Jfep

AND OTHE& FAIRY iSTORIES

THE GIANT KILLER

Cornell University Library

PZ 8.1.L26Jg
The history
of Jack the Giant-killer, an

3 1924 014 519 155

Cornell University Library

The

original of this

book

is in

the Cornell University Library.

There are no known copyright

restrictions
text.

in

the United States on the use of the

http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924014519155

BEAUTY AND HEE B1KDS.

See p. 90

THE JHISTORY
OF

JAGK JHZ QIANT-jflLLEp
AND OTHER STORIES
"

BASED ON THE TALES IN THE 'BLUE FAIRY BOOK
EDITED BY

ANDREW LANG
WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY
H.
J.

FORD-

NEW

IMPRESSION

LONGMANS, GEEBN, AND
PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON NEW YORK, BOMBAY, AND CALCUTTA
39

CO.

1908

Ml

rights reserved,

.

CONTENTS
(3>

%3^<3
I.
.

Jack the Giant-killer
*

—Part

.,

PAGE 5

II

.

9
12 15 18 22 26 28 33 35 39 43 47 51 55 59 61 66 69 71 75 78 83 86 89 91 93 96

HIIV.

.

.

Prince Hyacinth

—Part


I.

v.
. .

.

.

II.

.

III.

.

.

IV.

.

.

V. VI. VII.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Beauty and the Beast

Part

I.

.

II.

.

III.

.

IV.

.

V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

XIV. XV. XVI. XVII.
XVIII.

.
.

.
.

98
100 103 107

.

XIX. XX.

.

.

THE HISTORY OF JACK THE
GIANT-KILLER
PART
In the reign of the
there
lived
in
I

great

King
a
lad

Arthur

Cornwall

named

Jack.

He was
delight
in

a very brave hearing
or

boy,

and took

reading of giants

and

fairies.

He
Table.

used to like to listen to the deeds

of the knights of

King Arthur's

Bound

In those days, there lived on a very
high
rock
off

Cornwall,

a

huge
feet

giant,

eighteen feet high and

nine
the

round.
of
all

His

fierce

looks

were

terror

who beheld him.

:

'

6

THE HISTORY OF

He

dwelt in a dark cave on the top

of the rock,

and

used to

wade over

to

the mainland in search of prey.

He
upon

would
his

throw

half-a-dozen
tie

oxen
as

back,

and

three

times
his

many

sheep

and

hogs
his

round

waist,

and march back to

own

abode.

The giant had done this for many years, when Jack made up his mind to
kill

him

So Jack took a horn, a spade, a pick, and a dark lantern, and one winter's
evening he went to the mount.

There he dug a

pit

twenty-two

feet

deep and twenty broad.
top over so as to

He
it

covered the

make

look like firm

ground.

He

then blew his horn

so

loud, that
his den,

the giant

awoke and came out of
saucy scamp
broil

crying out
'

You
I'll

!

you

shall

pay
!

for

this.

you

for

my

breakfast

JACK THE GIANT-KILLER

7

He had
pit,

just

done

speaking,
fell

when
the

taking one step further, he

into

head with

and Jack struck him a blow on the his axe which killed him.

Jack then
Another

went
giant,

home
called

to

cheer

his

friends with the news.
'

Blunderbore,'

8

THE HISTORY OF
kill

swore that he would
should have

Jack;

if

ever he

him

in his power.

This giant kept a fairy castle in the

midst of a lonely wood.

Some time
being
sleep.

after killing the first giant,

Jack was passing through
weary,
sat

a wood, and,

down

and

went

to

The
carried

giant passing by

and seeing Jack,
a
large

him

to his castle.

He
bodies,

locked

him up
and
giant
also

in

room,

the floor of which was
skulls,

covered with the
of

bones

men
fetch

and
his

women. Then
brother,

the

went

to

who was
was
out,

a giant, to come
for supper.

and help him eat Jack
Jack
peeping
very

much
saw round
the

afraid

when,
giants

he

two

coming home.

He

looked

all

the

room, and

saw a long and strong cord

in one corner.

JACK THE GIANT-KILLER
This he
just

9

made

into a slip-knot,

and then,

as

the giants were passing under his
it

window, he threw
then tied
to

over their heads.

In an instant he
it

drew

it

tight,

and

the bars

of the
his

window.
till

He

then pulled

with

all

might

he had choked them.

When
slid

they were black in the face, he
the

down

rope

and stabbed them to

the heart.

THE HISTORY OF JACK THE
GIANT-KILLER
PART
Jack next
took
a
II

great

bunch of keys

from the pocket of Blunderbore, and went
into the castle again.

He made

a

search

through

all

the
three

rooms, and in one

of

them found

io

THE HISTORY OF
up by the hair of
their heads,

ladies, tied

and almost starved to death. They told him, that their husbands had been killed by the giants, who had
then said that the ladies should be starved
to death, because
flesh of their
'

they would not eat the

own dead husbands.
said
his

Ladies,'

Jack,

'

I
;

have

killed

the

giant
this

and
castle

brother
all

and

I

give
it,

you
to

and
the

the riches in

make up
felt.'

for

dreadful

pains you

have

He
castle,

then gave

them the keys
further

of

the

and
Jack

went had
fast

on

his journey

to Wales.

As
At
Jack

but

little

money,

he

went on_as

as

he could.
to

length he

came
the

a fine house.

knocked
forth a

at

door,

when

there

came
had

Welsh
way,

giant.

Jack said
lost

he was on

a poor

man who
the
giant

his

which

:

JACK THE GIANT-KILLER
asked him to come
in,

ir

and

let

him

into

a room, where there was a good bed to
sleep in.

Jack took
to sleep.

off his clothes

quickly, but,

though he was

weary,

he

could

not

go

Soon
walking

after

this,

he

heard

the
in

giant

backward

and

forward

the

next room, and saying to himself
'Though heie you lodge with me
this night,
light
:

*

You

shall not see the

morning

My
'

club shall dash your brains out quite.'

Say you so

?

'

thought

Jack.

'

Are

these
as

your tricks?

But I hope to prove
are.'

cunning as you

Then, getting out about the room, and
large
his

of
at

bed,
last

he found

felt

a
in

thick

bit

of

wood.

He

laid

it

own
The

place in the bed, and then hid

himself in a dark corner of the room.
giant,

about

midnight,

came

:

12

THE HISTORY OF
the room,

into

and with
the
bed,

his

club

struck

many blows on

in

the

very

place where Jack had laid the log.

Then he went back
thinking he had broken

to his
all

own room,

Jack's bones.

THE HISTORY OF JACK THE
GIANT-KILLER
»

PART

III

Early
into

in

the

morning,
the
matter,
to

Jack

put

a

bold face upon
the
giant's

and walked

room

thank him for

the use of the room.

The
'

giant

started

when he saw him,
is
it

and began

to say

Oh

!

dear

me
see

;

you
in

?

Pray

how
you

did

you
or
'

sleep

last

night ?
the

Did
dead

hear

anything

of the night

?

JACK THE GIANT-KILLER
'Nothing
Jack.
or
four'

13

worth
rat,

speaking

of/

said

A

I fancy,

gave
tail,

me
and
to

three

slaps

with

its

woke
sleep

me

a

little.

But I soon went
did

again.'

The
think
of

giant
this.

not

know
did

what
not
say

to

Yet

he

a

word, but went to bring two great bowls
of milk and bread for their breakfast.

Jack wanted to make the giant think
that he could eat as

much
fall
it

as himself.

So
coat,

he

hid
let

a

large

bag

inside

his

and

the food

into this bag,

while he seemed to put

into his mouth.

When
the
giant
I
:

breakfast
'

was
will
all

over,

he said to
fine

Now

I

show you a

trick.

can

cure

wounds

with

a

touch.

I

could cut off
the
place.

my

head in one
it

minute,
again in

and
its

next

put
shall

sound

You

see

what

I can do.'

He

then took hold of the knife, ripped

14

THE HISTORY OF
bag,
floor.

up the

and

all

the

food

fell

out

upon the
'

Oh,

dear
giant,

!

Oh,

dear

! '

cried

the

Welsh

who would not be outdone
fellow as

by such a

little

Jack.

'

I can

do that myself!

So he snatched up the
it

knife,

plunged
at

own stomach, and dropped down dead.
into
his
giants,

once

Jack was very proud of having
four
kill

killed

and

made up
got

his

mind
a cap

to

more.

He

therefore

a
of

horse,

of

knowledge,

a

sword

sharpness,

shoes

of swiftness, and an invisible coat.

These

were

to

help

him

to

do the

great things, which lay before him.

JACK THE GIANT-KILLER

15

THE HISTORY OF JACK THE
GIANT-KILLER
PART IV

He

walked
third

on
day,

over

high

hills,

and
large

on the
forest,

he

came
into

to
lay.

a

through which his road
he

Just as

came
heads,

the forest, he

saw a big giant
hair
lady.

dragging
a

along by the

of

their

knight

and

his

Jack got
to

off his

horse,

and, tying

him
of

an oak

tree,

put on his invisible coat,
carried
his

under

which
he
stab

he

sword

sharpness.

When
tried

to
his

came up to the giant, he him. But he could not
he
cut his
legs
places.

reach
in

body, though

two or three

At

length, putting both

hands to his

t6

THE HISTORY OF
all

sword and aiming with
cut off both his legs.

his

might, he

Then Jack,

setting, his

foot

upon

his

neck,

plunged his sword into the giant's
knight

body, and so killed him.

The

and

his

lady

thanked

JACK THE GIANT-KILLER
Jack
to
for

if

saving
house,
so

them,

and asked

him

their

that they

might give

him a
'

fine gift.
'

No,' said Jack,

I cannot be easy

till

I find out where this .wicked giant lived.'

The
go.

after

way to So he mounted his horse, and soon came in sight of another giant, who
knight
told'

him

which

was

sitting

on

a

log

of

wood, waiting

for his brother.

Jack
to

jumped
giant and

from

his

horse,

and,
close

putting on his invisible coat,
the

came
blow
only

aimed
his

a

at

his

head,

but,

missing

aim,

he

cut

off his nose.

On
'

this the giant

seized his club,

and

struck at Jack with all his might.

Nay,' said
better kill

Jack,

'

if

this

be the case
So,

I'd

you at
.

once.'

jumping
in

upon
back,

the

log,

he

stabbed

him
dead.

the

when he dropped down

18

THE HISTORY OF

THE HISTORY OF JACK THE
GIANT-KILLER
PART V
Jack
then went
dales,
hill.
till

on

his

way,

over

hills

and
high

he came to the foot of a

He knocked
house,

at

the door of
let

a lonely

and an old man
Jack

him

in.

When
said
:

was seated the old man
this
hill
is

'My
an

son,

on the top of
castle,

enchanted
a

kept

by

a

giant

and
they

bad
seized in

fairy.

Only the
lady,
father's
deer.'

other

day

a
her

noble

who

was

walking

garden,

and

turned her into a

Jack swore
the risk

that
life,

in

the

morning, at

of his

he would break into

the castle and kill the giant.

JACK,
After

THE GIANT-KILLER
sound
sleep

ig

a

he

rose

early,

put on his invisible coat, and got ready.

When
the
hill,

he had climbed to the top of
fiery griffins.

he saw two

He
least

passed between
for

fear,

they

them without the could not see him
he
found
were
a

because of his coat.

On

the

castle

gate

golden trumpet, under
ten these lines:
Whoever can
this

which

writ-

trumpet blow,

Shall cause the giant's overthrow.

As soon
seized
blast,

as

Jack

had

read

this,

he

the

trumpet

and
the
itself

blew
gates
to

a
fly

shrill

which

made
castle

open,

and the very

shake.
fairy

The
end,

giant and the
their
evil

wicked
course

now
an

knew, that

was

at

and they stood biting
fear.

their

thumbs

and shaking with
Jack,

with

his

sword

of

sharpness,
B 2

st>

THE HISTORY OP
killed

soon

the

giant,

and

the

fairy

was then carried

and

every

away by a high wind; knight and lady, who had

been changed into birds and beasts, were turned once more into their proper shapes.

The
night
at

knights
the
set

and

ladies

rested

that

old

man's

hut,

and

next

day they

out for the Court.

JACK THE GIANT-KILLER

21

Jack then went up to the King, and
told

him

all

about

his

fights

with

the

giants.

Jack's fame had
all

now
wish
lady,

spread

through

the land.

At
lovely

the

King's
noble

he

married
every

a

and

and

cne

was

glad.

After this the
farm,

King gave him a
he

large
lived

on

which

and

his

lady

the rest of their days in joy and peace.

22

PRINCE HYACINTH AND

PRINCE HYACINTH AND THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
PART
Once upon a
time,
in
I

there

lived

a king,

who
cess,

was deeply
but she
she

love

with

a

prin-

could

not marry any one,

because

was

under

a

spell

thrown

over her by a

fairy.

So the King

set

out to seek a
could

fairy,

and
the

asked

what
love.

he

do

to
said

win
to

Princess's
:

The Fairy
the
is

him
'

You know
cat,
is

that

Princess

has

a
of.

great

which
clever
is

she

very
to

fond
tread
is

Whoever
that
to marry.'

enough

on

cat's tail,

the

man

she

bound

THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
The King
said

23

to

himself
task.

that

this

would not be a very hard

As
himself
:

he
'

left

the

Fairy,

he

said
tail

to

I

will

grind the cat's

to

powder, rather than
all.'

not

tread

on
was

it

at

You may
and
puss,

be

sure

that

it

not

long before he went to see the Princess,
as
usual,

marched
a
long

in

before

him, arching his back.

The

King

took

step,

and

:

84

PRINCE HYACINTH
-

AND
tail

quite
his

thought
but

he
the

had
cat

the

under

foot,

turned
air.

round

so sharply, that he only trod on

And
till

so

it

went

on. for
to

.eight

days,

the

King began
full

think

that this

tail

must be
still

of quicksilver

it

was

never

for a

moment.
however,

At
enough

last,

he
puss

was
fast

lucky
asleep,

to

come
his

upon

and
him.

with

tail

spread

out

behind

So

the
set

King,
his

without

losing
it

a

moment,

foot

upon
the

as

hard

as he could.

With a
up,

dreadful yell

cat

sprang

and

at

once
fixing

changed
his

into

a

tall

man,

who,

angry

eyes

upon
be-

the King, said
'

Tcu

shall

marry

the
able

Princess,

cause you have been
spell,
*

to

break the

but I will have

my
a

revenge.
son,

You

shall

have

who

will

THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
never be happy until
his
tell

25

he finds

out

that

nose

is

too

long,

and
be

if

you

ever
to
off,

any one what

I

have just

said

you,

you

shall

at

once
ever

carried

and no one
of you again.'

shall

see

you

or

hear

Though
afraid

the
this

King
wicked
has
to

was
fairy,

very

much
could

of

he

not help laughing at his threat.
'

If

my
he

son

such

a

long
'

nose

as

that,'

said

himself,
it
;

he

must
if

always see
is

it

or feel

at

least,

he

not blind or without hands.'
But,
as

the

fairy

had
time
the

gone, he
in

did

not

waste

any
to

more
seek
that

thinking,

but
said
.

went
at

Princess,

who
marry

once

she

would

him.

!

26

"PRINCE HYACINTH

AND

PRINCE HYACINTH AND THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
PART
II

But

after

all,

they

had
the

not

been
died,

married very long when

King
left

and the Queen had nothing
for

to

care
called

but

her

little

son,

who was
Tiad
in

Hyacinth.

The
eyes,

little

Prince

large

blue
world,
alas

the

prettiest

eyes

the
but,
it

and
his

a nose

sweet

little

mouth,
that

was

so

big,

took

up
out
her

half his face.

The Queen was very much put when she saw this great nose, but
ladies

told

her
it

that

it

was

not

really

as large as

looked.
it

They
you

said

was a
to

Roman
any

nose,

and
on

had

only

open

book

THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
history,

27

to

see

that

every great

man
fond

has

had a large
her
told

nose.

The Queen, who
baby,
her,

was

yery

of

was

pleased

with
she

what
looked not

they
at

and

when
his

Hyacinth again,

nose

did

seem
with
could
stories

to her quite so large.

The
great
speak,

Prince
;

was
as

brought
soon
all

up
he
of

care

and,

as

they told him

sorts

about people,

who had

short noses.
let

They would not
big
as
his

any
the

one

come

near him, whose nose was not nearly as

own,

and

ladies

who
their

served
babies'

the

Queen, took to pulling

noses

many
did

times

every

day

to

make them grow
This
they

long.

to

please

the

Queen

and to get into her

favour.

But, do what

they would, they could

not

make them
the Prince's.
learnt
his-

anything like the same

size as

When

he

grew

older

he

2,8

.

PRINCE HYACINTH AND

tory.

And whenever any
princess

great

prince
of,

or beautiful

was

spoken

his

teachers took

care to tell him,

that they

had long
His
all

noses.

room

was

hung
so

with

pictures,

of people with very large noses.

The Prince grew up
long
nose

sure

that

a

was
not

a

great

beauty,

that

he

would
his

on

any

account

have

had

own a

single inch shorter!

PRINCE HYACINTH AND THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
PART
III

When
the

he

was

twenty
it

years

of

age,

Queen thought
be
married,

was time that he
she

should
to

so

had

brought
prin-

him the
for

likenesses

of

several

cesses

him

to

see,

and

among

the

THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
others
.

29

was a picture of the Dear
!

Little

Princess

Now,
great

she

was

the

daughter

of

a

king,

and

would

some

day

be

queen over a great many kingdoms.

But
thought
sort,

Prince
to

Hyacinth
for

had

not
of

a

spare
so

anything
struck

that
her

he

was

much

with

beauty.

30

PRINCE HYACINTH AND

The
nose,
tiest

Princess,

whom
however,
her

he thought quite
a
little

charming,

had,

saucy
pret-

which,

on

face,

was the

nose that ever was seen.

This was a cause of great trouble to
the
courtiers.

They had
at

got

into
noses,

such
that

a habit

of

laughing

little

they

sometimes
at
hers,

found

themselves

laughto

ing

before

they

had
at

time

think.

But
the
joke,
his

this

did

not
quite

do

all

before
see

Prince,

who

failed

to

the

and went

so

far

as

to

send two of
daring

friends out of the

country, for

to laugh at the

Dear

Little Princess's tiny

nose!

The
this,

others,

taking
think

warning
before

from
they

learnt

to

twice

spoke.

One even went
Prince
that
that,

so

far
it

as

to

tell

the
true,

though
could

was

quite

no

man

be

worth

anything

THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
unless

31

he

had
beauty

a

long

nose,
at

still,

a

woman's
a man's.

was

not

all

like

He
man,
books,

said

that

who had
that

knew a learned read in some very old
he

the

most

lovely

queen

the

!

32

PRINCE HYACINTH AND
had
ever

world

seen

had

a

'

tip-tilted,'

or turned-up, nose.

The Prince made him a
as

fine

present
at

a reward for this good news, and
ask the

once sent to
cess

Dear

Little

Prin-

to

marry him.
father,

The King, her
to
see

said

yes

;

and

Prince Hyacinth was in
the Princess, that

such great hurry

he

went

many

miles to meet her.

He was
the
like

just

about to kiss her hand,
all

when, to the horror of

who
and,

stood by,
the
scene

wicked
a flash

fairy

came

upon

of

lightning,

snatching
flew

up the

Dear

Little

Princess,

away

with her out of their sight

THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS

33

PRINCE HYACINTH AND THE DEAR LITTIE PRINCESS
PART IV

The

Prince

was

left

very

sad,

and

swore that nothing should

make him go

back to his kingdom, until he had found
her again.

He would
tiers

not

let

any of
so

his

courhis

follow him,

and
sadly

he mounted

horse and rode

away, letting

him
a

choose his ,own path.

So
time,

it

he
he

came to came to a
rode
all

pass,

that,

after

great

plain,

across

which
seeing

day

long

without

a single house.
last,

At
dead
tile

both horse and rider were nearly
hunger,

with
Prince

when,

as

night
light,

fer-

caught sight of a
cave;

which

seemed to shine from a
b

c

'

34

PRINCE HYACINTH AND

He
old

rode up

to

it,

and
to

saw
be

a
at

little

woman, who seemed
She
put

least

a hundred years old.

on

her

glasses
it

to

look
quite
fix

at

Prince

Hyacinth,
time
before

but
she

was

a

long

could

them
very

tightly,
short.

because her

nose

was

so

The Prince and the Fairy (for that was who she was) had no sooner looked
at

one another, than they went into
once;
'

fits

of laughter, and cried both at

Oh,

what a funny nose
'

!

Not

so

funny

,

as

your
;

own,'
'

said

Prince Hyacinth to the Fairy

but,

mabe
to

dam, I beg
our noses

you
to

to as

stop

talking

about
to

— such
am

they are— and

good
eat,

enough
for

give

me

something
so
is

I

starving,

and
said

my

poor horse.'

'

With all my heart,' Though your nose is
'

the Fairy.

such

a

queer

'

'

THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
shape,

35

and
loved

so

very,

very

big,

you
he

are

the son of
'

my

best friend.

I

your

father

as

if

had

been

my
And'

brother.
!

Now

he

had a very

handsome nose
'

pray

what

does

mine

lack ?

said the Prince.
'

Oh

!

it
'

doesn't
Its

lack

anything,'
is

said

the Fairy.
is

only fault
it.

that

there

much one may be
too

of

But
worthy

never

mind,

a ;very
long.

man

though

his

nose

is

too

PRINCE HYACINTH AND THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
PART V
'

I was telling you that I was your father's

friend.

'He

often

came to

see

me

in the old

c3


36

PRINCE HYACINTH AND
and
you

times,

must

know
days
;

that I was
at least,

very pretty

in those
so.

he

used to say
'I

should like to

tell

you of a talk

we had
*

the last time I ever saw
said
it

'Indeed,?

the

Prince,

him/ 'when

I

have supped,
pleasure
to

will give
it;

me
but

the greatest
just

hear

think,

madam,
'The
Fairy
in,
'

I beg of you,

that

I have

had
the

nothing to eat to-day.'
poor
I did

«

boy
I

is

right,'

said

;

not think of that.
will

Gome
some
I can

then,

and

give

you

supper,
tell

and while you are eating

you

my

story in

a very few words

for I don't like endless tales myself.
'

Too

long

a
.

tongue
,

is

worse

than

too

long a nose, and I remember, when
less I

I was young, that the
7

had to say
'

the more people thought of me.
'

'

*

-

They

used
it

to

tell

the

Queen,

my

mother," that

was

so.

For though you

'

'

THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
see

37

what I
'

am

now, I was the daughter

of a great king.

My
I

father

>—

Your

father,

dare

say,

got
!
'

somesaid

thing to eat
the Prince.
'

when he was hungry
did,'

That

he
shall

said

the

Fairy,

'

and
I

you also

have

supper at once.

only just wanted to
'

tell

you-

-'

But
the

I

really

cannot

listen

to

any-

thing, until I have
cried

had something

to eat,'

Prince,

who

was getting quite
to

angry.

But
he

then, better

thinking

himself
as

that

had
'I

be

polite,

he
:

much
of

needed the Fairy's help, he added

know

that

in

the

pleasure
quite
horse,
!

hearing your story, I should

forget

my own

hunger

;

but

my

who

cannot hear you, must really be fed

The Fairy was very much pleased by
these
polite
:

words,

and

said,

calling

to

her servants

38

PRINCE HYACINTH AND

'You
you are
size of

shall

not

wait

another minute,
in
spite

so

polite,

and
you

of

the

your

nose,

are really a very,

nice
'

young man.'
Plague take the old lady
!

How
'
.

she
the

does

go

on

about

my

nose

!

said

Prince to himself.
'

One would almost
all

think,

that mine
that hers

had taken
lacks
!

the extra length

If

I

were

not

so

hungry,
this

I

would soon have done with
pie,
'

chatter-

who

thinks she talks very
stupid
faults
:

little.

How
own

people
!

are

not

to

see

their

That comes of being
spoilt

a

princess

she has been
friends,

by

her her

servants

and

who have made
little

think that she has very

to say.'

THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS

39

PRINCE HYACINTH AND THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
PART VI

By
the

this

time

the

servants

were
the

putting

supper on the table, and

Prince

could

not

keep

from

laughing

to

hear

the Fairy talk.

Nothing
the
servants

could

stop

her.

She

asked

a thousand questions, simply

that she might hear herself speak.

There was one

maid who, no matter
always

what was being

said,

made a
he

point

of praising her mistress's wisdom.
'

Well

! '

he

thought,

as

ate

his

supper,

'I'm

very

glad

I

came
to

here.

This just shows me, what a
it
is,

good thing
those

that I

would never
me.

listen

who
'

tried to flatter

People of that sort praise us to our

40

PRINCE HYACINTH AND
without shame, and either hide our
or tell

faces
faults

us

we have

none.

For

my

part, I

never will be taken in by them.
failings, I hope.'

I

know my own
Poor
Prince
all

Hyacinth
he said

!

He

quite
truth,

thought that

was the

and hadn't an idea that the people who had
praised
his

nose

were

laughing

at

him, just as the Fairy's maid was laughing at her.

For the when slyly,

Prince
she

had seen
do

her
so

laugh

could

without

the Fairy seeing her.

However, he said nothing
he

;

.

and when
wanted,

had

eaten
:

as

much

as

he

the Fairy said
'

My

dear

Prince,

might

I

beg

you

to

move a
see

little

more that way,
on

for your
really
plate.

nose casts

such a

shadow, that I

cannot

what I have

my

Ah

!

thanks.
let

'Now,

us speak of your father*

'

;

THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS

4i

'When
only a
ago,

I

went

to

his

Court he
is

was

little

boy, but that

forty years

and I have been
Tell

in this lonely place

ever since.
c
'

me

what

goes

on

nowadays

are

the ladies

as

fond

of

fun

as at

ever?
parties

In

my
'

time

one

saw

them
a

and
have
'

balls every day.

Dear
!

me

!

What

long
!

nose you

I cannot get used to

it

Really,

madam,'

said

the

Prince,

'

I

42

PRINCE HYACINTH AND
leave
off

wish you would

talking

about

my

nose.

It

cannot matter to you what

it is like.

'I

am
is

pleased
it

with
shorter.

it,

and

have no

wish to have

One must take
with
Fairy,

what
'

given one.'

Now
tell

you

are

angry
the

me,

my
vex

poor

Hyacinth,'

said

'and I
to

can
you.
'

you that I didn't

mean
all

I

want to help you
though
say
I

I can.

However,
not

really

cannot

help your nose being a shock
will

to

me, I
it.

try

to

anything

about

I will even try to

think,

that you have

a nose like other people's.
'

To

tell

the

truth,

it

would

make

three of any nose I ever saw before.'

THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS

43

PRINCE HYACINTH

AND THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
PART
VII

The
grew
he

Prince,
so

who was no

longer

hungry,

angry at what the Fairy would

keep saying about his nose, that at last

threw

himself

upon
he

his

horse

and

rode hastily away.

But
the

wherever
were
his

came
for

he

thought
they
all

people
of

mad,

talked

nose,

and

yet

he
it

could

not bring himself to think
too long.

that

was

He had
hear
it

been so used

all

his

life

to

called

handsome.
Fairy,

The
She

old

who wished
hit

to

make

him happy,
shut
a

at

last

upon a
Little

plan.

the

Dear
palace

Princess

up

in

glass

and

put

this

44

PRINCE HYACINTH AND

'HIS LOJfG KOSB

WAS ALWAYS

IS

IHE

WAY.'

[See p. 45

'

THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS
palace
fail

45

down where
it.

the Prince could

not

to find

His joy at seeing the Princess

again

was
with

very
all

great,

and
to

he
try

set

to get

work
into

his

might,

to

the palace and let her out.

But no
failed.

matter how he tried he only

At
Little

last

he thought he
speak

would
to

try

to

get near

enough to
Princess,

the

Dear
part,

who,

on
that

her

stretched
kiss
it.

out

her

hand

he

might
he
his

But turn

which
it

way he
to
his

might,
lips,

never could raise

for

long nose was always in the way.

For the
it

first

time he saw
:

how long
must own
palace flew

really was,
'

and said

Well, I

am
is

afraid

that I
!

that

my

nose

too long the

In
into

an

instant

glass

a thousand

bits,

and the old Fairy,

46,

PRINCE HYACINTH
the

taking

Dear
say

Little
:

Princess

by the
think
I

hand, said to the Prince

'Now,

if

you
was

do

not

have been your best
'

friend.

Much good
you
about

it

for
!

me
You
very

to

talk

to

your

nose

would
big
it

never have found
was, if
it

out

how
you

hadn't

kept
to.

from
see

doing

what

you

wanted
us

You

how
our

self-love

keeps

from

knowing
vain
see

own
'

faults,

both of mind and body.
tries

Our
to
find

reason
us
;

in

to

show

them

we
in

will

not

we

them

the

way
whose
else's,

of

them till what we
nose

want.'

Prince

Hyacinth,
like

was
fail

now
to

just
all

any one
wiser

did not
lesson

be

the

for

the

he

had> learned.

He

married the Dear

Little

Princess,

and they

lived happily ever after.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

47

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PAKT
Once upon a time,
try,
I

in a very far-off coun-

there
in
rich.

lived
all

a

man who had
he
did,

been so
he was

lucky
very

that

that

But
not
just

as

he

had
to

six

sons

and
all

six

daughters,

he

found that his money was
let

too

much,

them
for,

have

what they wished
to.

as

they

had
of

been used

But

one

day

they

had

a

stroke

very bad luck.

Their house caught burnt
books,
to

fire,

and was soon
all

the

ground,
gold,
it.

with

the

pictures,

silver,

and precious

goods that were in

48

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

And
troubles.

this

was

only the

first

of their

Their

father,

who
in
all

had
ways,

until
lost

now
every

been very lucky

ship

he

had
he

upon
heard

the
fire.

sea,

either

by
in

dint of shipwreck or

Then
places far

that

his

clerks

away,
trust,

whom

he always thought

he could

had

stolen his

money.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

49

And
All

at

last,

he

fell

from

having

great riches, to even

want

for bread.

that

he

had

left

was

a

little

house in a lonely

place,

far

away from
go and
at
live.

the town in which he had lived.

Here
His
to

at

last

he had to
very

children

were
fine

sad,

having
live

leave

their

house, to go

and

in this poor place.

Indeed,
their

his

girls

at

first

hoped
would

that
so

friends,

of

whom
were

they had
rich,

had

many

while

they

ask

them to go and stay in their houses, now they no longer had one of their own.
But they soon
left

found

that

they were

alone.

Those
said
it

who
was
poor,

had

been

their

friends,

their

own

fault

that
to

they
help

were so

and did not
for

offer

them
go

in any way.
left

So nothing was
to

them but
stood
in

to

the

cottage,

which

the

b

D

50

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
forest,

midst of a dark
the dullest place

and seemed to be
face of the earth.

upon the
too

As they were
servants,

poor
to

to

have

any
hard,

the
sons,

girls

had
their

work

and the

for

part,

had to dig
clothes
to
so

in the fields to earn their living.

The
wear,

girls

had

only
to

poor
eat.

and

not

much

And

they were

always thinking

of the happy

days they had known, and
they might

wishing

that

come back

again.
tried
to

Ouly the youngest

be

brave

and

cheerful.

She
first,

had
set

been as sad

as

any one at
brave,
best

but she was both good and
to

and soon
of things.

work to make the
she

She
father
tried

did

all

could to

make
her

her

and brothers
to

happy and gay, and
to
join
in

get

her

sisters

dancing and singing.

But

they

would

do

nothing

of

the

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
sort,

51

and,

because
they
she

she

was

not

as

sad

as

themselves,
life

said

that
fit

this

kind

of

was
she

all

was

for.

But

was
that

really

far

prettier

and

cleverer than
so

they were.
she

Indeed, she was

lovely

was

always

called

Beauty.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART
After
getting
II

two
used

years,

when
their

they

were
life,

all

to

new
lost,

their

father heard

that

one of his ships, which,

he

had

-thought

was

had
at

come
once

safely into port with a rich cargo.

All the

sons

and

daughters

thought that the hard
end,

times were at
out at once

an
for

and wanted to

set

the town.

But

their

father

begged them to wait

52

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

Aj5trril/i

a

little,

and,

though
ill

it

was harvest-time,
spared,

and

he

could
if

be

he

went;

himself to see

the good news was true.

'

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
Only the youngest
doubt,
rich rich

53

daughter

had any
be as
least

but they would soon again
as

they
to

were
live

before,

or

at

enough
would
they

in

some town, where
of

they

find

lots

fun

and

gay

friends once more.

So
father,

all

crowded

round

their
all

and begged him to buy them
of
fine

kinds

things.

It

would
to

have

taken

a

house-full
all.

of

money

have

paid for them

Only Beauty, feeling sure that
of no use, did

it

was
So

not ask for anything.
:

her father said
'

And
?

what

shall

I

bring

for

you,

Beauty

'The only thing I wish
you come home
safely,'

for

is

to

see

she said.

Her

sisters
;

were angry when they heard
they said she was blaming
for

her say this

them for having asked Her father was

such costly things.

pleased,

but

as

he

54

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
that
at

thought
like
for

her

age

she

ought
to

to

pretty

things,

he
.like.

told

her

ask

what she would

'

Well, dear
I

father,'

she

said,

'

as

you

say

must,
rose.

I

beg

that

you
seen

will

bring

me

a

I have not

one since
so much,'

we came

here,

and I love them

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

5.5

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART
So he
set
III

out,

and reached the town
there,

as

quickly as he could.

But when he got
it

he found that
so

was thought that he was dead, and
old friends had

his

shared between them,

the goods which the ship had brought.

And
poor
as

so,

after

all,

he found himself as
started,

when

he

having
to

been

able to get

only just enough

pay the

cost Of going

home
this

again.

Nor was
the
as
it

all.

For when he
was just
as
so

left

town, the
could
be,

weather

bad
he

and

by the time
his

was within a few miles of

home, he

was almost dead with cold and hunger.

Though he knew

it

would take some
forest,

hours to get through the

he wished

56

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
to
his

much made up
so

be

at

home

again,

that

he

mind

to go on.

But night overtook him, and the snow
grew
that
so at

deep
last

and

the

frost

so

bitter,
still.

his

horse

stood

quite

It could

not go another step.
to

Not a house was
trunk of a great
all

be

seen.

The

only shelter he could get was the hollow
tree,

and there he hid

the

night,

which seemed to him the
so tired, the howl-

longest he had ever known.

But though he was

ing of the wolves kept him awake.

Even when

at

last

the day
off,

broke he
the
falling

was not much better

for

snow had hidden every path, and he did
not know which way to turn.

At
track,

length he

made

out some

sort

of

and

so he started. so rough,

At first it was down more than
became
better,

that he
it

fell

once.
at last

But
led

soon
into

and

him

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

57

58

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
long

a

walk

shaded

by

fine

trees.

At

the end of this walk was a grand castle.
It

seemed very
fallen

strange
here,

to

him, that
that
the

no snow had
trees

and

had

fruit

and flowers upon them.
first

When
castle,

he reached the
them, and
full

court of the

he saw before him a

flight of steps.

He went up

passed

through

room after room The warmth
feel better

of lovely things.

of

the

air

made
nobody
could

him
in

and wish
place,

for food.

But there
all

seemed

to

be he

this

vast

whom
to

ask

to give

him something
a/

to eat.

Not
his feet

sound

was
floor.

be

heard,

but

upon the
last
rest,

At
ing,

he stopped in a room smaller

than the

where a clear

fire

was burnclose to
it.

and a couch was drawn up
Thinking that
if

he waited here some

one

must

soon
fell

come,

he

sat

down,

and very soon

into a sweet sleep.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

59

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART IV

He

slept

soundly

for

a

long time, and

But when he woke he was still alone. a little table, upon which was a good dinner, had been drawn up close to him.

As he had
It

eaten

nothing for twenty-

four hours, he began his dinner at once.

was
have

so

good
chance

that

he

made
he

a

hearty .meal,

and

hoped

that

would
the

soon
one,

the

of

thanking
feast.

who had given him such a
no
one
came,

But

and

even

after

another long

sleep

there was no sign
fresh

of

anybody, though a

meal

of
little

cakes
table

and

fruit

was ready upon the
to

at his side.

Being timid, he began
of being in
this

feel
all

afraid

grand

castle

alone.

;

po

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
his

So he made up

mind

to search

once

more through
of no use.

all

the rooms.

But

it

was

Not even a servant was to be seen there was no sign of life in the place. He began to wonder what he should do, and to think how rich he would be
if
all

the

fine

things he

saw

were

his

own mind he began to share them among his children. Then he went down into the garden,
own.

In

his

and though
here the

it

was winter everywhere

else,

sun shone, and the birds sang,

and the flowers
air

were in bloom, and the
with

was

soft

and sweet.
all

He was charmed
heard,
'

he saw and
me.

and

said to himself:

All

this

must be meant
minute, and
all

for

I

will

go

this

bring
fine

my

chil-

dren to share
me.'

these

things

with

In

spite

of being so

cold

and weary

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
when he reached
the
castle,

61

he had taken
it.

his horse to the stable

and fed
he

Now
and
ride

he thought he would get

it

out

home.

So

turned
-

down

the path which led to the stable.

BEAUTY AND TEE BEAST
PART V
This path
side

had a hedge of roses on each
and he thought he had never

of

it,

seen or smelt such lovely flowers before.

They
Beauty

made
had

him think of what asked him to bring her.
just

So he stopped, and had
to

picked one

take

to

her,

when
he
to

he

was
a

startled

by a strange noise behind him.
Turning
Beast,

round,

saw
be
:

frightful

which

seemed

very angry,

and

said, in

a loud voice

62

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

Who
my
roses?

told

you that you
it

might pick
I

Was

not enough, that

let

you eat and sleep in
?

my
is

palace,

and

was kind to you

This

the

way you

:

'

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
pay
roses

63

me
!

for

my

kindness,

by

stealing

my

But I

will

punish you for this/
with
fear

The man
fierce

shook

at

these

words, dropped the fatal rose, and,

falling
'

on
to

his knees, cried
sir.

Pardon me, noble
you
so
for

I

am
could

truly

grateful

all

your
I

kindness,

which
think

was
that

great,

that

not

you

would

be angry by
rose.'

my
ever,

taking such a

little

thing as a
as

But the Beast was
in spite of all the
'

angry as

man

could say.

You
cried
;

are
'

very ready with fine words,'
that will

he

but

not

save

you

from the death you deserve.'
'

Alas

!
'

thought he,
only

'

if

my
!

dear

girl

Beauty

could

know

what

danger

her rose has brought

me

into

Then he
his

told
:

the

Beast

all

about

troubles

how
gone

poor
so

he
far

was,

and
from

why he had
home.

away

'

64

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

He
the

ended
gift

by
his

telling

the
girl

Beast,

that

only

dear
rose*

Beauty had
it
it.

asked for

was a

And
gold

was

to

please her that he
'

had picked
of
that
;
'

A

house

full
all

would
other

hardly
girls

have
asked
I

bought
for,'

my

he said
least

but I thought that

might at

take

Beauty her
for

rose.

I beg you

to

forgive

me,

you

see

I

meant no harm.'

The
'

Beast

thought

for

a

moment,
you you
will

and then he
I
will

said, in

a kinder tone:

forgive

you

if

promise

me

one

thing.

Will
poor

give

me

one of your

girls ?

'Ah!'
were cruel

cried

the
to

man,

'if

I
life

enough

buy

my
'

own-

by giving you one of
Tell
'

my

children,
?

how
the

could I get her to come here
'

her

the

whole
at

tale,'

said

Beast.

K

she

comes

all

she

must

come

willingly.

BEAUTY
'

A-ND
not

THE BEAST
come of her
her.

65

If

she

does

own

free will I
'

whTriot have

See

if

any one loves you well enough
1

to

come and save your life. You seem to be a good man,
'

so

will trust
'

you to go home.

I give

you a month, to see
will

if either

come back with you and stay here, to let you go free. 'If neither of them is willing, you must come alone, after bidding them good-bye for ever, for then you will
of

your

girls

belong to me.
'

And
me,
I

do not think that you can hide
for
if

from

you

fail

to

keep

your

word

will

come

and

fetch

you

~

!

added the Beast.

b

66

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

BEAUTY

AND*-

THE BEAST

PAKE YT
The man
try,

said

he

would would

go
be

home and
think
willing

though he did not
his

really

any
to

of

daughters

come.

He
back

said

if

he
Beast

failed,

he would come
the

to

the

at

proper
to

time,

and

then,
if

only

too

glad

get

away,

he asked

he might

set off at once.

But the Beast told him that he could
not go until the next day.
'

Then
you,'

you
he

will

find
'

a

horse

ready
eat

for

said.

your supper, and

Now go and await my orders.'
more
his

The
alive,

poor

man,
to

dead

than
a

went back
which
fire.

room, where
the

nice
table,

hot supper was ready on

little

was

drawn

up

before

a

blazing

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
But
only
fear

6-j

he

was
a

too

sad
of

to

eat,

and
for

tasted

few

the

dishes,

the

Beast

should
orders.

be

angry,

if

he

did

not

obey

his

When
noise
in

he had done, he heard a great
the

next room, which

be knew

meant that the Beast was coming.
the

As he could do nothing to only thing for him was to
afraid as

get

away,
as

seem
into

little

he could.

So,

when the Beast
the

came
if

the

room, and asked roughly

he
said

had suphe

ped

well,

poor

man

had

had
the

a

very

good
it.

supper,

and

thanked

Beast for

Then
forget
to
tell

the

Beast

warned
said he

him, not

to

what he had
Beauty
all

would

do,

and
the

the

truth

about

matter.

'Do not get up to-morrow,' he added, 'until you see the sun and hear a golden Then you will find your breakbell ring.

'

68
fast

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
waiting for you here, and
are to
ride
will

the horse
in

you
yard.

be

ready

the

'He will also bring you back again, when you come with your daughter a month hence. Take a rose to Beauty, 'Farewell.
and do not forget your promise The poor man was only
he
could
until
!

too

glad

when the Beast went away, and though
not
sleep
for

sadness,

he

lay

down

the sun rose.
after

Then,

a

hasty
rose,

breakfast,

he

went to pick Beauty's
his

and mounted

horse,

which
in

carried

him

off

so
lost

swiftly,

that

an

instant

he had

sight of the palace.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

65

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART
VII

He

went

so

fast,

that

he

was
the

still

thinking of his

trouble,

when

horse

stopped before the door of the house.

His

sons

and

daughters,
his

who
away

had
so

been very uneasy at
long, rushed to

being

meet him.

They
got
his

all

wanted to
back.
fine

know
Seeing
they

if

he had
that
at

money
a

he

was

riding

horse,

once

thought that he had.

But he hid the truth
first,

from

them

at

only

saying sadly to
:

Beauty as he
asked

gave her the rose
'

Here
;

is

what
you

you

me
it

to

bring you
cost.'

little

know what
all

has

These words

made them

wonder

what he meant.

70

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
'

Why

are

you

so

sad ?
his

'

cried

they.

So he told them
they were
all

all

story,

and then
hopes,
father

very unhappy.

The
and
castle.

girls

wept over
swore,

their

lost

the

sons

that
to

their
this

should

not

go

back
to
it

dreadful

They began
the
Beast,
if

make
should

plans for killing

come
'

to

fetch

him.
'

No,'

said

their

father,

I

said

I

would go
than break

back,

and I would
word.'

rather die

my

Then
Beauty,

the

girls

were
it

very angry with
all

and
if

said

was

her

fault,

and that
else,

she

had asked
would

for

something
fallen

their

father

not

have

into
'

such trouble.
It
is

not

fair,'

said

they,

'

that

we

should have to suffer for your

folly.'

All this
'

made poor Beauty
indeed
the
cause

very sad.
of
all

I

am

the

BEAUTY AND THE BEAUT
trouble,'

71

said

she.

'

But who could have
a
rose
in

guessed,

that

to

ask for

the
?

middle of summer would lead to this
'

But
that

as I

I

am

the

cause,
for

it
it.

is

only
will

just

should suffer

I

go

back

with

my

father

to

keep

his

promise.'

At
her

first

nobody would

hear

of

this,

and her

father

and
her

brothers,

who
But

loved

dearly,

swore
let

that
go.

nothing

should

make
was

them

Beauty

firm.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART
VIII
near,

As
that
said

the she

time

drew

she

shared
sisters,

all

had
the

between
day

her

and

good-bye to everything she loved.
last

When
to

came she

tried

cheer her father.

72

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
'

Do

not
as

fret,'

she

said,

'

all

may

yet

be

mounted together the horse which had brought him back. It seemed to fly rather than gallop,
well,'

they

but

it

went so smoothly, that Beauty was
all afraid.

not at

Indeed,
glad,

she

would
so

have

been
ride,
if

very
she

at

haying
feared

good a

had

not

what
it.

might
begged

happen to
her
to

her at the end of

Her

father

still

go

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
back,
vain.

73

and

let

him
were
to

go

alone,

but

in

While
fell,

they
then,

talking

the

night

and

their
lit

great
all

surprise,

bright

lamps

were
all

about

them,
forest

They were of They were
began
to

colours,

and the
that

was as light as in the day.
so
bright,

the

forest
it

seem
lasted

quite

warm,
they

though
reached

had been very cold before.
This
until

the

long walk shaded by orange

trees.

Here were long
flaming torches, and
to

lines

of

men
it

holding

when they got nearer
that

the

palace,

they saw

was

lit

up from the roof to the ground.
music sounded softly on every hand.
'

Sweet

The
this

Beast

must

be
laugh,
his

very
'

hungry,'

said Beauty, trying to
all

if

he makes
is

show because
she

supper

com-

ing,'

for

thought

the

Beast wanted

to

eat

her.

74

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
But,

though
saw.

she

was

so
all

sad,

she

could not help gazing at
things
she

the

strange

The horse stopped
flight

at the

foot

of the
castle.

of

steps
had.

leading

to

the

When
father

they
led.

got

off
little

the

horse,

her

her to the

room he had
fire

been in before.

Here they found a bright

burning,

and the

table spread, with supper.

He
afraid,

knew

that

this

was

meant

for

them, and Beauty, who was not so

much

so

now that she had passed through many rooms and seen nothing of the
quite

Beast, was

willing to begin, for her

long ride had

made her very hungry.
their

But they had hardly done

meal,

when
was
father

the
heard,
in

noise

of

the

Beast's

footsteps

and
fear,

Beauty

clung

to
all

her
the

which

became

greater

when

she

saw

how much

afraid

he was.

'

:

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

75

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART IX

But

when

the

Beast

really

came,

though she shook with fear at the sight
of him,

she did her best to hide

it,

and
look-

spoke bravely and kindly to him.
This pleased
the
Beast.

After

ing at her he said, in

a tone that might
the
boldest
heart,

have struck fear

into

though he did not seem to be angry
'

Good-evening, old

man.
not
said,

Good-evenspeak
:

ing, Beauty.'

The
with
'

father

was

able

to

fear,

but Beauty

very sweetly

Good-evening, Beast.'

'

Have you come
'

willingly ?

'

asked the

Beast.

Will

you
?

stay

here

when your

father goes

away

Beauty told him bravely that she had

come

to stay.

76

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
'I

am
'

pleased

with

you,'

said

the

Beast.
free-will,

As you have come
you
for

of your

own

may
you,

stay.

'As

old

man,'

he

added,

turning

to

her

father,

'at

sunrise

to-

morrow you
'

will leave for

home.
get

When
eat

the bell rings

up quickly
you
will

and
find

your

breakfast,

and

the same

horse

waiting to take you

:

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
home
;

77

but you must never expect to see

my
'

palace again.'

Then, turning to Beauty, he said

Take your and help him
to have.
'

father into the next room,
to

choose

everything,

you

think your brothers and sisters would like

You
as

will find
full

two trunks

there.

Fill

them
just

as

you

can.

It

is

only

that

you
rich

should

send
fine,

them
so

somethey

thing

very

and

that

may never forget you.' Then he went away,
1

after

saying,

Good-bye, Beauty

;

good-bye, old man.'
at

Though Beauty was very sad
bound
to

the
felt

thought of her father leaving her, she

do

what
round

the

Beast

told

her.

So they went into the next room, which

had shelves
There
with
all

all

it.

were

dresses

fit

for

a queen,

the jewels that were to be worn

with them,

78

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

And
boards,

when
she

Beauty
quite

opened the
dazzled
in

cupthe

was

by

precious

stones,

that

lay

heaps upon

every

shelf.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART X

After
she

choosing

a

great

number,
sisters

which
for she

divided

between
a

her
of

had
for
chest,

made
each
of

heap

the

fine

dresses

them— she opened
full

the

last

which was
think,

of gold.
she
said,

'I

father,'

'that,

as

the gold will be

more
out

useful

to you,

we

had
again,

better

take
fill

the

other
it.'

things

and

the trunks with
this.

So they did
put
be,
in,

But the more they the more room there seemed to
at
last

and

they

put

back

all

the
out,

jewels

and

dresses

they

had

taken

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
and Beauty
of

79

even
as

added
she

as

many more
carry
at

the

jewels,

could

once.

Then the

trunks

were not

too

full,

but they were so heavy that an elephant
could not have carried
'

The

them Beast was mocking
!

us/

cried
all

the merchant
these
things,

;

'

he said I might have
that I

knowing
and
to

could

not

carry

them away.'
us wait
see,'

'Let
'I

said

Beauty.
us.

do not think he meant
tie

to

mock

we can do is leave them ready.'
All

them up
went back

and
to

So they
the
little

did

this

and

room, where

they found break-

fast ready.

The
ful

was so much more cheerthat he made a good meal.
father

The great kindness made him begin to think
he might
see

of

the

Beast
all,

that, after

Beauty again, and perhaps

So

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

soon come back and see her in her new

home.

But she
leaving

felt

sure that
ever,

her father was
she

her

for

so

was
for

very

sad

when the

bell

rang sharply

the
the

second time,

and warned

them

that

time was come for them to part.

They went down
the

into the yard, where

two horses were waiting, one loaded with
two
trunks,

the

other

for

the

old

man

to ride.

They were pawing
restless

the

ground, and so
start,

in

their

hurry to

that he
farewell.

was forced to bid Beauty a hasty

As
off at

soon as he was mounted, he went

such a pace, that she lost sight of

him in an instant. Then Beauty began to cry, and went sadly back to her own room. But she soon found that she was very sleepy, and as she had nothing better to do, she
lay

down and

at once fell asleep.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

81

And
walking
trees,

then she dreamed, that she was

by

a

brook

that

flowed her
sad

under
fate,

and

crying

over

when a young

prince, nobler than

anyone

8a

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
you have been beEverything you ask for you shall
off

better
fore.

than ever

have.
'

Only try to find

me

out,

no matter

in

what form I may come to you, as I love you dearly, and in making me

happy
ness.

you

will

find

your

own
are
left

happipretty,

Be

as

good as

you

and we
for.'

shall

have nothing

to

wish

'What
you
'

can
'

I

do,

Prince,

to

make
do

happy ?

said Beauty.
grateful,'

Only be
do

he

said,

'

and

not trust too

much
not

to

your

eyes.

And,
you

above

all,

leave

me

until

have saved
After
self in

me from my

cruel fate.'

this,

she thought she

found her-

a room with a stately and lovely
said to her
:

lady,
'

who
Dear

Beauty,

try
left

not

to

be

sorry
for

for

all

you

have

behind

you,

you

will again

be very happy.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
'Only be
always
careful

83

and
sure

watchful,

and
are

make

quite

that

things

what they seem to

be.'

BEAUTY AND TEE BEAST
PART XI
Beauty
But
calling

liked

her

dreams

so

much, that

she was in no hurry to awake.
at
last

the

clock roused her by

her

name

softly

twelve times, and

then she got up and found her dressingtable
set

out

with

everything
dressed,

she

could

want.

When

she had

she found
to

dinner was waiting in the
hers.

room next
take

But dinner does

not

very long

when you
soon
sofa,

are
sat

all

by
in to

yourself,

and
about
F 2

very

she

down

the

corner of

a

and

began

think

the

84

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
Prince
she

charming
dream.
'

had

seen

in

her

He

said

I

could
herself.

make him
that
this

happy,'

said

Beauty to
seems,

'It

then,

dreadful
alone.

Beast

keeps

him
set

shut

up

all

How
why how
'

can

I

him

free?

I

wonder
trust

they both told
things

me
I

not to
don't

to

looked

?

know what

to think.

But,

after

all,

it

was only a dream,
myself
find

so

why
I

should

I

trouble

about

it?

had
she

better

go

and

somelook
the

thing to do to pass away the time.'

So
into
palace.

got up,
of

and

began

to

some

the

many rooms
went
into

of

The
with
herself

first

she

was
Beauty
she

lined

looking-glasses,

and

saw
a

which
she

ever

way

looked.

She thought charming room.

had never seen

such

BEAUTY AND TBE BEAST

85

Then a bracelet which was hanging from a lamp caught her eye, and on
taking
picture
it

down, she saw that
the

it

held a
just

of

she had seen

unknown Prince, him in her dream.
delight

as

With
bracelet

great

she

slipped

the
into

on her arm, and
full

went

on

a room

of pictures.

Here she soon found a picture of the

same handsome
and so well
at
it

Prince,

as

large
as

as

life,

painted* that

she looked
her.

he seemed to smile kindly at

Tearing herself away from the picture
at
last,

she

passed through
all

into

a room

which held
sun.

kinds of music under the

Here
was

she

spent a long while in try-

ing some of them, and singing until she
tired.

36

BEAUTY

AtfD

TME BEAST

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART XII

The
she
co

next

room
as

was
as

full

of

books,

and

saw everything she had
read,

ever wanted

well

everything she had

read.
It

seemed

to

her

that a whole

life-

time would not be enough, even to read
the

names of the books, there were

so

many.

By this time it was growing and wax candles were beginning to
themselves in every room.

dusk,
light

Beauty found her

supper

served
it.

just

at the time she wished to have

But she did not see anyone or hear a sound, and, though her father had warned her that she would be alone,
she began to find
it

rather dull.

: :

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

87

But soon she heard the Beast coming. 'Now/ thought she, 'he means to kill and
eat me.'

However, as he did not seem
fierce,
'

at

all

and only
gaily,

said gruffly

Good-evening, Beauty,'
quite

she

spoke

to

him

and

hid from

him that

she was afraid.

Then the Beast asked her what she had been doing to pass away the time, and she told him of all the rooms she
had
seen.

Then he asked
could
told

if

she

thought

she

be

happy in
that

his

palace.

Beauty
so to
lovely,

him
she

everything

was

that
if

would
about

be

very hard

please

she could not be happy.

After

an

hour's

talk,

Beauty
not
at
her,

began
nearly
first.

to
so

think that the
bad,
as

Beast

was

she

Then

he

got

had thought up to leave

and

said in his gruff voice

:

:

88
1

BEA UTY AND THE BEAST

Do Oh
!

you

love
'

me,

Beauty

?

Will

you marry
1

me ?

what

shall

I

say ?
to

'

cried

Beauty, for she was

afraid

make

the

Beast angry by saying 'no/
'

Say

" yes "

or

"

no

"

without

fear,'

he

said.
'

Oh

!

no, Beast,' said

Beauty at once.
not,

'

Since

you

will

good-night,

Beauty,' he said.

And

she said

'Good-night, Beast,'
that
said

very glad to find
she

he was not angry because
'

had

no.'

And
soon
in
,of her

after

he was gone she was very

bed

and

asleep,

and

dreaming

unknown

Prince.

She thought he
you so unkind
to

came and
to

said to her

'Ah, Beauty!

why
I

are

me?
for

I

fear

am

fated

be

un-

happy
the

many
then
,

a long day

still.'

And

her

dreams

changed,

.

but
all.

charming

Prince

was. in

them

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

89

When
it

morning
really

came,
the

her

first

thought
see
if

was to look at was
it

picture,

and
she

like

him, and

found

that

was.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART
XIII

This morning she made up her mind to
spend
sun
.

her time

in
all

the
the

garden,

for

the

shone,

and

fountains

were

playing.

But when she looked
seemed
'

about her,
Avell.

she

to

know

the place quite

S 11 rely I have been here before
she

?

'

said

she.

Then
-the

came

to

the

brook

where

she had met the Prince in her dream, and that made her think more than ever, that he must be kept shut up by the Beast.
trees

were

growing, where

first

'


BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
she was tired, she

go

When
to
full

went

back

the

palace,

and

of things for

new room every kind of work
found a
bows, and silks to

ribbons to

make
flowers.

into

work into Then
full

there

was
to

a

very

large
so

cage

of

rare

birds,

which

were
as

tame,
as

that

they

flew
her,

Beauty
perched

soon

they

saw
Pretty

and

upon
said,
'

her

shoulders and her head.
'

little

dears,'

she

how
to

I

wish
!

that

your

cage

was

nearer

my
sing

room, that I might often

hear

you

So

saying,

she

opened
it

a

door,

and

found, to her delight, that

led into her

own room, though
was quite the other
There
farther

she

had

thought

it

side of the palace.

were

more
they

birds

in

a

room
that

on.
talk,

There

were

parrots

could

and

called

Beauty

by

her name.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
Indeed,
she

gr

found
of

she

could
that

get

so

much

fun

out

them,

she

took

one or two back to her room, and they
talked to her while she was at supper.

Then
visit,

the

Beast

paid
the

her

his

usual

and

asked

same

questions
'

as

before,

and then with a

gruff

good-

night,'

he went away, while Beauty went

to

bed to dream of her unknown Prince.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART XIV

The

days

passed

swiftly

in

doing

all

kinds of things, and after a while Beauty

found out another
palace,

strange thing

in

the

which

often

pleased

her

when

she was tired of being alone.

There was
not
looked

one

room which she had
It

into

before.

was empty,

gz

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
that under

except

each of the windows

stood a fine easy-chair.

The
of
that

first

time
it

she

had

looked
to

out her

the

window,

had

seemed

a black

curtain

stopped

her

from

seeing anything outside.

But the
the

second

time
very

she

went

into
sat

room, she

was
the

tired,

and

down
aside,

in one of the chairs. at

All

once

curtain

was

rolled
her.

and a play was acted before
dances,

There were
of

and bright
music,

lights

many

colours,
it

and
all
it.

and

pretty

dresses,

and

was
she
turn,

so gay, that

Beauty

was charmed with
After
that
in

tried

the
there

other

seven

windows

and

was

some
lonely

new thing
so

to be seen

from each of them,
could
feel

that

Beauty

never

any more.

Every evening

after

supper the Beast

came

to

see

her,

and always before say-

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
ing
voice
'

93

'

good-night
:

'

asked

her

in

his

loud

Beauty, will you marry
it
'

me ?

'

And
she said
sad.

seemed to Beauty, that when

No, Beast,' he went away quite

But her some
young
the
to

happy dreams of the handPrince

soon

made her

for-

get the poor Beast.

And
her,

only thing that

at all upset

was

be

told

to

let

her

heart

guide her, and not her eyes, which, think

about

it

as

she

would,

she

could

not

understand.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART XV
So everything went on
until
for

a long time,
was,

at

last,

happy
for the

as

she

Beauty

began to long

sight of her father
sisters.

and her brothers and

'

:

94

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
One
night,

seeing

her

look very

sad,

the

Beast

asked

her

what

was

the

matter.

Beauty was no longer afraid of

him.

Now

she

knew

that

ha

was

really
his

gentle, in spite

of his fierce looks

and

dreadful voice.

So she told him that she
this,

was longing to see her home once more.

Upon
'

hearing

the

Beast seemed

very unhappy, and cried out sadly

Ah

!

Beauty,

have you the heart to

unhappy Beast like this ? What more do you want to make you happy ?
leave an
Is
it

because

you
Beast/

hate

me,

that

you

want to get away ?
'

No, dear
do

said

Beauty
I

softly,

'

I

not hate

you,

and

should

be

very sorry
but
I

never to see
to
see
for

you

any

more,
again.
I

long
let

my

father

Only

me

go

two months, and

promise to come
for the rest of

back to you
life.'

and

stay

my

:

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
The
very,

95

Beast,

who
while

had
she

been

looking

very

sad

spoke,

now
you
find
fill

said
'

:

I

cannot

refuse
it

you
should

anything
cost

ask,
life.

even though

me my

in

Take the four boxes you will the room next to your own, and
to

them with everything you wish
with you.
'

take

But
or
if

do

not

forget

your

promise.
are

Come
over,
it,

back you

when the two months

may have
faithful

cause
in

to

repent

for

you do not come
not

good time
coach

you will find your
'

Beast dead.

You
your

will

need

any
say

to

bring you
all

back.
brothers

Only

good-bye to
the

and

sisters,

night

before

you

come
to

away,

and when
this

you

have

gone
wish

bed turn
go

ring round

upon your
'

finger
to

and say firmly
back
to

" I

my

palace

and

see

my

Beast again."

96

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
'

Good-night,

Beauty.

Fear

nothing,
shall

sleep peacefully,
see

and before long you

your father once more.'

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART XVI

As soon
the

as Beauty
all

was alone, she

filled

boxes with

the rare and precious

things she saw about her.

Only when she was
things into

tired

of

heaping

Then

them did they seem to be full. she went to bed, but could
at
last

hardly sleep for joy.

And when
dream
of

she

did begin

to

her

beloved

Prince,

she

was

him stretched upon a grassy bank sad and weary, and hardly
very sorry to see
like himself.
'

What

is

the matter ?

'

she cried.

But he looked at

her,

and

said

:

'

'

'

; '

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
'

97

How
?
!

can

you

ask

me,
to

cruel

one

?

Are you not
perhaps
'

leaving

me

my

death,

Ah don't be so sad,' cried Beauty I am only going to let my father see that I am safe and happy.
{ '

I

have

promised

the

Beast

that
die

I
of

will

come back,
'

and
keep
that
'

he

would
!

grief if I did not

my word
matter

What would
the
Prince.

to

you

?

said

Surely

you would
ungrateful

not

care ?
'

Indeed I

should

be

if

I

did not care for such a kind Beast,' cried

Beauty.
'I

would die to save him from pain.
he
is

It is not his fault that

so ugly.'


;

BEA UTY AND THE BEAST

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART XVII
Just
then a strange

sound

woke
far

her

some one was speaking not very
and, opening her eyes,
she

away
herself

found

in

room she had never seen before, which was not nearly so grand as those
a
she was used to in the Beast's palace.

BEAUTY AND^ THE BEAST
Where
and dressed
the

99

could

she

be ?

She
1

got

up
that

hastily,

and

then saw
the

boxes

she

had

packed
wondering,

night

before,
'

were

all in

the room.

While
had and

she

was

how

;

the
to

Beasl;

carried

them

and

herself

this

strange place, she

heard her father's
greeted

voice,

rushed

out and

him
very

joyfully.

Her brothers and

sisters

were

all

much
to
see

surprised, as they

had never hoped
no end

her again, and there was

to the questions they asked her.

She had also much to hear, about
they

all

had

been

doing,

while

she

was

away, and of her father's journey home.
'

But when

they

heard

that

she

had

only
time,

come to be with them for a short and then must go back to the
palace
for

Beast's

ever,

they

all

fell

a-weeping.

<t3

ioo

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART XVIII

Then
he

Beauty

asked

her
the

father,

what
of

thought

could

be

meaning
to
trust

her strange

dreams,
her

and why the Prince
not
to

always
the

begged

looks

of things, but

rather

to

trust

her feelings.
After
tell

much
yourself
loves

thought

he

said

:

'

You

me
he
is,

that the Beast, frightful

as

you

dearly,

and deserves

your love for his gentleness and kindness.
I think the

Prince

must

mean you
to,

to

understand, that you ought to reward

him
spite

by doing
Beauty
this

as

he

wishes

you
help
to

in

of his ugliness.'

could

not
likely

seeing

that
case.

seemed very
Still,

be the

Prince,

when she thought of her dear who was so handsome, she did

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
not
feel

101

as

if

she

could

marry

the

Beast.

At

any

rate,

for

two

months

she

need not make up
But, though
lived
in

her

mind, but could

enjoy herself with her

sisters.

they were rich now, and
again,

a

town

and

had

plenty

of

friends,

Beauty

found

that

nothing

pleased her very much.

She
where
that at

often

thought
so

of

the
the

palage
?

she

was
Prince,

happy,

more
quite

so

home

she never once

dreamed of
sad

her

dear

and

she felt

without him.

Then her
quite

sisters

seemed to

have

got

used to being without her.

Some-

times they even found her rather in the

way.

So

she

would

not

have

been

sorry

when the two months were over, but for her father and brothers, who begged her
to stay.

»02

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
They seemed
so

sad

'

at

the

thought
she say

of

her

leaving

could

not
,

them again, that make up her mind to
,
;

'good-bye to them.

Every

day
say she

when
it

she

got

up

she

meant
night
at
last

to

at

night,
it

and
again,

when
until

came
she

put
a

off

had

bad
was

dream
walking

which
a

helped her to

make up
she

her mind.
in

She

thought
in

lonely path

the palace gardens,

she heard

groans, which

seemed to

when come

from some bushes hiding the entrance of
a cave.

And,
could' be

running

quickly'

;

to

,

see

what

the matter, she found the Beast

stretched out

upon

his: side,

nearly dead.

He
of his

told

her that

she was

the

cause

death,

and

at

the same

moment
very

a

stately
:

lady

came
you

and
are

said

gravely
'

Ah

!

Beauty,

only just, in

!

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
time to save his
life.

163

See what happens

when people do not keep their promises If you had stayed away one day more, you would have found him dead.'

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART XIX
Beauty
that
all

was
she

so

upset

by
she

this

dream,

the that

next

morning
go
she

told
at

them
once,

.should

back
said

and that
to
'

very

night
all

good-bye

her father and

her

brothers

and
she

sisters.

And
and and

as

soon as she was in

bed,

turned her ring
said firmly
:

round
go

upon
to

her

finger,

'I

wish
see

to

back
again,'

my
as

palace

my

Beast

she

had

been told to do.

104

BEAVTY AND THE BEAST
Then
she
fell

asleep,

and only woke
'
:

up
at

to

hear

the

clock
times,

saying

Beauty,
her

Beauty,'

twelve

which

told

once that she was really in the palace

once more.

Everything
her
birds

was

just

as

before,

and
never

were so glad to see her.

But

Beauty

thought

she

had
again,

known such so much to
she
felt

a long day, for she
see
if

wanted
that

the

Beast

as

supper-time

would

never

come.

But when

it

did come, and

no Beast

came

to

say

good-night to her, she was
afraid.

really very

much

So, after waiting

for

a long time, she
for

ran down into the garden to search
him.

Up
the
in
vain,

and down the paths
ran
for

and
to

among
him

trees

poor

Beauty,

calling

no sound was

be heard,
find.

and not a

trace of

him could she

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
At
a
last,

105

quite
rest,

tired,

she

stopped
she

for

minute's

and
the her

saw

that

was
that

standing
she

close in

to

shady

path,

had seen

dream.

'

.io6

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
did

her horror he
eyes.

.

not

move
and

or

open his

'

Oh

!

he

is

dead

;

it

is

all

my
she

fault,'

said Beauty, crying sadly.

But thsn, looking at
thought
fetching
well,

him

again,

he

still

breathed,

and,
the

hastily

some

water
it

from
he

nearest

she threw
great

over his face, and, to

her
his
'

delight,

began

to

open

eyes.

how you frightened me she cried. I never knew how much I loved you until just now, when I feared

Oh

!

Beast,
'

!

I

was too
'

late to save

your
love

life.'

Can

you

really
?
'

such

an

ugly

thing as I
'

am
was

said

the Beast faintly.

Ah

!

Beauty,
I
\

you
dying
-

only

came
I

just

in

time,

because

thought

you
go

had forgotten back' now and
Beauty,

your
I

promise.
shall

But
you
•'

rest;

see

again by-and-by.'
;-

who, had

thought

that

he

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
would
by
his

107

be

angry

with

her,

was

cheered

gentle

voice,

and

went

back

to

the palace.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
PART XX
Soon
after,

the

Beast came in
the

as

usual,

and
been

talked

about

time
if

she

had
all

spent with her father,

asking
if

she had

very

happy,

and

they

had

been very glad to see

her.

Beauty

was

very

glad

to

have

him

near her again, and to hear his voice.

She told him
she left him.

all

she had

done since
time

And when
for

at

last

the

came
as

him

to

go,

and

he

asked,

he

had

so often asked before:

loS

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

!

;

Beauty and the beast
'

109

Beauty,
:

will

you

marry

me ?

'

she

said softly
'

Yes, dear Beast.'
she

As
up
and
trees,

spoke a blaze of light sprang
the

before

windows

of

the palace

fireworks
across
in

crackled

and
long
all

guns

went
of

off,

the

row

orange
fire-flies,

letters
:

made
and

of

was written

'Long
could
all

live the Prince

his Bride.'

Turning

to

ask

the

Beast

what
that

it

mean,

Beauty found
in
his

he
her

had

gone,

and

place

stood

long-loved Prince

At
a
ladies

the same

moment
heard

the

wheels of

coach

were

outside,

and
at

two
once
in

came
of

into the room.

One
to

them
stately

Beauty knew
lady,

be the

she had

seen
also

her

dreams.

The
queenly,
to greet

other

was
Beauty

so

grand

and

that
first.

hardly

knew which

119

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
But
the

one

she

already,

knew

said

to her friend:
'

Well,

Queen,

this

is

Beauty,-

who

has

had

the

courage

to

love

your

son

when he was in the form of a beast, and so has made him a prince again. They love one another, and only wait

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
for

m
to
see

you to say you
I consent

will

be glad

them married,
'

to be quite happy.'

with

all

my
I
girl,

heart,'

cried

the

Queen.
enough,

'How

can

ever
for

thank
having

you
given

my dear me back my dear
then
she
Prince,

son again?'

And
and
to

kissed

both

Beauty
talking
all

the

who had been

the Fairy,

and thanking
the

her for

she had done for them.
'

Now,' said

Fairy to
like

Beauty,
to
sisters

'

1

suppose
for
all

you
your

would

me
and

send
to

brothers
'

dance at your wedding

?

And

so

she

did,

and
day,

they

were
Beauty

married the

very next

and

and the Prince lived happily ever

after.

PRINTED BY

SPOTTISWOODE AND

CO. LTD.,

NEW-STREET SQUARE

APPENDIX
THE HISTORY OF JACK THE GIANT-KILLER
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