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Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Program

Cook County Water Plan Initiatives




Dave Stark – Cook County Soil and Water
Conservation District -Water Plan Coordinator

Date of Completion: December 31, 2007
Project No. 306-04-08
Contract No. A92530



This project was funded in part under the Coastal Zone Management Act, by
NOAA’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, in
cooperation with Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Program. This project
was also made possible by a grant provided by the Minnesota Department of
Natural Resources. Additional cash and staff contributions were provided
by Cook County and the Soil and Water Conservation District.








Soil & Water
Conservation District
Cook County

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Introduction
The Cook County Local Water Management plan outlines a number of goals, objectives
and initiatives to protect and enhance water resources in Cook County. The plan calls for
continued leadership in the area of water quality monitoring. This project provided
funding to continue this water quality data collection and prioritize water bodies for
sampling, provided outreach and education on septic systems, research into possible
stormwater modeling tools, strategies to solve issues related to erosion on county roads
and how to more effectively manage wetlands.

Work Completed

Task 1 – Lake Monitoring
The grant was initiated on September 15, 2006 and included water quality monitoring
during 2007 on the lakes identified above. Dave Stark coordinated the volunteers and
oversaw all sampling activities. ERA Laboratories, Inc. was contracted to perform
laboratory analyses on lake samples and provided the required bottles. Lake laboratory
analyses were performed for total and ortho-phosphorous, pheophytin and chlorophyll-a.
Samples were obtained utilizing an integrated sampler (0-2 meters) when depth
permitted; otherwise grab samples were taken. A hydro lab multi-meter was used to
record epilimnion and hypolimnion field parameters including temperature, depth, pH,
specific conductivity and dissolved oxygen. Sampling occurred at six sites and included:

1. Agnes Lake (Lake ID16-359; 1 site -201)
2. Deeryard Lake (Lake ID 16-0253; 2 sites – 201, 202)
3. Ward (Lake ID 16-248; 1 site - 201)
4. Pike (Lake ID 16-0252; 2 sites – 101, 201)

The laboratory analysis data has been transferred to the Minnesota Pollution Control
Agency (MPCA) Environmental Data Access (EDA) database and will be utilized for
education and outreach at next summer’s lake association training events and meetings.
An electronic copy of the results in the MPCA database format is included on the
electronic submittal for this report and a shortcut to this data exists in Appendix A,
Lakes Water Quality Monitoring Results.

Citizen volunteers were contacted and provided training on sampling protocols similar to
the MPCA Citizen Lake Monitoring Plus (CLMP+) program. Information on this
program can be found at http://www.pca.state.mn.us/water/clmp.html Volunteers
provided canoes for sampling activities. The volunteer monitors that participated in lake
sampling included:

• Kate and Steve Surbaugh (Pike Lake);
• John Oberholtzer (Deeryard and Ward Lakes);
• Agnes (Tristan Beaster).

Monthly sampling occurred from May through September during the 2007 season.
Cook County Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) staff attended the Caribou,
and Hungry Jack lake association meetings in the summer of 2007. Information on water
quality and steps that landowners could take to improve lake management was shared.

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Associated Water Quality (Education, Training and Monitoring Activities)
Dave Stark assisted the Cook County Coalition of Lake Association in organizing a
volunteer lake monitoring training event for 8 participants on Poplar Lake. This training
was in addition to the individual training with the citizen monitors mentioned above. At
a previous lake association meeting, Dave had the good fortune of meeting Bob Carlson,
an internationally renowned expert in limnology and Cook County summer resident. Bob
attended the Poplar Lake training and provided information on detection limits and
methodology for sampling. RMBEL Laboratories was utilized for this sampling, which
was not charged to the grant. Various lake associations started working with this
laboratory, due in part to their web based interface to Citizen Lake monitoring data and
services for submitting data to STORET. Information can be found at
http://www.rmbel.info

Cook County currently partners with six organizations on water monitoring programs.
These include the Cook County Planning and Zoning department, MPCA, the Natural
Resources Research Institute (NRRI), the Flute Reed Partnership and the Cook County
Coalition of Lake Associations (CCCOLA). Other significant monitoring beyond this
grant included involvement with the MPCA Beach Monitoring Program and sampling
associated with the Poplar River TMDL study. 16.04 inland lake shoreline miles were
monitored for this grant.

A prioritized list of lakes and streams in the Coastal Zone of Cook County are included in
Appendix B. Various documents, plans and personal judgments were made in compiling
this list. These included, but were not limited to the Cook County Water Management
Plan, the North Shore Loading Study, the Lake Superior Basin Plan, MPCA 303-d lists as
well as waters deemed to be “un-assessed” by the MPCA. The vast majority of sampling
that is required in Cook County is for the purposes of establishing baseline and trend
water quality information. In general, lakes should be monitored for chlorophyll a, total
phosphorous and secchi depth to establish a baseline. If additional concerns exist on
lakes (i.e. failing septic systems) additional parameters could be added to better
characterize the system. Some of the general threats to water quality and some sampling
parameters are listed below:
Septic System Impacts-Phosphorous, Nitrogen, Total Suspended Solids, Turbidity and
Biological Oxygen Demand
Road Impacts – Chloride, Turbidity, Total Suspended Solids
Runoff Impacts – Phosphorous, Total Suspended Solids, Turbidity

Field parameters of Temperature, Conductivity, Total Suspended Solids, Turbidity and
Dissolved Oxygen should be recorded.

For streams the primary threats are related to runoff from developments, road building
activities and increased temperature due-to removal of trees in the riparian zones of
rivers. Primary parameters include Turbidity, Total Suspended Solids, Temperature and
Chloride.

This should not be considered an exhaustive list. It should be noted that each individual
water body would require a certain level of evaluation in terms of what scientific

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questions are trying to be answered and funding available/required to complete the
monitoring.

Village Ditch Review
The grant called for review and interpretation of data collected for the Village Ditch
stormwater project. A review of Village Ditch paper and electronic files was completed
and it was determined that the quantity or documentation related to the files was not
sufficient for interpretation. Some water quantity information in the form of water level
log information was obtained, but locations and scales were not clearly recorded. No
water quality information was discovered for the project. As an alternative to graphing
and interpreting data, a number of other activities occurred. Dave Stark, the current
Water Plan Coordinator, interviewed Planning and Zoning, NRRI, MPCA and Barr
Engineering staff to determine what had been completed with an ISCO sampling device
and water level loggers. . ISCO samplers are typically used in stormwater sampling
activities. The devices can be set up to trigger a “grab sample” after a significant rainfall.
Various attempts were apparently made to deploy the ISCO samplers but they were not
successful in recording a full data set that was sufficient for use in calibrating the SWMM
stormwater model. Dave instructed and set up Planning and Zoning staff with T-tube and
water quality bottles for taking Total Suspended Solids (TSS) and Turbidity
measurements and instructed Bill Lane of Planning and Zoning, to collect samples, if he
felt they would be helpful in any regulatory actions in the Business Development Park.
No samples were taken in 2007. A meeting was held with Joint Power’s Engineer, Keith
Anderson, and the following items were listed as steps for 2008.

• Walk the village ditch to identify erosion areas and check on previous repairs;
• Evaluate existing stormwater ponds for retention and hydrology;
• Review previous modeling efforts and note strengths/weaknesses;
• Interview previous consultants regarding modeling and ability or need to upgrade
or improve the model;
• Investigate the location, design and function of the BDA ponds;
• Provide value engineering and review of Grand Marais - Stormwater Management
Plan (SWMP) project recommendations;
• Continue to complete and update list of projects in Grand Marais SWMP;
• If specific needs for water quality or quantity information are identified, develop a
monitoring and deployment strategy that documents the goals, outcomes and steps
in the process.



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Task 2 – Individual Sewage Treatment System (ISTS) Outreach

The Agricultural Best Management Practices (AgBMP) individual sewage treatment
system (ISTS) brochure for the county loan program was updated. An outreach strategy
was completed and is in the process of being implemented. One major mailing occurred
where specific information on ISTS systems in Cook County was developed and mailed
to residents in the Coastal Zone. The mailing also included copies of specific
information from the Property Owner’s Resource Guide and the document Septic System
Owners Guide produced by the University of Minnesota extension program. A copy of
these materials are included in Appendix C, ISTS Updated Brochure, Education
Materials and Outreach Plan.

Other activities related to ISTS systems included attending meetings at the Tofte
Schroeder Sanitary Sewer District (TSSSD), applying for grants for inspections, updates,
GIS projects and management plans. Additional educational materials on rainwater,
greywater and blackwater solutions were provided as requested by citizens.

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Task 3 – Road Construction and Stormwater Modeling Recommendations
The following persons were involved with consultation on stormwater modeling needs
for Cook County:

• Bill Lane (Cook County Planning and Zoning Department);
• Keith Anderson (Joint Powers Board Engineer);
• Shae Kosmalski (Cook County – Highway Engineer);
• Jim Dexter (MPCA Stormwater Division); and,
• Colby Manwaring (Environmental Modeling Systems, Inc.)

Dave Stark held meetings with various departments and discussed the need for
stormwater modeling in plat and design review. The biggest obstacle is the level of
training and expertise needed in modeling and need for a Professional Engineer (P.E.) to
sign off on evaluations. Most comments indicated that the developer is usually in charge
of the modeling for design purposes and not much review of the model takes place. My
recommendations include providing training to Bill Lane and Shae Kosmalski in the
areas of Stormwater, Hydraulic and Hydrologic modeling. The highway department
currently utilizes a variety of techniques to size structures and implementation of
consistent modeling could lead to better sizing of structures. As the GIS capabilities of
the county increase, these tools can be used to more effectively evaluate impacts and to
size structures appropriately which will lead to less erosion and capital costs. Another
major limitation within the county is high resolution Landuse, Soils and Elevation data.
Projects to encourage the acquisition of this data should be encouraged. Having a WMS
model assembled for the county could drastically reduce the amount of time and expenses
paid to consultants doing watershed based analysis. The county should continue to
partner with research institutions like the Natural Resources Research Institute (NRRI) on
projects that are evaluating cumulative impacts of watershed development. Most of this
work is beyond the scope of work for county employees and most do not have the
expertise to make a formal evaluation of these impacts. These are difficult questions and
involvement in the Poplar River TMDL study will provide some of these types of
answers, but not all. I recommend building a stormwater modeling GIS package for the
entire county with WMS and adding better, consistent high-resolution data to it as it is
received. A powerpoint presentation with links to the three recommended
software/internet stormwater modeling packages is included on the CD for this report.
The three main software packages are described below:

Summary of Software Recommendations:
1. Watershed Modeling System (WMS)
2. Hydrocad
3. LMNO Engineering Online Calculators

Watershed Modeling System (www.emsi.com/WMS)
The Watershed Modeling System (WMS) is a comprehensive graphical modeling
environment for all phases of watershed hydrology and hydraulics. WMS includes
powerful tools to automate modeling processes such as automated basin delineation,

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geometric parameter calculations; GIS overlay computations (CN, rainfall depth,
roughness coefficients, etc.), cross-section extraction from terrain data, and more.






Coupled models of interest are:
Rational Equation – Peak discharge from a catchment up to 200 acres.
TR-55-General stormwater modeling
Culvert and Other Calculators-Sizing of culverts using Manning’s Equation

Pros and Cons of WMS
+Could be used to model cumulative impact analysis on a watershed by watershed basis
+Includes the most number of tools, models and applications (coupled to various models)
+GIS based
-Complexity – Requires a skilled user of ArcGIS with modeling background. Would
require extensive training for staff.
-Data – Current spatial inputs of landuse, soils and elevation data are course resolution.
-Expensive – Packages from free download of graphical version to $3750.

Pricing for WMS
Free demo version with all functionality
Free graphical interface version available
$1950 - $3750 plus modules

Hydrocad (http://www.hydrocad.net/)
HydroCAD is a Computer Aided Design tool used by Civil Engineers for modeling
stormwater runoff. HydroCAD provides a wide range of commonly used drainage
calculations.







HydroCAD is ideal for studies using the TR-20, TR-55, or SBUH methods. (Please visit
the Hydrology Library for background information.) HydroCAD provides a wide range
of standard H&H techniques in an easy-to-use graphical form, managed by the on-screen
routing diagram we pioneered in 1986.

Pros and Cons of HydroCad
+Most applicable to common tasks of evaluating runnoff from construction sites, sizing
culverts etc.

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+Complexity – Still need a registered engineer for any formal project review, but could
be used as a tool by Planning and Zoning and Highway Department with some
background education and training.
-Not GIS based
-Not effective for watershed based or cumulative impact analysis.

Pricing for Hydrocad
Free demo version for downoload
$195 - $1595 depending on number of nodes

LMNO Engineering Online Calculators
LMNO Engineering Online Calculators provide a number of tools on line for free or low
cost applications. This would be a logical point for Planning and Zoning and Highway
staff to start utilizing some of these tools and equations for stormwater evaluation. Two
of the applications that seems appropriate for initial understanding.

Rational Runnoff Calculator and Culvert
http://www.lmnoeng.com/Hydrology/rational.htm
http://www.lmnoeng.com/CircularCulvert.htm












Pros and Cons of LMNO Online Calculators
-Not GIS based
-Not effective for watershed based or cumulative impact analysis
-Data – Could use MN DOT manual for most inputs
+Complexity – Still need a registered engineer for any formal project review, Planning
and Zoning staff and others could start using immediately to understand background
equations
+Price – Packages from free to $200

Pricing for LMNO Online Calculators
7 days for 1 to 5 computers. $30 (US Dollars).
90 days for 1 to 5 computers. $90 (US Dollars).
1 year for 1 to 5 computers. $200 (US Dollars).
30 days for up to 30 computers. $120 (US Dollars).


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Road Construction Maintenance Protocols and Stormwater Ordinance Compliance
This task was delayed until a new Highway Engineer was hired for the county in October,
2007. The Water Advisory Commmittee (WAC), Cook Coalition of Lake Associations
and other watershed groups commented on the qualifications of the new Highway
Engineer, including hydrology background. The County was fortunate in hiring Shae
Kosmalski who brings a new level of expertise and commitment to water quality
protection. She, Bill Lane from Planning and Zoning and Soil and Water staff will
continue to work together to bring road mainatenace protocols into compliance with the
stormwater ordinance. Bill has been successful in raising the bar for contractors and
highway department staff by having an enforceable stormwater ordinace in place. Shae
will continue to work on new protocols in her first year as Highway Engineer.

Shae recommended that job performance standards be linked to her position and her
supervisory staff. She felt that it was her responsibility to effectively train her staff to be
in compliance with the new Stormwater Ordinance. One standard, suggested by the
working group, was that no violations of the stormwater ordinance occur by county
highway department staff. Bill noted that enforcement of a new stormwater ordinance is
more difficult with contractors, if they see the county highway department breaking the
ordinance. Everyone agreed that ongoing education is important, but the fact that there
have been a few fines levied, has brought the level of work up to a new standard. There
is still significant room for improvement.

The ability to collaborate on various projects was discussed. One current proposal for
inventorying existing culverts was discussed in terms of needs of the highway department
and protection of water resources in the county. Staff will meet to discuss possibility of
future grant applications.


Task 4- BWSR Wetland Management Consultation
Informational meetings were held with Tim Nelson and Gary Kettleson from the Cook
County Planning and Zoning Department. The decision was made not to pursue a
separate comprehensive wetland management plan at this time. Tim cited the difficulties
other communities have ratifying such plans and that the current combination of Soil and
Water staff, Planning and Zoning Staff and the technical advisory panel (TEP) Research
into these plans was conducted including gathering information on the “avoid, minimize
and mitigate” language contained in the Wetland Conservation Act (WCA), specific case
studies from the Ricke Creek watershed district and Anoka County on implementing a
wetland management plan and a document that includes hits on preparing a
comprehensive wetland management plan.

Other meetings with Water Advisory Committee (WAC) members indicated needs for
mapping of coastal wetlands and outstanding resource value waters and having these
maps accessible by the Planning and Zoning staff. Some of these GIS layers already
exist, including biodiversity indices in the Biological Survey. The problem is having the
interpretation, so that planners can use this to help making decisions. Other specific areas
of interest for protection included headwater wetlands, riparian wetlands and lands that
include rare native species. Other counties and resource personnel should be consulted
and then funding for a formal project should be instituted. The baseline of the project can
be the National Wetland Inventory (NWI), but more detailed information on coastal

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wetlands should be sought. An important piece of this will be the methodology for
identifying these wetlands and to what level of precision do these need to be mapped or
can some general GIS mapping serve the needs. Another suggested approach would be
to attempt to map data related to Minnesota Rule 8420.0548 or special considerations on
wetlands. Items include:

• Endangered and threatened species
• Rare natural communities
• Special fish and wildlife resources
• Archaeological, historic, or cultural resource sites
• Groundwater sensitivity (Consider the DRASTIC model)
• Sensitive surface waters (Consider tying this to an overall county GIS watershed
model).
• Education or research use
• Waste disposal sites

There is no substitute for knowledgeable on the ground assistance when a landowner is
considering altering the landscape.

Results
The lake monitoring results from this project will be utilized to identify whether the
specific water body is meeting water quality standards as defined by the MPCA. Citizens
and other organizations will be able to access the information through the MPCA
Environmental Data Access (EDA) system to gain a better understanding of water quality
conditions on their lake. Providing education and outreach to citizen monitors will likely
result in more informed decisions and an active participation in stewardship of coastal
resources. Further baseline information will be available to assess trends in water
quality and will be used in a separate project that has been created to link critical lake
features to the county GIS system. The most important aspect of this project is to keep
citizens involved in the protection of water resources. The prioritized list of lakes and
streams can be used into the future to obtain baseline water quality information. The
Highway Engineer meeting was an excellent chance for the incoming Engineer to meet
the various people involved with water resources in the county. In addition, this effective
working relationship should be fostered as the need and potential for collaboration on
erosion control on road systems is a priority in the Water Plan. The stormwater modeling
tool suggestions can be used to evaluate what level of training will be required and what
capabilities should be handled within and outside of the county. The wetland information
should continue to be evaluated if parties believe that a separate wetland plan aside from
the enformcement of the Wetland Conservation Act (WCA) is needed.

Lessons Learned and Challenges
An annual refresher course for training volunteer lake monitors is required each spring.
Changes in grants, laboratories being utilized and procedure updates need to be
communicated. Working with a laboratory who submits data directly to the STORET
system is a benefit for the lake volunteers and staff involved. Challenges in the sampling
primarily had to do with defining volunteers who could consistently go out and could
change to the Water Planner’s changing schedule.

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Challenges surrounding Task 3 revolved around the fact that the existing Highway
Engineer was retiring and the new Highway Engineer was hired near the end of the grant
cycle. The meetings were productive and everyone involved felt that there was a
renewed sense of working collaboratively with the Highway Department to implement
changes in the existing protocols. Task 4 was inhibited by the fact that County Planning
and Zoning personnel were not interested in considering a separate county specific
wetland management or enforcement plan at this time. Staff felt that the current
interpretation and use of the Wetland Conservation Act (WCA) was as or more effective
than when other counties implement a formal wetland management plan.

List of Appendices

Appendix A - Lakes Water Quality Monitoring Results
Appendix B - Prioritized List of Lakes and Stream Monitoring
Appendix C - ISTS Updated Brochure, Education Materials, Outreach Plan
Appendix D – Highway Engineer Meeting Agenda



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Appendix A -Lakes Water Quality Monitoring Results

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Appendix B - Prioritized List of Lakes and Stream Monitoring

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Prioritized List of Lakes and Stream Monitoring in Coastal Zone
(See excel spreadsheet with final report for more information)
Priority Lakes
1 Caribou
2 Moosehorn
3 Barker
4 Benson
5 Blueberry
6 Bogus
7 Boys
8 Christine
9 Dyers
10 Kimball
11 Mark
12 Marsh
13 Mink
14 Monker
15 Scabbard
16 Stevens
17 Strobus
18 Turtle
19 White Pine
20 Agnes
21 Bigsby
22 Deeryard
23 Devil Track
24 Pike
25 Trout
26 Ward
Priority Streams
1 Poplar River
2 Cascade River
3 Devil Track River
4 Flute Reed River
5 Temperance River
6 Two Island River
7 Cross River
8 Kadunce Creek
9 Brule River
10 Nature Boy Creek
11 Village Ditch
12 Colville Creek
13 Durfee Creek
14 Kimball Creek
15 Spruce Creek
16 Sugarloaf Creek
17 Leveaux Creek
18 Indian Camp Creek
19 Cutface Creek
20 Cliff Creek
21 Carlson Creek
Comments:
There are no MN milestone rivers that provide regular monthly sampling (not event based) in Cook County.
As of 2007, the Brule River and Poplar River are the only two rivers assumed to be fully assessed. See MPCA manual on
assessment of rivers for tmdl.
Guidance Manual for Assessing the Quality of Minnesota Surface Waters for the Determination of Impairment 305 (b) Report
and 303 (d) List - October, 2007.
The recommendations above are for the bare minimum to assess the lake for 303-d lists. Additional parameters should be
considered when a known or suspected threat to water quality occurs.
Some additional parameters for consideration are listed below along with a potential stressor.
Septic System Impacts-Phosphorous, Nitrogen, Total Suspended Solids, Turbidity and Biological Oxygen Demand
Road Impacts – Chloride, Turbidity, Total Suspended Solids
Runoff Impacts – Phosphorous, Total Suspended Solids, Turbidity
A more complete list of parameters for a stream or lake suffering from development impacts would likely include:
Field measurements: pH, Dissolved Oxygen, Specific Conductivity, Temperature, Turbidity and Total Suspended Solids
Lab paramters of Turbidity, Total Suspended Solids, Total Phosphorous, Ortho Phosphorous, Alkalinity, Chloride, Nitrogen
Parameters (Total Nitrogen, Nitrate + Nitrite and Ammonia)
The hydrolab owned by Cook County should be utilized for both Lake and Stream montioring to record field measurements.
All data should be submitted to the MPCA EDA Storet database for inclusion in water quality assessments.

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Appendix C - ISTS Updated Brochure, Education Materials,
Outreach Plan
Loan Process
1. Cheek with Soil & Water for availabil ity
of funds (387-3647).
2. Arrange for a contractor bid.
3. Request a site inspection from County
Environmental Health (387-3632). This
triggen; a time limit for repain;.
4. Provide to Soil & Water l)copyof
"Notice of Non -Compliance", 2) copy of
contnlCtor bid. and 3) AgBMP Loan
Soil & Water then signs
Application and places you on the waiting
list. You will be notified when funds are
available.
5. Give signed AgBMP Loan application to
lender for crl'(\it qualification.
6. Contmctor begins construction. As on all
systcms built in Cook County,
Envimnmentallkalth inspects during and
after construction and provides landowner
wilh a "Cenificalc This
assures Ihalthe rcpain; were installed in
conformance with state and counly
standards.
7. Give to Lender 1) tlnal invoice from
contractor, 2) "Cenificatc of
Compliance" from County.
8. Lender payment is directly to contrac\Qr.
Contractor provides signed Mechanics
Lien WaiVCT to Lender.
9. Applicant, now a Borrower, makes
monthly p.lymcnts to Lender.
Mainlena nce, .Mainlenance.,Maintenance
o Sewage treatment systems require
regular inspection ami pumping - every
one to Ihree years depend ing on use.
Systems are expensive investments
worth protecting.
o Yearly pumping is important fo r homes
using garbage disposals or draining
grease and olher hard-Io-digest
matcrials.
o Bleach and other bactcria-killing
products impair function therefore more
frequent pumping is necessary. Systems
depend on live bacteria to break down
sewage.
For More Information
Potential borrowers in Cook Counly may
contact Rcbttca Wiinancn about loan
availability.
Soil & Waler
2nd Floor, Court House
411 West 2ud Street
Grand Marais J\IN 55604
218-387-3647
Local units of govcrnment, local lendcrs
or individuals wishing additional
infornlation may contact Dwight Wilcox.
Agrle ull"rp 8tst !'ractie" l..Qlno
MinneSOla Dcporln", nt. or
90 West Pl, to nt,·d.
SI. Pa ul, MN 55107
(651)215-101 8
OSIl!Y2007
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2007 [STS
Loan Program for
Cook County
Minnesota
3% Financing for Repairs to
Non-Compliant Individual
Sewage Treatment Systems
Single- & Multi-Connection ISTS
Agriculture Management Practices
loan Program (AgBMP)
State Revolvint: Funds (SRF)
MinneS<)la Department of Agricutture
AdminislCrc<J by
Cook County Soil & Water COltSCTV31ion
Local Water Managemcnt Program
Jim
Johnson
Roger
Haertel
Chel Jerry
Anderson Johansen
Don
Goodell
, ..
Eleanor
Lease
Biz Clark
Poplar
COOK COUNTY
Water Management Plan
Advisory Committee
Dave Stark - Cook County Water Plan Coordinator
Cell (218) 428-4413
david.stark@co.cook.mn.us
This project was in part under the
Coastal Zone Management ACL. by NOAA's
Oflice of Otcan and Coastal Resource
ManagCl1'lCnt, in coopct'"Jlion wi th Millncsota's
Lake SllPCriQT Coostal Program.
Dear Coastal Zone Resident:
Season' s greetings from the Cook County Water Advisory Committee! You are
receiving this mailing because your address is located within the Coastal Zone
Program Boundary and is for informational purposes only. Consider sharing the
documents with a neighbor or returning to the Cook County Zoning Department if
you already have a copy or have no need for the publications.
Maintenance e As 2007 comes to a close consider marking your calendar for any
required maintenance of your septic system in 2008. All septic systems require
routine pumping for longevity of the soil treatment area and to protect the water
resources of Cook County. Septic tanks must be pumped every 2-3 years
(required by state law) to remove scum and sludge.
Education - Included are two items to help you understand the functioning of
your septic system and the importance of routine maintenance. The Septic
System Owner's Guide is published by the University of Minnesota Extension
and provides information on water use, operation and maintenance of your
system. The Cook County Property Owner's Resource Guide includes county
specific information on septic systems.
Care State-licensed professionals must complete design, installation, inspection
and pumping of septic systems. A list of certified personnel can be obtained at
the county zoning department or can be found on the Minnesota Pollution Control
Agency (MPCA) website. Pete Gresczyk of G & G septic is currently the only
state certified pumper in Cook County and can be reached at 387-1572.
Repair - If you suspect your system does not comply with county or state
regulations have it inspected. Leroy Halberg from Cook County Environmental
Health can perform system inspections and can be reached at 387-3632.
Individuals can also contract with a state-licensed Inspector or Designer I to
perform an inspection. Residential and commercial landowners may receive low
interest (3%) financing through the Agriculture Best Management Practices
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(AgBMP) loan program for repair or replacement of non-compliant systems.
Rebecca Wiinanen from the Cook County Soil and Water Conservation District
(SWCD) administers this program and can be reached at 387-3647.
Septic System Information Links
Cook County Environmental Health - www.co.cook.mn.us/zoning/index.html
MPCA Licensed Professionals - http://www.pca.state.mn.us/programslists/ists.xls
MPCA Septic System Regulations - www.revisor.leg.state.mn.us/arule/7080/
University of Minnesota Extension Septic Program - http://septic.umn.edu/
Cook County Property Owners Resource Guide -
www.co.cook.mn.us/sw/cook pog.pdf.
Books - Great Last Minute Gift Ideas 10 Learn More about Waler and
"Waste"
Septic System Owner's Manual - www.shelterpub.com/ shelter/ssombook.html
Rainwater Collection -
www.booksamillion.com/ncom/books?pid=0966417062&ad=FGLBKS
Humanure the 3"' Edition - www.joseph-jenkins.com/bookshumanure.html
Creating an Oasis with Greywater -
www.oasisdesign.neUgreywater/createanoasis/index.htm
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Most town and city dwellers rely on a publi c waste wat e r treatment
system tor sewage management. While publi c waste water t reat ment
systems may be available to some rural d wellers, most rely on private
individuil l sewage twatment systems (ISTS).
The design and installation of ISTS is regu lat0d oy State Rules
nnd permitted through the Cuok County Planning & Zoning
Depart ment. ISTS must be inlitalled by State licens('.d • .ontnu;wrs.
L\ list of cont ractors ca n be obtained at t he Planni ng & Zoning
Department. Alternative sewage treatment systems will
be considered tor approval. Contact the Cook County
Environmcntall-lealth Departmental 218-387-3632 .

I. Good vegetati ve cover should be maintained over the
soil treatment system. Howevel; do not pl ant trees or shruhs
hecause the roots may clog the distribution li neli.
2. Do not drive over t he soillrca tment system and
maintain snow cover in the winter to prevent the area from
freezing.
8. Use of garbage disposals is not recommended_
Consider composting.
9. The septic tank MUST be dCillled tplllllpcd) evcly
2-3 years to re move floating scum and liludgc that al:cumu-
latc. If t his material is a!lowr.d to enter the soi! treatment
system (mound or trcnch) it will expensive and often
irreparable da mage. 3. Use wille r-conserving fi xtures like low-flow shower-
heads and toilets.
4. Distribute wash loads evenly throughout the to
avoid overloading the system with large amounts of wate r.
5. Wash only full loads in the and washing
lllachi ne. Consider a water-conselVing washing machine
neeau:;c they use less wilter.
10. Rou te roof drains il nd drai n tile ilway from the drain-
licld.
1J. [)n not dispose of solvents, paints, antifreeze, and
down the (\r<lin.
6. Use litlUid detergents (powde red detergent:; add
particle s that may dog the lioil treatme nt system).
12. DO NOI' USE starters, feeders, cleaners and other
additives. Then! is 00 quick fix or substitute lor proper oper-
ation and regula r maintenance_
ror addi tiona l informat ion on sewage treatment
systems contact the University of Minnesota
http:/ / septic.coaff!s.llllln.cctu/ homeoll'ncrli ndcx . h tm I
7. Reduce the use of harsh cleaners and ant ibacterial
soaps.
DoYou Know ..•
Se ptic Syste m Setback Requirements
Welt
100 feet from the t reat ment area if
well has less t han 50 feet of casing
and does not encounter
10 fee t of impervious material.
50 feet from the treatment area if
well has more than 50 feet of casing
or encounter s 10 feet of impervious
material.
Buil di ng5
• 10 feet from septic tank
• 20 fcet from treatment area
Shoreland
• 100, 150 feet from the vegetation
line, depending upon DNR protected
waters classificati on, from any
component of the sewage t reatment
syst em.
Property Line
10 feet (rom any component of the
septi c system.
Road Right of Way
• 10 feet from any component of
the septic system,
i
100
line.


..
,.
..

" setback from lake depends on classiflC.3Uon of lAke.
'Call Pl anning and Zoning for your lake classification.
Some commonly asked questions
Q Whm am IWc{kti /(J mstalll1 !'><!W(lge I retIlJHI!/ lI sysll:m;
11,lIu do I (;oll/u{;/>
A An <Ippiirali on is j ointiy sllhmi lt t.:d by t he licensed designer
ami th(; h O!lH.:OW1H:T to the Planning to( liming lkpnrtmcn t.
Q W/w/ is a CCYfijiwlc of Cml1pliwlI.:f: ,'
A A C('.rt ili G.1 tc of Compiianr:e show:,; that at the time of
inspect ion, tht: t!l!;ltment systt:m W,LS insta lled
It IS after a system 11;1;; prope rl y
installed, or aft er a n in;;pceti on I l l' <1 11 existi ng :->yMl:m has
ti) u nd thai t hf'. sySt(:1ll is in wit h Statl !
sta ndards. This Cer ti tk.1t(' of is conSitlt :fCd to
I'l l: d lcct ive lo r a period of li ve yea r.,: fi l r i \ I1t!W systt: m amI
th ree years 1(IT an existing sys!I!!!\.
Q IJo I !!IXlJ ( I .'i!!W(fg/! II1:a11111:1I1 ,:,:r/i/;/;(I//: if 1 {Ill! jUIi /
gOj llg 10 builtl (I
A <I nti No. No, if .you do not livl: in shnrdanu. Ycs, if you
live in s hord ;md a nd t!-H: OJ" any ot her st rudlm: you
ilre h uil din.g is J 60 teet or lo ng!:r.
Q Who tdls me willi / type I ncet[>
A Thl: lice nsed d(:signcr l:all ll1,lke this d(:wnn ina!ion
hasl:d on suil and site c(Jll diti o ns, a nd specific needs of thl:
owner.
Q I bm' is 1/1(: I.lJPC of ,ws1cm 11t'-t:(kd UI1 Illy ,mllJf.;rt.tj dctermi n ed?
A The type of system is dt: h: n n incd by :;0;1 (t;/( t um, depth to
water wb1e, pmximity to SUrf;ICt: wa ll: ns, ;md the !lumber o f
peoph: it is inlendl:d 10 M',t'VI':. ["!cl;illlSC of high w,ll er
table and heilvy soib, flO of Gook Cou ntY'1i liCp-
tit: sYlit (:ms art' mOll lui SYIi\eJllIi.
Q /-lou' ao! know iF/lie SCU'I,!.!;/: 11011' Olr
Illy /JrDl)I:rl.l) works:' Who is n:sp(}lII,;ill/r; ji)/' clJ/xhug il.)
A Most Systems in Cook Count y ;I n: mo unu syste ms. Signs of
mOlllld system bilufCs incluue: wm arcas <! I"O\II Ki t he
ot the !llotlllli; ca ttai ls or ot her vegetat ion; and/ o1·
black ;l rou nd ti l(: ed.l',e of the nl ou nd, systems
ill revc;\1 pondi n)!; or to a low s pot. lfbuying
p ro pe rty, eVI',n wit h a Ccrt ifkate Ot' C0111 pli nnn :, it is wist'.
10 hi re a sewage system inspector to conduct;1
Poi nt ofSak inspection.
Q r II'WII IrJ sd/IIIY I1ml ll:. T11C IJll.lJl:r 11'(1111$ (I l'oilu-rJ/:S({/c
ilISpt!(;/ion IJFllly 1!"l:'-t:ttHU:lli syMt:lII. WIlli dill (:I/Il/(Jr:IIO
do Ifllli)
A A staW ..lice nsed sewage treatmcnt system or
Designe r 1 should he contacted. I\. li st G;111 ohwil1l:d from
the Cook Cou nty Plann ing Co(' Zoning 1)(:pa r tmenl, or
doll' III oadp,d ti-om WW!II./}(;(I.IiI(rlr:. III /I,
rq,riNtlZlli()n./I/))11 ( ;Ol lk C;ou n ty F.nvirnnmcnlalll ea lth
Depa rtme nt will al so dn l'oitn-(jf .. inspections.
Q Do llwcd {r pen!!it w {/II or instal/II
c.:1I1Il}JOStil1g
A Yes, t hey n:qui n: a jll:rmil fronl Cook COllnty
Enviroomell tali lea lth !)4:partJllCnt
Q C(1I1 I im; tall nI.!J Oil')! sr:UJill:t: In:atme l1l 1)(1 l eVGII hOl'I:
to 11Ilv(! {I sewage / rc(I/I!wl ll
A YOII (:<I Tlnot inswll yo ur own trea tment I;ystem.
Only licenscd may. You arc rCl luin'(.l tl) havc 11
sewag(: sylilem if,l lly s t nJctu rc has ll lulllbing_ If
your slme(ll n: no! lwvc pl u mhing,;m out house is
acn:pt<lhlc.
Protecting your sewage treatment system
from freezing:
lJu ri ll):!: winh:rs with ,I !,Ick of s now co ver il nu l;ultl (e m l){: r,ll u rcs, S4:W;lgl: treat IIH:llt systems
can fret:zc. This {'_a n be lint only ,I t n :mel'l dOLIS inulIl vt: ll ie n cc, h u t call rc.suh ill expl: nsivc
rep'lirs. 10 p n :vent your syste m fro m f reezing, t() l1(l w t li cs(:
Add a [;ly(:r Ilf hay o r s t raw mulch inches) ov(:r l h e pi pes, ta nk, .Hl d su i ll w.lt llw n f
;u e a .
"1.. Usr: normal a moull t s o f wat(:l, tl lc tlte bdt(:r.
:$ , pix any Jt:aky p ill mbing imu [)O NOr ad d to t he
4. Keep al! - including i\"!'V'S ;lJld s nowmohi les - otf of ti ll: sept ic s-"stem.
5. Mak(: lillfl: <Ill ri scrs, ;l!1d manhoks ha ve cover:<. I\tl tl ing ins lIl:ll ioll ovcr
;Ind ovcr thl: sepLic t, (l ik is ,I good it!l:a.
fi. L(\I Ihe grass in your I;lwll grow ill la te s ummer a n d ca rly tlill lOver Ihl: soi l
trC<!lll w nl tu ;11_:\ as a Sil O\\-' catch <lnd p rovi de ins ul a t io n.
7. If you' ]) he .\,\one lOr an exte nded h;lving KIJIlll :onn vi.sit ;lnd w'w water
n:gul arly_
Copies of this publication were included with the cover letter above.
21
ISTS Media Outreach Plan
The following media outreach plan was prepared in consultation with the Cook County
Water Advisory Committee and members of the Cook County Planning and Zoning
Department. The list below is a starting point on educati ng the public on seplic syslem
issues, operations and maintenance.
• Utili ze infonnation included in the Properly Owner's Resource Guide as this
document includes relevant information on current zoning requirements.
• Planning and Zoning Staff continues djstribuling the U of M Extension Septic
System Oowers Guide on newly permitted systems. Consider providing copies to
G&G septic so that information can be disseminated. Define funding source for
this activity. Perfonned a mailing directed at private landowner's in the Coastal
Zone in 2007.
• Consider sending educational materials out when tax statement is sent .
• Place reminders on Borea1.org and in local newspapers.
• Remind citi zens that If you own a seasonal residence or expect long periods
without water use don ' t pump your seplic in the fall as thi s can lead to cracked
tanks and costly repairs.

• To lle Schroedcr Sani tary Sewer Distri'ct (TSSSD) to mail a copy of The Septic
System' s Owners Manual to each household in the di strict.
• County commissioners to mention Sept ic System operation and maintenance
when on general radio interviews.
• Water Planner to provide infonnation while at Lake Association meetings.
• Provide information atlwo orthe major summer events including the County Fair
and Fishenmms Picnic.
• COLA and Water Planner to stress the important linkage between septi c systems
and lake water quality.
• Provide infonnation on ISTS Loan Program at varioll s venues li sted above.
• Provide information on Lake Inspection programs and grants received for
.inspect ions and upgrades.
• Confimled with G&G Sept ic that his company name and numbers can be
distributed on varioll s mailings.
• Provide information on rainwater, greywater and blackwater systems.
22

16
Loa n Process
I . Check with Soil & Water for availability
of funds (387-3647).
2. Arrange for a contractor bid.
3. Request a si te in!i>ection from County
Environmental Health (387-3632) . This
triggers a time limit for repai rs .
4. Provide to Soil & Water t ) copy of
"Notice of Non-Compliance", 2) copy of
contractor bid, and 3) AgBMP Loan
Awlication. Soil & Water lhen signs
Application and pl aces you on the waiting
li st. You will be notified when funds are
avail able.
5. Give signed AgBMP Loan appli cation to
lender for credit qualification.
6. Contractor begins construction , As on al l
systems built in Cook County,
Environmental Health inspects during and
after constructi on and provides landowner
with a "Certificate of Compliance". This
assures that the repairs were installed in
conformance with state and county
standards.
7. Give to Lmder I) final invoice from
conlIador. 2) "Certifi cate of
Compli ance" from County.
8, Lender payment is di rectl y to contractor.
Contractor provides signed Mechanics
Lien Waiver to Lender .
9. Applicant, now a BOITower, makes
monthl y payments to Lender .
Maintenance .. Maintenance .. Maintenance
D Sewage treatment systems require
regular inspection and pumping - every
one to three years depending on use.
Systems are expensive invesbnents
worth protecting.
D Yearly pumping is important for homes
using garbage disposals or draining
grease and other hard-to-digest
materials.
D Bleach and other bacteria-killing
products impair functi on therefore more
frequent pumping is necessary. Systems
depend on live bacteria to break down
sewage.
For More InfOJ' mation
Potenti al borrowers in Cook COWlty may
contact Rebecca Wiinanen ahout loan
availability.
Soil & Water
rd Floor, Court House
411 Wes t 2nd St reet
Grand Mar a is MN 55604
218-J87·3647
Local units of govenunent, local lenders
or individuals wishing additional
infonnation may contact Dwight Wilcox.
AgrlcultureBest Management. PrActices Loans
Minnesota Department. of Agriculture
90 West Plat o Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55107
(651) 215- 10 18
051I61l007
2007 ISTS
Loan Program for
Cook County
Minnesota
3% Financing for Repairs to
Non-Compliant Individual
Sewage Treatment Systems
Single. & Multi·Connection ISTS
Agriculture Best Management Practices
LoaJ. Program (AgBMP)
State Revolving Funds (SRF)
MinnesotaDepartment of Agriculture
Administered by
Cook County Soil & Water Conservation
Local Water Management Program

17











Dear Coastal Zone Resident:

Season’s greetings from the Cook County Water Advisory Committee! You are
receiving this mailing because your address is located within the Coastal Zone
Program Boundary and is for informational purposes only. Consider sharing the
documents with a neighbor or returning to the Cook County Zoning Department if
you already have a copy or have no need for the publications.

Maintenance - As 2007 comes to a close consider marking your calendar for any
required maintenance of your septic system in 2008. All septic systems require
routine pumping for longevity of the soil treatment area and to protect the water
resources of Cook County. Septic tanks must be pumped every 2-3 years
(required by state law) to remove scum and sludge.

Education - Included are two items to help you understand the functioning of
your septic system and the importance of routine maintenance. The Septic
System Owner’s Guide is published by the University of Minnesota Extension
and provides information on water use, operation and maintenance of your
system. The Cook County Property Owner’s Resource Guide includes county
specific information on septic systems.

Care - State-licensed professionals must complete design, installation, inspection
and pumping of septic systems. A list of certified personnel can be obtained at
the county zoning department or can be found on the Minnesota Pollution Control
Agency (MPCA) website. Pete Gresczyk of G & G septic is currently the only
state certified pumper in Cook County and can be reached at 387-1572.

Repair - If you suspect your system does not comply with county or state
regulations have it inspected. Leroy Halberg from Cook County Environmental
Health can perform system inspections and can be reached at 387-3632.
Individuals can also contract with a state-licensed Inspector or Designer I to
perform an inspection. Residential and commercial landowners may receive low
interest (3%) financing through the Agriculture Best Management Practices
Chel
Anderson












Biz Clark
Poplar

Jim
Johnson
Commission


Roger
Haertel
SWCD

Dave Stark - Cook County Water Plan Coordinator
Cell (218) 428-4413
david.stark@co.cook.mn.us
COOK COUNTY
Water Management Plan
Advisory Committee

Don
Goodell
Lutsen

Eleanor
Lease
Road Lake
Jerry
Johansen









This project was funded in part under the
Coastal Zone Management Act, by NOAA’s
Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource
Management, in cooperation with Minnesota’s
Lake Superior Coastal Program.



18
(AgBMP) loan program for repair or replacement of non-compliant systems.
Rebecca Wiinanen from the Cook County Soil and Water Conservation District
(SWCD) administers this program and can be reached at 387-3647.

Septic System Information Links
Cook County Environmental Health - www.co.cook.mn.us/zoning/index.html
MPCA Licensed Professionals - http://www.pca.state.mn.us/programs/ists/ists.xls
MPCA Septic System Regulations - www.revisor.leg.state.mn.us/arule/7080/
University of Minnesota Extension Septic Program – http://septic.umn.edu/
Cook County Property Owners Resource Guide -
www.co.cook.mn.us/sw/cook_pog.pdf.

Books - Great Last Minute Gift Ideas to Learn More about Water and
“Waste”
Septic System Owner’s Manual - www.shelterpub.com/_shelter/ssom_book.html
Rainwater Collection -
www.booksamillion.com/ncom/books?pid=0966417062&ad=FGLBKS
Humanure the 3
rd
Edition - www.joseph-jenkins.com/books_humanure.html
Creating an Oasis with Greywater -
www.oasisdesign.net/greywater/createanoasis/index.htm

19
12
In eTre
Most town and city dwell ers rely on a public waste water treatment
system for sewage management. While public waste water treatment
systems may be avai lable to some rural dwellers, most rely 0 11 p rivate
individua1 sewage treatment systems (lS1'5).
The design and installation of ISTS is regulated by State Rules
and permitted through the Cook County Piannjng & Zoni ng
Department. ISTS must be installed by State lice nsed contractors.
A list of contractors can be obtai ned at th e Pl a n n ing & Zoni ng
De partment. Alternat ive sewage treatment systems will
be considered for approvaL Contact the Cook County
Environme ntal Health Departmental 218-387-3632.
1. Good vegetative cover shoul d be maintained over the
soil lreatment system. ll owever, do not plan t trees or shrubs
because the mots may clog the distr ib ut ion lines.
2. Do not dr ive over the soil treatment system and
mai ntain snow cover in the win ter to prevent the area from
freezing.
3. Use water-conserving fIxtures like low-flow shower-
heads and toilets.
4. Distribute wash loads evenly throughout the week to
avoid ove rloadin g the system with large amounts of water.
5. Wash only full loads in the dishwasl1cr and washing
machine. Consider a water-conserving washing machi ne
because they usc less water.
6. Use liquid detergents (powdered detergents add tine
particles that may clog the soil treatment system).
7. Reduce the LIse of harsh Cleaners <lnd antibacterial
soaps.
DoYou Know ...
Se ptic System Setback Requirements
Well Shoreland
8. Use of gaTbage disposal s is not recolllmended.
Consider composting.
9. The septic tank MUST be c1eaned (pumped)
2-3 yea rs to remove f10ating scum and s1udge t hat accu mu-
hlte. If t his material is allowed to en ter the soil treatment
system (mound or trench) it will cause expensive and often
irreparable damage.
10. Rou te roof drains and drain tile away from the drain-
ticld.
11 . Do not dispose of solvents, paints, antifreeze, and
chemicals down the drain.
12. DO NaT USE starters, feeders, cleaners and other
additives. There is 00 quick ti.x or substitute fo r proper oper-
ation and regular maintenance.
For additional information on sewage treatmcnt
systems contact the University of Minnesota
http://septic.coafes.umn.edll ! homeowner/ il1dex . h tml
• 100 feet from the t reatment area if
well has less than 50 feet of casing
and does not encounter
10 feet of impervious materi al.
50 feet from the treatment area if
well has more than 50 feet of casing
or encounters 10 feet of impervious
mat erial.
• 100, I SO feet from the vegetat ion
line. depending upon DNR prot ected
waters classifi cation. from any
component of the sewage treatment
system.
x·----1
Bui ldings
• 10 feet from sept ic tank
• 20 feet from treatment area
150
Re creational 100
lake SUEeri or ' 40
Natural Envi ronment 150
Special Recreational 100
150
100
100
150
15 0
Property Line
• 10 feet from any component of t he
septiC system.
Road Right of Way
• 10 Feet from any component of
the septic system.
*From vegetation li ne.
Well
x = setback from lake depends on classificat ion of lake.
'Call Planni ng and Zoning for your lake classification.

20

Some commonly asked questions
Q What pennits arc needed ({) install a sewage treatment system;
who do I COil/act?
A An applicat ion is jointly submi tted by the licensed designer
and the homeowner to the Planning & Zoning Department.
Q l-Vlwt is a CertificCI/e of Compliance?
A A Cert ificate of Compliance shows that at the time of
inspect ion, the sewage treatment system was installed
properly. It is issued after a new system has been properly
installed, or after an inspection of an existing system has
found that the sewage system is in compliance with State
standards. This Certificate of Compli ance is considered to
be effective for a period of five years for a new system and
th ree years fo r an existing system.
Q Do 1 need a sewage treatmel1t system certificate if I am just
going to build a shed?
A Yes and No. No, if you do not live in shoreland. Yes, if you
live in shoreland and the shed or any other st ructure you
are building is 160 square teet or longer.
Q Who tells me what type of system I l1eed'
A The licensed 1ST'S designer can make this determination
based on soil and site condit ions, and specific needs of the
01vner.
Q How is the type of system needed on my property determil1ed?
A The type of system is determined by soil texture, depth to
water table, proximity to surface waters, and the number of
people it is intended to ."P.l"VP. . of high ground ,vater
table and heavy clay soil s, 80 percent of Cook County's sep-
tic systems are mound systems.
Q How do I know if the sewage {reatrnel1t system now e.:"is(il1g 011
my property works? Who is responsible jar checking it?
A Most systems in Cook County are mound systems. Signs of.
mound system failures include: wet areas around the edge
of the mound; cattails or other wp.thll1n and/ or
black areas around the edge of the mound. 1tench systems
in fail ure reveal pandi ng or lea kage to a low spot. Ifbuying
property, even 1'\1it h a Certificate of Compliance, it is wise
to hire a sewage treatment system inspector to conduct a
Point of Sale inspection.
Q I want to sell my home. The buyer wants a Point-at-Safe
inspection of my sewage treatment system. Who do 1 contact to
do this?
A A state-licensed sewage treatment system Inspector or
Designer I should be contacted. A list can be obtained from
the Cook County Planning & Zoning Department, or
dovvnloaded from www.jJcci.statc.ml1.l.Is/ programs/lists/
registrationl1tml. Cook County Environmental Health
Department will also do the Point-of-Sale inspections.
Q Do I need a permit to construct an outhouse or install a
compostil1g toilet?
A Yes, they require a permit frol11 Cook County
Environmental Healt h Department.
Q Can [ install my own sewage treatment system? Do J even have
to have a sewage treatment system?
A You cannot install your O\-VI1 sewage treatment system.
Only licensed install er::; IIwy. You are requ ired to have a
sewage treatme nt system if any structure has plumbing. If
your structure does not have plumbing, an outhouse is
acceptable.
Protecting your sewage treatment system
from freezing:
During winters with a lack of snow cover and cold temperatu res, sewage treatment systems
can freeze. This can be not only a tremendous inconvenience, but can result in expensive
repairs. To hel p prevent your from fr eezing, foll ow these general guidelines:
1. Add a layer of hay or straHl mulch (8- 12 inches) over th e pipes, tank, and soi l trea tn1en t
area.
2. Use normal amounts of water, the warmer the better.
3. Fix any leaky plu mbing and DO Naf' add an tifreeze to the systen1.
4. Keep all of vehicles - including ATV's and snovlInobil es - off of the septic system.
s. Make sure all risers, inspection p ipes and Inanho]es have covers. Adding insulation over
pipes and over the septic tank is also a good idea.
6. Let th e grass in your lawn grow h igher in th e late summer and early fall over the soil
treatment area to act as a snow catch and provide better
7. Ifyou'lJ be gone for an extended time, consider having someone visit and use \vater
regularly.
8. Don't pump the tank in the fall and leave it empty over tIle winter.
I
,I

21


Copies of this publication were included with the cover letter above.

22
ISTS Media Outreach Plan
The following media outreach plan was prepared in consultation with the Cook County
Water Advisory Committee and members of the Cook County Planning and Zoning
Department. The list below is a starting point on educating the public on septic system
issues, operations and maintenance.


• Utilize information included in the Property Owner’s Resource Guide as this
document includes relevant information on current zoning requirements.
• Planning and Zoning Staff continues distributing the U of M Extension Septic
System Onwers Guide on newly permitted systems. Consider providing copies to
G&G septic so that information can be disseminated. Define funding source for
this activity. Performed a mailing directed at private landowner’s in the Coastal
Zone in 2007.
• Consider sending educational materials out when tax statement is sent.
• Place reminders on Boreal.org and in local newspapers.
• Remind citizens that If you own a seasonal residence or expect long periods
without water use don’t pump your septic in the fall as this can lead to cracked
tanks and costly repairs.

• Tofte Schroeder Sanitary Sewer District (TSSSD) to mail a copy of The Septic
System’s Owners Manual to each household in the district.
• County commissioners to mention Septic System operation and maintenance
when on general radio interviews.
• Water Planner to provide information while at Lake Association meetings.
• Provide information at two of the major summer events including the County Fair
and Fishermans Picnic.
• COLA and Water Planner to stress the important linkage between septic systems
and lake water quality.
• Provide information on ISTS Loan Program at various venues listed above.
• Provide information on Lake Inspection programs and grants received for
inspections and upgrades.
• Confirmed with G&G Septic that his company name and numbers can be
distributed on various mailings.
• Provide information on rainwater, greywater and blackwater systems.

23
Appendix D – Highway Engineer Meeting Agenda
Agenda
Meeting with County Highway Enginneer

Date: Thursday - October 25, 2007
Time: 1:00 – 3:00 P.M.
Location: Cook County Courthouse ITV Room

Introductions and County Roles
Jim Johnson – County Commissioner and Chair of the Water Advisory Committee
Dave Stark – Water Plan Coordinator
Keith Anderson – Joint Powers Engineer
Bill Lane – Planning and Zoning – Stormwater Ordinance Administration
Shae Kosmalski – County Highway Engineer

Potential for Project Collaboration and Grants (Discussion – All)


Overview of Stormwater Ordinance and Plat Review Process (Bill Lane)


Road Construction and Maintenance Protocols (Keith Anderson /Shae Kosmalski)


Stormwater Analysis Tools (Dave Stark/Keith Anderson/Shae Kosmalski)


Job Performance Standards (Jim Johnson/Shae Kosmalski)

Outcomes
Minutes from meeting.
Recommendations on stormwater modeling tools for incorporation into grant report.
New county road construction and maintenance protocols for incorporaton into grant
report.
Written job performance standards for incorporation into grant report

Materials for Distribution
Sign In Sheet – Documentation for Match
Cook County Water Plan
Coastal Grant Language
Preliminary Recommendations on Stormwater Modeling Tools







Task 3: Coastal Grant Language
Work with the Water Advisory Committee, County Highway Department, County Planning and
Zoning Department, and Soil & Water Board to accomplish specific actions from the Water Plan
related to reducing water quality impacts associated with roads and other land use activities
managed or approved by Cook County.

1) Develop plat review process that includes storm water analysis and assessment by the
developer using hydrologic modeling software or techniques. Investigate hydrologic modeling
software tools available for stormwater analysis and assessment and investigate usefulness for
cumulative effects analysis in the county plat review process. Make recommendation to county
Planning office regarding what tool(s) to incorporate to improve plat review of stormwater issues.

2) Work with county Engineer to bring county road construction and maintenance protocols into
compliance with county stormwater ordinances and the state-regulated NPDES stormwater
program.

3) Establish job performance standards, related to county road system erosion control, and run-off
pollutants, for county Engineer and responsible staff, for annual evaluation as part of performance
review.

This task is in the Cook County Water Plan Goal 5:1 Action Items 3, 5, 10, 12. Work on this task
will occur concurrently with work on the other tasks.

Deliverables
Task 3:
Recommendations on plat review tool(s).
New county road construction and maintenance protocols.
New job performance standards for county Engineer and responsible staff .

24

Agenda
Meeting with County Highway Enginneer

Date: Thursday - October 25, 2007
Time: 1:00 – 3:00 P.M.
Location: Cook County Courthouse ITV Room

Introductions and County Roles
Jim Johnson – County Commissioner and Chair of the Water Advisory Committee
Dave Stark – Water Plan Coordinator
Keith Anderson – Joint Powers Engineer
Bill Lane – Planning and Zoning – Stormwater Ordinance Administration
Shae Kosmalski – County Highway Engineer

Potential for Project Collaboration and Grants (Discussion – All)


Overview of Stormwater Ordinance and Plat Review Process (Bill Lane)


Road Construction and Maintenance Protocols (Keith Anderson /Shae Kosmalski)


Stormwater Analysis Tools (Dave Stark/Keith Anderson/Shae Kosmalski)


Job Performance Standards (Jim Johnson/Shae Kosmalski)

Outcomes
Minutes from meeting.
Recommendations on stormwater modeling tools for incorporation into grant report.
New county road construction and maintenance protocols for incorporaton into grant
report.
Written job performance standards for incorporation into grant report.

Materials for Distribution
Sign In Sheet – Documentation for Match
Cook County Water Plan
Coastal Grant Language
Preliminary Recommendations on Stormwater Modeling Tools