotel, please contact 214‐922‐8000     .   About GLAAD  The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) is dedicated to promoting and ensuring fair, accurate and  inclusive representation of people and events in the media as a means of eliminating homophobia and  discrimination based on gender identity and sexual orientation.     Find GLAAD at glaad.org, glaadblog.org, facebook.com/glaad and twitter.com/glaad.   

 

New Media Training Institute at Creating Change  Thursday, February 4, 2010 

Time  8:30AM‐9:00AM  9:00AM‐9:20AM 

Beginner Track Sign In and Breakfast

Advanced Track 

Welcome, Introductions, Goals & Objectives  Fred Sainz, Gill Foundation  Rashad Robinson and Allison Palmer, GLAAD  Overview: How the LGBT Community Currently Uses New Media  to Reach Advocacy Goals  Gregory Rae, Living Liberally  Using and Integrating New Media Tools:  Part 1  Jen Nedeau, Former Director of Digital  Strategy for Air America Media  Using and Integrating New Media Tools:  Part 2   Jen Nedeau, Former Director of Digital  Strategy for Air America Media  Using Social Media to Monitor Your  Brand, Campaigns and Opposition  Chris Hoyt, AT&T 

9:20AM‐10:00AM 

10:10AM‐11:00AM 

11:10‐12:00PM 

Using Mobile in Advocacy Campaigns Jed Alpert, Mobile Commons   

12:15PM‐1:00PM   

Lunch and Speaker Learning from Obama Campaign Successes and Making the Most Out of New Trends  Scott Goodstein, Revolution Messaging LLC,   Former External Online Director for Obama for America  Best Practices for Developing Social  Media Campaigns   Heather Cronk, New Organizing Institute  (NOI)  Break Integrating Social Media Into Advocacy  Campaigns   Heather Cronk, New Organizing Institute   Developing Social Media Plans for Your  Organization   Heather Cronk, New Organizing Institute   Integrating Social Media Into Advocacy  Campaigns   Julia Rosen, New Organizing Institute   Developing Social Media Plans for Your  Organization   Julia Rosen, New Organizing Institute   Best Practices for Developing Social  Media Campaigns   Julia Rosen, New Organizing Institute  (NOI) 

1:15PM‐2:30PM   

2:30PM‐2:45PM  2:45PM‐4:00PM 

4:00PM‐6:00PM   

6:00PM‐6:30PM   

Closing Jarrett Barrios, President of GLAAD  Rashad Robinson, Senior Director of Programs, GLAAD 

New Media Training Institute at Creating Change  Speakers and Trainers 
  Jed Alpert  Founder, Mobile Commons   Twitter: @mobilecommons     Jarrett Barrios  President, GLAAD   Twitter: @glaad, @JarrettBarrios     Heather Cronk  Chief Operating Officer, New Organizing Institute   Twitter: @hcronk, @neworganizing     Scott Goodstein  Revolution Messaging LLC, Former External Online  Director for Obama for America     Christopher Hoyt, PHR  Associate Director, AT&T Talent Attraction   Twitter: @TheRecruiterGuy     Jen Nedeau  Former Director of Digital Strategy for   Air America Media   Twitter: @humanfolly       Allison Palmer  Director of Digital Initiatives, GLAAD   Twitter: @glaad     Gregory Rae  Living Liberally    Rashad Robinson  Senior Director of Programs, GLAAD   Twitter: @rashadrobinson, @glaad     Julia Rosen  Trainer with New Organizing Institute and Online  Political Director at Courage Campaign   Twitter: @juliarosen     Fred Sainz  Vice President, Communications & Marketing,   Gill Foundation         

  Bios 
    Jed Alpert is founder of Mobile Commons and Chief Strategy Officer. Previously he served as the President of  Sunshine Amalgamedia where he developed an innovative syndication sponsorship model, commissioning  top young directors to make short films for multiple distribution networks with nationally branded  sponsorship. Sunshine partners, clients, and customers have included Microsoft, Oracle, Scripps Howard, and  others. Additionally, while at Sunshine, Jed oversaw the production of feature films and developed television.    Prior to joining Sunshine, Jed worked as an attorney, focusing his practice on entertainment and media law.  During his time practicing law at Rudolph and Beer, and as an associate at Paul Weiss, Jed's clients included  films such as Slingblade, Hurricane Streets, Sunday, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, The Cruise, Next Stop  Wonderland, Three Seasons, and Star Maps. He represented companies such as Open City Films, Rhino  Entertainment and Sonic Net.    Jed has produced numerous feature films including Sunday, winner of the 1997 Sundance Film Festival Grand  Jury Prize and the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award. He has also served on the board of a number of film  festivals and arts organizations, including Genart, The Newport Film Festival and Thread Waxing Space.    

Jarrett Tomás Barrios began his tenure as the President of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation  (GLAAD) in September 2009. Barrios is known for his work as a human rights advocate and former state  legislator, and is proud of his role as a husband and father of two teenage sons.   Under Barrios' leadership, GLAAD advocates for full equality for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender  (LGBT) community –and challenges discrimination—not in court rooms or in Congress, but where attitudes  towards LGBT people are formed ‐ TV and news outlets that reach the living rooms of America, faith  communities, virtual communities, entertainment, sports and more.     Barrios joined GLAAD after serving nine years in the Massachusetts legislature and two and a half years  advocating for access to care and coverage for residents of Massachusetts as the president of the Blue Cross  Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation. He was the first Latino and first openly gay man elected to the  state Senate. While in the legislature, Barrios served as the chair of the Public Safety and Homeland Security  Committee and Vice‐Chair of the Health Care Committee. He also chaired the Massachusetts Black Legislative  Caucus and founded its Latino Caucus, along with Oíste, the statewide organization advancing the standing of  Latinos in Massachusetts, and the Commonwealth Seminar to promote the inclusion of underrepresented  minorities in politics. He was named Legislator of the Year by organizations as diverse as the Massachusetts  Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition, the Disabled American Veterans, Metropolitan Area Planning  Council and the Massachusetts Senior Action Council.     As a state Senator, Barrios successfully helped lead the legislative effort to protect marriage equality in  Massachusetts, and is best known for a globally televised speech where he spoke on discrimination faced by  his own family. In the legislature, he pioneered the legislative approach to anti‐bullying education, succeeded  in codifying the state Gay and Lesbian Youth Commission to prevent teen suicide and make schools safe for  LGBT youth, wrote the state's buffer zone law around women's health facilities and other progressive issues.  Barrios has been an advocate for equality since co‐chairing Harvard's LGBT student organization in the late  1980s and the Boston Gay and Lesbian Anti‐Violence Project in the early 1990s. In 2004, he was named to the  inaugural "Hall of Fame" by the Equality Forum in Philadelphia.    The son of a carpenter and a social worker, Barrios worked three jobs to help put himself through college at  Harvard, where he graduated magna cum laude. He received his J.D. with honors from Georgetown  University Law Center. His pro bono work as an attorney included the first successful petition of a gay  Dominican man for asylum in the United States. He is also active in progressive issues at the national level as  vice‐chair of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America Action Fund, and member of the board of  Families, USA and the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights.     He resides in Boston with his husband Doug and their two children, and splits time between GLAAD's New  York and Los Angeles offices. www.glaad.org    Heather Cronk is the Chief Operating Officer at the New Organizing Institute, overseeing NOI's growing  operations and planning strategically for NOI's programs. Prior to her work at NOI, Heather worked with  PledgeBank <www.pledgebank.com>, a project of mySociety <www.mysociety.org> , reaching out to  organizations and individuals across the country to encourage use of PledgeBank as a tool for local  community organizing and citizen‐centered collective action. Heather's background is in campus organizing ‐‐  she worked with Idealist.org's campus program, traveling nationally to train at campuses and conferences,  running day‐to‐day operations for the program, helping to organize a 1,500‐person national conference on  student engagement and activism, and building a network of engaged university programs and nonprofit  organizations. A native of Lexington, KY, Heather holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in religion/philosophy from  Berry College in Rome, GA, and a Master of Divinity degree from Wake Forest University Divinity School in  Winston‐Salem, NC. 

Scott Goodstein was External Online Director for Obama for America, and developed the campaign's social  networking platforms. His pioneering work included running the first political campaign effort to launch niche  based social networks like BlackPlanet, Eons, MiGente, AsianAve, Disaboom, etc. He built the campaign's  lifestyle marketing strategy and developed the "street team" materials used in battleground states.  Goodstein also created and implemented Obama Mobile, an advanced communication strategy that included  text messaging, downloads, interactive voice response communication, a mobile web site (WAP), and even an  iPhone application. Prior to his work at Obama for America, Goodstein worked for the Democratic Legislative  Campaign Committee, Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, and over two dozen progressive  political initiatives. In 2004, Goodstein co‐founded Punkvoter.com and Rock Against Bush which became a $4  million young voter mobilization effort. He has conducted political trainings for the National Democratic  Institute, UNICEF, Democracy for America, the Campaign Management Institute, and the New Organizing  Institute.    Goodstein has spoken at Columbia University, The American University, The George Washington University,  and The Milken Institute. He has been a featured speaker at events in Morocco, Hungary, Finland, Singapore  and Malaysia. www.revolutionmessaging.com/about    Christopher Hoyt, PHR, is the Associate Director at AT&T Talent Attraction. In his current role he leads the  integration of social media and mobile marketing within a workforce strategy that includes search engine  marketing and optimization for the Talent Attraction teams at AT&T. The strongest focus of his work lies with  Social/Interactive Recruiting, Candidate Experience, on both national and regional based strategies. Chris  works towards maximizing the return on investment through cutting edge tracking methods of  implementation because of his passion for driving towards change within the recruiting industry. His current  thought streams and voice around what's occurring in today's talent management industry can be found on  his personal blog, www.RecruiterGuy.net or via his Twitter stream at www.twitter.com/TheRecruiterGuy     Jen Nedeau works as a new media consultant, writer, progressive activist and feminist speaker based in New  York City. From June 2009 ‐ January 2010, Jen worked as the Director of Digital Strategy for Air America  Media, where she has helped transition radio, a legacy medium, into the age of the Internet. From August  2008 – December 2009, Jen pursued her passion for writing and activism by serving as Editor of the Women's  Rights Blog for Change.org where she facilitated daily discussion about the feminist movement as it related to  politics, technology and social norms. Previously, Jen worked for New Media Strategies where she employed  online campaigns for Fortune 500 companies utilizing the power of social media to promote and protect  clients. Jen has given speeches about the state of the feminist movement and the evolution of social media in  front of audiences at Organize 2.0, STAND Against Genocide Conference, Netroots Nation, Princeton's  Woodrow Wilson School, Politics Online Conference, YWCA's 150th Anniversary and many other locations.  She also volunteers as the Chief Technology Officer for New Leaders Council and first began her career by  pursuing political journalism at The George Washington University's School of Media and Public Affairs. You  can learn more at www.jennedeau.com and follow her on Twitter @HumanFolly.    Allison Palmer is the Director of Digital Initiatives at GLAAD. Before joining GLAAD in late 2009, she was the  Online Strategy & Digital Media Manager at The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center in  New York City, the second largest LGBT community center in the world. Prior to that, she served as Co‐ Director of May First Technology Collective/Media Jumpstart, where she developed and implemented digital  tools for social justice organizations. She has been working in digital since 1999, when she worked for the  National Employment Law Project and launched their first website. She also volunteers with the Sylvia Rivera  Law Project and other local organizations. www.glaad.org, facebook.com/glaad, twitter.com/glaad     

Gregory Rae is a member of the national leadership of Living Liberally, an organization dedicated to creating  social spaces centered around progressive politics. After 5 years as an engineer at Google in charge of log  analysis and reporting, he got involved in online political and non‐profit organizing. In September 2008, he  became tech lead for the No On 8 campaign, where he oversaw the website, online outreach, and data  analytics. He continues to advise marriage equality organizations (including One Iowa and Maine's No On 1  campaign in 2009). He has served on Lambda Legal's National Leadership Council since 2008.     Rashad Robinson is the Senior Director of Programs at GLAAD. He has been with the organization since 2005.  In his current role, he oversees the advocacy work of the Media Programs team as they work with lesbian,  gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) advocates and media professionals alike to promote fair, accurate and  inclusive media coverage of the LGBT community. Before joining GLAAD, Rashad served as National  Communications Director for the Right to Vote Campaign, a national collaboration of eight major civil rights  organizations working on voter disenfranchisement. He also served as National Field Director with the Center  for Voting and Democracy. In 2003, Rashad served as lead organizer for the Claim Democracy Conference,  which featured national civil rights leaders, presidential candidates and congressional leaders.    He has been a featured spokesperson on an array of issues in print, radio and television, and in 2004 he  appeared as the youngest contestant on Showtime's Political Reality series American Candidate. A graduate  of Marymount University in Arlington, VA, Rashad was a Politics major with a minor in History and  Communications. He is also a graduate of the acclaimed SPIN Project Media Academy in Petaluma, Calif. and  currently sits on the board of directors for FairVote. www.glaad.org    Julia Rosen is the Online Political Director at the Courage Campaign. Julia got her start in politics working for  Common Cause. She moved out to California to work for the Alliance for a Better California, where she wrote  over 2,000 posts on why Arnold Schwarzenegger is not a Democrat. Julia continued her work within the labor  movement serving as the Online Communications Director for Working Californians. Her background is in  connecting the netroots and the labor movement to bring about progressive change. She is currently an  editor at Calitics and a regular contributor to Crooks and Liars, when she isn't blogging at her personal site  Ruck Pad. Julia currently serves as a trainer for the New Organizing Institute.    Fred Sainz is Vice President of Communications & Marketing at the Gill Foundation. He brings twenty years of  media relations, public affairs, and crisis communications experience to his post as the Gill Foundation's vice  president of communications and marketing. Just prior to assuming this position in August 2008, Fred served  for three years as the director of communications for the City of San Diego and press secretary to its mayor,  Jerry Sanders. In that capacity, he led a quick‐paced external and internal communications office equally  adept at proactively promoting the mayor's reform initiatives and responding to crises ranging from the city's  inability to access the public bond market to the worst wildfires in California history.    Fred has held a number of other challenging positions including serving as the chief administrative officer for  the Gateway Computers/Waitt Family Foundation; vice president for public affairs at the San Diego  Convention Center Corporation; and director of convention planning for the 1996 Republican National  Convention. He began his career as an aide to then‐Vice President George H.W. Bush.  Fred is a three‐time recipient of the Public Relations Society of America's (PRSA) Silver Anvil Award, twice in  crisis communications and once in public affairs. Fred and his press office team at the City of San Diego were  recently named by PRSA as the "2008 PR Professionals of the Year" for their work responding to the 2007  California Wildfires.    Fred is a native Spanish speaker whose parents immigrated from Cuba in 1959. Fred now lives in Denver with  his partner, Mike Tipton, an attorney. 

Company Overview

Mobile Commons
Mobile Commons makes it simple to create and manage mobile campaigns and connect them to the web, CRM Tools, and other media. Mobile Commons is the leading mobile application for brand messaging, cause-related marketing, fundraising, and advocacy. The company is quickly growing in the consumer marketing, health care and event marketing sectors. Mobile Commons removes the barriers to mobile and provides tools to allow full two-way messaging, integrated audio, and a connection to the web.

Key Mobile Benefits Broad reach: More than 290 million US mobile subscribers send over 3 billion text messages per day. Mobile reaches all demographics. Easy to Use: “Text Blue Ocean’s FishPhone at 30644 with the message FISH and the name of the fish in question. Immediately you’ll get a text back with an assessment and, when appropriate, a more environmentally sound alternative..” — The New York Times
mData - Fish Phone

Product Overview
Mobile Commons offers four products and a robust API that allows you to create mobile campaigns easily and quickly. Each product is integrated in one Mobile Commons dashboard, so all of your mobile data is available for any campaign or application you create. Additionally, the dashboard can be used to create Web opt-in forms, making it easy for people to participate directly online. mCommons: The platform offers a wide-range of features that allow you to integrate powerful 2-way mobile messaging into your campaign strategy, Web site, and your CRM tools. mConnect: This innovative voice/SMS application easily integrates with your email, Web, and mobile campaigns. mConnect makes it simple to connect people by phone, anywhere. This feature is great for call-in campaigns. mCast: Use mCast to take incoming messages and project them onto the sides of buildings, large screens at live events, or widgets across the Web. mData: makes any database instantly accessible from any mobile phone. Simply upload a spreadsheet or connect to a database. Users get the information they need, when they need it.

Instantaneous: “The new textmessaging service [powered by Mobile Commons]... is part of an emerging wave of technology that allows consumers to get instant ... information through their cellphones.” — The Wall Street Journal Always reachable: 90% of people keep their mobile within arm’s reach 24/7. Spam-free: Mobile users never receive spam on their phones, so your message won’t get ignored. With response rates 10-20x greater than email, mobile is an ideal direct response medium.

© 2009 Mobile Commons

Company Overview

How Organizations are Going Mobile
Our customers use the Mobile Commons platform in a variety of innovative ways. Below are several examples of our products in action: mCommons at Live Events — On behalf of a Mobile Commons client, the Jonas Brothers asked fans to text the word JONAS to 30644 to get involved in their communities. This call to action was made live at their inauguration performance and the video was also broadcast on TV and the Internet. The campaign was a hit. Thousands of young adults texted in, and in a single day the Mobile Commons client grew their list significantly. mConnect to Close the Loop — Human Rights Campaign (HRC) uses mConnect to mobilize supporters for congressional call-in campaigns. The HRC sends out an alert message that lets constituents connect directly to their local representatives. The result: by making it simple for people to participate, HRC has enjoyed call-in rates that average more than 25%. mCast to Make a Statement — It’s Our Healthcare (IOH) combined the offline world with the online world using mCast. They installed a large screen outside the California Statehouse in Sacramento and asked Californians to text in their thoughts about healthcare. Those messages were then projected on the screen and pushed to Flash widgets all across the Web. mData to Communicate with Consumers —With a goal of providing consumer information about seafood, Blue Ocean launched an mData program that allows people to text in the name of a fish and receive up-to-date environmental and health advisories on their mobile phone. Consumers love it because they receive information they want, when they want it; and Blue Ocean benefits by collecting real-time data about their constituents’ interests and behavior.

Selected Clients

New York • San Francisco • San Diego info@mobilecommons.com http://mobilecommons.com 212.537.5175

© 2009 Mobile Commons

Working with Blogs and Bloggers
This guide covers the different aspects of working with blogs and bloggers. Most blogs fit into one of these categories: personal, nonprofit/advocacy, corporate/business, and topic/issue. People who write personal blogs typically reflect on life, share opinions, and generally use it as a creative outlet. Nonprofit/advocacy groups use blogs to talk about the work they’re doing, give updates on issue campaigns, and discuss how different laws affect their issues. The corporate/business world use blogs for marketing, communications, and publicity. There are topic/issue blogs that discuss travel, politics, music, design, niches, immigration, health care – you name it. The different types of bloggers also fit into four categories: professional, activist, identity, and hobbyist. A professional blogger is a current/former journalist looking for a new medium or a new audience. Activist bloggers are citizen activists who cover stories that aren’t covered by traditional media. Identity bloggers are motivated by the desire to connect with others like them (e.g., mommy bloggers, LGBT bloggers). Hobbyist bloggers are motivated by the desire to share information with others who share the same passion (e.g., sports bloggers, UFO bloggers). You should blog if: you have something to say that’s worth people’s time; you have the time to write articles; you’re interested in inviting conversation; and you’re willing to respond to comments/questions and engage with your readers. You should NOT blog if: you’re interested in distributing press releases to a new audience; you’re uncomfortable getting feedback through public comments; or your organization has several layers of bureaucracy to publish public-facing information. If you’re not sure, start small and read other blogs to get a better idea of the blogosphere, the culture, and various writers/communities.

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Internal Organization & Goals Before you start blogging, you need to identify your resources and figure out how blogging fits into your overall organizational structure. Who’s going to be the blogger/voice of your organization? How much time do they have to dedicate? What kind of review process do you need and how does blogging fit into your communications calendar? In addition to thinking through your organizational structure, you need to identify what you want to accomplish by having the blog. Who’s your audience and who do you want to engage with? Can your current content management system (CMS) publish blogs? If not, you could explore free blogging platforms like WordPress, Moveable Type, Blogger, or Tumblr. Blogging As we mentioned above, blogging isn’t about reciting/re-posting a press release. It’s about being engaging and thought provoking. You want to share original content with your readers, including relevant/topical information from around the blogosphere. You want to give readers a reason to return. When you write, the headline and first paragraph (or two) are important because you want to grab a reader’s attention (just like with an email blast). Use a natural voice and casual tone when you write, and pose a question and encourage people to leave their thoughts/opinions. Make sure you respond quickly to comments/questions so your readers know that you value their opinions. Participate & Engage Introduce yourself to other bloggers in the space and read/comment on other blogs. You want to participate and become a member of the community. People hate it when you just “stop by” to plug/advertise your blog and then leave. You can also reach out to other bloggers and ask them to be a guest blogger on your blog. Your readers will benefit and you might be able to increase your readership a little. Promote & Track Make sure you promote the blog on your website, social networking sites, email blasts, appropriate listservs and with friends, family, colleagues, and related organizations. Track the metrics on your blog so you can gauge what works and what doesn’t work. Different metrics you can track are: views, comments, posts, and trackbacks. And most importantly, listen to feedback.
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Glossary of Terms Blogroll List of blogs that a blogger recommends and is reading Trackback Notifies a blogger that someone linked to or referenced their blog article Permalink (permanent link) The specific, permanent URL of a blog article RSS (really simple syndication) Web feed of your blog (or other website content) that is read through an RSS reader or aggregator (e.g. Google Reader) Vlog & Vlogger Video blog & video blogger

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Building a Website
(Thanks to Larry Huynh & Jordan Higgins for some of this great content.) Your website is a reflection on you and your organization and you only get one chance for a first impression. This guide covers the organizational aspects of building a website. There are core principles you should follow when building your website and they can be broken down into two categories: overarching and functional. Overarching Principles (1) Make sure your website is easy to navigate – it’s fundamentally important. You don’t want to loose energized supporters because they don’t know what you stand for or how to get involved. (2) It should be a part of your overall communications and strategy plan. Don’t build your website in isolation. Involve the other departments in your organization. (3) It should complement your offline program by providing resources, updates, and next “asks.” Functional Principles (1) When people visit your site, you don’t want to loose the opportunity to communicate with them again, so make sure you have a simple email signup form and that it’s in a prominent place on your site. It’s also a good idea to capture the supporter’s zip code, which will help you later down the road when you want to segment your list by geography. (2) Organize the navigation and content so users can easily find the information they need, and make sure you have a bio/about us/issues section. (3) Pictures and photos are a great way to visually tell your story, so include them whenever you can; it also helps to break up some of the content. (4) Your call to action buttons (e.g., donate, volunteer, signup) should be prominent and they should stand out on your site.

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(5) Promote your social networking sites so users know what online communities you are part of, and include ways for supporters to tell their friends about your website and your mission. Goals Before you start designing a new site, it’s important to identify your: organizational priorities, the purpose and requirements, and your audience. This will ensure that you build a successful website. Make sure you set a timeframe with goals so everyone is on the same page. Information Architecture (IA) Think of the information architecture as the “table of contents” for your website; it’s the logical grouping of your content. When coming up with the IA, you want to prioritize the content that your supporters will be looking for, not what you think is exciting. Keep in mind that you don’t need a design mockup to come up with the IA because they are two separate components of your site. Wire frame Think of a wireframe as the blueprint of how your pages will be laid out. Creating a wireframe allows you and your team to focus on the placement of items on the page and not get caught up in the look and feel. Content & Design When you come up with a design for your site (based on the wireframe), make sure you tell your story using engaging content and pictures and don’t post more content just for the sake of having more content. Your content/message and style (brand) should be consistent across your website, social networks, and email campaigns. Create a content calendar to help with planning/strategy, so you always have new and engaging content on your site, and make sure it’s in-sync with your email calendar. Quality Assurance (QA) Make sure you QA the site before you launch it. Test the site on Macs/PCs and test it on different browsers (Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer). Check all of the content and formatting on each page, click on all of the links, and test all of the forms. And make sure you get the appropriate signoff before you launch the site. Metrics Monitor the site traffic and track the progress using web analytic tools like Google Analytics. The different metrics you can track include: visits, unique visitors, page views, click paths, entry & exit pages, time spent on your site, search words, and AdWords.

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Home Page Example The WWF does a good job of visually telling their story and engaging supporters on their home page. In the top right corner, you can donate, signup for email updates, adopt animals, and take other actions. http://www.wwf.org

Landing Page Example The Courage Campaign does a good job of creating landing pages. On the left side of the page is the copy with the “ask.” On the right side is a video further engaging the user, and immediately below the video is the form, where they only two required fields are Name and Email Address – simple and to the point. http://www.couragecampaign.org

Issue Page Example The One campaign does a good job of creating Issue pages. The first thing you see on the top of the page is bold betters and engaging imagery, and then you see the paragraphs of copy. In the main content area, the page successfully describes the challenge and the opportunity to act and create change. On the right side of the page are related quick facts, further adding to the content. And just above the copy, there are multiple ways to share this page with your friends. http://www.one.org
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Building an Email List
(Thanks to Roz Lemieux of Fission Strategy for some of this great content.) Lists are more than just names on a spreadsheet or in a database. Lists are people who care about your issues and show up to your events. Each one of them has something unique to contribute, and they have their own networks that they can tap into. This guide covers the basic organizational aspects of building a list. You’ll keep your supporters engaged by telling a story over time and by providing updates throughout the narrative arc. Remember to be flexible when implementing your plan, because things will happen that are out of your control. First, think about what your goals and objectives are. Are you trying to reach a new audience? Grow your current supporter demographic? Find more supporters in a particular geographic area? Second, you need to think about staffing and technology. A. Staffing. In order to be successful, you have to put the time and resources into execution and monitoring your strategy. You might need at least one or two people dedicated implementing your new media strategy. B. Technology. As your list grows, you'll need smart technology to effectively manage it. Some things to look for in a technology platform include the ability to send out segmented email blasts, create custom sign up forms on your site, and run various reports. Once you have the manpower and the tools to execute your plan, you can follow one or more of these strategies to build your list: Online Organizing This is where your story comes into play. Your story should share the same narrative arc in as many locations as you can effectively manage - email blasts, your website, and social network sites should all carry the same elements of your organization's story - and match the work you're doing offline as well. When your message is compelling, it won't fall on deaf ears. Make sure to encourage supporters to tell-a-friend, to increase momentum through word of mouth.

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Online Organizing Case Study: Defenders of Wildlife Defenders of Wildlife manages an email list of 500,000, effectively using it to fundraise, spur offline organizing, educate, and influence elections. Through testing different strategies, they have determined a number of simple best practices. More info: http://www.box.net/shared/txvdzdfmex

Mobile Organizing You can also grow your list via text messaging. The nature of text messages is unique – they are short and more importantly, they are immediate because everyone carries their cell phone with them. You can also ask people to forward the text message: pls fwd = please forward Mobile Organizing Case Study: NARAL Txt4choice program NARAL Pro-Choice America spent months building a list of 8,500 supporters who opted in to receive text message alerts as part of its Txt4Choice program. Action alerts hit a peak in the lead up to the election, with mobile-based action alerts, call-in campaigns, and an on-the-fly candidate information service. More info: http://www.e-benchmarksstudy.com/ (pg. 17)

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Modeling If you have a particular list and you’re not sure who is (and isn’t) an active supporter, modeling is a way to narrow it down. Take your list and do a short poll to a large portion of the list to create the “model” of a typical supporter. Rank everyone on your list based on this model and then focus on your active/event-going/donating supporters based on your request. Give highly engaged supporters a higher ask. Modeling Case Study: Obama for America/Blue State Digital More than 13 million people provided their email addresses to the campaign via the BSD-powered Web site. Over the course of the campaign, aides sent more than 7,000 different messages, many of them targeted to specific donation levels (people who gave less than $200, for example, or those who gave more than $1,000). In addition to fundraising, modeled emails mobilized volunteer and GOTV activity, and solidified the Senator's constituency in all fifty states. More info: http://www.bluestatedigital.com/casestudies/client/obama_for_america_2008/

Partnerships & Coalitions It’s always smart and strategic to partner with other organizations that have a similar investment and passion in what you’re fighting for. There is strength in numbers and you can broaden your reach, and it’s a great way for each organization to pool their resources to build their respective list. Video Creating a short, provocative video is another great way to build your list. Give supporters an easy way to forward the video, and have a pre-selected checkbox (on the same page) for them to signup for your updates. Video Case Study: National Resources Defense Council The NRDC Action Fund created a video to inform the public about proposed laws that would allow for oil drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. To help spread the word and rally opposition, the organization produced a twominute advocacy video narrated by actor Robert Redford and posted it to the Internet.
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More info: http://www.techsoup.org/learningcenter/internet/page5876.cfm

Merchandise Giveaways Another list-building technique is to create a campaign around a limited item given to the first X number of people to signup. Some things to give away include bumper stickers, yard signs, t-shirts and priority access to an event. This helps build your list and depending on the action item, can also help get people out to your office/event. Think about what will work best for your organization and supporters. Merchandise Case Study: Chicago Public Radio Chicago Public Radio offers premiums to constituents. These include chances to win prizes by pledging a donation before a specified date. Baseball hats, tote bags, CDs, DVDs and VIP passes for events are all up for grabs. More info: http://www.convio.com/files/gd_fundraising.pdf

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Online Fundraising
(Thanks to Lauren Miller of Blue State Digital for some of this great content.) According to the Pew Internet & American Life Project (April 2009 Survey), 75% of people buy a product online, 57% bank online, and 19% make a donation to a charity online. Although that last number is a little lower than what you might expect, we’re going to run through different things you can do to maximize your online fundraising initiatives.

So what does it take to raise money online? It takes a little bit of luck, a user friendly website, passionate supporters to help you carry the message, and a solid theory of change. Before you can effectively raise money online, you need to make sure you are organized internally. Online fundraising is about money, but it’s also about intense internal cooperation. The Fundraising Dept, Field/Organizing Dept, and Communications Dept all have a stake in making sure everything runs smoothly, and all of the departments need to be on the same page so everyone is working towards the same goal. The Communications Dept and Field Dept can provide great stories for you to highlight, and they can also assist with list building and fundraising asks. It’s also important to coordinate the fundraising initiatives across your different channels: new media, phone banks, field, and direct mail.

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Building Your List You can collect email addresses through petitions, pledges, donations, tell a friend submissions, social networking sites, and other offline activities. Explore the possibility of doing an email swap with an organization that has a similar mission and similar goals. Know Your List It’s important to know where the people on your list came from. It may sound silly, but it’s true – not everyone on your list is the same. Do people on your list support your overall work, or are they more concerned about a certain campaign or issue? Did they previously donate money because of a certain campaign? Did a friend tell them about your organization? Once you know your list, you can segment it and tailor your message so you maximize your interaction with supporters. Different ways to segment your list include: different interests, donors v. non-donors, recent donors v. lapsed donors, average volunteer v. super volunteer. Tell Your Story Tell your story by using voices and personalities from your organization. Be creative whenever you can, and use both email and the web. Make sure you invite a conversation with your supporters and ask them for their input, so they are a part of the process and the solution, and always FOLLOW UP and provide supporters with updates. Make Your Ask It’s not just about donating money, it’s about empowering supporters and providing a way for them to take action. Set goals and deadlines, and be transparent when you’re asking for money. Let supporters know what you want to do (be specific), what it’s going to cost, and what change will result from their donation. Start with a small ask (e.g., $10 or $25) and after people donate, slightly increase the amount in the next ask (later down the road). Maximize Your Website A key to online fundraising is making it as easy as possible for supporters to donate (and to signup for email updates). This means making sure your website isn’t cluttered and that the calls to action are prominent. Sharing personal stories on the site is a great way to engage your supporters. The content on your site should match the content in your email campaign so there is a consistent message.

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Donation Page You want to make it as easy as possible for supporters to donate, so make sure all of the information you need them to fill out is on one page, and that the page is organized in a sensible way. And ALWAYS thank supporters after they donate. Create a thank you page and give your supporters another “ask” to keep them engaged. Don’t forget – THEY will decide when they’re finished taking action on your behalf. Don’t make that decision for them – always offer a next step! Track & Engage Make sure you stay on top of all of your initiatives and track the progress against your goals. Segment your list and do A/B testing to help identify what works and what doesn’t work. When you do A/B testing, test one item at a time. Different things to test include: subject line, sender, small graphics, the ask, length of the email, placement of the donation link. Different types of metrics to look at include: open rate, click-through rate, average donation, number of donations, increase in donation amount. And most importantly, keep the conversation going by providing updates and action items to your supporters. The last thing you want to do is loose energized supporters. Additional Fundraising Methods The following are additional methods you can employ to help with your fundraising initiatives: splash page (home page takeover), name the fundraising campaign, feature personal stories, text-to-donate campaigns, match two donors and introduce them to each other, dollar for dollar matching, and recurring donations.

Case Study: Oxfam America In Nov. 2008, the economy was terrible and Oxfam’s appeal was generating 50% of last year’s total, even though the audience had grown by 50%. Instead of continuing their standard end of the year appeal, they decided to focus on a single problem, that 100 million more people went hungry in 2008, and they decided to gave it a name: the Global Hunger Epidemic. This is the strategy that they employed: • They conducted A/B testing with their emails. Email A referred to the

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financial crisis as a challenge in their work and Email B did not reference it. Email B outperformed A, so they didn’t mention the crisis in their appeals going forward. • They set a public goal of raising $2m online by Dec 31 and promoted it in email and web copy, and they also created a thermometer graphic to keep a visual total of their progress. They created a short but powerful video and included it on all landing pages to help reinforce the message. By replacing an e-newsletter and a yearly giving appeal, they were able to add two appeals to the email calendar without sending more messages than the previous year. In the very last email of the year, they included a hint of guilt-inducing language. During December, they added a home page takeover, which was only displayed once per visitor using cookies.

At the end of the campaign, all of their work paid off and they exceeded their goals. They increased end-of-year giving by almost $200,000 over 2007 and brought in over 3,500 more donations.

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Online Organizing 101
Online organizing allows you to scale your actions, connect with people that you couldn’t visit in person, engage new audiences, and empower supporters to take action in their own community. It should be integrated into every corner of your organization because it complements and improves fundraising, communications, and field work. Online organizing only goes so far, so you need an offline connection in order to be successful. People respond to online calls to action because you’re tapping into something they’re already interested in, and the best way to connect with them is visually – by using pictures and video. Make sure you include the sense of urgency that exists and explain the meaningful change they can affect by getting involved and taking action. This guide covers the basic organizational aspects of online organizing. Internal Organization The first thing you need to do is identify who has responsibility for new media initiatives. How much time do they have to dedicate to it? Is there someone internally who can be an ally? Figure out the best way to coordinate with other departments, and develop an event calendar and organize around milestones and key dates. Website Your website is a reflection on you and your organization and you only get one chance for a first impression. You don’t want to loose energized supporters because they don’t know what you stand for or how to get involved. When people visit your site, you don’t want to loose the opportunity to communicate with them again, so make sure you have a simple email signup form and that it’s in a prominent place on your site. It’s also a good idea to capture the supporter’s zip code, which will help you later down the road when you want to segment your list by geography. You want to make sure that you organize the navigation and content so users can easily find the information they need, and make sure you have a bio/about us/issues section. Pictures and photos are a great way to visually tell your story, so include them whenever you can; it also helps to break up some of the content.

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Your call to action buttons (e.g., donate, volunteer, signup) should be prominent and they should stand out on your site. Promote your social network sites so users know what online communities you are part of, and include ways for supporters to tell their friends about your site and your mission. The WWF website does a good job of visually telling their story and engaging supporters on their home page. In the top right corner, you can donate, signup for email updates, adopt animals, and take other actions. http://www.wwf.org

The One campaign does a good job of creating Issue pages. The first thing you see on the top of the page is bold betters and engaging imagery, and then you see the paragraphs of copy. In the main content area, the page successfully describes the challenge and the opportunity to act and create change. On the right side of the page are related quick facts, further adding to the content. And just above the copy, there are multiple ways to share this page with your friends. http://www.one.org

Email It’s important to remember a couple of key points when you’re putting together an email blast. The From line is the voice of your organization, so pick one or two people from your organization to be your voice. They will be the ones who communicate with your supporters on a regular basis.
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The subject line should be engaging, action-oriented, and specific. Users open their email based on subject lines. Just like having a clean website is important, the same is true for email blasts. You don’t want to have a lot of images cluttering up your email and taking away from your content and your “ask.” You should have short paragraphs with a link to your landing page. Make sure the copy is conversational and that you only have one “ask.” If you put multiple asks, you’ll split your success rate. And create an email calendar to help with scheduling and planning. The American Red Cross does a good job of putting together effective emails. There’s a simple graphic in the header, next to their logo. The first sentence grabs you, “This is the scariest.” They provide a link after a few short paragraphs, and they complement the copy with a graphic on the right side of the email. They tell you why they’re asking for money: to assist people affected by the levees that broke, and their ask is specific, “Will you donate to the Disaster Relief Fund?”

Online Fundraising Raising money online is about empowering supporters and providing a way for them to take action. Make sure you set goals and deadlines. Be as transparent as possible when asking for money, and explain where the money will go. Use personal stories whenever it’s possible and make it as easy as possible for people to donate. Don’t create multiple step forms; put everything on one page. Amnesty International does a great job with their donation form because they tell you what they’re going to put the money towards, and all of the information that they need from supporters is on one page. http://www.amnestyusa.org/donate
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Blogs Blogging isn’t about reciting/re-posting a press release. It’s about being engaging and thought provoking. You want to share original content with your readers, including relevant/topical information from around the blogosphere. You want to give readers a reason to return. Don’t forget to connect with other bloggers in the community. Read and comment on other blogs and participate in discussions. If your content management system (CMS) can’t publish blogs, think about utilizing one of the free blog platforms out there. Some options are: WordPress, Moveable Type, Blogger, and Tumblr.

Social Networking Sites Social networking sites are great because compared to a regular website, they allow for twoway communication and collaboration. Another advantage of social networks is that each person has their own network of friends that you can tap into, allowing you to exponentially grow your volunteer base. Make sure you let people know how they can get involved, and be superresponsive to questions that are posted. Two examples of organizations using social networking sites effectively are: (1) charity: water on Facebook and (2) Amnesty International on Twitter. Both organizations are posting content that is relevant and they are engaging their supporters with questions and answers. They also use pictures very well to help tell their story. http://www.facebook.com/charitywater http://twitter.com/amnesty

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Using Video The great thing about video is that it has emotional bandwidth and an immense capacity for storytelling. Don’t worry about your video “going viral” because it’s like becoming famous, no one has control over it. Instead, you should focus on your content and your message. Put your time and energy into these two efforts and you’ll have a great final product. The three steps to making a quality video are: pre-production, production, and postproduction. Make sure you understand the process and plan accordingly. The “Signs of Hope & Change” video is a great example of a video that captures the intensity and emotion of a campaign. The video was created by the Obama campaign and features footage and photos from supporters across the county. It’s a great way to engage supporters and to give them an opportunity to express themselves, but in the context of an overriding theme/campaign. Watch it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcRA2AZsR2Q

Metrics Make sure you monitor your initiatives and track the progress against your goals. The worst thing to do is spend time and energy on projects and not know if they had any effect or impact. Don’t be afraid to try new things and learn from your successes and failures. Here are some metrics to follow: Website: visits, unique visitors, page views, search words Email: open rate, click-through rate Fundraising: avg. donation, number of donations Blog: trackbacks, comments Social network sites: number of members/new names, video/photo views, wall comments Video: views, comments

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Using Video
(Thanks to Quentin Kruger for some of this great content.) Video has emotional bandwidth and an immense capacity for story telling, and it’s the most empathetic non-live medium that’s out there. It can bring your supporters to places and events that they otherwise can’t get to. This guide covers the organizational aspects of using video effectively. There are many different things that you can use video for: list building, education/training, telling a story, sharing candidate bios, capturing energy and excitement at events, introducing people to your organization, documenting egregious acts by opposition groups, and receiving feedback from supporters in the form of video responses. Everyone wants their video to “go viral” – but going viral is like becoming famous, no one has control over it. Your video doesn’t need to go viral for it to be successful. What you should concentrate on is your content and your message in the video, and then focus on the quality of views that you are receiving. Are you reaching your target audience? And are they responding to your call to action? Video sometimes gets a bad rap for being expensive, but that’s because people don’t plan accordingly. You can’t think about it at the last second and then wonder why it costs so much. If you understand the process of making a quality video and plan accordingly, then you’ll spend your money efficiently and you’ll produce a great video. If you’re new to shooting/producing videos, check out the glossary at the bottom of the page for some common terms that are used. Resources Take stock of what internal resources you already have, including staff, equipment, and software. You’ll need to decide who’s going to take the lead, and if you need to hire someone, be specific about your goals. Going back to the earlier point, if you build video into your overall operation and fund it from the beginning, your Return on Investment will be greater. Strategy & Message Define your goal for the video. Do you want to use it: to ask people to make a donation, or to encourage people to sign-up for an event/offline action, or for list building? Depending on your message and the “ask,” think about how you can integrate the video into other social media channels.
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Make sure you know your audience and what moves them. The worst thing would be to spend all that time and money and have the video fall flat on the floor because it doesn’t connect with your supporters and what they care about. When you’re putting together the message, weave together your organizational and community narrative to help generate momentum. List-Building Example MoveOn created a video where you could customize it and send it to your friends. On the form, they prepopulated the “Keep me posted via email updates” checkbox. This video had very high production costs, so most organizations can’t duplicate it, but the idea is what’s important: create something people will want to forward to their friends; make it easy for them to forward it; and make it easy for them to signup for updates.

Event Signup Example Organizing for America created a signup page asking people to commit to attending at least one meeting during the month of August. The only two required fields on the form are Name and Email Address.

Donation Example The Courage Campaign created this donation form where they put their copy (including the “ask”) on the left, their video (that visually engages their users) on the right, and the form fields below everything (where they ask for billing info AND email address).

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Tools (Cameras, Software, and Video Hosting) Your tools can be broken down into three different categories: cameras, software, and video hosting. Think about the type of video you’re going to shoot and what your budget is, then decide which type of camera works best for you. Here are some camera options and their costs: webcam ($40-$130), Flip video camcorder ($150-$230) www.theflip.com; camcorder ($300-$1,400), professional camcorder ($1,000-$4,000+). Software on the low end costs $100 or less. Apple iMovie comes free with new Macs and Windows Movie Maker is free with XP or Vista. Software at the mid-range costs between $200-$600 and some examples are Adobe Premiere Elements or Sony Vegas Movie Studio. Software at the high-end costs $800+ and some examples are Apple Final Cut Express (Mac) or Sony Vegas Pro (PC). After you shoot and edit the video, you’ll need somewhere to post it. YouTube is free and they have a special nonprofit program that gives you added features. (You can learn more here: www.youtube.com/nonprofits) Vimeo offers their basic package for free and their Plus package is $60. Tubemogul is another site that’s free, and their added value is that you can post videos to multiple hosting sites via their platform and view all of the analytics in one place. Pre-production Before you do any shooting or editing, you want to create a storyboard that includes the supporter call to action. A storyboard is basically an outline where each scene is broken down (e.g., who’s on camera, what are they saying, direct to camera shot, b-roll shot, on-screen graphics). Make sure your script/idea/copy has been vetted before you start shooting so you don’t waste time.
(Storyboard picture courtesy of http://digitalcommons.psu.edu)

Production When you’re setting up a shot, make sure to put your subject in the best light possible. Follow the storyboard and make sure the audio is clear. Make sure you schedule time to shoot different takes, and remember to shoot B-roll as well. Post-Production Editing can vary from hours to day to months depending on the scope of the project and the amount of video. The length of your final video will vary depending on our content and your message. Remember to take your audience into consideration. And
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before you show the final cut to your boss or colleagues, make sure it meets the goals of the project. Track & Engage Once you post your video, don’t forget to monitor the number of views and track the progress. Listen to feedback, read the comments, and watch video responses. And most importantly, keep the conversation going with updates and action items.

Glossary of Terms DTC (direct to camera) Speaker’s head and shoulders are filmed while they are looking directly at the camera. The intent is to provide a sense of an eye to eye connection with the viewer. B-Roll Footage used to “cover up” holes in a shot. By using B-roll, the editor has the option to cut away from a boring shot to something relevant and perhaps more interesting. SD (Standard Definition) Has an acceptable amount of visual detail and richness. Usually the preference if you are not editing using higher end equipment. HD (High Definition) Has a greater amount of visual detail and richness. Requires large & fast storage (hard drives), large amounts of memory (RAM), and a fast processor. Compression/Encoding Process that allows you to take a larger, higher quality video file and reduce it in size to a smaller file that can be easily transmitted across the Internet.

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“Creating an Online Strategy” Worksheet (Beginner Level)
• • • Spend 5 minutes thinking of an upcoming campaign that your organization is considering. Spend 15 minutes walking through the worksheet, thinking outside of the box as much as possible, unconstrained by resources or current organizational structures. Pair up with a partner and spend 10 minutes talking about your campaign and walking through the ideas you brainstormed. Allow your partner 10 minutes to give you feedback, then switch (again taking 10 minutes to talk about the campaign and 10 minutes for partner feedback). Take your partner's feedback and re-visit the worksheet. Spend 15 minutes thinking through your brainstorm and your partner's feedback, in the context of your current organizational resources/limitations. Edit what you brainstormed in order to create a cohesive, coherent organizational campaign.

Describe the campaign you are thinking of launching:

1. What is the moment that you are capitalizing on? How is it timely/relevant to existing and potential supporters? How does it tie into the larger narrative that your organization is weaving? What kinds of content can you add/solicit to make the campaign vivid?

2. What is your central ask? How do you combine crisis and opportunity to grab your audience? What is the theory of change that underlies the campaign?

3. How will you spread the word about your campaign? What assets do you already have? What do you need? Who can you partner with? Who are your primary targets?

4. How will you track your work in order to learn from it? What kinds of metrics will you use to indicate whether the campaign is successful? What’s next, after this campaign, that you can lead your supporters toward?

After partner feedback:

Moment:

Ask:

Promotion:

Tracking:

   

Creating an Online  Strategy (Intermediate Level) 

(Thanks to Echo Ditto for some of this great content.)  When you’re putting together an online strategy, you want to make sure you think through your  campaign from the beginning to the end, so you avoid any potential pitfalls and so you don’t waste your  time and energy.  If you can’t effectively articulate your theory of change and the reason for launching  the campaign, then you need to keep brainstorming and strategizing.  Another key component is to also  identify all of the possible collaborators and allies who can help you with your campaign.  To some degree, you already know how to: create user‐friendly designs; update your website and blog;  share content on social network sites; collect email addresses and send email blasts; and create online  toolsets (e.g., tell a friend, letter to the editor).  Now you want to bring all of the pieces together, be  more strategic with your online resources, and sustain online engagement.  This guide covers the organizational aspects of creating an online strategy at the intermediate level.  Choose Your Moment  When you choose your moment, make sure it’s timely and relevant to your supporters.  Is it part of your  larger campaign narrative?  Is it word of mouth ready?  Do you have rich content that you can use (e.g.,  photos, videos, personal stories)?  Create Your Ask  Your ask is rooted in crisi‐tunity (crisis + opportunity) and theory of change.  The crisis is that something  bad is happening or is going to happen, and the opportunity is that you can do something to prevent it.  The theory of change is that by acting now, this is how you will create the change you want to see.  When you create your ask, only come up with one.  You want to keep it as simple as possible so you  don’t confuse people.    What’s the real world impact?  What are you internal goals and your public goals?  Post It & Promote It  Once your ask is finalized, publicize it over as many distribution channels as you can.  There are many  different ways you can promote your ask, by using your own assets and leveraging others.  Your own assets include your email lists, blog, website, social networking sites, and video.  Earned media  includes traditional PR activities and outreach to bloggers.  Paid media includes targeted  search/contextual ads, blog ads, and banner ads.  Partnerships include email swaps, blog articles, and 

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cross‐linking (from ally websites).  Grassroots includes research followed by outreach to related online  groups and communities.  Case Study: Courage Campaign  After Prop 8 passed in California, the  Courage Campaign recognized their  moment and they wanted to take  advantage of it by mobilizing people to  overturn Prop 8.  Their assets included:  a deep skill in storytelling, good  technology infrastructure, and a nimble  staff.  The earned media they received  was the “recognized moment” and a  powerful video they produced that  received a lot of media hits.  They didn’t purchase any ad buys or other advertising.  They  partnered with MoveOn and the LGBT blogosphere to help spread the word.  Their grassroots  initiatives included mobilizing gay and straight supporters with offline events, including Camp  Courage trainings and distributed rallies across the state.  http://www.couragecampaign.org/equalityhub    Track & Engage  Make sure you monitor your initiatives and track the progress against your goals.  The worst thing to do  is spend time and energy on projects and not know if they had any effect or impact.  Don’t be afraid to  try new things and learn from your successes and failures.  Here are some metrics to follow:  Website: visits, unique visitors, page views, search words  Email: open rate, click‐through rate  Blog: trackbacks, comments  Social network sites: number of members/new names, video/photo views, wall comments  Video: views, comments  Remember to keep the conversation going by providing updates and personal stories, and make sure to  use photos & videos whenever you can.  Let people know how their individual action is a part of a  collective action, and as a collective group, that’s how you’re making progress towards your goal.  A lot  of people who own a small piece of the campaign can grow it into something huge.  When you’re  providing the updates, give the next ask or action item (tell a friend, donate, volunteer).    You always want to be thinking one step ahead so you can answer the question, “What’s next?” 

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