You are on page 1of 5

Site Plan

1. Convention+Hotel
2. Arena
3. Housing
4. Parking
5. Park
6. Cultural Center

6

3,500,000 SF
20,000 Seats
564 units
500 spaces
45 acres
50,835 SF

3

6

*Buildings under development/construction are
rendered in a light grey.
4
1

1

2
1

Topographical Interventions
I-5 cut through the city in 1962, dividing the Seattle Neighborhoods.

Eastlake

Capitol
Hill

Images from WSDOT, during the construction of I-5

“C.A.P. proposes to insert topography
and public park space into the chasm
created by Interstate 5”

A narrow swath of land between Lake Washington and Elliott Bay is
situated in the remote upper northwest corner of the United States
– here sits the City of Seattle. Populated by Douglas fir and Red cedar
trees until settlers started turning the isthmus into a fast growing
metropolis just over 150 years ago. The first major industry in the city,
logging, was successful in turning the tall forests into an urbanized
landscape. As the growing city met topographical challenges, the
topography was simply removed, relocated or filled-in to create a more
suitable environment for euro-centric city building. This approach
to city building was so successful that by the mid-1900’s the city of
Detroit, MI had more trees and greenspace downtown than Seattle,
WA. The boom and bust cycles of this west coast city have afforded
grand opportunities to build parks and public space and positioned
difficult obstacles to seeing those plans through. (Olmsted Seattle
Parks system, Klondike Gold Rush, Boeing, Software, Dot-Com, Fastest
growing city in the U.S.) During one boom cycle in the early 1990’s a
proposal to create the Seattle Commons south of Lake Union was put
forward. The Seattle Commons took an underutilized portion of the
city within close proximity of the downtown core and turned it into
a Central Park-esque feature in the middle of proposed development
on the periphery. Despite generous support from Paul Allen to create
the Seattle Commons as a public amenity to balance out the proposed
development, the City of Seattle said no thank you to a 45 acre

Topographical Interventions
I-5 cut through the city in 1962, dividing the Seattle Neighborhoods.

Downtown
Seattle

Images from WSDOT, during the construction of I-5

Capitol Hill

First Hill

downtown park. 25 years of impressive growth have built-out South
Lake Union as well as many other neighborhoods around the city.
The downtown core and Capitol Hill are experiencing unprecedented
growth and development. As the urban core densifies opportunities
for significant public green space downtown are becoming difficult to
imagine.
Interstate 5 occupies an immense swath of land through downtown
Seattle, slicing the isthmus in two pieces with the cut occurring along
the edges between the International District/Downtown Core/South
Lake Union to the west and First Hill and Capitol Hill to the east. This
jarring separation of the urban fabric is experienced by all who pass
within earshot of the non-stop roar of traffic that emanates from the
man-made canyon and ledge that make-up the freeway structure.
Minor attempts to connect the city with itself are tenuous at best.
The C.A.P. proposal solves multiple issues, our growing city can thrive
from the complexity of the challenges facing its citizens. We can have
a beautiful public park, a destination convention center, a downtown
sports arena and affordable housing. Each of the neighborhoods
have multiple opportunities to tie the city back together at large
and small scales. Focus on the public amenities, public input and
evolutionary process that the C.A.P. infrastructure supports will allow
the development of the concept over time.

Project Goals
45 ACRE PARK

Trails, Paths, Overlooks, Community Spaces

RECONNECT NEIGHBORHOODS AND THE
URBAN FABRIC OF THE CITY
PUBLIC BENEFIT FOR DENSIFYING URBAN
CORE
ENERGY GENERATION, NOISE REDUCTION,
STORMWATER MITIGATION, EMISSIONS
CONTROL
ARCHITECTURAL INFRASTRUCTURE AT A
CITY SCALE IMPLEMENTS

45 Acre Park
Convention Center Expansion
Downtown Arena
Downtown Housing
Cultural and Activity Space
Collective Views of the City, Water and Mountains