Call for Entries

In Partnership with
Australasian Student Design Awards 2010
www.design.org.au/asda 1 of 11
In recent years, Sustainable Design has moved past its pop-culture status to form
a key requirement of any good design process. Sustainable Designs allow us to
live, work and play in such a way that is more effcient, proftable, secure and
pleasurable but most importantly a way that does not compromise our future. Now
as one of the defning ideas of the 21st century, Sustainability holds tremendous
possibilities for designers.
The Design Institute of Australia’s Australasian Student Design Awards (ASDA) fosters
the future of Sustainable Design practice by rewarding the region’s best emerging
designers. As the foremost student design awards, the ASDA multidisciplinary program
attracts an exceptional range, depth and quality of entries.
The DIA invites Australian and New Zealand tertiary design institutes to nominate
their top student design projects that refect design excellence and adopt innovative
Sustainable Design principles.
Now in its 15th year, the DIA presents the ASDA in conjunction with designEX. Entries
will be judged and displayed at this premier interior architecture and design exhibition
which attracts over 20,000 Australian and International design professionals.
The ASDA prize pool includes cash prizes, travel scholarships, art & design supplies, DIA
memberships and ASDA certifcates.
Call for Entries
The Design Institute of Australia is the voice of professional design in Australia and has
been actively improving the community recognition and status of designers since 1947.
The DIA is the only multidisciplinary organization representing designers in Australia.
The organisation promotes the value of design and designers to industry, business,
government and the community. The DIA provides a vibrant networking base on a state,
national and international level. Through its international affliations, the DIA links its
members with designers in over 40 countries.
Design Institute of Australia
T-4-2
LOW TABLE AND STOOLS
Contact Details:
Caroline Benzie
National Events & Programs Offcer
T: 1300 888 056 F: +61 3 9662 4140
cbenzie@design.org.au
Australasian Student Design Awards 2010
www.design.org.au/asda 2 of 11
Important Dates:
17/3/10 Educators Registration Close
1/04/10 Entrant Nominations Close
9/04/10 Entrant Submissions Close
22/4/10 Final Judging Process
22-24/4/10 designEX Exhibition, Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre
Step One: Educators – Read the Call for Entries which includes
Category descriptions, Judging Criteria and Terms
& Conditions.
Step Two: Educators – Visit www.design.org.au/asda to register your
school and pay $60 (incl GST) + booking fee per entry
by 17/3/10
Step Three: Educators – Judge your students overall body of work
and submit your Entrant Nominations Form outlining
your top three student projects per category by email or
fax by 1/4/10
Step Four: Educators – Send the Entry Specifcations to
your nominated Students.
Step Five: Entrants – Once nominated, read the Entry
Specifcations and submit your project in the form
of a presentation board and PDF on CD by 9/4/10
The ASDA program offers great opportunities for young designers:
Expose your work to a national and international design audience •
Gain positive public recognition of your skills as an innovative emerging designer •
Gain peer recognition of your work •
Launch your new design and ideas into the market place •
Media attention through media releases circulated to major media outlets and •
features on the DIA Website, tri-annual Newsletter “Spark”, Facebook page and
weekly E-Newsletter
Winning work will also be recognized by prizes and Australasian Student Design •
Awards 2010 Certifcate

The ASDA program also offers opportunities for Tertiary Institutes:
Provide your graduates with a unique opportunity and advancement tools as they •
commence their professional careers.
Promote your school’s design capabilities to a national and international audience. •
Entry is open to design projects created in 2nd Semester 2009 or 1st Semester 2010
from entrants aged 18 years or older as at the date of entry who are:
Permanent residents of Australia and New Zealand or international students •
under a Student Visa in Australia and New Zealand.
Currently studying, full time equivalent or apprentice tertiary courses at a •
Certifcate III, Certifcate IV, Diploma or Advanced Diploma or Degree level or
graduated from any of these courses in Semester 2 2009.
Why enter the ASDA?
Who can enter the ASDA?
Entry Process:
Australasian Student Design Awards 2010
www.design.org.au/asda 3 of 11
SPACE
1. Interior Design
Residential, commercial or retail applications: designs should consider and resolve
the treatment of space and spatial volume, structural requirements, traffc fow,
furniture, fxtures, furnishings, overall lighting plans, surface fnishes and sustainable
design practices.

2. Interior Decoration
Residential or commercial applications: designs should consider surface decoration
including colour applications in paint, fabric and furnishings, overall lighting plans and
sustainable design practices.

3. Exhibition / Display Design
Trade, retail or exhibition applications: designs should outline furnishings, fxtures,
display stands, signage, visitor fow, overall foor plan and sustainable design practices.
IMAGE
4. Visual Design
2D text, symbol or picture based applications: designs should have particular
emphasis on clarity of communication, the matching of information styles to audience
requirements and sustainable design practices.
Categories
OBJECT
5. Industrial Design
Object, light fxtures or packaging applications: designs should focus on functional and
aesthetic aspects, human usage and behavior, and sustainable design practices.

6. Jewellery Design
Wearable applications: designs should pay particular attention to ergonomic,
functional and aesthetic aspects, and sustainable design practices.

7. Furniture Design
Movable object applications: designs should allow for all aspects of furniture that relate
to human usage and behaviour, product appeal and sustainable design practices.

8. Textile Design
Fabric applications for use in furniture, soft furnishings, clothing, vehicles, fnishes,
plastics or other products: designs should consider aesthetic and functional aspects,
materials, weights, textures and sustainable design practices.

9. Fashion Design – new 2010
Wearable applications: designs should include a focus on functional and aesthetic
aspects, pay particular attention to relationship of the apparel to the human form and
sustainable design practices.
Australasian Student Design Awards 2010
www.design.org.au/asda 4 of 11
The ASDA Judging Panels consist of highly respected experts in each design discipline.
Each entry will be assessed on the following equally weighted criteria:
Sustainability:
Demonstrated understanding and use of sustainable resources •
Consideration of economic, social and ecological design practices •
Concept:
Clear understanding of the parameters of the original brief from tertiary •
course work
Evidence of research, development and resolution of the original brief from •
tertiary course work
Creativity:
Innovative ideas translated from conceptual approach •
Effective communication of ideas •
Space / Function / Materials / Technology (where appropriate):
Design intent refects and is supported by spatial arrangement •
Demonstrated functional practicality •
Appropriate and innovative selection of materials •
Demonstrated understanding, integration and resolution of manufacturing processes •
Judging
www.design.org.au/asda 5 of 11
Australasian Student Design Awards 2010
ASDA 2009
Award of Excellence - Tied Overall Winner
Ecient water management for our future
EXPLODED VIEW
VEIL EBD PROJECT
As part of the Victorian Eco Innovation Lab Project for the EBD, (Eco Business
District) we explored possible lifestyles for sustainable living at a site to be
developed in 2014, situated between Docklands and North Melbourne.
We explored and proposed Low consumption Urban living at the EBD in
2017, medium to high density living in high/medium rise purpose built
buildings. These buildings have a focus on shared communal spaces to build
community and make a shared lifestyle desirable. The objective of this studio
was to develop products that would enhance sustainable living in the EBD
in 2017.
We can plan for water wise gardens but what about the notion of using
water wisely to suit our specic gardening needs. Grey water can be recy-
cled for our rose bushes while rain water can be used for the food we eat.
The user can either select the use of clear or grey water to best suit their plot,
thus allowing the community to save on water usage from the mains.
The aqua anytime system was designed for the communal garden. The
system could also be applied to other areas of such as industry and farm-
ing. The possibilities are endless. It looks like drought is here to stay. Victo-
ria is seen as the garden state of Australia. We need to take new measures
to keep out state green. Aqua anytime ecient water management for our
future.
User Centred Techniques were applied to this project and through talking to
the plot holders at community gardens I found out the biggest problem fac-
ing community gardens. WATER!
Valves, meters, computer and a digital network make this system possible.
The system has a central access point and the discharge points. The access
point is where the user inputs their key for identication and the discharge
point is what the user would use to water their garden. There are many
discharge points all depending on the number of plots in the community
garden.
My project deals with water management for the communal garden in the
EBD district. The Aqua anytime water product system is a tool which would
help the EBD community better manage their garden water usage. It pro-
motes smart water management for the EBD’s communal garden. By doing
so it gives users the freedom of watering their garden in their own time.
“Australia is the driest continent on earth and we are currently in a
drought. The lessons of the past show clearly that it cannot be eliminat-
ed. The current drought is nowin its tenth year.”
Source: http://drought.melbournewater.com.au/Default.asp?bhcp=1
CURRENT SYSTEM
1. ACCESS
2. HYDRATE
AQUA-ANYTIME
Nazia Kachwalla - The Museum of Ephemera:
Interior Design of the Museum of Wellington City
and Sea - Victorian University of Wellington
Ching Tan - Aqua Anytime - Swinburne University
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First: Wasim Jaber - Translating Fear - TAFE NSW -
Sydney Institute, Design Centre Enmore
Second: Morgan Terry & Samantha Harwood -
A Century of Memories - Massey University
Third: Andy Florkowski - Archive of a Century -
Massey University
www.design.org.au/asda 6 of 11
Australasian Student Design Awards 2010
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First: Nazia Kachwalla - The Museum of Ephemera:
Interior Design of the Museum of Wellington City
and Sea - Victorian University of Wellington
Commendation: Anthony Hamilton-Smith - The Slow
Kitchen - RMIT University
Second: Tessa Peach - Treehut Retreat - Massey
University
Commendation: Georgia Ezra - Circa Silos -
University of New South Wales
Third: Stephanie Schicker - Commuters Interchange
- Massey University
www.design.org.au/asda 7 of 11
Australasian Student Design Awards 2010
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Ecient water management for our future
EXPLODED VIEW
VEIL EBD PROJECT
As part of the Victorian Eco Innovation Lab Project for the EBD, (Eco Business
District) we explored possible lifestyles for sustainable living at a site to be
developed in 2014, situated between Docklands and North Melbourne.
We explored and proposed Low consumption Urban living at the EBD in
2017, medium to high density living in high/medium rise purpose built
buildings. These buildings have a focus on shared communal spaces to build
community and make a shared lifestyle desirable. The objective of this studio
was to develop products that would enhance sustainable living in the EBD
in 2017.
We can plan for water wise gardens but what about the notion of using
water wisely to suit our specic gardening needs. Grey water can be recy-
cled for our rose bushes while rain water can be used for the food we eat.
The user can either select the use of clear or grey water to best suit their plot,
thus allowing the community to save on water usage from the mains.
The aqua anytime system was designed for the communal garden. The
system could also be applied to other areas of such as industry and farm-
ing. The possibilities are endless. It looks like drought is here to stay. Victo-
ria is seen as the garden state of Australia. We need to take new measures
to keep out state green. Aqua anytime ecient water management for our
future.
User Centred Techniques were applied to this project and through talking to
the plot holders at community gardens I found out the biggest problem fac-
ing community gardens. WATER!
Valves, meters, computer and a digital network make this system possible.
The system has a central access point and the discharge points. The access
point is where the user inputs their key for identication and the discharge
point is what the user would use to water their garden. There are many
discharge points all depending on the number of plots in the community
garden.
My project deals with water management for the communal garden in the
EBD district. The Aqua anytime water product system is a tool which would
help the EBD community better manage their garden water usage. It pro-
motes smart water management for the EBD’s communal garden. By doing
so it gives users the freedom of watering their garden in their own time.
“Australia is the driest continent on earth and we are currently in a
drought. The lessons of the past show clearly that it cannot be eliminat-
ed. The current drought is nowin its tenth year.”
Source: http://drought.melbournewater.com.au/Default.asp?bhcp=1
CURRENT SYSTEM
1. ACCESS
2. HYDRATE
AQUA-ANYTIME
Matiu/Somes: The Inhabitants Book design
Sarah Bowie
Nature has been a constant source of inspiration in the design of the
human environment. The ‘model of nature’, with its forms, structures,
and organising principles does not only inspire the widest range of
concepts and design processes, but also can be expressed in a broad
spectrum of forms and functions.
Pressing sustainability concerns and immersion in an increasingly
non-organic environment have created a need for design to embody
ecological principles, inspiring this project’s central proposition: ‘Design
inspired by nature seems to acquire relevance whenever modern
society finds itself in crisis as it searches to re-establish a harmonious
relationship with an environment perceived as out of balance or hostile’
(Sachs, 2007). This project builds a documentation of the history of
Wellington Harbour’s Matiu/Somes Island by using remnants from
inhabitants as inspiration for a graphic and typographic direction.
From the beginning the aim was to document Matiu/Somes Island’s
layered ‘living history’ in a visually engaging way in order to generate
interest in preserving the island’s future. In essence this project has
taken the form of an alternative history book.
The nature-inspired concept of ‘building a nest’ has been employed
to ‘build up a past’ and tell the island’s many stories. Like a nest is
constructed of found objects, this project was inspired by remnants and
objects left behind. Through revealing layers of the island’s inhabitation
the viewer is invited to ‘look through’ to the past. A nest is an object
composed of many different layers that form a whole. This has been
used as a metaphor to express the diverse historical character of
Matiu/Somes Island.
A nest is also symbolic of a sanctuary and represents the island’s
future as a conservation project. Like a nest, Matiu/Somes Island
represents a place of refuge.
cover back cover front spread
spread
spread spread
spread
spread
spread
09013-asda-594x420.indd 3 20/04/09 10:08 AM
Coolers- thermally insulated containers,
containing ice for keeping food and
drink cool. Suitable for transport.
Thermally Insulated food containers are designed to
keep small portions of food hot or cold when eating
away from home
Multi-tiered Lunch Boxes-portable containers which allow
layers of different food types to be carried together.
Serving Platters- a large flat dish or plate,
typically oval or circular in shape, used for
serving food.
Protective Food Covers- Prevent contami-
nation caused from flies landing on food
TARGET MARKET
The intended users for the Outdoor Party Platter are females aged be-
tween 20 and 50 of a medium to high socioeconomic background.
These people will probably have full time jobs, and will spend time relax-
ing and entertaining friends on the weekends. They may have a
deck,patio or outdoor entertaining area.
OUTDOOR PARTY PLATTER
PROBLEM STATEMENT
The Outdoor Party Platter has been designed in response to a brief
calling for a portable household item that meets a current consumer
need. Specifically outdoor products and accessories, including barbe-
cue grills, food and beverage coolers, outdoor furniture, picnic items,
patio and garden accessories.
The problem identified is that existing outdoor serving platters do not
take environmental or food safety issues into consideration. Also
existing food coolers on the market are mostly large plastic cavities
that are not appropriate for the storage or transport of a platter of
food or they may be small single meal containers whose primary func-
tion is to keep food warm.
When dining outdoors food may be left for an extended period of time
at unsafe temperatures without protection from flies. Food needs to
be kept cool when travelling to destinations, such as picnics or a
friendʼs house.
The Outdoor Party Platter has been designed in response to the prob-
lems identified.
DESIGN INSTITUTE OF AUSTRALIA
2009 STUDENT DESIGN AWARDS
EXISTING PRODUCT ANALYSIS
CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT
1.
After analyzing 2009 color trend forecasts a variety of colors have
been chosen to highlight the outdoor party platter.
STYLING
Lime Green French Blue
Fuschia Yellow
Kinetic Typeface and video design
Richard Payne
By using Cuba Street, Wellington, New Zealand as the context, this
project explores the ways in which stories can be told through the
design of letterforms. The student is to transform these letterforms
into a typeface and construct a 30 second digital production that can
further enhance the chosen story by utilising sound and motion.
Kinetic is a typeface that puts forth the notion that Cuba Street is a
place of chaos and frantic movement. People appear to be in a rush,
whether they are passing through or shopping on the street. From my
observation Cuba Street is a sustainable environment, in which walking
is the primary means of transportation. Walking reduces air pollution
and can be healthier to our environment than other means of transport.
The medium used to create each individual letterform was flour, a
fairly inexpensive and sustainable resource that contrasts with the
dark footpath. By walking through the letterforms and documenting the
process I was able to portray the idea of movement. The transforming,
decaying state of letters indicates a presence of people and a sense
of time. The words NO, TIME, TO, TALK, are re-arranged to further
illustrate the nature of Cuba Street in the digital format. Sound effects
add interest and a sense of rhythm to help illustrate the story. My
project speaks about the importance of preserving our environment and
maintaining a healthy lifestyle through the act of walking. As such a
sense of movement is captured in the progressive movement of
the alphabet.
video stills
typeface design
09013-asda-594x420.indd 1 19/05/09 8:42 AM
1
Cradle Alive becomes a distnctly
adult piece of furniture
Cradle Alive becomes a rocking
horse once the child has
grown out of the cradle
(perfect rocking horse age)
Cradle Alive is flat packable
Certain dots act as both
decoraton and covers
for bolts necessary for
change over period
Seatback for safety
Arm for hanging
mobiles
In 2009 we are throwing things away
at an alarmingly fast rate, so fast in
fact that in some countries only one
percent of goods are stll in use six
months afer the date of sale.
Children’s goods are no excepton.
Our landfills are overflowing; our air,
water and land is polluted and our
planet is warming. To this extent the
need has arisen for thoughtully
designed cradle to cradle goods, made
from sustainable materials. Cradle
Alive has been designed in response to
this need. htp://www.storyofstuff.com
The Cradle Alive changes from a
rocking cradle, suitable for the first
year or so of a child’s life, to two
distnct pieces of furniture; a fun and
colourful rocking horse, (suitable for
children 2 years and over), and a
distnctly adult storage bench, which is
not restricted for use in the kids room,
but could be used in the lounge room,
hall way etc, as either an otoman or
bench seat giving the piece a
considerably longer lifespan. The
piece reconfigures by means of the
decoratve screws hidden behind the
dots on the horse never to be seen
untl they are needed.
What becomes the base on
the storage bench acts as
storage shelf and brace in
cradle form
Cradle Alive
Cradle that reconfigures into a rocking
horse and storage bench
Wellington Creative Markets System of visual communication design
Kate Arnott
Wellington Creative Markets is an artisan market with a focus on New
Zealand made and designed products. It is a vibrant weekend event,
incorporating 80-100 stalls selling high-quality local goods, cuisine
and hosting live performances. The market will eventually evolve into
a group of linked markets around Wellington. No comparable market
exists in New Zealand currently.
It became clear that a visual communication system for the Wellington
Creative Markets needed to be flexible, as the market was an ever
changing event. The graphic solution had to be able to be updated
easily and without additional expense or environmental impact.
The concept was to combine the colourful vibrancy of a carnival with a
typeface inspired by handpainted market signage with the idea that a
market is the sum of all of its parts.
The result is a an energetic, vibrant, complex and yet simple, system
of visual communication. The system is based on a few guidelines,
that allow it to be flexible and evolve while still retaining the look and
feel of the market identity. These guidelines include the use of a colour
key. This is based on the three categories of entertainment (yellows),
food (reds and oranges) and products (purples and blues), which when
combined with a palette of neutrals, convey the vibrancy of Wellington
Creative Markets. The format also allows for change, so that when
necessary, stall categories can be removed and replaced with new
ones, simply by swapping out one piece of the composition.
This visual communication system was then applied to various design
problems including external market signage, promotional posters and
flyers, stationery including business cards and a letterhead, a reusable
shopping bag and recycled paper packaging.
Posters and flyers are only reprinted seasonally or for special events,
as instead of listing the businesses who have stalls each week they
represent the variety and vibrancy of the market itself. This means
they become a semi-permanent advertisement of what’s on at the
Wellington Creative Markets; this saves on printing costs and helps
prevent unnecessary paper waste.
The reusable shopping bag is both practical and a design object. It
reflects the Market’s policy of no plastic bags and works together with
the recycled paper bag packaging.
External market signage is the physical form of the visual
communication system. It covers the entire exterior wall of the
Wellington Creative Market’s location with painted pieces of wood
displaying stall categories. Despite its large scale it is still flexible,
allowing for pieces to be removed and repainted if necessary, when the
Market stalls change.
reusable shopping bag design
typeface design
packaging design
system design
flyer designs
poster design
09013-asda-594x420.indd 2 20/04/09 10:07 AM
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First: Ching Tan - Aqua Anytime - Swinburne
University
First: Sarah Bowie - Matiu / Somes: The Inhabitants
- Massey University
Commendation: Vicki Runnegar - Outdoor Party
Platter - Griffth University, Queensland College of Art
Second: Liam Mugavin - Evo Book - University of
South Australia
Second: Richard Payne - Chaotic Cuba - Massey
University
Commendation: Serena Holloway - Cradle Alive -
Griffth University, Queensland College of Art
Third: Kate Arnott - System of Visual Communication
for the Wellington Creative Markets - Massey
University
www.design.org.au/asda 8 of 11
Australasian Student Design Awards 2010
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sustainability
The Manhattan Shed is a study in architectural contrasts.
It begins with the contrasting name. Manhattan denotes the glitz and glamour of downtown New York.
Shed is a typically Australian term suggesting an informal outback setting that gathers workers.
The Look from the busy city street is one of both informality and formality.
The informality arises from the fact that the facility is in a basement setting. It has windows onto the street. As
pedestrians walk by they look down into the bar. Being in a subterranean setting, they would perhaps expect a
storage or informal work area. In fact, they view into a warm and hospitable ambience that is highly formalized and
set up to entertain.
From inside, this contrast is expressed further in the creation of a light and dark ambience. Black and white furnishings
are evident. Custom-made dark-coloured chairs are placed alongside light coloured tables. Lighting fittings create a
light and shade environment.
Dark timber partitions with stainless steel mesh inserts enable the basement space to be zoned. This creates formal
seating from informal “standing room” only areas. These contrasts are softened by recycled timber floors. It is
enhanced by brightly coloured bar features and vertical “Manhattan Shed” naming designs.
The Manhattan Shed Bar and Restaurant project highlights sustainability. It
incorporates the fundamental concepts of water management, energy
efficiency, recycled building materials and efficient site management
into each unique project. It incorporates economical building systems and
the use of energy efficient fixtures and fittings. As a result, it provides
direct financial savings on construction costs. This project will address
the environmental aspects such as:
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1. Scheisse exploding light bulb – Norway (Northernlighting.nor)
2. Pendant Light – Shade orange (Designer Lights)
3. Recycle Cast Iron Post – Black (Stepneys Restoration Centre)
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5. Dining Chair with Stainless Steel frame (approx 60% recycled content) and
a recycled engineering grade timber seat and back mouldings – 3D (JR Sit)
6. Dining Table with Teak table top and Stainless steel leg (approx 60%
recycled content) - MDT (JR Furniture)
7. Adolfo Bar Stool with Satin Finish stainless steel leg and black Faux leather seat
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vestibule perspective rendering
The Brief... Is to design a scheme for a resort in North East Thailand. The client has purchased this property with the intention of running it in his
retirement. He is very concerned with current global issues of sustainability and is interested in the local culture. The client has requested that the
scheme encourages a sense of relaxation and wellbeing.
My Concept... Raw Adornment was inspired by a Thai Festival called Loy Krathong, where the tradition is to send afloat a raft made from
banana tree trunks which are decorated with flowers and candles. The raft is symbolic of letting go of all ones grudges, anger and anxiety, so that
one can start life afresh. The client is starting a new phase of his life in a cultural haven, this resort is a place to relax and let go of everyday life.
This conceptual approach is reflected in the furniture selections made from raw materials which have been intertwined to create decorative
elements within the space. The vestibule wall is constructed from sandstone which has been carved to achieve a sense of raw adornment.
The stair rails and ceiling panels are coated with a brass metal finish. It is important to implement environmental controls and systems to ensure
that there is no negative impact on surrounding environments. The limestone and sandstone is supplied by companies who offset where they can
and donate a percentage of their turnover to local and international sustainable organisations.
lounge perspective rendering
thailand resort RAW ADORNMENT
limestone flooring
limestone flooring & pillars
brass finish stair rails & ceiling panels
plan level 1
section
sandstone wall carving
cushion fabric
cushion fabric
cushion fabric
cushion fabric
lounge fabric
Bolito by Kundalini Whitewash Brick Living Stone by Grass Wall by Ustatic Pluto by Kundalini Kirei Board Spiral Island - David Trubridge Existing Flooring Spiral Island - David Trubridge
Smarin Self maintaining humidity substrate Reclaimed sorghum straw
ECO-MAGNIFY
Fingerprints - the individual mark of the designer signifying impact on our
visual and physical spaces. They are a mark of identification with our envi-
ronment and our influence over economical. social and ecological sustain-
ability. Spanish Interior Design Compa-
ny Hadgley & Penderfytt are look-
ing to establish an Australian de-
sign studio in a large older style
Art Deco building in Sydney, NSW.
Their vision is for a fresh identity,
in keeping with the current con-
cern for economical and environ-
mental sustainability. The existing
marble flooring, brick walls, glass
doors and 8 metre high
windows are to be in-
corporated into a new
practical yet stimulat-
ing design concept. All
materials, products and
finishes are to comply
with commercial Aus-
tralian Standards and
reflect strong commit-
ment to ecologically
sustainable, Australian
made and owned prod-
ucts.
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First: Elizabeth Kirkland - Tides Eco Resort - CATC -
The Rocks
Commendation: Thien Nguyen (Nathan) -
Manhattan Shed - RMIT University, School of Design
(TAFE)
Second: Vesna Mlinac - Raw Adornment - TAFE NSW
- Sydney Institute, Design Centre Enmore
Third: Kirby Clark - Eco-Magnify - CATC – Brisbane
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T-4-2 is an environmentally sustainable furniture solution
which consists of a contemporary style low table and
integrated stools.
The design brief identifies the target market as inner city
living requiring furniture solutions which are appropriate
to space constraints and can adapt to meet user needs.
The compact yet versatile table and stools can be
arranged in a variety of ways both when in use or
when in storage. The cushions have been designed
to be stored away within the table when not in use.
Environmentally responsible FSC Certified White Birch
Plywood has been used on edge to create the elegant
lines which sweep across the surfaces before wrapping
around the ends of the table. The repetition of line
was intended to resemble the growth rings of a tree.
The table elements were manufactured using a flat
bed CNC machine. The plywood sheet was cut into rib
like shapes to maximise sheet usage and help minimise
wastage. The ribs were aligned using dowels before
being glued together with non toxic PVA glue.
After sanding it was finished with a combination
of natural oils and waxes.
While the two “pill” shaped cushions made for prototype
use a traditional extra firm foam the intention is to make
future cushions using new environmentally friendly soy-
base foams when they become commercially available.
However, traditional foam can be chipped and recycled
into combination foam sheets at end of life. The stools
are covered in a 100% recyclable upholstered fabric.
Natural biodegradable upholstery fabrics could
also be used as an alternative.
T-4-2
LOW TABLE AND STOOLS
mat i s s e c h ai r
The brief I developed for this project is to provide a seating object for public and private residences suitable
for both indoor and outdoor use, able to be used singularly or as multiples and suitable for relaxation
in comfort away from the hubbub of life.
The inspiration for this piece are the Henri Matisse “gouaches découpés” series produced at the end
of his life. At seventy Matisse was confined to bed by poor health which kept him from painting so instead
he used scissors and different colour paper to create a vivid world of flora and fauna. In his words "You see
as I am obliged to remain often in bed because of the state of my health, I have made a little garden
all around me where I can walk... There are leaves, fruits, a bird"
My “Matisse chair” is designed to be a highly visual organic seating object but with effective underlying
ergonomics and functionality. The contour of the chair wraps around or encloses the human body
within. The 360 degree swivel base and tilting system permit the outlook and orientation to be
adjusted. Like a caring hand or Matisse’s little garden, these features allow the chair to provide
a degree of privacy in private or public areas.
Matisse chair’s construction and materials are designed with sustainability in mind
- the main structure is made as a HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) shell which can
be cost effectively produced using rotational moulding. For outdoor use this creates
a durable, UV resistant object which is easily cleaned and available in multiple colours.
The form of the chair facilitates the addition of cushions or coverings for additional comfort.
The indoor version of the chair would feature the addition to the HDPE shell of open cell flexible
polyurethane foam (FPF) as cushioning with wool fabric upholstery. The lower structure with swivel
base and tilting system is made of steel sheet, steel spring and steel tubing. The HDPE, steel and foam
are recyclable and the fabric is a bio degradable natural material.
First: Jacob Wong - Table & Stools T-4-2 - TAFE NSW
- South Western Sydney Institute, Lidcome College
Second: Alastair Blaine - Cellar Bench - University of
Tasmania
Third: (Alex) Shye Ru Lee - Matisse Chair - TAFE NSW
- South Western Sydney Institute, Lidcome College
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Have you ever had a perfect day?
A shining, sparkling, adventuresome day,
the kind that just smells like a holiday.
Have you ever felt empty? Just …empty.
That cold, sharp feeling that teeters on the
edge of despair.
“The heart of ecological design is not efficiency or
sustainability. It is the embodiment of animating spirit,
the soul of the living world embedded in each one of us
waiting to be reborn and expressed
in what we create and design.” – Sim Van der Ryn
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Delve, for a moment,
into your memoryand come
with me on my journey as I explore my
memories, tell my stories, where I’ve been
and where I’m going. Feel the feelings with
me; look for emotions in lines and colours,
textures and shapes. Explore with me, uncover-
ing the hidden things, the unexpected treasures
waiting to be discovered.
What do I feel?
My perfect day, 2008, 950 silver
Passion, 2008, Tombak, paint
Breathless, 2008, ebony
Van der Ryn, Sim, 2005, Design for Life, Gibbs Smith Publisher, Layton, Utah, p127
When I rub the layers back,
what is underneath is real
- passion and strength
Vertical Landscape
One of the many paradoxes of the
Australian environment is that
only through the destructive na-
ture of fire can the diversity of life
exist. If early European settlers
had learnt from the thousands
of years of knowledge gained by
the Aboriginal people they would
have learnt to appreciate fire as
a means of land management, as
a preventative measure against
high intensity wild fires and as a
means of fauna rejuvenation and
biodiversity of native foods and
plant species.
“Fire has been used as a resource management tool by
Aborigines for many thousands of years, thus many
of the ecosystems encountered by the Europeans had
evolved under a long history of systemic burning…with
a clear adaptation of so many Australian species to peri-
odic fire.”
GOOT, Beth, Fire as an Aboriginal Management Tool in South-Eastern Australia, Conference Proceedings Australian Bushfire Con-
ference, Albury, July, 1999. 31 January 2008 <http://www.csu.edu.au/special/bushfire99/papers/gott/,
The interconnection between
food and fire is a thread that con-
nects both indigenous and non-
indigenous cultures and led to
the inspiration for a series of
candleholders. Fire is a common
element that takes centre stage
for both a fine dinning dinner ta-
ble setting and the bush campfire
alike. There is also a connection
between food and fire with the bio-
diversity of native foods created
when using fire as a land manage-
ment system. The design hopes to
highlight the beauty of both cul-
tures in equal importance to the
overall diversity of the Australian
identity as well as highlighting
the need to understand, accept
and protect what remains of the
Aboriginal knowledge of this envi-
ronment in which we live.
Elements such as repetition and the elongated, verti-
cal forms became the starting point for the design.
Layers of fine sheet metal wrapped around the centre
were etched to create the heavily textured surface.
First: Danielle Butters - I Feel - TAFE NSW - Sydney
Institute, Design Centre Enmore
Second: Joanne Piper - Vertical Landscape - TAFE
NSW - Sydney Institute, Design Centre Enmore
Third: Bibi Locke - Weeds of National Signifcance
Series 2008 - Griffth University, Queensland College
of Art
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First: Fiona James - Fabric Refractions - RMIT
University
www.design.org.au/asda 9 of 11
Australasian Student Design Awards 2010
www.design.org.au/asda 10 of 11
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Before completing your nominations or submitting an entry,
please carefully read these Terms & Conditions.
Submitting an entry indicates that you have read and agree to all
the Entry Terms & Conditions.
Information on the registration and nomination forms and the 1.
prizes themselves form part of them Terms and Conditions.
Entry into this awards program is deemed to be an acceptance 2.
of these Terms and Conditions.
These Terms and Conditions apply to the awards program 3.
Australasian Student Design Awards 2010, commences on 1
September 2009 and ends on in 1 July 2010. The Organiser
may extend the time or otherwise vary the awards program at
any time in its absolute discretion.
This awards program adheres to ICOGRADA’s (International 4.
Council or Graphic Design Association) “Regulation and best
practices for organizing design award competitions best
practice paper”.
The Organiser may cancel the awards program at any time 5.
without prizes being awarded.
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy, currency 6.
and reliability of the information included in this document
and elsewhere. However, changes in content and process may
become necessary at the absolute discretion of the Organiser.
The Organiser accepts no liability for any use of the said content
or reliance placed upon it.
Failure by the Organiser to enforce any of its rights at any stage 7.
does not constitute a waiver of those rights.
The Organiser reserves the right to remove any entry from the 8.
awards program without explanation.
Entry Submissions
Entry is open to design projects created in 2nd Semester 2009 9.
or 1st Semester 2010 from entrants aged 18 years or older as
at the date of entry who are:
Permanent residents of Australia and New Zealand or a.
international students under a Student Visa in Australia and
New Zealand.
Currently studying, full time equivalent or apprentice tertiary b.
courses at a Certifcate III, Certifcate IV, Diploma or Advanced
Diploma or Degree level or graduated from any of these
courses in Semester 2 2009.
Offcers, directors, and employees of the Organiser as well as 10.
those individuals’ immediate family members and the residents
of their household, are not eligible to enter.
To register and nominate entries, Tertiary Institutes must: 11.
Visit the “Register Your School” menu at www.design.org.au/ a.
asda and complete the online process and pay $60 (incl gst)
+ booking fee per entry by 17/3/10.
Judge their students’ overall body of work and select three b.
student projects per category (Interior Design, Interior
Decoration, Exhibition & Display Design, Visual Design,
Furniture Design, Textile Design, Industrial Design, Jewellery
Design and Fashion Design) and submit your Entrant
Nomination Form by email to cbenzie@design.org.au or fax
+61 3 9662 4140 by 1/4/10
Send the Entry Specifcations to your nominated students. c.
In certain circumstances, the Organiser may allow additional 12.
student nominations per tertiary institution.
Tertiary Institutes may not nominate the same students in the 13.
same category in consecutive years. Tertiary Institutes may not
nominate the same students in 2 or more categories annually.
Once nominated, Student or Graduate entrants must: 14.
Create their entry in the following forms: a.
Presentation Board i.
Textile and Fashion Categories: - 1 x A2 foam core board
with light samples and fabric swatches attached.
I - nterior Design, Interior Decoration, Exhibition &
Display Design, Visual Design, Furniture Design,
Industrial Design and Jewellery Design Categories:
1 x A2 coated/laminated 160gsm paper poster with no
samples or fabric samples.
The front of the board must visually demonstrate one -
design project. In under 300words, discuss the project
using the following titles * Original design brief /
problem & * Description of project, design solutions and
sustainable thinking.
The back of the board must list the name of the student, -
title and date of work, tertiary institute and educator’s
name in Arial Font Size 24 on the right hand lower corner.
Digital Files ii.
Soft copy of the Presentation Board in a high resolution -
pdf format on CD/DVD.
File name convention: Category_Surname+First Intial.pdf -
Submit their entry by 4pm, 9/4/10 by the following methods: b.
POST: Design Institute of Australia, ASDA Entry, -
GPO Box 355, MELBOURNE VIC 3001
COURIER/HAND DELIEVERY: -
Design Institute of Australia, ASDA Entry,
Level 1, 175 Collins Street MELBOURNE VIC 3000
Entries must be the entrant’s own unrealized or realized 15.
original design.
Entries may have been previously shown, sold or entered in any 16.
competitions in Australia or overseas.
Entries created using unauthorized, pirated copies of computer 17.
software will not be accepted.
Entries must be the work of one or two students. Group work of 18.
more than two students will not be accepted.
Entries text and diagrams must be legible from at least one meter. 19.
The front of entries must not include indentifying features 20.
including the Entrant’s name, course or institute.
Loose sheets not attached to entries will not be considered 21.
during the judging process.
Entries must be packed according to post offce preferred 22.
guidelines and may not have a frame or heavy attachments
which constitute a handling risk. Secure freight and insurance
costs to be borne by the Entrant.
Entries will be deemed accepted at the time of receipt at the 23.
DIA and not at the time of submission by the entrant.
The Organiser reserves the right, at any time, to verify the 24.
validity of entries and entrants (including an entrant’s identity,
age and place of residence).
The Organiser collects personal information in order to conduct 25.
the Awards Program and may, for this purpose, disclose
such information to third parties, including, but not limited
to, prize suppliers and as required, to Australian regulatory
authorities. Entry is conditional on providing this information.
Unless otherwise advised, the Organiser may also use the
information for promotional, marketing and publicity purposes
www.design.org.au/asda 11 of 11
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including sending electronic messages. Entrants should direct
any request to access, update or correct information to the
Organiser.
All entries (excluding those entered in the Textiles and Fashion 26.
categories) remain the property of the Organiser. Textile and
Fashion entry collection / return enquiries should be directed to
cbenzie@design.org.au
Entrants wishing to cancel their submission are required to 27.
advise the Organiser in writing by email to cbenzie@design.org.au
Pre-selection Process
Prior to judging, a Pre-selection Committee will assess all 28.
entries based on their compliance with Category Descriptions
and these Terms and Conditions. Entries that do not comply will
be deemed disqualifed, will not be exhibited at designEX and
no entry fee refunds will be made.
The pre-selection process will be conducted by an Organiser 29.
appointed Pre-Selection Committee including but not limited to:
Phillippa Rowland, General Manager, Design Institute of a.
Australia
Robyn Potter, Administration & Finance Assistant, Design b.
Institute of Australia
Exhibition
All entries which pass the Pre-selection Process will be 30.
displayed at designEX, Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre
from 22-24/4/10.
The Organiser will endeavor to hang students work according to 31.
their directions however this may not always be possible.
Final Judging, Prizes and Intellectual Property
Final judging for all 9 categories will be conducted by an 32.
Organiser appointed Judging Panel and a Chairperson (who will
have a casting vote and will write a report on the voting results)
at designEX on 22/4/10.
The entries in each of the 9 categories will be judged based on 33.
the following equally weighted criteria:
Sustainability a.
Demonstrated understanding and use of sustainable -
resources
Consideration of economic, social and ecological -
design practices
Concept b.
Clear understanding of the parameters of the original brief -
from tertiary course work
Evidence of research, development and resolution of the -
original brief from tertiary course work
Creativity c.
Innovative ideas translated from conceptual approach -
Effective communication of ideas -
Space / Function / Materials / Technology (where appropriate) d.
Design intent refects and is supported by spatial arrangement -
Demonstrated functional practicality -
Appropriate and innovative selection of materials -
Demonstrated understanding, integration and resolution -
of manufacturing processes
First Prize in each category will be awarded to the entry which 34.
best fulfls the judging criteria. Second Prize in each category
will be awarded to the entry which secondly fulfls the judging
criteria. Third Prize in each category will be awarded to the
entry which thirdly fulfls the judging criteria. The Overall
Winner will be selected from the First Prize category winners
and will be presented with the Australasian Student Design
Award for Excellence.
Judges decisions are fnal and no correspondence will be 35.
entered into in relation to the conduct of the competition, or the
methodology adopted to determine the First, Second and Third
Category Prizes or the Overall Winner.
Where an entry is created by more than one entrant, the prize 36.
will be awarded to the the frst individual named in the entry
form. This individual is solely responsible for sharing the prize
with the other individual involved. The Organiser shall have no
responsibility for or obligation in distributing the prizes to any
person other than the frst individual named on the entry form.
Judging Panel, at its discretion, may withhold the prizes or 37.
divide the total prizes in other proportions.
The Judging Panel’s results will be displayed at the conclusion 38.
of the judging process at designEX on 22/4/10 and
www.design.org.au/asda . All entrants will also be notifed
of the results by mail within two months after the end of the
Awards Program.
Prizes will be mailed directly to winning entrants within two 39.
months after the end of the Awards Program.
Textile and Fashion category winning entries will be 40.
professionally photographed. The Organiser reserves all rights
to use photographic reproductions for publicity purposes.
Prizes, or any unused portion of the prize, are not transferable 41.
or exchangeable and cannot be taken as cash, unless
otherwise specifed.
Multiple DIA memberships that have been awarded for the 42.
same calendar year through DIA National or State programs are
required to be taken concurrently.
Each prize recipient agrees that acceptance, use and enjoyment 43.
of the prize will be undertaken at their own personal risk.
The Organiser anticipates a note of appreciation will be written 44.
by each prize winner to the sponsor of their category by 30/7/10.
Sponsor contact details will be available from the Organiser.
Contact Information
The ASDAs Moderator is Caroline Benzie, National 45.
Program and Event’s Offcer, Design Institute of Australia.
cbenzie@design.org.au T: 1300 888 056 F: +61 3 9662 4140
The Organiser is Design Institute of Australia (DIA) ABN 12 46.
004 412 613 Level 1, 175 Collins Street Melbourne 3000.
www.design.org.au