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Draft Environmental Assessment

State Archive Preservation Facility
202 South Thornton Avenue
Madison, Wisconsin
DFD Project No. 09H2L

Prepared for:
State of Wisconsin
Wisconsin Department of Administration
Division of Facilities Development
December 1, 2014

Draft Environmental Assessment
State Archive Preservation Facility
202 South Thornton Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin
DFD Project Number 09H2L

This report prepared by:
___________________________________
Neil E. Carney, PE
Project Manager

This report reviewed by:
___________________________________
Dennis L. Johnson, PE
Environmental Engineer

5201 E. Terrace Drive, Suite 200
Madison, WI 53718
608.443.1200 • Fax: 608.443.1250
www.AyresAssociates.com
Ayres Associates Project No. 19-0291.30
File: v:\env\final\19029130\09h2l - state archive preservation facility draft ea_final.docx

Contents

Page No.

Introduction .................................................................................................................................. i
EA Process ..............................................................................................................................i
1.0

Description of the Proposed Action...................................................................................1

1.1

Title of Proposed Project ............................................................................................. 1

1.2

Location ....................................................................................................................... 1

1.3

Site Description ........................................................................................................... 1

1.4

Project Purpose and Need (History, Background, Justification) ................................... 2

1.5

Estimated Cost and Funding Source ........................................................................... 7

1.6

Project Schedule ......................................................................................................... 7

2.0

Description of Those Factors in the Human Environment Affected by
the Proposed Action .........................................................................................................8

2.1

Terrestrial Resources .................................................................................................. 8

2.2

Aquatic Resources ...................................................................................................... 8

2.3

Structures .................................................................................................................... 9

2.4

Utilities ......................................................................................................................... 9

2.5

Traffic and Parking ...................................................................................................... 9

2.6

Noise ..........................................................................................................................10

2.7

Recreational Pathways ...............................................................................................11

2.8

Registered Fuel Storage Tank Removal .....................................................................11

3.0

Evaluation of Significant Primary and Secondary Environmental Effects That Would
Result if the Proposal Were Implemented.......................................................................12

3.1

Physical Effects ..........................................................................................................12

3.2

Biological Effects ........................................................................................................12

3.3

Socioeconomic Effects ...............................................................................................13

3.3.1

Social ...................................................................................................................13

3.3.2

Economic .............................................................................................................13

3.4

Bike and Pedestrian Traffic .........................................................................................14

3.5

Noise ..........................................................................................................................14

3.6

Vehicular Traffic..........................................................................................................14

3.7

Utilities ........................................................................................................................15

3.8

Wetlands ....................................................................................................................15

3.9

Flood Plains ................................................................................................................15

3.10

Groundwater...............................................................................................................15

3.11

Protected Plant, Animal, and Fish Species .................................................................16

3.12

Historical.....................................................................................................................16

Page No.
4.0

Brief Study, Development and Description of Reasonable Alternatives to the Proposed
Action and a Brief Evaluation of the Significant Environmental or Other Effects of These
Alternatives ....................................................................................................................17

4.1

No Action/Defer the Proposed Project ........................................................................17

4.2

Alternate Project Locations – State-Owned Properties ...............................................17

4.3

Non-State Owned Properties ......................................................................................19

4.4

Selected Location – 202 South Thornton Avenue .......................................................19

5.0

A Listing of Other Agencies or Groups Contacted and the Comments of and Other
Pertinent Information from these Agencies and Groups..................................................20

6.0

Evaluation of Specific Factors Related to the Proposed Project ..................................... 21

6.1

Stimulation of Secondary (Indirect) Effects .................................................................21

6.2

Creation of a New Environmental Effect .....................................................................21

6.3

Impacts on Geographically Scarce Environmental Features .......................................21

6.4

Precedent−Setting Nature of the Action ......................................................................21

6.5

Significant Controversy Associated with the Action .....................................................22

6.6

Conflicts with Official Agency Plans or Local, State, or National Policy .......................22

6.7

Cumulative Impacts of Repeated Actions of this Type ................................................22

6.8

Foreclosure of Future Options ....................................................................................22

7.0

An Identification and Brief Discussion of Appropriate Alternatives to Proposed Type II
Actions That May Involve Unresolved Conflicts Concerning Alternative Uses of Available
Resources, Including the Alternative of No Action ..........................................................23

7.1

No Action/Defer the Project Request ..........................................................................23

7.2

Unresolved Conflicts Related to Selected Alternative .................................................23

8.0

References .....................................................................................................................24

List of Appendices
Appendix A – Figures
Appendix B – Information Letter and EA Distribution List
Appendix C – Information Letter Public Responses
Appendix D – Site Photographs
Appendix E – Site Soils Map and Descriptions
Appendix F – WDNR Endangered Resources Review Request
Appendix G – SHPO Review Request

List of Tables
Table 2-1 - Summary of Registered Fuel Storage Tanks

List of Figures
Figure 1 - Project Location Map
Figure 2 - Site Map
Figure 3 - Existing Site Plan
Figure 4 - Proposed Site Plan
Figure 5 - Wetland and Wetland Indicators Map
Figure 6 - Floodplain Map
Figure 7 - Summary of Alternative Sites Evaluated Within the CWC Madison Campus
Figure 8 - Alternative Site Location – Tennyson Lane – Lot #1

Glossary of Acronyms
AST
bgs
CGC
CWC
dB
DATCP
DFD
DOA
DSPS
EA
EIS
ERR
ESA
FEMA
HVAC
LBP
LEED
MG&E
MIC
MMHI
MSL
PAHs
RCLs
REC
SAPF
SHPO
UL
USGS
USDA
UST
WDNR
WEPA
WHS
WPDES
WVM

Aboveground Storage Tank
Below Ground Surface
Construction • Geotechnical Consultants, Inc.
Central Wisconsin Center
Decibels
Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection
Division of Facilities Development
Department of Administration
Department of Safety and Professional Services
Environmental Assessment
Environmental Impact Statement
Endangered Resources Review
Environmental Site Assessment
Federal Emergency Management Agency
Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning
Lead-Bearing Paint
Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design
Madison Gas & Electric
Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion
Mendota Mental Health Institute
Mean Sea Level
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
Residual Contaminant Levels
Recognized Environmental Conditions
State Archive Preservation Facility
State Historic Preservation Offices
Underwriters Laboratories
United States Geologic Survey
United States Department of Agriculture
Underground Storage Tank
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
Wisconsin Environmental Policy Act
Wisconsin Historical Society
Wisconsin Pollutant Discharge Elimination System
Wisconsin Veterans Museum

Introduction
The State of Wisconsin Department of Administration (DOA) Division of Facilities Development
(DFD) retained Ayres Associates to prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the State
Archive Preservation Facility (SAPF) to be constructed at 202 S. Thornton Avenue in Madison,
Wisconsin. Refer to Appendix A, Figures 1 and 2 for the project location and site map of the
project. The EA has been prepared in accordance with the Wisconsin Environmental Policy Act
(WEPA) and Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter ADM 60 to determine whether an
Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required for the project.

EA Process
The WEPA compliance process began in February 2013 with authorization by the DFD to
prepare an EA. An Information Letter to solicit input on potential impacts of the project was
submitted to potentially interested agencies and groups on July 9, 2013. A copy of the
Information Letter and the distribution list for parties that received the Information Letter and this
Draft EA are included as Appendix B. Responses received for the Information Letter from
interested parties are included as Appendix C.
The Draft EA was made available on December 1, 2014, for a 15-day public review period.
Copies of the Draft EA were made available at the Central Branch of the Madison Public Library
and online at www.ayresprojectinfo.com/StateArchiveFacility_EA.
All comments should be received no later than 6:30 p.m., December 16, 2014, and sent to:
Neil E. Carney, PE
Ayres Associates
5201 E. Terrace Drive, Suite 200
Madison, WI 53718
carneyn@ayresassociates.com
A public meeting on the Draft EA is scheduled for December 16, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. in the
St. Croix Conference Room on the 1st Floor of the Wisconsin DOA Building located at 101 East
Wilson Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53703. The meeting is open to the public and will be
attended by representatives of the DOA, DFD, Wisconsin Historical Society (WHS), Wisconsin
Veterans Museum (WVM), and Ayres Associates. Information and comments derived from the
meeting and throughout the public comment period will be reviewed to determine whether an
EIS is required for the project.
The following subsections provide information required by ADM 60 to evaluate whether this
project is a major action that will significantly affect the quality of the human environment, or is a
proposed course of action which involves unresolved conflicts concerning alternative uses of
available resources.

i

1.0

Description of the Proposed Action

1.1

Title of Proposed Project
State Archive Preservation Facility
DFD Project # 09H2L

1.2

Location
Address: 202 South Thornton Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin, 53703
County: Dane
Political Town: City of Madison, Wisconsin

1.3

Site Description
The 202 South Thornton Avenue parcel is a 5.10-acre developed parcel that is the
current site of the DOA Central Services Building. This building is currently vacant and
previously housed the Department’s Enterprise Document Services, Mail Distribution
Services, and Central Fleet Operations.
The parcel contains a total of five discrete buildings and paved parking and drive areas.
Some grassy areas and a tree-lined buffer exist along the eastern and northern property
boundaries, respectively. The Yahara River Bike Path is present along the eastern
parcel boundary and the Yahara River beyond, which is a bike/pedestrian path on the
west side of the Yahara River which extends from Lake Mendota to Lake Monona, and
provides bike/pedestrian underpasses at East Johnson Street and East Washington
Avenue. The Capital City Trail is present along the southern parcel boundary, which is a
17-mile bike trail that meanders around and through the heart of Madison. South
Dickinson Street is present along the western boundary of the parcel, and an active
railroad spur is present along the northern parcel boundary.
Refer to Appendix D for photographs of site features of both the project and adjacent
areas.
The topography in the project area is relatively flat with a slight slope towards the Yahara
River to the north at the north end of the project site. The site high point is at
approximate elevation 854 ft. Mean Sea Level (MSL) at the approximate center of the
parcel, to a low point of 851 ft. MSL at the north end of the parcel adjacent to the Yahara
River Bike Path. Finished floor elevation of the proposed facility is currently estimated at
elevation 856 ft. MSL.
Soils in the project area are mapped on the United States Department of Agriculture
(USDA) – Web Soil Survey as predominantly Colwood silt loam (Co) across the majority
of the site (81% of the land area), and Batavia silt loam, gravelly substratum, 2 to 6
percent slopes (BbB) across a narrow area along the eastern boundary of the site
(approximately 19% of the land area). The Colwood silt loams consist of poorly drained
soils on relict lakebed depressions. Parent materials are stratified silt and fine sand
lacustrine deposits. A typical profile includes silt loam, loam and stratified fine sand to silt
loam. The Batavia silt loams consist of well drained soils on outwash plains. Parent
materials are deep loess over loamy outwash. A typical profile includes silt loam, silty

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clay loam, gravelly clay loam, and gravelly coarse sand. A soil map and descriptions are
included in Appendix E.
A geotechnical investigation conducted by Construction • Geotechnical Consultants, Inc.
(CGC) was completed at the proposed project site in April 2012. A total of six standard
penetration test soil borings were drilled to depths ranging 20 to 40 feet below grade.
Results of the geotechnical investigation revealed the subsurface soils to generally
consist of a 2- to 12.5-foot layer of non-engineered fill consisting of sand, gravel, clay,
cinders, glass and similar materials, followed by a 0- to 3.5-foot layer of medium to stiff
lean clay, followed by a 6.5- to 20.5-foot loose to very dense sand, gravel, or silt layer.
CGC concluded weathered sandy dolomite bedrock and/or cobbles were encountered at
the terminus of each boring. Groundwater was encountered at depths of 8 to 10 feet
below the existing ground surface.
Additional geotechnical investigation activities were completed by CGC in May 2013 to
collect supplemental data to assist with determining floor slab loading support
requirements for future construction. A total of eleven soil borings were performed to
depths ranging from 12 to 15 feet bgs. Soils in borings consisted of relatively thin layers
of clayey sand and sandy clay extending to 6 to 8 feet bgs, with underlying sand strata
extending to the depth of each boring.

1.4

Project Purpose and Need (History, Background, Justification)
The primary users of the proposed facility are the WHS and WVM. A brief history/
background for each organization is provided below.
History/Background – Wisconsin Historical Society
The WHS, founded in 1846, moved to the current headquarters location at 816 State
Street, Madison, Wisconsin, in 1900. The WHS serves as the State of Wisconsin’s
trustee for preserving state and national history and is required to make the history
accessible to the public. Its broad mandate requires WHS to collect both documents and
artifacts that embody Wisconsin and American history and to protect, preserve, and
maintain access to the collections.
Currently, the WHS stores library materials, archive materials, and museum artifacts at
the headquarters building and in leased space. More than 50 percent of the
headquarters building is used for collection storage. The estimated value of collections
stored at WHS headquarters is over $1.116 billion.
The collection storage space at the current WHS headquarters is inefficient and does not
have the appropriate environmental conditions for the storage of museum, library, and
archive materials. In addition, it does not meet current or future needs for these
programs nor does it meet the American Association of Museum Stewardship
Guidelines. The majority of library and archive shelving is old, low density, lacks
flexibility, and is built into the structure. The existing facility space also limits the size of
objects that can be added to the museum collections. In addition, collections are
jeopardized due to lack of proper environmental conditions (controlled temperature,
humidity, lighting, etc.) and security. Intake and processing of museum collections are at
high risk of water damage because the operations occur in basement spaces that

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include steam piping, and are beneath surface parking lot areas. The lack of space has
also resulted in museum exhibits being prepared in storage aisles.
As a result of these conditions, the WHS has reduced collection acquisitions; decreased
the volume of archives; utilized space that does not provide adequate preservation;
stopped the collection of large objects; transferred objects back to historic sites; and has
refused archeological collections. The current conditions jeopardize the current and
future storage operations of the WHS.
History/Background – Wisconsin Veterans Museum
The WVM was established in 1901 as the Grand Army Memorial Hall. For 90 years, the
museum was located at the State Capital Building and occupied 6,000 square feet of
space. The museum has been located at 30 West Mifflin Street since 1993, and contains
more than 32,000 square feet of storage, reference, exhibit, and office space on the
ground, basement, second and third floors. Although the collection is irreplaceable, the
estimated value of the collections stored at the current location is over $18,000,000 for
museum artifacts, archives, and exhibits. The museum has been accredited by the
American Association of Museums since the 1970s which requires adherence to strict
standards of artifact care and environmental conditions.
Overall, the existing building and its environmental systems comply with building codes
and storage standards. However, recent moisture and leakage problems related to the
building envelope have threatened the museum collections. HVAC mechanical piping
failures have resulted in water leaks above the suspended ceiling. Water issues have
caused permanent damage and loss of material stored at the museum.
Due to existing space constraints, the museum currently leases 1,000 square feet of
warehouse space for large artifacts and display equipment. Approximately 85 percent of
the museum’s exhibit design and installation is outsourced. Lack of space has caused
the museum to become more selective, thereby turning away potential acquisitions. The
museum estimates that storage and processing space needs will significantly increase in
coming years due to the passing of the World War II generation, a renewed interest in
the history of the Vietnam War, and the return of service members from current conflicts.
Project Description and Justification
The current WHS, Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs, and WVM preservation
and storage spaces are inadequate, older facilities with insufficient space/volume, and
lack the necessary building infrastructure and support services such as efficient bay
spacing and storage systems. The current spaces have leaking piping, do not have
appropriate environmental conditions (temperature and humidity controls), and lack the
necessary security measures for storage of museum, library, and archival materials.
These inefficiencies have resulted in damages to existing artifacts/collections, reduced
collection acquisitions, reductions to the volume of archives, and have restricted the size
of objects that can be added to the museum collections. Additional damages to existing
collections are probable unless improved environmental conditions are provided.
The State Archive Preservation Facility will serve as an enterprise solution to protect,
preserve, and safeguard the valuable collections and artifacts that embody Wisconsin

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and American history. This new facility will address the inefficiencies in storage space
and allow for storage of collections and artifacts in a controlled and secure environment.
The building design will follow sustainable design principles, meet the State’s energy
efficiency standards, and seek the equivalent of Leadership in Energy & Environmental
Design (LEED) Silver. The facility’s HVAC systems and corresponding space
environmental controls will be designed to meet the special conservation and
preservation needs of the archive and museum collections.
The facility will be constructed on State-owned property located at 202 S. Thornton
Avenue. The DOA Central Services Building will be demolished as part of the proposed
project. This site was selected after evaluation of several State-owned and non-Stateowned parcels in the Madison area and its selection is a product of a cooperative
partnership between the City of Madison and the State of Wisconsin.
The 202 S. Thornton Avenue site is the preferred location due to its proximity to WVM,
WHS, and UW-Madison; because it would allow for a viable repurposing of the current
site and demolition of the existing building; because of the availability of public
transportation; and because the proposed use is consistent with city zoning code.
General Overview – State Archive Preservation Facility
The facility has a total of 188,733 square feet that includes a four-story archive
preservation wing, a two-story processing wing, and a centrally located support space.
The archive preservation wing will house library material, archive materials, and
museum artifacts from the WHS and WVM, and will serve as a support facility to their
museum functions. The archive preservation wing utilizes specialized storage shelving
systems that will be flexible and adaptable to meet the changing and growing needs of
the tenant agencies and will allow ease of access and retrieval of stored materials. The
processing wing includes work areas, administrative functions, and specialized archive
preservation space. These wings are supported by centrally located space that includes
areas for receiving and the mechanical equipment. The total footprint of the building will
be 61,820 square feet.
Main access to the facility will be at the southeastern corner of the property via Thornton
Avenue. A fire lane will be present along the western property boundary, which will be
accessible from Dickinson Street. This fire lane will lead to a loading dock entry on the
north side of the building. An equipment area will be located to the northeast of the
loading dock. A landscaped area will exist at the western end of the property and will be
slated for future expansion if needed.
There will be an 8-stall visitor parking area at the main entrance, and a 25-stall staff
parking area, both of which will be located along the southern property boundary.
A Native American Indian ceremonial ground will be located at the northeast corner of
the property.
Refer to Appendix A, Figures 3 and 4 for the existing and proposed site plans for the
proposed facility.

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Landscaping/Plantings
A landscaped area will be present along the south side of the building between staff and
visitor parking areas, as well as in front of the visitor parking spaces. The Native
American Indian ceremonial grounds will incorporate a berm with denser plantings
surrounding the area. A landscape buffer is planned for the area between the ceremonial
grounds and the equipment area/loading dock on the north side of the facility. The area
along the west end of the project site will be landscaped as a natural meadow area.
Groundcover adjacent to the building along west and north service drives will be sod.
Trees will be planted along the length of the southern property boundary between the
facility and the Capitol City Bike Path, and along the east property boundary between the
facility and the Yahara River Bike Path. The landscape buffer between the ceremonial
grounds and the equipment area/loading dock will also include new tree plantings. The
proposed landscaping will utilize indigenous tree and shrub species.
Additional Site Amenities
Outdoor seating will be provided near the building entrance and patio. Bicycle racks will
also be provided for visitors and employees of the facility.
Security
Security for the facility will be provided as a multi-layered system; initial access into the
building followed by controlled access into the various interior secure areas of the
building. As this facility is a joint-use facility for two user Agencies, some areas are
shared spaces while others will be Agency-specific access only. The main storage space
will be subdivided into Agency and department-specific access areas.
The objective of the security system is to provide protection of entrances via card
access, video capture, motion detection, and intrusion detection at the exterior doors.
Internal card access will be utilized to limit access to the secure areas off the corridors.
Storm Sewer and Stormwater Control
The roof drain and storm sewer system will be routed through a stormwater
management system via stormwater catch basins and underground detention storage
facilities before connecting into the existing City of Madison storm sewer system which is
ultimately directed north to the Yahara River. The stormwater management systems
have been designed considering potential future expansions to the State Archive
Preservation Facility, and will accommodate the full build-out of the site.
The stormwater system design will meet the quantity and quality requirements of
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) NR 151.
Stormwater management design for the project will meet WDNR new development
requirements. Stormwater infiltration structures are not proposed due to the
environmental conditions present within the site soils. The project is expected to reduce
the amount of impervious surface currently residing within the project area from 92% to
68%.

5

Due to site soil disturbance greater than 1-acre, a Wisconsin Pollutant Discharge
Elimination System (WPDES) permit will be prepared for the project. As part of the
permit process a stormwater management plan and an erosion control plan will be
prepared.
Sanitary Sewer
The use of existing service laterals will be explored with the City of Madison and private
utility providers. The plumbing of the facility will comply with the building codes and the
DFD Design Guidelines.
Potable and Fire Protection Water Supply
Water supply for the building and fire protection will come from the existing City of
Madison 6-inch water main in the vacated Wilson Street right-of-way (bike path) along
the south of the property. Testing has been done which verified that there is sufficient
pressure and capacity in the system to serve the building.
There are sufficient existing fire hydrants around the property perimeter to meet the City
of Madison Fire Department requirements. No additional fire hydrants will need to be
added to the site.
Electrical
Primary electrical service to the new building will come from existing power (Madison
Gas & Electric [MG&E]) lines running north-south along the vacated Thornton Avenue
bike path at the east perimeter of the site. A new transformer will be set on the north side
of the building.
Site Lighting
The site lighting will consist of primarily of pole-mounted lighting for parking and drive
lanes supplemented by building-mounted lighting at entrances and site exits and lowlevel bollard lighting at building entrance walkways.
Fire Protection
The building will be protected by a sprinkler system. Sensitive work and storage areas
will utilize a pre-action dry-pipe system with general areas protected by a wet sprinkler
system. The pre-action system will consist of the following:


Each pre-action zone will have a valve alarmed and activated by heat and
smoke detectors
An air compressor to pressurize piping
A nitrogen generator to keep the piping system free of moisture and
microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) issues

The fire alarm system will be an Underwriters Laboratories (UL) approved, addressable
and multiplexed fire detection and alarm system. The system will consist of a fire alarm
control units, alarm initiating devices, alarm notification appliances, control devices,
supervisory devices, door holders, battery power supply, wiring, and necessary
6

accessories for interface and control functions with the building sprinkler system and
HVAC systems.
The system will be capable of transmitting and receiving addresses and data between
the fire alarm control panels and the addressable devices. The audible/alarm
communication speaker system will provide automatic pre-recorded sound.
Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)
The primary mechanical systems include central chilled water refrigeration systems,
variable volume desiccant dehumidification air conditioning systems, central hot water
heating systems, and central clean steam boilers for humidification systems, and
desiccant reactivation. Room and zone controls include hot water reheat as well as zone
humidification, and variable volume or constant volume controls, depending on the
specific zone control needs.
Natural Gas Supply
The building will be provided with natural gas service from MG&E. The use of existing
service laterals will be explored with the City of Madison and private utility providers. All
building mechanical systems including steam and hot water boilers are planned to
operate off natural gas.
Emergency Power System
A standby emergency generator will supply electrical power to Emergency and Optional
standby systems including freeze protection equipment. The generator will be located on
the north side of the building adjacent to the loading dock area. The generator will have
a self-contained diesel fuel storage tank mounted below and will be contained within a
manufacturer supplied sound attenuation enclosure. The generator distribution
equipment will be located in a separate room with a 2-hour fire rating.

1.5

Estimated Cost and Funding Source
The estimated total project cost is $46,723,700, funded with a combination of General
Fund Supported Borrowing and Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

1.6

Project Schedule
Start of Demolition
Start of Construction
Substantial Completion

April 2015
June 2015
June 2017

The proposed project schedule calls for construction to commence in June 2015 with
substantial completion anticipated in June 2017. The noted schedule is tentative.
Demolition duration is expected to be a minimum of 9 weeks. Construction duration is
anticipated to be 24 months from commencement through substantial completion.

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2.0

Description of Those Factors in the Human Environment
Affected by the Proposed Action

2.1

Terrestrial Resources
Site development for construction of the facility will include building demolition, removal
of brush, trees, and grassy vegetation; excavation, trenching, and grading for building
construction; utility trenching and installation and landscaping on the project site. It is
expected that minimal soil will be removed from the site, and excavated materials will be
used where possible to balance fill areas. The minor existing trees scrub and brush will
be removed and the site manipulated to facilitate building and pavement construction
and to facilitate stormwater drainage. New trees and landscaped areas will be added to
the project location as part of the construction process.
The site will be graded to allow for positive drainage away from the building. Erosion
control measures will be implemented in accordance with WDNR technical standards for
construction within and around the perimeter of the construction zone. The construction
zone will be limited to the smallest possible size in order to minimize disruption of site
soils.
The stormwater system will be designed to meet the quantity and quality requirements of
the WDNR. Stormwater infiltration structures will not be constructed; however, the
proposed project and subsequent future expansion are expected to reduce the amount
of impervious surface currently residing within the project area.
Review of historical Sanborn fire insurance maps compiled during a Phase I
Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) (Ayres Associates, June 2013) identified
recognized environmental conditions (RECs) primarily related to the historical operation
of electric motor and machine manufacturing companies, including a machine shop,
paint shop, brass foundry, and loading/unloading activities from adjacent railroad spurs.
Additional information sources also indicated the former presence of transformers,
storage tanks, and historical releases. Based on analytical data collected from soils at
the site during a Phase II ESA, (Ayres Associates, July 2013) management of impacted
soil will be required in order to successfully reduce potential impacts to human health
and the environment and fulfill substantive requirements of Chapter 720, Wis. Admin.
Code. The majority of the site contains a layer of fill material from 0-3 feet below ground
surface (bgs) which demonstrates discoloration and contains polycyclic aromatic
hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals which exceed Residual Contaminant Levels (RCLs) for
direct exposure and protection of groundwater.

2.2

Aquatic Resources
Aquatic resources are not located within the boundaries of the project site. The Yahara
River is located immediately adjacent to the project site, within 100 feet of the eastern
parcel boundary. The Yahara River flows to Lake Monona to the east-southeast.
Because water quality and erosion control measures will be in place during and after
construction, it is unlikely that these aquatic resources will be affected by the project.
There are no surface water features (streams, lakes, etc.) within the perimeter of the

8

project site. In addition, wetland features were not readily observable within the project
area during a site walkover performed on February 15, 2013.
Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 151 includes performance standards for construction
sites and post construction sites. The standards are intended to protect water quality by
minimizing the amount of sediment and other non-point source pollutants that enter
waterways. The standard regulations for construction site erosion control call for the
limitation of sediment, so that there is a reduction of 80 percent of the sediment load
carried in runoff as compared to no sediment or erosion control measures.

2.3

Structures
Existing structures currently present within the project site will be demolished prior to
construction. The phasing for the demolition of existing structures has not yet been
determined. Existing concrete materials will be ground onsite to be utilized as fill for the
new facility, or disposed off-site. Materials including, but not limited, to structural steel,
piping, and siding will be salvaged and appropriately managed by a recycling contractor.
All other materials will be disposed offsite by the demolition contractor. The open parking
areas currently residing on the west and east ends of the project site will be utilized as
staging areas during demolition. It is anticipated the western boundary of the site will be
used as the staging area during facility construction.
Potentially hazardous materials including lead-bearing paint (LBP) and asbestos will be
removed by a certified contractor during demolition, and disposed in accordance with
applicable state and federal regulations. Inspection and/or testing will be required by a
licensed contractor prior to (or during) demolition to identify, segregate, and dispose of
hazardous materials.

2.4

Utilities
Existing utilities on-site will be disconnected prior to commencement of demolition
activities. The use of new service laterals will be explored with the City of Madison and
private utility providers. The proposed project utilities will include some or all of the
following utility systems: roof drain/storm sewer, potable water/fire protection, sanitary
sewer, natural gas, electric, site lighting, and telecommunications.

2.5

Traffic and Parking
During construction, traffic will access the facility from the existing drive entries from the
Thornton Avenue cul-de-sac at the southeast corner of the project site. Public access to
historical documents and materials will continue to be provided at the downtown WHS
and WVM facilities. Transportation of collections and or artifacts between the existing
facilities and the new facility will occur approximately 1-2 times daily using a large
commercial moving van. The western access driveway via South Dickinson Street will
serve as a fire lane and service entrance for deliveries and other service vehicles.
Completion of the project will result in a long-term decrease in traffic in the vicinity of the
subject property. The total number of employees which travel by vehicle to the property
each day will decrease as the DOA Central Fleet Services is no longer operational.

9

2.6

Noise
Although demolition and construction will occur during permitted hours, the increase in
noise will be mitigated where possible by the use of muffling equipment. Noise may
temporarily affect local communication and pose a short-term nuisance to nearby
recreational users, residents, and local workers.
Demolition duration is expected to be a minimum of 9 weeks. Construction duration is
anticipated to be 25 months from commencement through substantial completion. Noise
during demolition and construction activities will be of short duration with hours of
operation between 7:00 AM and 5:00 PM. Demolition and construction work will target
compliance with the applicable ordinances.

Source: U.S. Report to the President and Congress on Noise, February 1972

The chart above lists typical peak operating noise levels from construction equipment at
a distance of 50 feet, grouping construction equipment by mobility and other operating
characteristics. Earth moving equipment of limited size will be used for this project due to
the site constraints. Residual noise levels in an outdoor residential setting are 44

10

decibels (dB) during the daytime, and 40 dB during the evening (U.S. Senate, February
1972).

2.7

Recreational Pathways
There are no anticipated changes to the adjacent Yahara River Bike Path or the Capital
City Trail (East Wilson Street Bike Path) during demolition and construction, or following
construction completion. Both pathways will be maintained in their current configuration
and will not be altered as a result of this project, during or after construction.

2.8

Registered Fuel Storage Tank Removal
The following four registered storage tanks are currently present at the facility and will
require appropriate decommissioning prior to site demolition activities.
Table 2-1 – Summary of Registered Fuel Tanks
DATCP Tank ID
202106
273019
802273
1232029

Type
AST
UST
AST
AST

Contents
E-85
Unleaded Gasoline
Waste Oil
Diesel

Size
1,000 gallons
10,000 gallons
280 gallons
10,000 gallons

Product will be required to be pumped from fuel storage tanks prior to removal. All tanks
and underground piping related to the tanks will be required to be drained, cleaned,
purged of vapors, removed, and properly disposed/salvaged. Following removal, the
excavations/areas will be inspected, analyzed, and backfilled (as required) to match
surrounding topography. A Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer
Protection (DATCP) Certified underground storage tank (UST) site assessor will be
required for completion of Form ERS-8951, and for appropriate documentation of site
closure in accordance with Wisconsin Administrative Code, Chapter ATCP 93.

11

3.0

Evaluation of Significant Primary and Secondary
Environmental Effects That Would Result if the Proposal
Were Implemented

3.1

Physical Effects
Physical effects from the project are primarily related to removal of existing structures
and pavements, disturbance of soil, and change of grades. Physical changes to the site
will not encroach on or impact adjacent properties except as a change on visual aspects
from surrounding areas. Excavation will be required to construct the building footings,
utilities, and other subsurface aspects.
Grading will be required because the site is currently developed, and the first floor
elevation of the new building will be higher than that of the existing ground elevations. In
order to accommodate required first floor design elevations, approximately 18,000 cubic
yards of fill material will be utilized at the site.
A beneficial effect of the proposed action will replace portions of the existing developed
areas and hard surfaces with vegetated areas. The project is expected to reduce the
amount of impervious surface currently residing within the project area from 92% to
68%. As such, surface water infiltration at the site will be increased compared to existing
conditions. The additional planned landscaped areas will be a positive aesthetic
improvement over existing conditions.
Excavation and closure of registered fuel storage tank locations, removal of asbestos
containing material, removal of LBP, and capping of impacted soils will provide a
beneficial impact as a result of the project. Exposure to these materials and potential
adverse effects to facility users and environmental receptors will be minimized due to the
physical changes at the site.

3.2

Biological Effects
Biological effects as a result of the project include increased green space as depicted in
the proposed site plan (Appendix A, Figure 4). The short-term biological impacts as a
result of the project are the loss of native grasses, scrub vegetation, and some existing
trees in order to accommodate demolition of existing structures and construction of the
proposed facility. Construction of the facility will result in an increase in permeable area,
due to the increased green space at the eastern property boundaries, and the decreased
footprint of paved areas including parking, driveways, and walkways.
Trees along the perimeter of the property boundary will remain intact to the extent
practicable. Trees and shrubs removed during site demolition will be replaced as part of
the proposed site plan shown in Appendix A, Figure 4.
The removed structural and vegetative features provide habitat for birds and small
mammals typically encountered in similar urban environments. Loss of these site
features will be off-set, in-part, by the provisions included in the proposed landscaping
plan. New trees planted on site will be selected to be indigenous to the project

12

environment, and match species found in adjacent properties, where appropriate.
Portions of the project site will be planted with native or low maintenance vegetation.

3.3

Socioeconomic Effects
3.3.1

Social

When construction is completed, the project will result in a beneficial social impact by
providing a facility for long-term storage and preservation of artifacts and archival
materials with historical significance. This facility will allow for the proper preservation of
existing artifacts as well as enable the collection of additional materials that could not
currently be considered because of size and/or space constraints. The facility will also
provide a beneficial social impact by enabling visitors and staff to learn and study the
artifacts well into the future as a result of the increased lifespan in the improved storage
conditions. Authorized public access to the artifacts and exhibits will also be improved.
The reduced size and design of the building will represent an aesthetic change in view to
local residents, drivers, and pedestrians who observe this stretch of South Dickinson
Street, Thornton Avenue, and adjacent recreational pathways, which are otherwise
surrounded by mid to high intensity mixed residential and commercial properties. The
use of high-quality building materials will provide a long-term, durable, and modernlooking building.
The facility will incorporate a Native American Traditional Care Room to accommodate
requests of the Wisconsin Intertribal Repatriation Committee for space to care/handle
boxed human remains, funeral objects, and other sacred objects. In addition, there will
be an indoor receptacle to hold ceremonial embers during prayers and rituals. An
outdoor fire pit has been incorporated into the design with appropriate seating
arrangements for ceremonial prayers and rituals. These features will accommodate
improved access to sacred objects and facilitate continued practice of Native American
traditions.
3.3.2

Economic

Short-term beneficial economic effects include employment and retention of design,
architectural, and construction team members. In addition, there will be a positive impact
to the local and regional retail community resulting from purchase of food, lodging, fuel,
equipment, and supplies during the construction phase.
Short-term expenses include costs for the design, existing building demolition, and
construction of the facility which is inclusive of site development costs including site
grading, and utilities construction.
Currently, there is a commitment of financial resources in the amount of $46,723,700
which will be funded using General Fund Supported Borrowing and Program Revenue
Supported Borrowing. Based upon a January 2011 study titled “The Impact of
Construction on the Wisconsin Economy” (C3, Jan. 2011), every $1 spent directly on
construction projects produces an overall economic impact of approximately $1.92.
Therefore, the commitment of $46,723,700 may generate over $89 million in total
economic impact. The same January 2011 study states that every $1 million spent
directly on construction projects generates about 17 jobs throughout the economy.
13

Therefore, this project may generate over 794 full time positions during the course of
demolition and construction activities.
The facility will be staffed with 13 full-time employees and 13-part-time employees. The
majority of full-time positions will be transferred from existing WHS and WVM facilities.
The current part-time workers consist largely of no-cost staff that volunteer their time in
support of the WHS and WVM. The part-time positions will also be transferred from
existing WHS and WVM facilities.
Long-term maintenance expenses are anticipated for the operation of the facility. Costs
associated with equipment, parts, and labor during upkeep of the facility infrastructure
will be incurred over time. Additionally, the operational costs to supply electricity and
natural gas to the facility will be incurred by the DOA and are estimated to be
approximately $304,554 per year. Discrete costs associated with storage and upkeep of
materials (e.g. shelving, transport costs, storage containers) will be incurred (and
funded) separately by WHS and WVM due to their tenant status.
Once all materials are transferred from existing WVM storage areas, the museum will no
longer need to lease 1,000 square feet of warehouse space for large artifacts and
display equipment.

3.4

Bike and Pedestrian Traffic
Pedestrian and bicycle access at the perimeter of the project area via the Yahara River
and Capitol City bike trails will not be adversely impacted, other than short-term noise
during demolition and construction activities.

3.5

Noise
Short term noise impacts will occur during the demolition and construction period. Major
demolition and construction elements that will produce elevated noise levels include
structure removal and materials hauling, equipment and material delivery, excavating,
grading, and landscaping. Anticipated noise will most directly impact those individuals
recreating, living or working near the project, including near-by residents of residential
neighborhoods to the east and south, workers associated with the commercial properties
to the west, and recreational users of the bike trails to the east and north.
Ongoing existing noise from the site includes normal operation and use of the facility,
and a low volume of vehicular and pedestrian traffic to the facility; however, the
operation of the new facility should not result in an increase in vehicular or pedestrian
traffic and will likely result in a decrease in traffic compared to current levels. Since the
current operations will no longer be housed on this parcel, it is anticipated that vehicular
and pedestrian traffic will decrease, resulting in a long-term decrease in associated
noise levels.

3.6

Vehicular Traffic
During demolition and construction, local traffic may be temporarily impacted. These
impacts will be due to construction equipment, materials delivery, and minor increases in
traffic volume from construction workers and, therefore, will be of short duration. Care

14

will be taken to limit these impacts to the extent possible and to keep emergency access
lanes clear.
Completion of the project will result in a long-term decrease in traffic in the vicinity of the
subject property which is a beneficial effect to the surrounding properties and nearby
residents. The total number of employees which travel by vehicle to the property each
day will decrease as DOA Central Fleet Services is no longer operational at the current
location.

3.7

Utilities
Development of this project will not have an adverse impact on surrounding service for
existing utilities or service providers. Project utilities will include some or all of the
following utility systems: roof drain/storm sewer, potable water/fire protection, sanitary
sewer, natural gas, electric, site lighting, and telecommunications.

3.8

Wetlands
Impacts to wetlands are not anticipated. The nearest recorded wetlands are located at
the Tenney Park Lagoon located northwest of the project site, and at the source (Lake
Mendota) of the Yahara River also northwest of the project site.
According to the WDNR Surface Water Data Viewer, wetland indicator soils exist across
the majority of the project site with exception to the eastern project boundary. Refer to
Appendix A, Figure 5 for the Wetland and Wetland Indicators Map for the geographical
area near the project site.

3.9

Flood Plains
Impacts due to flooding and/or floodplains are not anticipated. According to Federal
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Flood Plain maps, the project site is not
located within a flood plain (WDNR, 2012). Refer to Appendix A, Figure 6 for the
Floodplain Map for the geographical area near the project site.

3.10 Groundwater
The majority of the site contains a layer of fill material from 0-3 feet bgs which
demonstrates dark discoloration and contains PAHs and metals which exceed RCLs for
direct exposure and protection of groundwater. Potential options to be considered for
management of soil include on-site placement with engineered barrier layer (e.g.
foundations, roadways/sidewalks, soil barrier) and off-site disposal for potentially
hazardous material. On-site management will be conducted in compliance with
requirements detailed in NR 718, Wis. Admin. Code. Management of soil in this manner
is anticipated to have a beneficial long term effect on groundwater as the potential for
percolation of surface water through impacted soils, and transport into groundwater, will
be reduced.

15

3.11 Protected Plant, Animal, and Fish Species
Impacts to protected plant, animal, and fish species are not anticipated as a result of this
project.
An Endangered Resources Review (ERR) request was submitted to the WDNR on
July 9, 2013, to gather data for threatened, endangered, and/or special concern species
that may be located in the general area or impacted directly by the project. Refer to
Appendix F for the ERR request that was submitted to WDNR.
A response (ERR Log #13-568) was received from the WDNR on July 12, 2013.
According to WDNR, there may be threatened or endangered flora and fauna species
that are located within or around the project area.
The ERR response indicates that specific actions in the form of erosion and siltation
controls will need to be taken in order to comply with state and/or federal endangered
species laws for protection of aquatic species in the vicinity of the project site. Specific
actions will not need to be conducted for protection of flora and fauna, as suitable habitat
for these species is not expected to be present in the project area.

3.12 Historical
A request for review of potential archaeological and historic features or sites was
received by the State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPO) on June 27, 2013. A
response from SHPO on July 2, 2013, indicates that there are no historic properties that
may be affected by the proposed project at the subject property. Results of a search
within the Wisconsin Architecture & History Inventory for the site, as submitted in the
SHPO review request, are included in Appendix G.

3.13 Railroads
An active railroad line operated by Wisconsin Southern Railroad exists along the
northern boundary of the site. Due to the proximity of the railroad line, the following
provisions and/or actions will be implemented as part of construction:

A temporary construction fence will be installed along the railroad a minimum of
15 feet from the tracks.

The railroad will need to be notified when the demolition work is within 25 feet of
the tracks. The railroad will be contacted at least 3 days prior to the beginning of
demolition work.

The need for a railroad flag person will be determined prior to the start of
construction.

DOA will communicate with the railroad throughout construction and provide information
on construction schedule and work hours.

16

4.0

Brief Study, Development and Description of Reasonable
Alternatives to the Proposed Action and a Brief Evaluation
of the Significant Environmental or Other Effects of These
Alternatives
The DOA conducted analysis of several alternative sites for construction of the proposed
facility, which included both private/commercial off-site and State-owned locations. The
following subsections describe the alternatives analysis, including the “no action”
alternative for the project.

4.1

No Action/Defer the Proposed Project
This is not a viable alternative since it would not address the needs of the WHS or WVM
as determined through the insufficient condition and function of the existing storage
facilities. Deferring the project at this time does not meet the purpose and need of the
users and, as such, is not a viable alternative.

4.2

Alternate Project Locations – State-Owned Properties
4.2.1 Vacant Parcel – Oregon, Wisconsin
A State-owned vacant parcel near the Oakhill Correctional Facility in Oregon, Wisconsin,
was evaluated for potential construction of the proposed project. This site was not
selected due to access issues for students, staff, and visitors.
4.2.2 Vacant Parcel – Verona, Wisconsin
A State-owned vacant parcel near Verona, Wisconsin, was evaluated for potential
construction of the proposed project. This site was not selected due to access issues for
students, staff, and visitors.
4.2.3 Existing State-owned Buildings
None of the existing State-owned buildings in the Madison area (either vacant or in use)
are feasible for retrofitting the required environmental controls and/or do not have
necessary structural requirements to support the proposed project functions/
4.2.4 Central Wisconsin Center (CWC) Campus
The Central Wisconsin Center (CWC) in Madison is a State-owned facility for the
developmentally disabled. The campus encompasses 200 acres on the northern shore
of Lake Mendota. The campus contains the Mendota Mental Health Institute (MMHI).
Constructed in 1860, this facility was built by the State as one of its earliest institutions.
During an initial site selection process for the proposed project conducted in 2011, four
sites on the CWC Madison Campus were considered for the location of the State
Archive Preservation Facility. The rationale for elimination of each property from
consideration is discussed below.

17

CWC Parcel #1 – Not Selected
During the site selection process, MMHI and CWC comments indicated that selection of
construction of the new facility on this parcel would negatively impact the neighborhood
and was not sufficiently buffered from the adjacent properties. The WHS Museum
Archeology Program indicated that this parcel is in an area just north of the Mendota
State Hospital Mounds. Early surveyors mentioned the presence of additional Native
American mounds north of the mapped mounds. Surface indications of the mounds are
lost but the subsurface area is believed to be intact. The site was not investigated
further.
Original CWC Parcel #2 – Not Selected
During the evaluation process, CWC indicated that long-term plans for the facility
identified this parcel as a residential play area. The official name of the area is Katherine
Wells Park. If a facility were to be built near this parcel, CWC requested relocation to the
south towards a more open area. They also requested development of a separate
entrance for the facility than what is currently used by the CWC, and asked that a tree
line buffer be kept.
CWC Parcel #3 – Not Selected
During the evaluation process, MMHI/CWC indicated that selection of this parcel would
impact their current entrance, underground tunnel, and mechanical distribution;
therefore, this parcel was not acceptable.
CWC Parcel #4 – Not Selected
During the evaluation process, MMHI/CWC indicated that selection of this parcel for
construction of the new facility would be too disruptive to residences where backyards
opened directly into the new facility. MMHI preferred to keep the natural buffer between
MMHI and the neighborhood. Therefore, MMHI suggested shifting the proposed
boundaries to the west. The WHS Museum Archaeology Program research indicated
that Parcel #4 was just east of a complex of small Native American habitation sites. One
of these habitation sites is eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. For these
reasons, the shifting of the proposed boundaries of Parcel #4 to the west was not
investigated further.
Relocated CWC Parcel #2 – Not Selected
CWC recommended relocating parcel #2 to a new location. This location was 402 Troy
Drive located on the CWC campus. Following selection, the WHS Museum Archeology
Program was contracted for a Phase 1 Archeology Survey of the relocated parcel.
Archeologists reviewed the historic literature and records for relocated Parcel #2. The
records did not indicate that there were any archeological resources on the new site.
Next, an archeology survey of plotted/grid diggings was performed. There were no
findings of pre-contact Native American artifacts. Modern/historic artifacts were noted as
inadvertent discard and not representative of an archaeological site. The survey found
that the area was farmed in the past so many of the recovered items were broken into
shards because they had been in a plow zone.
The DOA initially selected the relocated Parcel #2 as the proposed building site.
However, local citizens indicated a concern regarding the proposed facility at this
location. The site was subsequently eliminated from consideration.

18

4.3

Non-State Owned Properties
In 2011, the DOA evaluated Lot #1 of the Tennyson and Packers Avenue property, a
privately held property located at the north-west corner of Tennyson Lane and Packers
Avenue in Madison Wisconsin. The Tennyson parcel Lot #1 is 9.81 acres in size with
731 feet of frontage on Tennyson Lane and 586 feet of depth. Refer to Appendix A,
Figure 8 for information regarding the property.
Approximately 14 abandoned industrial buildings with unknown history are currently
located on the Tennyson site. A mature line of trees lines the Tennyson frontage and a
loose natural wood is present on the western edge of the site and neighboring property.
The neighboring properties to the south are single family homes, to the east is a
residential trailer park, to the north is farm field, and to the west is an elementary school
set in a natural wooded site. Given the apparent previous industrial uses, there is the
possibility of hazardous contamination both within the buildings as well as the soils
below. The demolition of existing buildings falls under Conditional Use in the local
Zoning Code and will require Plan Commission review and approval and special
permitting.
An evaluation of Lot #1 was conducted to determine potential site development costs for
the proposed facility, and to determine any building design implications of placing the
facility on the existing privately-owned site. The site evaluation was conducted based
upon an existing real estate sales property description, a certified property survey map,
a partial zoning map, a topographic map, and a site plan with the proposed building
placement on Lot #1. The evaluation provided the following conclusions:

Redesign of the facility would be required due to steeper topography and site
features.

There are too many “unknowns” regarding existing conditions at the site.

There are relatively high and undefined site development costs. A rough-order-of
magnitude cost of $3,701,676 was determined for site development at the Tennyson
Lane parcel based on existing information available for the site.

Based on the evaluation process, the site was not selected due to the above-listed
factors.

4.4

Selected Location – 202 South Thornton Avenue
This site was selected after evaluation of several State-owned and non-State-owned
parcels in the Madison area and its selection is a product of a cooperative partnership
between the City of Madison and the State of Wisconsin. The 202 S. Thornton Avenue
site is the preferred location due to its proximity to WVM, WHS, and UW-Madison,
because it would allow for a viable repurposing of the current site and demolition of the
existing building, because of the availability of public transportation, and because the
proposed use is consistent with city zoning code.

19

5.0

A Listing of Other Agencies or Groups Contacted and the
Comments of and Other Pertinent Information from these
Agencies and Groups
An Information Letter regarding the proposed project was sent to the following agencies
or groups for comment:
State Agencies






Wisconsin Department of Administration, Division of Facilities Development
Wisconsin Department of Administration, Division of Facilities Management
Wisconsin Veterans Museum
Wisconsin Historical Society
Wisconsin Historical Museum
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
State Historic Preservation Offices

Federal Agencies

U.S. Fish and Wildlife

Dane County

Dane County Department of Planning & Development

City of Madison



City of Madison Common Council
Department of Planning, Community & Economic Development Planning Division
Zoning Administrator
Mayor’s Office

Elected Officials


State of Wisconsin Governor
State of Wisconsin – 76th Assembly District
State of Wisconsin – 26th Senate District

Design Architect/Engineers

Enberg Anderson, Inc.

Community Contacts

Friends of Yahara Parkway
Marquette Neighborhood Association

A copy of the Information Letter and a detailed distribution list are included in
Appendix B.
20

6.0

Evaluation of Specific Factors Related to the Proposed
Project

6.1

Stimulation of Secondary (Indirect) Effects
There are no significant adverse secondary effects anticipated at the property address
as a result of the proposed project. Stormwater runoff will be managed in accordance
with WDNR standards. There are no threatened and/or endangered species which are
likely to be impacted. Following completion of construction, noise, emissions, and traffic
will not be significantly increased at the site.
There are potential long-term secondary economic effects in the immediate vicinity of the
existing project location due to the reduction in number of potential patrons to local
businesses. Conversely, the local businesses in the new tenant locations will potentially
experience an influx of new customers due to the increased number of patrons in the
immediate area.

6.2

Creation of a New Environmental Effect
The action alters the environment so a new physical, biological, and socioeconomic
environment or effect will exist, as described below.

6.3

Physical – Existing building demolition, new building construction, new paved
surfaces, site grading, and additional landscaping will create a new physical
environment or effect.

Biological – The site is inhabited by small mammals and birds which would be
temporarily displaced during demolition of existing facility. Upon completion, the
footprint for paved surfaces will be reduced as compared to current state, which will
increase the overall amount of green space at the facility. Proposed landscaping
including trees and other flora will allow for birds and other wildlife to inhabit the site
following initial displacement during construction.

Impacts on Geographically Scarce Environmental Features
The environmental features that exist at the project site are not geographically scarce,
as the majority of the site is developed with site structures and paved areas. The
presence of threatened and/or endangered species is improbable due to lack of suitable
habitat, and there are no registered wetlands present on the property.

6.4

Precedent−Setting Nature of the Action
The decision to build the project is not precedent-setting in nature. Construction and use
of the proposed facility uses readily available materials and utilities, and is consistent
with the current zoning and utilization of the current State-owned property.

21

6.5

Significant Controversy Associated with the Action
Based on general project discussions to date, responses from potentially interested
agencies and parties during distribution of the Information Letter, and the unanimous
outcome at the November 10, 2014, City of Madison Planning Commission Meeting,
there does not appear to be controversy associated with this action.

6.6

Conflicts with Official Agency Plans or Local, State, or National Policy
This action does not appear to conflict with official agency plans or any local, state, or
national policy. The demolition of the current facilities and the construction of the
proposed facility are consistent with the current zoning and utilization of the current
State-owned property.

6.7

Cumulative Impacts of Repeated Actions of this Type
Repeated actions of this type should not result in major or significant cumulative
impacts. Sustainable features consistent with LEED principles are incorporated into the
facility design. State of Wisconsin and WDNR requirements for stormwater runoff and
fugitive dust control will be implemented at the site. Trees removed during construction
will be replaced by additional quantities and similar types of trees as part of the
landscaping plan. There are no adverse impacts to the available amount of green space
for future construction due to the fact that existing properties and buildings will be
repurposed for use by the new tenants.

6.8

Foreclosure of Future Options
This action does not eliminate future options at the site.

22

7.0

An Identification and Brief Discussion of Appropriate
Alternatives to Proposed Type II Actions That May Involve
Unresolved Conflicts Concerning Alternative Uses of
Available Resources, Including the Alternative of No Action

7.1

No Action/Defer the Project Request
This is not a viable alternative since it would not address the needs of the WHS or WVM
as determined through the insufficient condition and function of the existing storage
facilities. Deferring the project at this time does not meet the purpose and need of the
users and, as such, is not a viable alternative.

7.2

Unresolved Conflicts Related to Selected Alternative
This site was selected after evaluation of several State-owned and non-State-owned
parcels in the Madison area and its selection is a product of a cooperative partnership
between the City of Madison and the State of Wisconsin. The 202 S. Thornton Avenue
site is the preferred location due to its proximity to WVM, WHS, and UW-Madison,
because it would allow for a viable repurposing of the current site and demolition of the
existing building, because of the availability of public transportation, and because the
use is consistent with city zoning code.
Based on evaluation of existing data, there are no known unresolved conflicts regarding
selection of the project site and/or facility. There has been extensive data research
during preparation of this EA regarding physical, biological, environmental, historical,
and socioeconomic conditions and potential effects on the human environment as a
result of the project.
Data evaluation, discussions during project development, responses received from
distribution of the Information Letter issued as part of this EA process, and the
unanimous outcome of the November 10, 2014, City of Madison Planning Commission
Meeting, indicate no controversy or unresolved conflicts regarding the site selection, or
implementation of the project.

23

8.0

References
Ayres Associates Inc, Phase I Environmental Site Assessment Report, DFD 09H2L –
202 South Thornton Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin. June 2013.
Ayres Associates Inc, Draft Phase II Environmental Site Assessment Report, Central
Services Facility, 202 South Thornton Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin. July 2013.
C3 Statistical Solutions, Inc., The Impact of Construction on the Wisconsin Economy.
January 2011.
CGC, Inc., Preliminary Geotechnical Exploration, Preservation Storage Facility, 202 S.
Thornton Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin. May 22, 2012.
CGC, Inc., Supplemental Geotechnical Exploration, Preservation Storage Facility, 202 S.
Thornton Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin. May 22, 2013.
Engberg Anderson, Design Report Appendix, State Archive Preservation Facility – DFD
#09H2L. July 5, 2013.
MSR Maps, United States Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5’ Topographic Quadrangle
Maps.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) Web
Soil Survey.
U.S. Report to the President and Congress on Noise, February 1972. 92nd Congress,
Senate Document No. 92-63.
Wisconsin Administrative Code. Chapter ADM 60. Madison, Wisconsin.
Wisconsin Administrative Code. Chapter NR 151. Madison, Wisconsin.
Wisconsin Administrative Code. Chapter NR 720. Madison, Wisconsin.
Wisconsin Administrative Code. Chapter SPS 305. Madison, Wisconsin.
Wisconsin Administrative Code. Chapter ATCP 93. Madison, Wisconsin.

24

Appendix A
Figures

Approximate Location of
Project Site

Source: USGS, Madison,
Wisconsin, United States ,
01 Jul 1983

Figure 1
Project Location Map
State Archive Preservation Facility
202 S. Thornton Avenue
Madison, Wisconsin 53703-3037

Approximate Location of
Project Site

202 S. Thornton Avenue
DOA Central Services Facility

Source: Bing Maps

Figure 2
Site Map
State Archive Preservation Facility
202 S. Thornton Avenue
Madison, Wisconsin 53703-3037

Environmental Assessment
Wisconsin Department of Administration
DFD Project No. 09H2L
State Archive Preservation Facility
202 S. Thornton Avenue
Madison, Wisconsin 53703-3037

Source: Topographical Survey, State of Wisconsin Document Sales Building, Date 10/15/2012

Figure 3 – Existing Site Plan

Environmental Assessment
Wisconsin Department of Administration
DFD Project No. 09H2L
State Archive Preservation Facility
202 S. Thornton Avenue
Madison, Wisconsin 53703-3037

Source: 09H2L - State Archive Preservation Facility, Sheet C200 , FR, Site Plan, Dated 5/16/2014

Figure 4 – Proposed Site Plan

Wetland Indicators Map - State Archive Preservation Facility

Figure 5

Legend

Approximate Location of Project Site

0

850

1700

2550 ft.

Map created on Sep 5, 2012

Wisconsin Wetland Inventory (WWI) maps show graphic representations of the type, size and location of wetlands in Wisconsin. These maps have been prepared from the analysis of high altitude imagery in conjunction with soil surveys, topographic maps, previous wetland inventories and field work. State statutes
define a wetland as "an area where water is at, near or above the land surface long enough to be capable of supporting aquatic or hydrophytic vegetation and which has soils indicative of wet conditions." The principal focus of the WWI is to produce wetland maps that are graphic representations of the type, size and
location of wetlands in Wisconsin. Within this context, the objective of the WWI is to produce reconnaissance level information on the location, type, size of these habitats such that they are accurate at the nominal scale of the 1:24,000 (1 inch = 2000 feet) base map. The DNR recognizes the limitations of using
remotely sensed information as the primary data source. They are to be used as a guide for planning purposes. There is no attempt, in either the design or products of this inventory, to define the limits of jurisdiction of any Federal, State, or local government or to establish the geographical scope of the regulatory
programs of government agencies. Persons intending to engage in activities involving modifications within or adjacent to wetland areas should seek the advice of appropriate Federal, State, or local agencies concerning specified agency regulatory programs and jurisdictions that may affect such activities. The most
accurate method of determining the legal extent of a wetland for federal or state regulations is a field delineation of the wetland boundary by a professional trained in wetland delineation techniques.

Scale: 1:8,862

Floodplain Maps - State Archive Preservation Facility

Figure 6

Legend

Approximate Project Location

0

275

550

825 ft.

This map is a user generated static output from an Internet mapping site and is for general
reference only. Data layers that appear on this map may or may not be accurate, current, or
otherwise reliable. THIS MAP IS NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION.

Scale: 1:2,910

Figure 7
CWC Campus
Alternatives

Environmental Assessment
State Archive Preservation Facility
202 S. Thornton Avenue
Madison, WI

Tennyson and Packers Avenue |

Figure 8

Madison, Wisconsin

FOR SALE
19.6
ACRES

21.6 PER CSM

LOTS 1&2 OF CSM

ZONED M-1

Price

Dane County
Regional
Airport

ed
c
u
d
Re

.
0
0
0
,
5
9
1
$2,
$2,995,000.
Features:

For further information
contact:
Thomas Keller*
T 608-227-6543
F 608-255-5005

City of Madison
Zoned M-1

Ext. 101

Thomas@KellerRealEstateGroup.com
*Broker owned.

Close to Dane County Regional Airport
Utilities to site
Also available as two lots
(call for pricing)

www.KellerRealEstateGroup.com
448 West Washington Avenue

. Madison, WI . 53703

This information has been secured from sources we believe to be reliable, but we make no representations or warranties, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy of
the information. References to square footage or age are approximate. Buyer must verify the information and bears all risk for any inaccuracies. K0170027

Appendix B
Information Letter and EA Distribution List

July 9, 2013

Re:

Environmental Assessment
State Archive Preservation Facility
202 S. Thornton Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin
DFD Project Number: 09H2L

The State of Wisconsin Department of Administration (DOA) Division of Facilities Development
(DFD) has retained Ayres Associates to prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the
State Archive Preservation Facility proposed for construction at 202 S. Thornton Avenue in
Madison, Wisconsin. The EA will be prepared in accordance with the Wisconsin Environmental
Policy Act (WEPA), and Wisconsin Administrative Code, Chapter ADM 60. An initial part of the
EA process is to contact potentially interested parties regarding the project. The comments
received from these parties will be considered during preparation of the EA to determine
whether an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required for the project. Because you, your
agency, or your group may have an interest in the project, we are inviting you to participate in
the process.
Project Description and Justification
The current Wisconsin Historical Society (WHS) and Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs,
Wisconsin Veterans Museum (WVM) preservation and storage spaces are inadequate, older
facilities with insufficient space/volume, and lack the necessary building infrastructure and
support services such as efficient bay spacing and storage systems. The current spaces have
leaking piping, do not have appropriate environmental conditions (temperature and humidity
controls), and lack the necessary security measures for storage of museum, library, and archival
materials. These inefficiencies have resulted in damages to existing artifacts/collections,
reduced collection acquisitions, reductions to the volume of archives, and have restricted the
size of objects that can be added to the museum collections. Additional damages to existing
collections are probable unless improved environmental conditions are provided.
The proposed State Archive Preservation Facility will serve as an enterprise solution to protect,
preserve, and safeguard the valuable collections and artifacts that embody Wisconsin and
American history. This new facility will address the inefficiencies in storage space and allow for
storage of collections and artifacts in a controlled and secure environment.
The new facility has a total of 188,733 square feet that includes a four-story archive
preservation wing, a two-story processing wing, and a centrally located support space. The
archive preservation wing will house library material, archive materials, and museum artifacts
from the WHS and WVM, and will serve as a support facility to their museum functions. The
archive preservation wing utilizes specialized storage shelving systems that will be flexible and
adaptable to meet the changing and growing needs of the tenant agencies and will allow ease
of access and retrieval of stored materials. The processing wing includes work areas,
administrative functions, and specialized archive preservation space. These wings are
supported by centrally located space that includes areas for receiving and the mechanical
equipment. The total footprint of the building will be 61,820 square feet.
The building design will follow sustainable design principles, meet the State’s energy efficiency
standards, and attain the equivalent of Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED)
Silver. The facility’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and
File: v:\env\final\env. project files\19029100\dfd 09h2l ea info ltr.docx

Project: 19-0291.00

1802 Pankratz Street ● Madison, WI 53704-4069 ● 800.800.5191 ● www.AyresAssociates.com

State Archive Preservation Facility
Environmental Assessment
July 9, 2013
Page 2

corresponding space environmental controls will be designed to meet the special conservation
and preservation needs of the archive and museum collections.
The proposed facility will be constructed on State-owned property located at 202 S. Thornton
Avenue in Madison, Wisconsin. The DOA Central Services Building is currently located on the
5.10-acre site and the existing building will be demolished as part of the proposed project. This
site was selected after evaluation of several State-owned and non-State-owned parcels in the
Madison area and its selection is a product of a cooperative partnership between the City of
Madison and the State of Wisconsin.
The 202 S. Thornton Avenue site is the preferred location due to its proximity to WVM, WHS,
and UW-Madison, because it would allow for a viable repurposing of the current site and
demolition of the existing building, because of the availability of public transportation, and
because the proposed use is consistent with city zoning code.
The proposed project schedule calls for construction to commence in May 2014 with substantial
completion anticipated in June 2016. Figures depicting the proposed site location maps and the
proposed site plan are provided with this letter.
EA Schedule
The Draft EA report will evaluate the potential environmental effects of the project in accordance
with WEPA guidelines. As part of our standard EA process, Ayres Associates will perform
research using available databases and resources to collect information pertaining to the
potential effects of the project on the human environment. The Draft EA report will be made
available to the public for a 15-day comment period anticipated to start in August 2013
depending on project design and input status. A notice will be published in state and local media
to announce the availability of the Draft EA and the beginning of a 15-day comment period.
Though not required, a public meeting will be held during the public comment period. You will
receive notification of the meeting date, time, and location once it is scheduled. Following
completion of the public comment period, the Draft EA will be reviewed, all public comments will
be considered, and a final determination will be made as to whether an EIS is required for the
project.
Comment Period
Because you, your agency, or your group might be interested in potential environmental effects
associated with this project, we would like to invite you to comment on this proposed project.
Comments may be submitted using the attached form and mailed or e-mailed by July 24, 2013,
to the following contact for consideration during the EA process:
Neil Carney, PE
Project Engineer
Ayres Associates Inc
1802 Pankratz Street
Madison, WI 53704
carneyn@ayresassociates.com

State Archive Preservation Facility
Environmental Assessment
July 9, 2013
Page 3

Thank you for your interest in this important project.
Ayres Associates Inc

Neil Carney, PE
Project Engineer
NEC:sem
Enclosures

RESPONSE FORM
Environmental Assessment Process
State Archive Preservation Facility
202 S. Thornton Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin
DFD Project Number: 09H2L

I have the following comments regarding potential environmental effects of this project:
[Please write comment here. Attach additional pages if necessary.]

Please complete the following information and sign if submitting comments:
Name:
Title/Representing:
Address:
Telephone Number:
E-mail Address (optional):
Signature:
I am interested in continuing my involvement in the public participation components of
this project. Please continue to send me project notices.
I am NOT interested in continuing my involvement in the public participation of this
project. Please do NOT continue to send me project notices.
Please return this form by July 24, 2013, to:

Neil Carney, PE
Ayres Associates Inc
1802 Pankratz Street
Madison, WI 53704
carneyn@ayresassociates.com

State Archive Preservation Facility - Site Location Map 1

City of Madison
Downtown Isthmus

Engberg Anderson & SmithGroupJJR

State Archive Preservation Facility - Site Location Map 2
202 S. Thornton Avenue
Frontage on Thornton Ave.
and Dickenson St.
5.10 acres

Engberg Anderson & SmithGroupJJR

State Archive Preservation Facility - Concept Site plan
Native American Indian
ceremonial grounds with
berm/denser plantings
surround

EXISTING RAILROAD

Existing trees to remain

Existing tree to remain

26’ wide fire lane

More formal landscape area/raised planter

Loading Dock

Natural
landscaping/
Meadow

Extension of river
landscape

Processing Rooms

Archival Preservation
Space
Mechanical Room

Staff Entry More formal landscape area

Main
Entry

8 visitor spots

26 staff parking spots
26’ wide fire lane

Salvaged brick paving/
reused brick as sub base for paving

EAST WILSON STREET BIKE PATH

Remove service
lane
Existing trees to remain

Engberg Anderson & SmithGroupJJR

E PATH
RIVER BIK

S. DICKINSON STREET

Landscape buffer between
loading dock and Native
American Indian area
YAHARA

Loading
Dock
Entry

Equipment
area

Environmental Assessment (EA) Document Distribution List
State Archive Preservation Facility
202 S. Thornton Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin

M - mailed a hard copy; M* - mailed a notice of availability; E - emailed an electronic copy or website notice; ND - not distributed

DFD Project #09H2L

Contact Name
Organization
State Government Agency Contacts
Bill Napier, Proj. Manager
Dept. of Administration, Division of Facilities Development
Keith Beck
Dept. of Administration, Division of Facilities Management
Cindy Torstveit
Dept. of Administration, Division of Facilities Management
Michael Telzrow
Wisconsin Veterans Museum
Paul Bourcier
Wisconsin Historical Society
Kate Easton
Wisconsin Historical Society
Ellsworth Brown
Wisconsin Historical Society
Wisconsin Historical Museum - Museum Director & WHS Native
Jennifer Kolb
American Liaison

State

Zip

Madison
Madison
Madison
Madison
Madison
Madison
Madison

WI
WI
WI
WI
WI
WI
WI

53702
53703
53703
53707-7843
53706
53706
53706

30 North Carroll Street

Madison

WI

US Fish & Wildlife Service

2661 Scott Tower Drive

Amanda A. Cushman

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources - EA Specialist

3911 Fish Hatchery Road
3911 Fish Hatchery Road

County Agencies
Todd Violante

Dane County - Dept. of Planning & Development, Director

210 Martin Luther King Jr., Blvd.

City of Madison
Alder Marsha A. Rummel
Steve Cover
Katherine Cornwell
Bill Fruhling
Matt Tucker
Anne Monks
Nick Zavos

City of Madison Common Council
Director, Dept. of Planning, Community & Economic Development
Director, Planning Division
Planning Division
Zoning Administrator
Mayor's Office
Mayor's Office

210
215
215
215
215
215
215

Elected Officials
Office of the Governor
Rep. Chris Taylor
Sen. Fred Risser

State of Wisconsin
State of Wisconsin - 76th Assembly District
State of Wisconsin - 26th Senate District

115 East State Street
State Capitol, Room 306 West
State Capitol, Room 130 South

Design Architect(s)/Engineer(s)
Paul Lourich
Jim Brown
Mark Ernst

Engberg Anderson, Inc.
Engberg Anderson, Inc.
Engberg Anderson, Inc.

320 E Buffalo St
305 West Washington Avenue
320 E Buffalo St

Local Libraries
Madison Public Library

Central Branch

126 S Hamilton St

Community Contacts
Ed Jepsen

Friends of Yahara Parkway

Todd Jensen

Marquette Neighborhood Association - President (2013)

410 Russell St.

Michael Jacob

Marquette Neighborhood Association - Vice President (2013)

1808 Rutledge St.

Lynn Lee

Marquette Neighborhood Association - President (2014)

Colleen Hayes

Marquette Neighborhood Association - Vice President (2014)

Federal Government Agencies
Pete Fasbender
State Agencies
Russ Anderson

Address Line 1

Address Line 2

City

101 E. Wilson Street
101 E. Wilson Street, 7th Floor
101 E. Wilson Street, 7th Floor
30 West Mifflin Street
816 State Street
816 State Street
816 State Street

PO Box 7866

Martin
Martin
Martin
Martin
Martin
Martin
Martin

Luther
Luther
Luther
Luther
Luther
Luther
Luther

King
King
King
King
King
King
King

Jr.
Jr.
Jr.
Jr.
Jr.
Jr.
Jr.

Blvd
Blvd.
Blvd.
Blvd.
Blvd.
Blvd.
Blvd.

Email Address

Document Distribution
Info Letter Draft EA

bill.napier@wisconsin.gov
keith.beck@wisconsin.gov
cindy.torstveit@wisconsin.gov
michael.telzrow@dva.state.wi.us
paul.bourcier@wisconsinhistory.org
kate.easton@wisconsinhistory.org
ellsworth.brown@wisconsinhistory.org

M/E
M/E
M/E
M/E
M/E
M/E
ND

M/E
M*/E
M/E
M*/E
M*/E
M*/E
M*/E

53703

jennifer.kolb@wisconsinhistory.org

M/E

M*/E

New Franklin WI

54229

greenbay@fws.gov

E

M*/E

Fitchburg
Fitchburg

WI
WI

53711
53711

russell.anderson@wisconsin.gov

Amanda.Cushman@Wisconsin.gov

E
E

E
E

Room 116

Madison

WI

53703

violante@countyofdane.com

E

M*/E

Room 417
Rm. LL100
Rm. LL100
Rm. LL100
Rm. LL100
Rm. 403
Rm. 403

Madison
Madison
Madison
Madison
Madison
Madison
Madison

WI
WI
WI
WI
WI
WI
WI

53703
53703
53703
53703
53703
53703
53703

district6@cityofmadison.com
scover@cityofmadison.com
Kcornwell@cityofmadison.com
WFruhling@cityofmadison.com
Mtucker@cityofmadison.com
Amonks@cityofmadison.com
nzavos@cityofmadison.com

M/E
E
E
E
E
E
E

M*/E
M*/E
M*/E
M*/E
M*/E
M*/E
M*/E

P.O. Box 8953
P.O. Box 7882

Madison
Madison
Madison

WI
WI
WI

53702
53708
53707

govgeneral@wisconsin.gov
Rep.Taylor@legis.wisconsin.gov
Sen.Risser@legis.wisconsin.gov

M/E
M/E
M/E

M*/E
E
E

Milwaukee
Madison
Milwaukee

WI
WI
WI

E
ND
ND

ND
E
E

Madison

WI

ND

M

E

E

M/E

ND

M/E

ND

ND

E

ND

E

2nd Floor

5th Floor
5th Floor

Apt. 2

53202-5883 paull@engberganderson.com
53703
jimb@engberganderson.com
53202-5883 marke@engberganderson.com

53703

Madison

WI

53704

Madison

WI

53704

edjepsen1950@gmail.com
President@marquette-neighborhood.org
toddwjensen@yahoo.com
VicePresident@marquette-neighborhood.org
michaeljacobdc@gmail.com
President@marquette-neighborhood.org
toddwjensen@yahoo.com
VicePresident@marquette-neighborhood.org
michaeljacobdc@gmail.com

Page 1 of 1

Appendix C
Information Letter Public Responses

Carney, Neil
From:
Sent:
Subject:
Attachments:

govgeneralreply@wisconsin.gov
Tuesday, July 09, 2013 12:20 PM
Message from Governor Scott Walker
OriginalMessage.txt

Thank you for your e‐mail message.  I welcome you expressing your views and concerns to me, and I commend you for 
participating in your state government.  I take into account the views of all of the citizens of Wisconsin, and I will keep 
your specific comments in mind during my service as your Governor. 
 
If you would like more information about my positions on issues, or would like to read my public statements on issues, I 
encourage you to explore my website: www.walker.wi.gov.  I like to respond individually to every letter and telephone 
call I receive; however, I cannot respond to each e‐mail individually due to the volume.  If your request is time sensitive, 
please call my office at (608) 266‐1212. You may also write to me via conventional mail at Governor Scott Walker: PO 
Box 7863, Madison, WI 53707. 
 
As noted on our website, please know that any communications may be subject to release under Wisconsin's public 
records law and that our policy is generally to release communications sent to this email address. 
 
Once again, thank you for contacting me. Please feel free to contact me again if I can ever be of assistance to you. 
 
Sincerely, 
 
Scott Walker 
Governor 
 

1

Carney, Neil
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:

Cushman, Amanda A - DNR <Amanda.Cushman@wisconsin.gov>
Tuesday, July 09, 2013 12:59 PM
Carney, Neil
Heggelund, Eric P - DNR; Anderson, Russell A - DNR; Bleser, Catherine A - DNR
09H2L - State Archive Preservation Facility EA

Good afternoon Mr. Carney‐ 
 
I am writing to inform you we have received your letter regarding the preparation of a Draft Environmental Assessment 
(EA) covering the State Archival Preservation Facility.  I wanted to provide my contact information to you since I will 
serve as your point of contact for this EA. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or concerns.  
We thank you for including our Department during the planning phase of your document and look forward to working 
with as it develops further. 
 
Amanda A. Cushman 
EA Specialist 
3911 Fish Hatchery Road 
Fitchburg, WI 53711‐5397 
 
*  Amanda A. Cushman 
Environmental Analysis and Review Specialist South Central Region Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources 
(*) phone:      (608) 275‐3485 
(*) fax:                        (608) 275‐3338 
(*) e‐mail:     Amanda.Cushman@Wisconsin.gov 
Website: dnr.wi.gov 
Find us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/WIDNR<http://www.facebook.com/WIDNR> 
 
 
 

1

Attachment to Wisconsin Historical Society Comments Document

The Wisconsin Historical Society (WHS) is not aware of any adverse impact this project will
have on the environment. WHS fully supports this State of Wisconsin/Department of
Administration project. The project will repurpose and enhance the appearance of the site, and
will greatly benefit the preservation and use of State-owned resources.

Greg Parkinson
July 24, 2013

Appendix D
Site Photographs

08/xx/2010

08/xx/2010

Photo 1: Looking west at existing fuel island and existing
ethanol AST.

Photo 2: Looking southeast at Central Services Building
along South Dickinson Street.

08/xx/2010

Photo 3: Looking north along South Dickinson Street.
Note southwest corner of Central Services Building is
visible.
DFD Project No. 09H2L - State Archive Preservation Facility

08/xx/2010

Photo 4: Looking east along Capitol City Trail.

08/xx/2010

Photo 5: Looking west along Capitol City Trail. South
end of property boundary on right.

08/xx/2010

Photo 7: Looking south at Thornton Avenue entrance.
East side of existing building is visible on right.
DFD Project No. 09H2L - State Archive Preservation Facility

08/xx/2010

Photo 6: Looking northwest at entrance via Thornton
Avenue cul-de-sac.

08/xx/2010

Photo 8: Looking west at existing parking lot on north
side of property.

08/xx/2010

Photo 9: Looking west along existing railroad tracks
located on north end of property boundary.

08/xx/2010

Photo 10: Looking east at north parking lot.

08/xx/2010

Photo 11: Overhead door located on north side of
building.
DFD Project No. 09H2L - State Archive Preservation Facility

08/xx/2010

Photo 12: Looking west along railroad tracks.

Appendix E
Site Soils Map and Descriptions

89° 21' 29''

89° 21' 48''

(State Archive Preservation Facility Project Area)

307640

307680

307720

307760

307800

307840

307880

307920

307960

308000

308040
43° 5' 20''

4773360

Ya
ha
ra
Th

nt

on

Av

Ri

ve
r

e

oS

t

4773320

St

C

4773280

n
er

t

Co

D

4773240

N

th
or

4773240

4773280

W
i nn

eb

ag

4773320

n
ai
M

or

4773360

43° 5' 20''

in

k
ic
n
so

Ca

BbB

S

ll C

t

ey

Ct

Ro
ge

w
De

4773160

4773160

W
illi

am

so

n

St

4773200

we

4773200

t

nt

rs

4773120

4773120

St

43° 5' 10''

43° 5' 10''

±

307680

307720

307760

307800

307840

307880

Map Scale: 1:2,090 if printed on A size (8.5" x 11") sheet.

0

25

0

Natural Resources
Conservation Service

100

50

Meters
150

100
200

400

Feet
600

Web Soil Survey
Soil Map—Dane
County,
National
Cooperative
Soil Wisconsin
Survey

307920

307960

308000

308040
89° 21' 28''

89° 21' 48''

307640

2/13/2013
Page 1 of 3

Soil Map–Dane County, Wisconsin
(6WDWH$UFKLYH3UHVHUYDWLRQ)DFLOLW\3URMHFW$UHD)

MAP LEGEND
Area of Interest (AOI)
Area of Interest (AOI)
Soils
Soil Map Units
Special Point Features
Blowout
Borrow Pit
Clay Spot
Closed Depression
Gravel Pit
Gravelly Spot
Landfill
Lava Flow
Marsh or swamp
Mine or Quarry
Miscellaneous Water
Perennial Water

MAP INFORMATION
Very Stony Spot

Map Scale: 1:2,090 if printed on A size (8.5" × 11") sheet.

Wet Spot

The soil surveys that comprise your AOI were mapped at 1:15,840.

Other

Warning: Soil Map may not be valid at this scale.

Special Line Features
Gully
Short Steep Slope
Other

Enlargement of maps beyond the scale of mapping can cause
misunderstanding of the detail of mapping and accuracy of soil line
placement. The maps do not show the small areas of contrasting
soils that could have been shown at a more detailed scale.
Please rely on the bar scale on each map sheet for accurate map
measurements.

Political Features
Cities
Water Features
Streams and Canals
Transportation

Source of Map: Natural Resources Conservation Service
Web Soil Survey URL: http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov
Coordinate System: UTM Zone 16N NAD83
This product is generated from the USDA-NRCS certified data as of
the version date(s) listed below.

Rails
Interstate Highways
US Routes

Soil Survey Area: Dane County, Wisconsin
Survey Area Data: Version 10, Jun 26, 2012

Major Roads

Date(s) aerial images were photographed:

Local Roads

The orthophoto or other base map on which the soil lines were
compiled and digitized probably differs from the background
imagery displayed on these maps. As a result, some minor shifting
of map unit boundaries may be evident.

Rock Outcrop
Saline Spot

6/23/2005

Sandy Spot
Severely Eroded Spot
Sinkhole
Slide or Slip
Sodic Spot
Spoil Area
Stony Spot

Natural Resources
Conservation Service

Web Soil Survey
National Cooperative Soil Survey

2/13/2013
Page 2 of 3

Soil Map–Dane County, Wisconsin6WDWH$UFKLYH3UHVHUYDWLRQ)DFLOLW\3URMHFW$UHD

Map Unit Legend
Dane County, Wisconsin (WI025)
Map Unit Symbol

Map Unit Name

Acres in AOI

Percent of AOI

BbB

Batavia silt loam, gravelly substratum, 2 to 6
percent slopes

1.3

18.8%

Co

Colwood silt loam

5.6

81.2%

6.9

100.0%

Totals for Area of Interest

Natural Resources
Conservation Service

Web Soil Survey
National Cooperative Soil Survey

2/13/2013
Page 3 of 3

Map Unit Description: Batavia silt loam, gravelly substratum, 2 to 6 percent
slopes–Dane County, Wisconsin

State Archive Preservation Facility Project Area

Dane County, Wisconsin
BbB—Batavia silt loam, gravelly substratum, 2 to 6 percent
slopes
Map Unit Setting
Mean annual precipitation: 28 to 33 inches
Mean annual air temperature: 46 to 52 degrees F
Frost-free period: 135 to 160 days
Map Unit Composition
Batavia, gravelly substratum, and similar soils: 100 percent
Description of Batavia, Gravelly Substratum
Setting
Landform: Outwash plains
Landform position (three-dimensional): Tread
Down-slope shape: Linear
Across-slope shape: Linear
Parent material: Deep loess over loamy outwash
Properties and qualities
Slope: 2 to 6 percent
Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80 inches
Drainage class: Well drained
Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water
(Ksat): Moderately high to high (0.57 to 1.98 in/hr)
Depth to water table: More than 80 inches
Frequency of flooding: None
Frequency of ponding: None
Available water capacity: High (about 9.9 inches)
Interpretive groups
Farmland classification: All areas are prime farmland
Land capability (nonirrigated): 2e
Hydrologic Soil Group: B
Typical profile
0 to 10 inches: Silt loam
10 to 44 inches: Silty clay loam
44 to 50 inches: Gravelly clay loam
50 to 60 inches: Gravelly coarse sand

Data Source Information
Soil Survey Area: Dane County, Wisconsin
Survey Area Data: Version 10, Jun 26, 2012

Natural Resources
Conservation Service

Web Soil Survey
National Cooperative Soil Survey

2/13/2013
Page 1 of 1

Map Unit Description: Colwood silt loam–Dane County, Wisconsin

State Archive Preservation Facility Project Area

Dane County, Wisconsin
Co—Colwood silt loam
Map Unit Setting
Elevation: 600 to 1,500 feet
Mean annual precipitation: 28 to 33 inches
Mean annual air temperature: 46 to 52 degrees F
Frost-free period: 135 to 160 days
Map Unit Composition
Colwood and similar soils: 100 percent
Description of Colwood
Setting
Landform: Depressions on lakebeds (relict)
Down-slope shape: Concave
Across-slope shape: Concave
Parent material: Stratified silt and fine sand lacustrine deposits
Properties and qualities
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80 inches
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water
(Ksat): Moderately low to moderately high (0.14 to 0.57 in/hr)
Depth to water table: About 0 inches
Frequency of flooding: None
Frequency of ponding: None
Calcium carbonate, maximum content: 20 percent
Available water capacity: High (about 10.4 inches)
Interpretive groups
Farmland classification: Prime farmland if drained
Land capability (nonirrigated): 2w
Hydrologic Soil Group: B/D
Typical profile
0 to 10 inches: Silt loam
10 to 24 inches: Loam
24 to 60 inches: Stratified fine sand to silt loam

Data Source Information
Soil Survey Area: Dane County, Wisconsin
Survey Area Data: Version 10, Jun 26, 2012

Natural Resources
Conservation Service

Web Soil Survey
National Cooperative Soil Survey

2/13/2013
Page 1 of 1

Appendix F
WDNR Endangered Resources Review Request
and Response

Project Title
State Archive Preservation Facility
Environmental Assessment (EA)
DFD Project #09H2L
Proposed Project Narrative
The current Wisconsin Historical Society (WHS) and Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs,
Wisconsin Veterans Museum (WVM) preservation and storage spaces are inadequate, older
facilities with insufficient space/volume, and lack the necessary building infrastructure and
support services such as efficient bay spacing and storage systems. The current spaces have
leaking pipes, do not have appropriate environmental conditions (temperature and humidity
controls), and lack the necessary security measures for storage of museum, library, and archival
materials. These inefficiencies have resulted in damages to existing artifacts/collections,
reduced collection acquisitions, reductions to the volume of archives, and have restricted the
size of objects that can be added to the museum collections. Additional damages to existing
collections are probable unless improved environmental conditions are provided.
The proposed State Archive Preservation Facility will serve as an enterprise solution to protect,
preserve, and safeguard the valuable collections and artifacts that embody Wisconsin and
American history. This new facility will address the inefficiencies in storage space and allow for
storage of collections and artifacts in a controlled and secure environment.
The new facility has a total of 188,733 square feet that includes a four-story archive
preservation wing, a two-story processing wing, and a centrally located support space. The
archive preservation wing will house library material, archive materials, and museum artifacts
from the WHS and WVM, and will serve as a support facility to their museum functions. The
archive preservation wing utilizes specialized storage shelving systems that will be flexible and
adaptable to meet the changing and growing needs of the tenant agencies and will allow ease
of access and retrieval of stored materials. The processing wing includes work areas,
administrative functions, and specialized archive preservation space. These wings are
supported by centrally located space that includes areas for receiving and the mechanical
equipment. The total footprint of the building will be 61,820 square feet.
The building design will follow sustainable design principles, meet the State’s energy efficiency
standards, and attain the equivalent of Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED)
Silver. The facility’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and
corresponding space environmental controls will be designed to meet the special conservation
and preservation needs of the archive and museum collections.
The proposed facility will be constructed on State-owned property located at 202 S. Thornton
Avenue in Madison, Wisconsin. The DOA Central Services Building is currently located on the
5.10-acre site and the existing building will be demolished as part of the proposed project. This
site was selected after evaluation of several State-owned and non-State-owned parcels in the
Madison area and its selection is a product of a cooperative partnership between the City of
Madison and the State of Wisconsin.
The 202 S. Thornton Avenue site is the preferred location due to its proximity to WVM, WHS,
and UW-Madison, because it would allow for a viable repurposing of the current site and
demolition of the existing building, because of the availability of public transportation, and
because the proposed use is consistent with city zoning code.
1

The proposed project schedule calls for construction to commence in May 2014 with substantial
completion anticipated in June 2016. Figures depicting site location maps, USGS map with
project boundaries, WDNR wetland indicators map, and proposed conceptual site plan are
included with this ERR request.

2

State Archive Preservation Facility - Site Location Map 1

City of Madison
Downtown Isthmus

Engberg Anderson & SmithGroupJJR

State Archive Preservation Facility - Site Location Map 2
202 S. Thornton Avenue
Frontage on Thornton Ave.
and Dickenson St.
5.10 acres

Engberg Anderson & SmithGroupJJR

State Archive Preservation Facility - Concept Site plan
Native American Indian
ceremonial grounds with
berm/denser plantings
surround

EXISTING RAILROAD

Existing trees to remain

Existing tree to remain

26’ wide fire lane

More formal landscape area/raised planter

Loading Dock

Natural
landscaping/
Meadow

Extension of river
landscape

Processing Rooms

Archival Preservation
Space
Mechanical Room

Staff Entry More formal landscape area

Main
Entry

8 visitor spots

26 staff parking spots
26’ wide fire lane

Salvaged brick paving/
reused brick as sub base for paving

EAST WILSON STREET BIKE PATH

Remove service
lane
Existing trees to remain

Engberg Anderson & SmithGroupJJR

E PATH
RIVER BIK

S. DICKINSON STREET

Landscape buffer between
loading dock and Native
American Indian area
YAHARA

Loading
Dock
Entry

Equipment
area

Approximate Location of
Project Site

Source: USGS, Madison,
Wisconsin, United States ,
01 Jul 1983

USGS Quadrangle Map
Proposed Location
State Archive Preservation Facility
202 S. Thornton Avenue
Madison, Wisconsin 53703-3037

Wetland Indicators Map

Legend

Approximate Location of Project Site

0

850

1700

2550 ft.

Map created on Sep 5, 2012

Wisconsin Wetland Inventory (WWI) maps show graphic representations of the type, size and location of wetlands in Wisconsin. These maps have been prepared from the analysis of high altitude imagery in conjunction with soil surveys, topographic maps, previous wetland inventories and field work. State statutes
define a wetland as "an area where water is at, near or above the land surface long enough to be capable of supporting aquatic or hydrophytic vegetation and which has soils indicative of wet conditions." The principal focus of the WWI is to produce wetland maps that are graphic representations of the type, size and
location of wetlands in Wisconsin. Within this context, the objective of the WWI is to produce reconnaissance level information on the location, type, size of these habitats such that they are accurate at the nominal scale of the 1:24,000 (1 inch = 2000 feet) base map. The DNR recognizes the limitations of using
remotely sensed information as the primary data source. They are to be used as a guide for planning purposes. There is no attempt, in either the design or products of this inventory, to define the limits of jurisdiction of any Federal, State, or local government or to establish the geographical scope of the regulatory
programs of government agencies. Persons intending to engage in activities involving modifications within or adjacent to wetland areas should seek the advice of appropriate Federal, State, or local agencies concerning specified agency regulatory programs and jurisdictions that may affect such activities. The most
accurate method of determining the legal extent of a wetland for federal or state regulations is a field delineation of the wetland boundary by a professional trained in wetland delineation techniques.

Scale: 1:8,862

Appendix G
SHPO Review Request