RED DOOR RECORD

LENT 2010 I invite you, therefore, in the name of the Church, to the observance of a holy Lent, by self-examination and repentance; by prayer, fasting, and self-denial; and by reading and meditating on God’s holy Word. And, to make a right beginning of repentance, and as a mark of our mortal nature, let us now kneel before the Lord, our maker and redeemer. Almighty God, you have created us out of the dust of the earth; Grant that these ashes may be to us a sign of our mortality and penitence, that we may remember that it is only by your gracious gift that we are given everlasting life; through Jesus Christ our Savior. Amen.
St. Luke’s Episcopal Church 921 Pleasant St. Worcester, MA 508-756-1990

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Nourished by God’s Word and Sacraments, we strive to be a community of faith where people come to know, love, and follow Jesus Christ.
Saint Luke’s Episcopal Church 921 Pleasant Street Worcester, MA 01602 (508) 756-1990 www.stlukesworcester.org

Staff The Rev. Warren E. Hicks, Rector The Rev. S. Jane Griesbach, Deacon Lisa Antaya, Parish Administrator Beth Letourneau, Sexton Officers Senior Warden, Dan Arnold Junior Warden, John Ferriss Clerk, Alice Valentine Treasurer, Rick Kimball Asst. Treasurer, Debra Holmes Asst. Treasurer, Janet McClure Vestry Susan Black Louise Berendes Chris Wychorski Sharon Strzalkowski Scott Roseen Kristin Hartness Law

Convention Delegates Don Groves Donna Hartness Robin Van Liew Dale Burton, Alternate

The Red Door Record is published monthly by St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in both print form and on-line at our website www.stlukesworcester.org Editor: Mary Hicks

Send news items to: reddoorrecord@gmail.com or St. Luke’s Episcopal Church 921 Pleasant Street Worcester, MA 01602

The deadline for submissions is the third Monday at Midnight of each month.

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MINISTRY NEWS
The Deacon’s Bench
Another calling of a deacon is to stay faithful in prayer. Know that I pray for St. Luke’s parish every morning. I also work my way through the parish directory to pray for individuals by name. My morning devotions include prayers for the world and in this day Haiti is so in need of all of our continued prayers. My column is cated to Haiti.

therefore dedi-

Hearts for Haiti – The Episcopal Church has designated the last Sunday of Epiphany as World Mission Sunday. It also happens to fall on Valentine’s Day this year. The earthquake in Haiti will be a little more than one month out on Feb. 14. The media will have moved on to new stories. Understandably, our thoughts and prayers may have also turned to other things. But the need in Haiti will still be enormous. So, to celebrate World Mission Sunday, our diocese is sponsoring “Hearts for Haiti” on Feb. 14. There will be several ways for our parish to participate. Come and see! The Episcopal Church began its work in Haiti in 1861, with the arrival of the African-American priest, James Theodore Holly and his company of 100 emigrants from New Haven, CT. They were seeking a country where people of color were not only legally but truly free. The bible was translated into Creole, the language of the people. The Episcopal Church of Haiti is the largest diocese of the U.S. Episcopal Church (one of the 12 overseas dioceses.) It has more than 100,000 baptized members in 109 congregations with only 40 ordained priests. The Sisters of St. Margaret are an Episcopal Religious Order of women called to glorify God and proclaim the gospel of Jesus Christ through their worship
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MINISTRY NEWS
(Continued from Page 3) and work, prayer and common life. Yes, there are orders of religious in the Episcopal Church! Their commitment to God and to one another is expressed through vows of poverty, celibate chastity and obedience. St. Margaret’s has a convent in the Roxbury section of Boston, a presence in New York City and until the earthquake, a convent in Port au Prince, Haiti. There are presently twenty-seven Sisters, two dogs and five cats in the community. The ages range from thirty to ninety-four! Members come from all walks of life. Among them are former schoolteachers, nurses, musicians, and administrators. The community is also multi-cultural. Five sisters are from Haiti, two are from Canada, and one is from Tortola. Two sisters are ordained priests in the Episcopal Church, and one is currently in the ordination process in the Diocese of Massachusetts. The Sisters of St. Margaret established their convent in Port-au-Prince in 1927, and have worked tirelessly for the people of Haiti ever since. Before the earthquake, the Sisters directed a scholarship program for children who otherwise would be left out of school for lack of ability to pay even minimal fees. They did this from their Convent in Port-au-Prince which has been destroyed. The Sisters directed the making of hand-embroidered church linens. They also directed Foyer Notre Dame, a home for elderly, indigent persons that includes terminal care and burial. This work has been in continuous service since 1962, and is supported entirely by donations. The Foyer is partially destroyed. The Sisters interact and collaborate with local clergy and parishes throughout the Diocese of Haiti. The diocese lost their beautiful cathedral with many murals and original art work. The home of the bishop and his wife was destroyed and they are now among the homeless. Many Episcopal churches were destroyed. The Sisters and diocesan staff are all safe. After three days without hearing directly from the Sisters we heard they were safely camped out on a soccer field with several hundred other Haitians. Once security can be insured, (Continued on Page 7)

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MEET YOUR NEW VESTRY
Senior Warden, Dan Arnold
First I'd like to thanks Barbara Groves for her service as Senior Warden this past year, 2009. I hope I can fill her shoes even a little. Hello, my name is Dan Arnold and I'm looking forward to my next year on the Vestry as Senior Warden. For those who don't know me let me tell you a bit about myself. My family and I have been at St. Luke's since Easter 2006. I'm 38 years old. I'm married to Brooke Arnold (6/23/02 -Christ Episcopal Church - Rochdale). We have 3 children - Olivia, 6, Daniel, 4, and Eleanor, 19 months. I was born in Ware, MA but grew up in Monson, MA. I graduated Monson Jr.-Sr. High School 1989 and then UMass Amherst in 1993. I currently work as the Business Manager for the Mass Dept. of Children and Families (DCF) Worcester West Area Office - you might know it as DSS. In the past I've been a Social Worker for children in an intensive foster care program in Springfield. I like camping and hiking, reading and crossword puzzles, as well as home improvement and landscape projects. Baseball is my favorite sport and of course I'm a Red Sox fan. In my life at St. Luke's I'm involved with the Hope for Housing ministry. I'm also looking forward to seeing what the Partnership for Missional Church PMC) process will yield. I don't know what the future holds for the St. Luke's community but I do know that it is a community that I will enjoy traveling with down God's pathway. What is God calling us to do? Let's listen and find out together.

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MEET YOUR NEW VESTRY
John Ferris, Junior Warden
Hello, I'm Dr. John Ferriss, the new junior warden. I joined St. Luke's 9 years ago, after moving back to New England from Hershey, PA. I previously served on the Vestry from 20052008. I work as an arthritis specialist at Wing Hospital in Palmer. I'm married to Dr. Mary Maloney, with 3 children (youngest is 22). We enjoy going to our summer cottage in VT, biking, and traveling. I'm a military history and train buff. My handyman skills are limited, so I will need God's help and the help of many of you, as I serve St. Luke's in this new role.

Rick Kimball, Treasurer
Richard Kimball, a 25 year member of St. Luke's, having held every possible post in Vestry, so enjoyed his last stint as Treasurer that he was delighted to take up the position again in 2010. Rick, a professor of psychology at Worcester State College is also a docent at Tower Hill Botanical Gardens, a long-time member of Worcester Chorus as well as its librarian and occasional narrator, an active faculty member of the WISE program, and a legendary expert on Hostas. He has been an initiating participant in DOCC, and a past leader of evening Bible studies. St. Luke's is very lucky that Rick was willing to take up the tough and thankless task of Treasurer.

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MEET YOUR NEW VESTRY
Susan Black, Vestry Class of 2012

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The Deacon’s Bench, Continued from Page 4
they will go to stay at the home of one of their Associates. They wish to stay in country to help wherever they are able. Living close to the people they love, the Sisters share the undying belief of the Haitian people that God is good, “Bon-Die-Bon”, and that the words of the 46th Psalm are for them: “God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble... It is he who makes war to cease in all the world.” Our own Sharon Strzalowski is an Associate of St. Margaret’s. I visit the Boston Convent for my annual retreat. So St. Luke’s is connected to the Sisters. Visit their web site at www.ssmbos.com to learn more about the Society of Saint Margaret.

Deacon Jane

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P.M.C. UPDATE
"The mystery of Pentecost is that the gift of discernment is breathed into the world, enabling us to see the presence of the divine in the midst of the human -not as an aside or an afterthought, but as the main event of our lives" Jay Rochelle, in *Christian Century*, 22 May 1985, p. 535

All Vestry PMC Retreat Saturday, February 20, 2010 Hosted at Church of the Good Shepherd in Clinton, MA Facilitator: Father Will Bergmann The vestry will review the reports presented at the Corporate Spiritual Discernment event in November as well as the results of that session. Our task is to then discern through Dwelling in the Word, prayer and guided facilitation one Missional challenge to undertake this year. Where is God already at work here in Worcester, in our neighborhood, in our parish, amongst the parishioners? How do we tap into what God is doing and follow God's lead at this time? This Missional Challenge will be shared with the congregation and a Missional Engagement Team will be assembled to "do the work that we have been given to do".

Chris Wychorski PMC Team Member

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P.O.W.E.R.
I wrote “Grace for the Earth” 9 years ago, in the middle of a snowstorm, when Anna was a baby and we were living on top of a beautiful hill in western Massachusetts. Our recent snow reminded me to share it:

Grace for the Earth
“What plants did you eat for lunch today?” I ask an eager group of girl scouts circled around me at the wildlife sanctuary where I teach nature programs to urban young people. They look at each other and then me, quizzically. “None!” they shout. “We don’t eat plants.” “How about animals? What animals did you eat for lunch today?” I continue. Now they think I’m playing a game. They giggle and answer me like I’m a silly two-year-old. “Yuck! We don’t eat animals for lunch.” When I ask who ate a hamburger today, several hands go up. “Did you know that hamburger meat comes from a cow? That a hamburger bun is made from wheat, a plant that grows on farms? And that ketchup is made from tomatoes?” Now the young girls are taken aback. They consider this information. I ask again who has eaten plants for lunch and this time all hands go up. They have made the connection. I love working with these young people because I’m able to teach lessons that I am still learning. I, too, was an urban child and I didn’t understand that the food I ate, the clothes I wore, the water I drank, the toys I enjoyed came from the earth. In my child’s mind, “things” belonged to the human world, and nature, somewhere way out West, belonged to the earth. In short, I did not understand that I lived upon the earth and that everything, absolutely everything I used, came from the earth. (Continued on Page 10)

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P.O.W.E.R.
(Continued from Page 9) My absolute dependence upon the earth is enough to give me pause, but as a Christian, my dependence upon the earth points to an even deeper dependence. The first chapter of Genesis describes the hard work God did to create the earth. “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth” (Gen1: 1, RSV). When I use some “thing,” it is not only a gift from the earth, it is a gift from God. Everything in my world is part of the sacred creation of God. Since the birth of my daughter five months ago, I’ve begun to imagine the earth as God’s womb, which nourishes us, grows us, and sustains us. God is, of course, greater than the earth, but we live within this beautiful earth which lives within God. “The earth is the Lord’s and the fullness thereof, the world and those who dwell therein” (Ps24: 1, RSV). Nothing belongs to us. Everything we have belongs first to the earth and finally to the God who created the earth. This truth – that everything we have comes from the earth which comes from God – is so basic, and yet our behavior, my behavior, suggests that it is a truth we do not understand and do not live. The word “consume” comes from a Latin root meaning, “to take.” When we consume things, and almost all of us in America consume more than we need, we literally waste the earth. Why would we want to squander the living creation of God? When we manufacture the things we consume, we leave behind garbage and pollution. Why would we want to destroy the sacred creation that sustains us? When we take more than we need, we literally steal from God who intended the creation for all who dwell there. Sometimes, I feel frustrated that there is so little in Christian ritual and practice to remind us of our connection to God’s earth, but usually, if I look hard enough, I find something right there under my nose. In this case, I discovered the answer sitting across the table from me. Before each meal, my husband thanks God for the food he is about to eat and enjoy. Following his example, I’ve found it helpful to extend the ancient practice of table grace to everything I (Continued on Page 11)

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(Continued from Page 10) use. I say a short prayer each time I consume. When I flick on a light, I thank the coal buried deep in the earth, which powers the electrical currents in my house. When I turn on the computer, I thank the petroleum, millions of years in the making, which became the plastic of my machine. When I use a piece of paper, I thank the tree, which gave its life for me to write upon it. Especially, when I drink water or take a shower, I thank the aquifer under the ground, which supplies me with this essential liquid. Each prayer establishes the connection, sometimes obvious, sometimes hidden, between my consumption and the earth and between the earth and God the creator. When I follow this practice faithfully, I find myself saying a quick prayer with each step. Every moment I consume, every moment I give thanks. My continuous words of gratitude serve as a constant reminder that everything comes from the earth, which comes from God. With these thoughts constantly in our minds and hearts, how can we do anything but consume less, consume more wisely, and share more of what we use?

Kristin Steinmetz For P.O.W.E.R. (Parishioners Optimistically Working toward Environmental Responsibility)

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ST. LUKE’S TURNS 100!
We are looking forward to a fun year as we celebrate our 100th!! Just some of the things coming this year: Visits from former Rectors and Clergy – They can tell us how they fit into the history of the St. Luke’s community and what they took with them. A Weekend Event celebrating the mid point of our 100 year history by Celebrating the Sixties – DJ, dinner, dancing and fun!! A community quilting project creating a Altar Frontal and more. A All Parish Outreach event. A Big Reunion Celebration in November – Inviting Current Past and Future parishioners to a reunion.

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OUR REFLECTIONS
Notes on Haiti’s Earthquake
Since Kobe’s Hanshin earthquake of 1995 forced me and my family to prematurely end teaching in Japan, I came back to St. Luke’s more than a little interested in the theology of earthquakes. The issue of God and natural disasters--God and suffering in the world—or the issue of theodicy still has an immediacy for me; events recently in Haiti only rekindled those interests. Below are some of the answers to my fundamental question, how does one reconcile God and human suffering? The first item merely restates the issue in its most recent formulation—there follows David Hume’s classically brief statement of the problem, and then responses---all of them inadequate, it seems to me, although I still admire Reverend Baldwin’s direct answer to me in a letter written at the time. From Deborah Sontag’s NYTimes article, January 17, 2010: “In varying versions, this scene repeated itself throughout the Haitian capital on Sunday. With many of their churches flattened and their priests and pastors killed, Haitians desperate for aid and comfort beseeched God to ease their grief. Carrying Bibles, they traversed the dusty, rubble-filled streets searching for solace at scattered prayer gatherings. The churches, usually filled with passionate parishioners on a Sunday morning, stood empty if they stood at all. Not far from the makeshift evangelical church at Champ de Mars, parishioners gathered outside the ruins of the capital city’s main cathedral to hear an appeal for forbearance from a bishop." We have to keep hoping,” said Bishop Marie Eric Toussaint, although he acknowledged that he had no resources to help the many who were suffering and that he found it hard to state with any confidence whether the cathedral would ever be rebuilt. Built in 1750, the cathedral, once an architectural centerpiece of the city, is now but a giant pile of twisted metal, shattered stained glass and cracked concrete. Bishop Toussaint said the quake had toppled the residences where priests stayed, crushing many of them. (Continued on Page 14)

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OUR REFLECTIONS
(Continued from Page 13) The Sacre Coeur cathedral, another grand structure, also lay in ruin, with a large, perfectly preserved Christ on a cross bearing witness to the destruction below — and a woman’s body lying across the street atop a mattress, her head resting on a pillow, sheeting draping over her. “It may seem like a strange moment to have faith,” said Georges Verrier, 28, an unemployed computer expert, his eyes moving from the body to the church. “But you can’t blame God. I blame man. God gave us nature, and we Haitians, and our governments, abused the land. You cannot get away without consequences.” Sounding a similar note, a self-appointed preacher at Champ de Mars stood on a crate during the makeshift service and proclaimed the earthquake punishment for a long list of sins that he enumerated in a singsong. “We have to kneel down and ask forgiveness from God,” he said.” David Hume’s formulation, from Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion: “Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is impotent. Is he able but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both willing and able? Whence then is evil?” Jesus' answer, from Luke: 13: 4, 5: “…Or those eighteen who were killed when the tower of Siloam fell on them---do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others living in Jerusalem? No, I tell you, but unless you repent, you will all perish just as they did.” From Bart Erhman’s God’s Problem: …”Moreover, if the Christian God is the one who suffers, then who is the one who created and sustains this world? Isn’t it the same God? By saying that God suffers with his creation, we seem to have sacrificed the view that God is sovereign over his creation. In other words, once again, God is not really GOD. And we are still left with the problem of suffering: why is it here?” …”Some of the biblical authors believed that suffering was ultimately redemptive; and it is true that there can often be a silver lining in the hardships we Continued on Page 15)

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OUR REFLECTIONS
(Continued from Page 14) encounter. But I just don’t see anything redemptive when Ethiopian babies die of malnutrition, or when thousands of people die today (and yesterday, and the day before) of malaria, or when your entire family is brutalized by a drugcrazed gang that breaks into your home in the middle of the night.” Or when 300,000 die in a tsunami, or 100,000 perish in a Haitian earthquake. …”Some authors—such as the one who wrote the powerful poetic dialogues of Job—maintained that suffering is a mystery. I resonate with this view, but I do not think highly of its corollary---that we have no right to ask about the answer to the mystery, since we are, after all, mere peons and God is the ALMIGHTY, and we have no grounds for calling him to task for what he has done. If God made us (assuming the theistic view for a moment), then presumably our sense of right and wrong comes from him. If that’s the case there is no other true sense of right and wrong but his. If he does something wrong, then he is culpable by the very standards of judgment that he has given us as sentient human beings. And murdering babies, starving masses, and allowing—or causing— genocides are wrong…” …”In my opinion, this life is all there is. My students have difficulty believing me when I tell them that that’s a view taught in the Bible—but it is. It is explicitly the teaching of Ecclesiastes, and it is a view shared by other great thinkers, such as the authors of the poetic dialogues of Job. So maybe I’m a biblical thinker after all. In any event, the idea that this life is all there is should not be an occasion for despair and despondency, but just the contrary. It should be a source of joy and dreams—joy of living for the moment and dreams of trying to make the world a better place, both for ourselves and for others in it.” From Jurgen Moltmann’s The Crucified God: “It is necessary to remember the martyrs, so as not to become abstract. Of them (Continued on Page 16)

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OUR REFLECTIONS
(Continued from Page 15) and of the dumb sacrifices it is true in a real, transferred sense, that God himself hung on the gallows, as E. Wiesel was able to say. If that is taken seriously, it must also be said that, like the cross of Christ, even Auschwitz is in God himself. Even Auschwitz is taken up into the grief of the Father, the surrender of the Son and the power of the Spirit. That never means that Auschwitz and other grisly places can be justified, for it is the cross that is the beginning of the Trinitarian history of God. As Paul says in I Cor. 15, only with the resurrection of the dead, the murdered and the gassed, only with the healing of those in despair who bear lifelong wounds, only with the abolition of all rule and authority, only with the annihilation of death will the Son had over the kingdom to the Father. Then God will turn his sorrow into eternal joy. This will be the sign of the completion of the Trinitarian history of God and the end of world history, the overcoming of the history of man’s sorrow and fulfillment of his history of hope. God in Auschwitz and Auschwitz in the crucified God—that is the basis for real hope which both embraces and overcomes the world, and the ground for a love which is stronger than death and can sustain death. It is the ground for living with the terror of history and the end of history, and nevertheless remaining in love and meeting what comes in openness for God’s future. It is the ground for living and bearing guilt and sorrow for the future of man in God.” From a letter by Rev. Lang Baldwin, February, 1995: “A major earthquake brings immense suffering. Non-believers, pagans may try to help if their contact with the suffering does not cause them too much pain. But because they devote most of their efforts in life to avoid pain, to find comfort, to achieve power that keep at a distance those who threaten their security and peaceful happiness, they will, much more quickly than true Christians, turn away in horror from terrible suffering. For one inspired by the spirit of Christ, suffering is seen in a different light. When life at its best, as seen in Jesus, consists in the exercise of loving service of others, in self-giving, in serving (Continued on Page 17)

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OUR REFLECTIONS
(Continued from Page 16) rather than having, then suffering—either one’s own or that of others—ceases to be a threat. Instead, it becomes the occasion and reason for a close relationship with God and thus to experience genuine life. Without suffering there would be no creative and fruit-bearing love in the world. The condition of isolation from suffering that is most earnestly desired by pagans is actually a condition of utter sterility and death, a condition where love is lacking. So suffering serves God’s purpose, which is to help humans grow in love. I dare to suggest this as an answer to the original question—An earthquake is a creative act of our God who loves his whole creation.”

John Zeugner

St. Luke’s Lenten Book Study
Join us on Wednesday evenings in March as we read and study Shusaku Endo’s A Life of Jesus. The book is “A simple and powerful retelling of the life of Christ as seen through the eyes of a Japanese novelist.” according to Amazon.com. Books are available numerous places online starting at around $10 on Amazon.com. Less expensive copies, both new and used, are available through bookfinder.com. The ISBN for the book is 978-0809123193. We’ll meet to talk about Endo’s rendering of Jesus and discuss how it informs our understanding of Jesus life and ministry. Alice Valentine and Fr. Warren will provide cultural and theological background for the discussion. The evenings will begin with Evening Prayer at 6 followed by a simple soup, bread and salad supper at about 6:15 with class beginning at 7. It is not necessary to be able to attend all meetings of the class to contribute and benefit from a different ‘take’ on Jesus than you may be used to. If you plan to attend contact Fr. Warren at padrewarren@stlukesworcester.org or sign up in the narthex. You can also volunteer to provide a part of the evening meal in either place.

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RECTOR’S NOTES
The text on the front of this issue of the Red Door Record comes directly from the Ash Wednesday Liturgy. The invitation of God and the Church is to the keeping of a Holy Lent. For me and for a long time I’ve had some very particular ideas about what Lent was all about. We talked about what we were going to ‘give up’ for Lent. I still think in terms of what sacrifice I’ll make for Lent but the fruits of that sacrifice have changed significantly for me over time. This is no more true than maybe it is this year. Recovering from physical ailments has afforded me what I seldom take enough of and that is time to reflect and limit my commitments. In November I attended a seminar on David Allen’s Getting Things Done methodology of getting to be more organized and productive. I had no idea what sort of impact those two days would have on my spiritual life. I went to the seminar just two weeks after going away to the Society of St. John the Evangelist (SSJE) in Boston for an extended silent retreat that was long overdue. I came back from retreat feeling like I was sufficiently calm and centered to make better choices about the balance between ‘being’ and ‘doing’ as a part of living my vocation as priest, father, husband and friend. Two weeks later, I found myself sitting with a bunch of other clergy and their administrators and admitting that I was as overwhelmed as when I’d left. Then our presenter for the day quoted one of David Allen’s guiding principles in Getting Things Done, namely that ‘whatever has your attention, has your attention.’ At first it seemed obvious but then I realized what terrific wisdom was in that statement.

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RECTOR’S NOTES
If I am preoccupied with many things, I neglect other things and some of those things neglected are not only important, they are critical. Thoughts of Mary and Martha (Luke 10:38-42) swept into my mind and the words of Jesus convicted me, “you are worried and distracted by many things.” (Luke 10:41). This long introduction leads me to what I hope is the point for me and may be of some use to you for this Lenten season of reflection, repentance and preparation to live anew in the light of the Resurrection. I need to get back to the basics of being present to Jesus and what is most important and all the rest will fall into place. In the Getting Things Done world, we are called to take all that comes into our minds and take them and put them in a trusted place where we can return to them and process them based on our values. Isn’t it the same with our lives in Christ? What has my attention has my attention and some of it’s not so very important as I’d like to think. Maybe I’d all do well to find a trusted place to park my worries until I get some clarity on things and then, and only then, return and pick them up again. I’m convinced Jesus’ is that place. If I am willing to do that, I suspect I’ll have gained some holy perspective, be clearer and more centered and find myself saying no to the many things and engaging more faithfully in the One Thing of most importance, namely my relationship to God and my part in God’s Mission. That’s my Lenten story, and I pray, by the grace of God I’ll be sticking to it. Pay attention to what and who has your attention and live your life accordingly. May we all keep a Holy Lent, in God’s name.

—Fr. Warren +

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Lenten Worship and Prayer Opportunities
During the 40 days of Lent there will be numerous opportunities for entering into corporate prayer. The following is a list of worship services throughout each week. Monday Tuesday Wednesday Wednesday Thursday Morning Prayer at 9 am Morning Prayer at 9 am Eucharist at 7 am and Evening Prayer at 6 pm Evening Prayer at 6 pm

I hope that you can make one or more of these services a part of your Lenten devotion.

Father Warren

The Red Door Record is published monthly. Editor: Mary Hicks. Send news items to: reddoorrecord@gmail.com or St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 921 Pleasant Street, Worcester, MA 01602

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