FREE NEWSPAPER

VOluME 2 IssuE 10 SERVING YULEE, HILLIARD, BRYCEVILLE , FERNANDINA BEACH AND CALLAHAN March 11, 2010
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The Nassau News The Nassau
H I l l I A R D F E R N A N D I N A B E A C H
Nassau Outdoors by Ryan Conner
Page 7
Highest
in circulation!
We mail to Callahan,
Bryceville and
Hilliard. We also
have drop-of
locations throughout the
entire county and surrounding areas!
Call Shirley Fountain
at 904-386-2403
or e-mail her at
sfountain@thenassaunews.com.
To
advertise:
By lauren Jones
Editor
ere are not a lot of things you can
get for free these days. Concerts are cer-
tainly not one of them.
But Sounds on Centre is one of those
exceptions. On the rst Friday of every
month from March until October,
a dierent band will play on Centre
Street in downtown Fernandina for the
free event.
e event is put on by the Histor-
ic Fernandina Business Association
(HFBA). Its sole purpose is to promote
the downtown area and its businesses
as well as draw people downtown who
would otherwise not go there, President
of the HFBA, Max Wohlfarth said.
Businesses in the downtown area
benet from the free event as well. It
brings a huge crowd of people down-
town and as Wohlfarth says, it is basi-
cally eight months of advertising. It is
a great opportunity for businesses to
promote themselves.
Some local business owners said they
beneted from the event but they ex-
pect even more business when it is not
so cold next month.
“ere was denitely an inux of
people walking around. It probably
helped. It certainly didn’t hurt,” Steve
La Torre, owner of La Torre’s Gallery
and Gift Shop said.
Amelia Island Coee on Centre
Street helped out freezing customers
with their warm coee drinks.
“Our sales were up and we had a lot
of out of town customers,” Manager
Alyssa Perry said.
In its third year, the concert series
bring bands to play for a crowd of peo-
ple all along Centre Street.
e event is supported by corpo-
rate sponsorship and many volunteers.
Wohlfarth says a lot goes into putting
on the event including advertising,
working with bands, setting up and
breaking down and selling the ra e
tickets at the event.
Ra e tickets are sold for coupons at
local venues such as a night at a hotel.
ey also sell drinks and popcorn at the
event.
Face for Radio, who opened the
festival on Friday, March 4, has been
playing together for ve years and has
played Sounds on Centre since it start-
ed.
“We love playing here, it feels good
seeing everyone and watching the kids
dance,” Drummer Rob Jewell said.
Jewell and the lead singer, Hupp met
at e Palace in downtown Fernandi-
na. Jewell worked there and Hupp was
playing acoustic sets. e two started
jamming and the next thing they knew,
they were a band.
e band consists of lead singer
Hupp, guitarist Vic Deacon, drummer
Rob Jewell and bassist Allen Flannery.
On the chilly Friday evening, they
played to a crowd of locals, including
the Fernandina Beach Pirates. ey
all danced the night away despite the
weather.
Lisa Peat of Fernandina Beach said
it’s a great gathering for locals and visi-
tors.
“I enjoy the people watching,” she
said.
“ere is nothing in the world that
would keep us from being here,” Mar-
ry Carlson (also known as Granny
Featherbottom to those who love
her) said.
She and her granddaughters
Winnie and Heidi Carlson have
never missed a Sounds on
Centre.
“ey [her grand-
daughters] feel like
stars coming out
here. All the older
people know
them,” Carlson
said. “We like to
see people come
out and wiggle.”
Sounds on Centre
Street occurs every rst
Friday, except in May
it happens on May 28,
from 6 to 8 p.m. on Cen-
tre Street between
2nd and Front
streets. Instant
Groove is sched-
uled to play in
April.
Above: Winnie Carlson jams out at
Sounds on Centre
Right: Hupp, lead singer for “Face For
Radio.”
Jessica Woodrumw/The Nassau News
celebrating on the centre
e Nassau County Sheri’s O ce is updating the way
inmates at the detention center receive money for their ac-
count. Funds can now be deposited into the new commis-
sary kiosk, a machine similar to an ATM.
Family members and friends no longer have to stand in a
long line to deposit money into an inmate’s account. Instead
of cashier’s checks or money orders, they can bring cash or
a credit or debit card and instantly deposit money into an
account.
With the new kiosk system, family members can also de-
posit money into an inmate’s account online at inmatede-
posits.com or by phone (866-345-1884).
e Nassau County Detention Center also has another
kiosk that allows inmates to receive a debit card with the
amount left in their account when they are released from
jail. Previously, a check was mailed to them about a week
later.
e kiosks will save time and help the facility become
more eco-friendly. ere are currently more than 170 in-
mates housed in the detention center.
SHERIFF MAKES IT EASIER
TO GIVE MONEY TO YOUR
HONEY BEHIND BARS
Family members can now deposit money into inmate’s accounts online.
2 The Nassau News | March 11, 2010
Mary was born in Callahan, but has had
a full life which took her to Savannah and
then to Michigan for almost 20 years.
“In the winter I would dream about the
Florida weather and Fernandina Beach.”
She made the decision to move to
Yulee 20 years ago and she has never
regretted it. “I love everything, this is
where I will stay.” Mary enjoys going
down to the river to talk with people.
She also likes to sit in her backyard at
night and stare at the stars.
To Mary the growth in Yulee has only
been positive. “We’ve got all these
wonderful stores. Why would I leave
now?”
The only complaint she had was the
damage to the roads caused by the
heavy truck traffi c. “As a senior citizen it makes driving that much
more diffi cult because you get stuck in those grooves.”
Laura and her husband first moved to
Hilliard 11 years ago when he got a job
pastoring a church. Her husband, Kris,
is the minister to Youth & College &
Career at First Baptist Boulougne.
Laura likes Hilliard because everybody
knows everybody. She especially loves
her church family. Currently, Laura is
helping plan a white water rafting trip
for the youth in August.
Laura is a dedicated mom to her
daughter Autumn, (pictured with
Laura) and is homeschooling her. She
does love the Hilliard school systems
though. “The principals and the
teachers really do care about the kids
and the community.”
Laura has enjoyed seeing the growth
in Hilliard, especially the increase in stores and restaurants. “If
Wal-Mart was here we’d be good.”
Printed on recycled paper
FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION
West side of Nassau County: call Shirley
Fountain at 904-879-0596 or 904-386-2403, or
send e-mail to sfountain@thenassaunews.com.
East side of Nassau County: call Lamar
Williams at 904-225-5100 or 904-349-1405, or
send e-mail to lamar@thenassaunews.com.
The publisher reserves the right to refuse
advertising space deemed unsuitable for
placement in this publication.
Letters to the editor are welcomed and
encouraged, but subject to editing at the editor’s
discretion. Editor is not responsible for errors
of content or omissions. Facts and statements
expressed in letters are not necessarily those of
The Nassau News.
When submitting letters please include your
name, address, occupation and telephone
number. If your letter is printed, only your name,
occupation and neighborhood will be listed.
Submissions may be edited for space.
All content is copyrighted and may not be
reprinted, copied, or reproduced without written
permission from the publisher. ©2009.
To submit a story idea or letter to the
editor, call 904-225-5100 or send e-mail to
laurenjones@thenassaunews.com. Mail can
be sent to : THE NASSAU NEWS, PO Box
837,Yulee, FL 32041.
Fernandina
Beach
Hilliard
Callahan
Yulee
Bryceville
governMenT
MeeTings
WWW.ThenassauneWs.coM
Twitter: Thenassaunews
Facebook: The nassau news
Publisher: Ray Fountain
editor: Lauren Jones
general Manager / sales: Lamar Williams
distribution / sales: Shirley Fountain
creative director: Jessica Woodrum
The Nassau News
Following are upcoming public
meetings in Nassau County.
COUNTY COMMISSION (Commission
chambers at the James S. Page
Government Complex, 96135 Nassau
Place in Yulee. They can be reached at
904-491-7380.)
9 a.m. Wednesday, March 17
6 p.m. Monday, March 22
SCHOOL BOARD (Nassau County
School Board District Offi ce building,
1201 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach,
unless otherwise noted. They can be
reached at 904-491-9900)
6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 25
FERNANDINA BEACH CITY
COMMISSION (Their offi ce can be
reached at 904-227-7305.)
6 p.m. Tuesday, March 16
6 p.m. Tuesday, April 6
CALLAHAN TOWN COUNCIL (Their
offi ce can be reached at 904-879-3801.)
7 p.m. Monday, March 15
7 p.m. Monday April 5
HILLIARD TOWN COUNCIL (Their
offi ce can be reached at 904-845-3555.)
7 p.m. Thursday, March 18
7 p.m. Thursday, April 1
OCEAN HIGHWAY AND PORT
AUTHORITY OF NASSAU COUNTY
(County Commission Chambers at the
James S. Page Government Complex,
96135 Nassau Place in Yulee. They can
be reached at 904-261-0098.)
6 p.m. Wednesday, April 14
knoW YOUR NEIGHBORS
Ryan Smith, his wife Victoria and
their daughter Johana just moved to
Fernandina Beach two months ago.
Ryan is recently retired from the Air
Force. He and Victoria met in Equador,
while he was stationed there.
They decided to come to Fernandina
Beach because it was farther away from
the city and it felt secure.
Ryan is currently going to school full
time and studying nursing. When asked
how Fernandina Beach compared to
Equador, Victoria said that Equador
was unique but that, “This is my home
because this is where my family is.”
The big to do in the Smith’s household
right now is their garage sale that they
will be holding this Saturday, (March
13th) in Lofton Point. So, if you would like to meet the Smiths
yourself be sure to stop by and welcome them to the area.
The smiths
Fernandina Beach
George and his wife Mary Ann have
been living in Callahan for the last nine
years. When he and his wife were married
they lived in Fernandina Beach. He
worked with the FAA in Hilliard and she
worked at the post offi ce in Callahan. In
1979 George retired and he and his wife
moved to Palatka. Eventually though, his
wife became homesick and they decided
to move back to the area.
George likes living in a small town and
being close to family. He also likes the
people in the community. “I haven’t met
one person I didn’t like.”
For fun George likes to go fishing on the
St. John’s River or at Lake George. When
asked if he enjoyed retirement, George
said, “I love it.”
The only thing George could say that he didn’t love about the
area was the increase in traffi c, especially the truck traffi c.
george steele
Callahan
Mary Elizabeth
Mckendree
Yulee
laura Elkins
Hilliard
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Get your walking or running shoes on!
You can take part in the “Cops and Kids” 5K
Walk/Run sponsored by the Nassau County
Sheri’s O ce. e inaugural event will take
place on April 10 at Fort Clinch State Park,
2601 Atlantic Avenue, in Fernandina Beach.
e event will start at 9 a.m.
Participants will be able to walk or run
through the scenic park. Anyone can partici-
pate. Prizes will be awarded to the top four
male and female runners. e registration fee
is $25 per person.
It’s $35 per person on the day of the event.
All of the proceeds benet the “Cops and
Kids” program.
You can pick up a registration form for the
5K Walk/Run at the Nassau County Sheri’s
O ce in Yulee (76001 Bobby Moore Cir-
cle), the YMCA in Fernandina Beach (1915
Citrona Dr.) or Anytime Fitness in Callahan
(450077 State Road 200).
For more information, contact Angela
Spears, Public Information O cer, at (904)
548-4050.
SHERIFF SPONSORS COPS & KIDS RUN
Baptist Medical Center Nassau now oers
certied Diabetes Self Management Educa-
tion (DSME) classes at the hospital on Satur-
days for those who nd it di cult to attend
during the week, says Mary Snyder, registered
dietitian and coordinator of Baptist Nassau’s
certied DSME program.
e four-part programs include a general
overview of diabetes causes, complications
and treatments, and steps patients can take
to reduce or control some of the eects of the
disease. Attendees learn about monitoring
blood glucose, blood sugar highs and lows,
proper diabetic diets, meal planning, the
importance of weight control and exercise.
Saturday programs are the same as those held
weekdays except Snyder teaches the Saturday
programs alone. She and Katie Aquino, RN,
teach weekday classes together, usually on
Tuesday afternoons.
Many insurance plans cover part or all the
cost of this program and a physician referral
is required. For more information and sched-
uling, call Ms. Snyder at 321-3700.
BAPTIST MEDICAL NOW OFFERS DIABETES CLASS ON SATURDAYS
Happy
Anniversary
Georgia and
Jose Rosado
From, Erin, Arriana, Syler,
Jose Jr., Destiny and George
March 11, 2010| The Nassau News 3
We pastors nd ourselves
thinking about one particu-
lar day each week: Sunday.
My former pastor said to me,
“Sunday comes every three
days.” He was right! e
same can be said about the
holidays which seem to come
every three weeks. So, we pas-
tors nd ourselves thinking a
lot about Christian
holidays too. I can
hardly believe Good
Friday and Easter are
less than a month
away. Wasn’t it just
three weeks ago
when we celebrated
Christmas?
is morning I
found myself think-
ing about Good Fri-
day while reading
in Exodus chapters
28-29. is is one of
those sections where
many who started to read the
Bible in one year drop out.
Chapter 28 gives a detailed
description of the garments
worn by the priests. ey were
very ornate: bells, tassels, pre-
cious stones and gold, all of it
incorporated into some high
quality threads. Chapter 29
is where we nd instructions
regarding the consecration
of the priests which involved
sacricing several animals and
getting their garments stained
with blood. “Take some of the
blood on the altar and some of
the anointing oil and sprinkle
it on Aaron and his garments
and on his sons and their gar-
ments. en he and his sons
and their garments will be
consecrated.” (Exodus 29:21,
NIV) Have you ever caught
a glimpse of the butcher at
the grocery store? It was like
that. Aaron the High Priest
(and brother of Moses) had
blood-red garments, stained
with the blood
of numerous
sacrices. I can
only imagine
what those gar-
ments smelled
like.
So how did
this lead to
thoughts about
the death of
Jesus Christ?
e Old Tes-
tament’s sac-
ricial system
was meant to
communicate two basic prin-
ciples: God is holy and we are
sinful and need to be cleansed.
e perpetual butchering of
these animals demonstrated
the severity of our sin. Even
the High Priest was sinful and
had to wear sacred garments
covered in blood just to per-
form sacrices for God’s peo-
ple. We live in a day where sin
is rarely mentioned in pulpits.
I once inquired about a wor-
ship leader position at a main-
line denominational church
in Maryland. I told the asso-
ciate pastor the types of songs
I use in worship emphasize
Christ’s death and our sin for-
given. e minister mocking-
ly referred to them as “bloody
Jesus songs.” He was not in-
terested in such silliness and
clearly thought I was an idiot
because it’s just too archaic for
modern people, not to men-
tion it is oensive to call peo-
ple “sinners.” Oensiveness
is a concern God has, but of
a dierent kind: he is deeply
concerned about how we have
oended him! But, because
he is good, merciful and lov-
ing, he has made it possible
for human beings to have
those oenses forgiven. God
made sure the Israelites saw
and smelled the seriousness
of sin in every drop of animal
blood that was shed on their
behalf. “e law requires that
nearly everything be cleansed
with blood, and without the
shedding of blood there is no
forgiveness. (Hebrews 9:22,
NIV)
e emphasis on their sin
and need for cleansing was
not meant to hopelessly weigh
them down under the burden
of their sin, but to point them
to the last and nal sacrice of
Jesus Christ where the burden
of sin is lifted permanently.
e Old Testament priest-
hood and the sacrices fore-
shadowed Christ’s work as
High Priest who oered, not
the blood of animals, but his
Barbara
Alice
Mason
Barbara Alice Mason, 60,
passed away Sunday morning, March 7 at the
Community Hospice Morris Center in Jack-
sonville. She moved to Yulee in 1983 from
St. Joe, IN and was of the Nazarene faith. She
was an avid supporter of the 700 Club televi-
sion ministry. She was a devout Christian and
devoted wife, mother and grandmother. e
love of her life was her grandchildren. Mrs.
Mason loved watching drag racing and went
to the Gator Nationals every year. She had a
special aection for her dog, Lady. She was pre-
deceased by her parents, Olan and Goldie Ren-
frow and a brother, Jerry Renfrow. Survivors
include her devoted husband of 42 years, Larry
Mason of Yulee; a daughter and son-in-law,
Carrie and Greg Beavers of Yulee; a brother,
Dewey Refrow (Diane) of Auburn, IN; two
sisters, Betty Myers of Douglas, GA and Jeanie
Hughes (Jim) of Jacksonville; two grandchil-
dren, Brittany and Brandon Beavers of Yulee;
her father and stepmother-in-law, John and
Opal Mason of St. Joe, IN; her mother in law,
Billie Jean King, of Ft. Wayne, IN; several
nieces, nephews and great nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held Wednesday, March
10 at the Journey Church with interment fol-
lowing in Green Pine Cemetery. e family
received friends Tuesday at Green Pine Funeral
Home. Condolence messages may be left at
www.greenpinefuneral.com. Arrangements
by Green Pine Funeral Home, Amelia Island,
Fernandina Beach, Yulee.
GREEN PINE
NASSAU COUNTY’S ONLY FULL SERVICE FUNERAL HOME & CEMETERY 904-261-0876
Amelia Island,
Fernandina Beach, Yulee
Online Obituaries & Condolences at
www.greenpinefuneral.com
The Water Boys
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Pastorally cont. on page 4
Pastorally
speaking
Rev. David Bradsher
Obituaries
Mary Jo
Turnberg
Mary Jo Turn-
berg, 50, of Yulee
passed away Tues-
day evening, March
2 at Baptist Medi-
cal Center in Fern-
andina Beach. She
was born May 28,
1959 in Herkimer,
NY and moved to
Yulee from Fells-
mere, FL two years ago. Mrs. Turnberg
loved to cook, sh and spend time with
her grandchildren. She was predeceased
by her parents, Vernon Maine and Bev-
erly Law. Survivors include a son and
daughter-in-law, Jerey and Chrissy
White of Grant, FL; a daughter, Dean-
na White, also of Grant; three brothers,
Donnie Maine of Yulee, Dean Maine,
also of Yulee and Scott Maine of Grant;
three sisters and brothers-in-law, Verna
and Jimmie Bennett of Yulee, Sheri
and Tim Rogers of Melbourne, FL and
Suesan and Andy Parker of Yulee; ve
grandchildren and many special nieces
and nephews. A graveside memorial
service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday,
March 13, at Hughes Cemetery with
Rev. Pete Jones o ciating. Condolence
messages may be left at www.greenpine-
funeral.com. Arrangements by Green
Pine Funeral Home, Amelia Island,
Fernandina Beach, Yulee.
Thinking about Good Friday… already!
4 The Nassau News | March 11, 2010
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own blood which he shed for the forgiveness
of sin. But this does not mean sin is now a
non-issue we can ignore. e cross itself is a
constant reminder of the seriousness of sin
and of how humans still oend God today.
It still communicates the two basic princi-
ples of God’s holiness and our sin and need
for cleansing. Upon the cross, God the Fa-
ther tore Jesus to pieces. He turned his back
on his beloved Son who was our substitute.
Jesus was a bloody mess. Mel Gibson didn’t
even come close! Our sins and guilt were laid
upon him in the same way the animals bore
the sin and guilt of Israel. at is what makes
Good Friday so Good. I am happy to sing
those bloody Jesus songs all the time because
it is constant reminder of what Jesus has
done for me and how he continues to forgive
me every day. Your blood has washed away
my sin. Jesus, thank you!
Got questions? Email me at pastor@grace-
nassau.com and I will print my response in
my column.
e Rev. David Bradsher is pastor
of Grace Community Church in Yulee.
www.gracenassau.com
Pastorally Cont. from page 3
As the weather warms up, you may be feel-
ing the urge to get out and garden, but did
you know that it can actually be good for you?
A recent study entitled “Senior to Senior:
Living Lessons” at Langston Uni-
versity in Langston, OK, found
that people share needs for sen-
sory stimulation, social interac-
tion and integration, engagement
with others in relationships, op-
portunities for self-esteem and self
worth and positive, enjoyable ex-
periences. is research was based
on a therapeutic program involv-
ing gardening known as Horticul-
ture erapy.
e philosophical basis for hor-
ticulture therapy is the belief that
contact with plants meets a basic
human psychological need. People have used
gardens since early times for both restora-
tive and educational purposes. Horticultural
activities decrease stress, increase self esteem
and provide conversational and social op-
portunities. e study involved gardening
activities for people 60 years of age and older.
e group met weekly for sessions focused on
horticulture principles and plant science.
One of the students in the study stated,
“To go to the greenhouse and see
something that I actually grew made
me feel good and I believe I can just
about do anything.”
e bottom line: gardening activi-
ties improve mental and physical well
being, decrease stress and can im-
prove self condence and self esteem.
Many outlets for taking garden
classes exist in Nassau county, in-
cluding the Learning Community
(www.tlcnf.com or 904-430-0120);
e University of Florida Nassau
County Extension (http://nassau.
ifas.ufl.edu/horticulture/mgnassau.
html or 904- 548-1116); and Florida State
College at Jacksonville (www.fccj.com or
904-359-5433).
Dr. Nancy Rossiter is the President of the
Learning Community of North Florida located
at 626 South 8th Street in Fernandina.
aging
gracefully
Dr. Nancy “School
Marm” Rossiter
Feeling blue? Try taking
a gardening class!
Callahan ChiropraCtiC/aCupunCture CliniC
(Subway Shopping Center • Callahan, Florida)
• School Physicals
• Sport Physicals
• Auto Accidents/
Workers Comp
904-879-2209 Dr. Daniel R. Weaver
We can help!
Pain & stiffness
from an auto
accident?
Laura Homan has joined Amelia Island Plantation as the
new Regional Sales Manager, covering business accounts in
various regions in the Southwest and Southeast.  Homan
most recently worked for the Hampton Inn and Suites in
downtown Fernandina Beach, where she held the Sales and
Marketing Management position.  Her prior experience at
Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort includes Marketing Man-
ager and Golf Tournament Coordinator.   In addition to her
professional experience, Homan holds a degree in Com-
munications from the University of Alabama .
laura Hoffman
AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATIONS WELCOMES
NEW REGIONAL SALES MANAGER
March 11, 2010| The Nassau News 5
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It’s been about a year since stock prices hit their
low point during the long bear market. Since then,
of course, we’ve seen a big rally, but some of the deci-
sions you made when the market was at its lowest
point may still be aecting your portfolio’s perform-
ance and prospects. So now that we’ve reached the
one-year anniversary of the market bottom, it’s a
good time to see where you are today and how you
can prepare for tomorrow.
In looking back at the market depths of a year
ago, it’s important to note that we didn’t get there
overnight. In fact, stock indices had fallen about 50
percent since hitting their all-time high in October
2007, which means that investors had gone through
a 16-month downturn. Consequently, it’s not sur-
prising that many people, tired of seeing gloomy in-
vestment statements month after month, decided to
“play it safe” for a while by putting large sums into
xed-rate vehicles such as Certicates of Deposit
(CDs). And a lot of those CDs had one-year maturi-
ties, which means they’re now coming up for renewal.
When you bought your CDs a year ago, you prob-
ably did so for their ability to preserve your principal,
but in the process, you made some trade-os. First,
you accepted a relatively meager income stream, be-
cause short-term interest rates, like those paid on
your CDs, were low. And second, you relinquished
the growth potential you might have gotten from
other investments, such as stocks. So now that we’re a
year removed from the bottom of a bear market, can
you use the money from your maturing CDs to help
you make progress toward your nancial goals?
Actually, now that you may have these maturing
CDs coming due, it’s a very good time to review your
overall investment strategy, possibly with the help of
a professional nancial advisor. Take a close look at
your portfolio. Is it well suited for your individual risk
tolerance, time horizon and long-term objectives, or
do you need to make some changes? Is it too aggres-
sive for your needs, or too conservative? Is it prop-
erly diversied among investments suitable for your
particular situation. ? While diversication, by itself,
cannot guarantee prots or protect against loss, it can
help reduce the eects of volatility and give you more
chances for success. Keep in mind that while CDs are
FDIC insured, other investments carry certain risks
that you should understand before investing.
Of course, if you have investments held in a bro-
kerage account, it’s likely not your only portfolio
— you may well be investing through your 401(k)
or other employer-sponsored retirement plan. If so,
keep in mind that you probably don’t want your in-
vestments to duplicate those inside your 401(k) ac-
count. Instead, look at your entire investment picture
“holistically” and seek to diversify through all your
accounts.
Once you’ve reviewed your portfolio and identied
any possible gaps, you can then consider where the
money from your maturing CDs can be used most
eectively.
You probably won’t see any festivities marking the
one-year anniversary of the market low. But you can
celebrate in your own way — by embracing available
investment opportunities.
is article was written by Edward Jones for use by
your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.
edward Jones
Financial advisor
Ronnie L. Stoots Jr.
A Year After Market Low, How Should You Invest?
In 1929 Adolf Butenandt and Edward Adelbert Doisy inde-
pendently determined and isolated the structure of the hor-
mone “estrogen”. Estrogen is a group of steroid compounds
and is considered to play a signicant role in women’s
mental health. Estrogen is working in “hyperdrive” dur-
ing pregnancy. Most women nd their hair is thicker
and shinier than ever. After the baby, hormonal changes
will have the opposite eect. Dry, dull and brittle hair
that easily falls out.
Hormonal changes during pregnancy cause the
scalp to produce less sebum (oil). e hair feels
less weighed down and thicker. In fact, your
hair’s growth phase is extended due to extra
estrogen. It will grow longer. About half
of women experience post-partum alo-
pecia (hair loss) which may last three months, or so. Estrogen
is returning to normal levels.
e three major naturally occurring estrogens in women
are estrone, estradiol and estriol. Estradiol is the predomi-
nant form in nonpregnant females, estrone is produced
during menopause, and estriol is the primary estrogen of
during pregnancy.
e good news: your hair will grow back. As your
hormones return to normal so will your hair. While
you’re waiting treat your hair and scalp to protein mois-
turizing shampoos and conditioners. Trim the hair often
while wearing a smile and enjoy your newborn gift.
Tom Hughes, magnasalon.com
how pregnancy affects your hair
Beauty
Tips
Thomas Hughes
lcd, PlasMa, led,
and now 3-D
I remember when the only choice of television
was size. 32” was big and 36” was huge. Not only
in size but, weight also. e choices we have to-
day are vast and varied. We no longer measure in
inches but in some cases in feet. When friends ask
how big our television is, I tell them 5 feet. OK, it’s
60 inches but 5 feet just sounds cool.
Now, a quick overview of each type of televi-
sion and why one may work better than another
for your situation. All of the televisions listed below
have 178 degrees of viewing, meaning no bad seat
in the house.
LCD PROS - Lightweight, energy friendly,
not much heat
emission and re-
sistant to glare.
Sizes are endless
from the very
smallest 1” screen
to over 108” (or 9
feet).
LCD CONS
– Less life like picture es-
pecially on standard deni-
tion. Have a di cult time
generating deep blacks and
Tech Tips
Bill Hughes
Tech cont. on page 9
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904 - 310 - 6729
Mon - Tues: 9 am - 6pm • Thurs - Fri: 9am - 6pm
Sat: 9am - 5pm
6 The Nassau News | March 11, 2010
nassau
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Ryan Conner
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In the past few weeks I have had
the opportunity to visit some of our
local golf courses. It is hard to talk
about Nassau County golng with-
out mentioning the Amelia Island
Plantation. is week I went to the
heart of the Plantation by
visiting Oak Marsh. After
a six-month closure this
prestigious course reo-
pened on February 15 and
has been a breath of fresh
air to the community.
I spent a few moments
with Head Pro Broc Nell
to discuss the reopening
and some of Oak Marsh’s
staples and history. He was
very informative as well as
courteous by inviting me
into the clubhouse.
Oak Marsh opened in 1974 and
has always been a favorite for local
golfers as well as those from out of
town. e course is a par-72 that
winds through Amelia Island’s scenic
marshes. Pete Dye certainly created
a lasting masterpiece when he de-
signed Oak Marsh.
Right now the course is in great
shape considering the circumstances.
Like any other course in our area, it
has been tormented by the unsea-
sonably cold winter. e fairways are
layered with Bermuda grass that is
just beginning to come back. It will
not be long before the entire course
is as plush and green as the rye grass
on the over seeded greens and tees.
Not only is the course beauti-
ful but challenging as well. With
all the marsh that surrounds it, wa-
ter is always in play. at it mind,
hole number 17 brings the complete
marsh package into the game. is
par-4 is completely surrounded by
marsh. In order to reach the green
you have to hit over two sections
of thick spartina grass and mud. If
you do not hit two perfect shots you
will have a great chance to put that
dreaded snow man on your score
sheet.
e signature hole is
number 16. In order to
reach the green you have
to cross over a 130 yards
of marsh and water. If that
was not di cult enough
there is a huge oak tree
blocking the entire right
hand side of the green.
You have to hit a solid
up and down to the left
to even have a chance at
birdie. is might be one
of the most challenging
par-3s in the area.
Oak Marsh most recently hosted
a Hooters Tour event in March of
2009. e Hooters Tour is the third
largest professional golf tour in the
world and is lled from top to bot-
tom with talent. All their carts are
equipped with GPS devices and
electronic score cards. e wildlife is
what you would expect around our
local marshes except for one thing,
they keep a constant eye on the water
and remove all gators from the facil-
ity.
If you are interested in playing
Oak Marsh, I would highly recom-
mend it. is is one of my favorite
courses in not only our area but any-
where else, period. Not only is the
setting perfect and serene, the sta
goes above and beyond to accommo-
date all your golf needs.
Green fees are $150 for eighteen
holes and $90 for nine. Public tee
times need to be made 24 hours in
advance. If anyone is interested, pros
Broc Nell and Dan Hackney oer
private lessons. Lessons are $110 an
hour. e address is 3000 First Coast
Highway, Amelia Island. Mondays
and Tuesdays are the slower days on
the course so make your tee times
and go enjoy one of the best golng
experiences around.
As for shing, the bite is starting
to pick up. After months of cold
front after cold front, we nally have
a break. is week calls for south
winds with highs in the 70s. We are
looking at some rain on ursday,
but that’s okay, as long as it is not
freezing. With the warmer tempera-
tures and south wind we should see
some drastic changes in our water
temperature.
e sh have just started to feed
heavier in certain areas and it is only
going to get better. ese sh have
not eaten well in months and are
practically starving. When the bite
really turns on, I have a feeling that
the shing is going to be ridiculously
good.
If using articial, try a Z-Man ar-
ticial shrimp. Tie it weedless with
a bullet weight in front of it. Work
it real slow on the bottom and if a
trout or red is around, I can almost
guarantee a bite. Mud minnows
have also been working really well
with the redsh on the last of the
outgoing tide.
e black drum bite has been re-
ally solid as of late. Try some dead
shrimp on the bottom right at the
changing of the tide. If you do decide
to play eighteen, drown a shrimp or
some articial good luck and be safe
out there.
Amelia Island Plantation’s Oak Marsh’s signature hole is number 16. To reach the green you must cross over a 130
yards of marsh and water, not to mention the huge oak tree blocking the entire right side of the green.
local course provides beauty along with diffi culty
Columnist Ryan Conner explores the Oak Marsh Golf Course on the Amelia Island Plantation.
March 11, 2010| The Nassau News 7
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If you own an annuity, it just makes sense
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why we offer complimentary annuity
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Plus, there may be features your current
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If you own an annuity, it just makes sense to review it
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www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Ronnie L Stoots Jr
Financial Advisor
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95766 Amelia Concourse
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
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By lauren Jones
Editor
Lilliston Ford started out small and has
grown into the largest car dealership in Kings-
land, GA. ey span over ve acres.
It was previously on Highway 17 and was
something small but came with bigger plans.
“e guy who started it [Fairley Cisco] had
a big vision,” Johnnie Robinson said.
Robinson is the general sales manager and
has been there since 1994. e original owner
saw him, not knowing a thing about him and
hired him on the spot. He saw potential in
Robinson. Robinson lived up to that poten-
tial and moved his way up from sales and says
he loves where he is at.
“It was a blessing,” Robinson said.
He says there are challenges in this business,
such as not being able to please everyone, but
he’s also learned some valuable lessons, such
as to never judge a person up front.
He says there was once a man who came
in looking like he came o the streets and all
the other salesmen ignored him, thinking he
would not buy a car. Robinson talked to him
and the man ended up buying two cars with
the cash he had in his pocket.
Lilliston Ford has 29 employees and Rob-
inson says about 95 percent of them are lo-
cal. Lilliston also draws customers from as
far away as Gainesville, GA, Hinesville, GA
and Savannah. ey form relationships with
those customers including Robinson’s best
friend. Robinson met his best friend while
selling him a Ford Explorer. He says most of
their customers are repeats and referral-based.
Despite having a dealership in a military town
with customers moving frequently, he still has
many repeat customers.
Robinson says they make sure they give
their customers the best treatment. He likes
to call it the Ritz-Carlton treatment. He
knows people don’t like to spend a lot of time
in a car repair shop. If the customers’ car will
take a long time to be xed, they give them a
free rental.
Lilliston provides service after sales and
tells his employees to under promise and over
deliver.
Lilliston Ford Staf lauren Jones/The Nassau News
car lot attributes quality
to it’s thriving business
Swine u may seem like last year’s news.
But health o cials are urging those who
have not been vaccinated against the virus —
or the regular seasonal u — to do so.
“It’s not too late for people to get their u
shot because u season typically peaks at this
time year,” said Nassau County, Fla., Health
Department spokesman Wade Sparkman.
“We have seen a substantial decline in cases
of H1N1, but that doesn’t mean we’re out of
the woods yet.”
One Nassau County resident died last No-
vember due to the H1N1 virus. Widespread
inuenza activity, the highest level of infec-
tion, was not reported by any counties early
this month. irty counties reported no ac-
tivity, with the rest reporting only sporadic
activity.
While swine u (H1N1) is on the de-
cline, the predominant strain of circulating
inuenza virus remains H1N1. But doctors
and other health professionals expect that
to change in the coming weeks. “H1N1 is
still out there, and is probably going to stick
around for a while,” said Dr. E. Ngo-Seidel,
Director of the Nassau County Health De-
partment. “But people need to remember
there’s another u virus out there — the
regular seasonal u generally peaks in the
second or third week of February, and that
strain kills 36,000 adults a year.
Ngo-Seidel encourages residents to get
protected against both the seasonal u and
H1N1, especially those with medical con-
ditions who are at higher risk of u-related
complications. She said residents should be
able to avoid the frustration some experi-
enced over limited H1N1 vaccine supplies
when swine u peaked last fall. Some clinics
have even dropped their prices slightly due
to the apparent glut of vaccine doses.
“ere’s plenty of vaccine to go around,”
said Sparkman. “People should also remem-
ber that anyone can get vaccinated. We are
no longer asking priority groups or those at
greatest risk of complications from the u to
get vaccinated rst, which was the message
the CDC was putting out when supplies
were limited.”
While health o cials are no longer hold-
ing free mass vaccination events at schools,
malls and other locations, some county
health departments, such as Nassau, are ex-
tending their hours. e health department
is actively contacting nursing homes, schools
and other locations where there are vulner-
able populations to vaccinate. Residents
should check with the county health depart-
ment for vaccination locations and hours.
Sparkman said what many perceived
to be a mild swine u season should not
lull residents into believing the u virus is
without danger. “e message here is, get
vaccinated. And if you’re experiencing u
symptoms like body aches, fever and cough
— seek medical attention,” said Sparkman.
“You can still get very sick and even die,
from the u.”
For further information contact the Flor-
ida Department of Health H1N1 Flu infor-
mation website at www.MyFluSafety.com
or the U.S. Centers for Disease Control
(CDC) website at www.cdc.gov/h1n1u/.
Please contact the Nassau County Health
Department for additional information at
(904), 548-1830, Monday-Friday, 8:00 am –
5:00 pm. Public information contact: Wade
Sparkman, Director, Environmental Health.
When it comes to the flu,
we’re not out of the woods
8 The Nassau News | March 11, 2010
ese reports are based on information supplied by the Nassau County Sheri’s O ce. Anyone whose name appears in the reports can contact e Nassau News if the case is dismissed,
charges are reduced, or they are acquitted of the charges. Call 225-5100, or e-mail laurenjones@thenassaunews.com. Please be prepared to provide documentation of the developments.
tucker’s
hwy 17 tavern
ROCK-N-ROLL WEEKEND
Swamp Rats Ride ends here Saturday, 3p.m. - 6p.m.
featuring Cupid’s Alley. Ride to benefit Keagan, (a child
with Cerebral Palsy), all proceeds go to Keagan’s parents.
904-225-9211
Thursday, March 11th - Karaoke
Friday, March 12th &
Saturday, March 13th -
“CUPID’S ALLEY”
Happy Hour
Mon. - Fri. 4-7 p.m.
Sat. 12-4
All Day Sunday
Please contact Erin West for your
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MONDAY, MARCH 1
Mitchell Maninger, 25 of Hilliard: posses-
sion of alcohol by minor.
James Jackson, 28 of Townsend, GA:
possession of a controlled substance with
intent to distribute.
kerrick Peters, 28 of Yulee: bond sur-
render, possession of marijuana and
possession of a new legend drug without
prescription.
nicholas Barnett, 18 of Yulee: auto bur-
glary and grand theft.
heather carroll, 27 of Fernandina Beach:
burglary.
Justin royal, 22 of Yulee: possession of
a controlled substance without prescrip-
tion.
TUESDAY, MARCH 2
Brian Wilson, 35 of St. George, GA: bat-
tery.
roosevelt daniels, 61 of Fernandina
Beach: not having a driver’s license (ha-
bitual).
amanda hendrix, 36 of Bryceville: ag-
gravated battery.
Matthew Pickett, 24 of Fernandina
Beach: aggravated assault.
Peter dwinnell, 29 of Yulee: solicitation of
a child to engage in sexual conduct.
gabriel arnold, 36 of Fernandina Beach:
driving with a suspended license.
kimberly rainey, 38 of Yulee: driving
with a suspended license.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3
amanda clements, 24 of Yulee: driving
with a suspended license knowingly.
Tara Mcduffi e, 27 of Fernandina Beach:
petit theft.
allen Mitchell, 51 of Fernandina Beach:
DUI.
Micheal lambert, 40 of Hilliard: domestic
battery.
Marvin Timmons, 39 of St. Marys, GA:
operating under foreign license while FL
license is suspended.
nidia harden, 58 of Fernandina: DUI and
violation of driver’s license restrictions.
amber lutze, 23 of Fernandina Beach:
possession of a controlled substance.
david echols, 19 of Fernandina Beach:
possession of alcohol under 21.
THURSDAY, MARCH 4
Travis davis, 34 of Jacksonville: driving
while license was suspended and revoked.
lance rayburn, 44 of Fernandina Beach:
possession of marijuana.
alfonso aguado, 26 of Yulee: no driver’s
license.
royce cowart, 55 of Callahan: knowingly
driving with a suspended license.
Theodore Jackson, 30 of Jacksonville:
driving with a suspended license.
donald Murphy, 48 of Yulee: driving with
a suspended license.
arsene Marchand, 36 of Fernandina
Beach: driving with a suspended license.
roderick leon, 22 of Jacksonville: posses-
sion of cocaine with intent to sell sched-
ule 2 and cocaine sell schedule 2.
FRIDAY, MARCH 5
Michael West, 28 of Jacksonville: driving
with a suspended license, attach tag not
assigned, petit theft and two counts of
obtaining property with worthless checks.
nolan king, II, 29 of Kingsland, GA: resist-
ing an of cer. He would not get out of the
car when of cer demanded it of him in
suspicion of a fre arm being concealed in
the car.
stephen harris, 24 of Folkston, GA: driv-
ing without or with a suspended license.
John nease, 36 of Fitzgerald, GA: pos-
session of marijuana, DUI and refusal to
submit to testing.
ernest green, 22 of Jacksonville: posses-
sion of marijuana.
Justin green, 20 of Fernandina Beach:
driving with a suspended license.
SATURDAY, MARCH 6
stacie Musgrove, 31 of Jacksonville: DUI
and possession of drug paraphernalia.
loretta Polk, 40 of Yulee: DUI.
larry cameron, Sr., 59 of Fernandina
Beach: aggravated assault with deadly
weapon with intent to kill and domestic
battery.
SUNDAY, MARCH 7
nyeisha Felder, 28 of Jacksonville: ag-
gravated battery.
Tara rainey, 39 of Yulee: grand theft mo-
tor vehicle and temporary unauthorized
use of a motor vehicle.
Phillip Bunch, 39 of Fernandina Beach:
battery.
sara denton, 25 of Yulee: domestic bat-
tery.
Javier vasquez, 32 of Orlando: DUI and
no driver’s license.
CRIME Beat
March 11, 2010| The Nassau News 9
Folks, mid-term elections are
coming up next year. Are you ready
to get blasted every day and night
with political ads on television and
radio? You know the drill, it’s in-
evitable. Virtually every time you
turn on the TV or radio, within
minutes you will see one candidate
or another. Politicians, car dealer-
ships, television stations and radio
stations are excellent examples of
someone who uses creative sales
techniques to sell their idea, prod-
uct, or service.
ere are many words used to create emo-
tional responses. Safety, security, love, sweet
and delicious are some of the positive words.
Danger, threat, taxes, terrorism, extremist,
weaken, lie, dishonest, cheated and wrong
are a few of the negative words used. ese all
cause some type of emotional response in the
majority of people, especially if they are stra-
tegically repeated many times. ere are focus
groups that are paid to conduct studies on
how certain words make people feel. e re-
sults of those studies are used for many dier-
ent promotions, such as political campaigns
and advertising products and services. Usually
the “hot button” word or phrase
is repeated several times through-
out the promotion. e next time
you see a commercial on television
or hear a radio commercial, watch
and listen closely to every word.
You should be able to pick out the
hot button word or phrase. Some-
times even background sounds or
pictures will be used to enhance
the mood.
Keep in mind small business
owners, the more senses you can
involve during your presentation of
your product or service, the more likely you
are to sell your product or service to a poten-
tial customer. e six main senses are seeing,
hearing, touching, tasting, smelling and of
course, the sense of security.
Car dealerships use these tactics to sell cars.
When you go to a car lot, most good car sales-
people will ask you many questions to nd
out what type of car you are looking for, what
the car will be used for, who will be driving
the car and why you are looking to buy a car.
Once they nd out these things that are most
important to you, they will target the senses
necessary to help you build an emotional tie
with the vehicle they have, that most ts your
real or perceived needs.
Seeing - “Look at the paint job and the
rims on this baby,” “this ‘sporty looking’ vehi-
cle really ts you.”
Taste - “that candy apple red looks so good
you can almost taste it.” (chances are, you
don’t want to lick a car, but by giving you a
reference to something you most likely have
tasted, it could cause you to think of the
sweetness of the candy apple and look favora-
bly on the car and color.)
Touching - “hop in, take it for a test drive,”
“feel the fabric on these seats.”
Smelling - “don’t you just love that ‘new
car’ smell?”
Hearing - “listen to that engine hum”, “lis-
ten to this sound system.”
Sense of Security - “there’s lots of room in
the back for your children and groceries to
safely ride along,” “this model has passed all
the government safety tests,” “there are safe-
sales Tips
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Grand Opening - Friday, March 19th
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LOFTON CREEK ANIMAL CLINIC
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On all neuters for
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bright whites. I nd LCD’s to be a little fuzzy on
the low def. channels.
PLASMA PROS – More natural coloriza-
tion or lifelike picture. Has been becoming less
expensive than other formats. No burn in issue
anymore and much more energy conscious than
before.
PLASMA CONS – Heavy, subject to glare (it
is a glass screen), Emits a good amount of heat,
sizes tend to start at 42 inches. at might be
a little big for the bathroom. (What? You don’t
have a TV in your bathroom? Call me!)
LED PROS – e WOW factor. Very thin,
approx. 1 ¾” thick, low heat emissions, energy
e cient, beautiful lifelike picture, not very heavy.
LED CONS - Cost (about double the same
sized LCD), can sometimes be too close to the
wall for some wiring situations, glare due to glass
screen, limited choices in brands (not everyone is
on board yet.)
3D PROS – Blows away LED’s WOW factor.
Reach out and touch lifelike picture. LED thick-
ness and weight. A variety of sizes. Watch movie
releases the way they were intended or produced.
Great for gaming
3D CONS – Oh boy, cost, cost and cost.
Granted, 3-D will nd its correct cost range
soon but as of now, it is the number one issue.
Upgrade Fatigue… buying the same movie you
already own but now in another format. Lack
of 3-D content. Not only the expense of the set
but heavy, expensive glasses that must be worn
by each viewer. Some people have a vision issue
known as monocular vision. ese folks cannot
even see in 3-D and often get headaches after
watching a 3-D movie. (Sorry Alice in Wonder-
land, which is a great movie.) Give 3-D a few
years to nd its niche within the electronic com-
munity.
Well, there you have it: some opinions based
on fact. I’ve always said that a good site survey
will help determine what television is right for
you, your lifestyle and the room.
Maybe Star Wars wasn’t too far o when R2-
D2 played the holographic laser transmission of
Princess Leia on a table for 360 degrees of view-
ing. It’s only a matter of time I am sure!
Next week: Wireless speakers. Cheers!
Bill Hughes is the owner of Bill’s Video Design,
96178 Sea Winds Dr., Fernandina Beach. He
can be reached at 904-415-5311 or by e-mail at
billsvideodesign@vpweb.com.
Tech Cont. from page 5
Dear Chairman Boyle and
Commissioners:
While you have heard a pres-
entation recently on possible
options for navigating the up-
coming budget season, I have
heard no mention of actually
reducing the size of government
itself. Merely delaying capital
expenditures until the economy
is again healthy may temporar-
ily reduce current expenditures,
but that is not an actual reduc-
tion in the size of government.
Further, using up reserves to
avoid a reduction in the ongo-
ing “operational and personnel
costs” of government only raises
the certainty of a severe tax in-
crease in the near future while
reducing the county’s ability to
counter any possible unforeseen
catastrophes.
e key to good scal health
is doing that which is hardest for
politicians, namely, actually cut-
ting the size of government. Tax-
payers demand it, candidates for
political o ce espouse it in their
campaigns, but it never seems to
be accomplished. You have to
look no further than Tallahas-
see or Washington to see how
not to run government. Bor-
rowing against the taxpayers tab
or just printing new money will
never solve the real problem. It
can only be solved by cutting
the government itself. I would
recommend that you consider
the following starting points for
reducing the cost of government
to Nassau County taxpayers:
Freeze capital projects inde-
nitely. Any project that is not
absolutely mandated by state or
federal law should be removed
from the Capital Improvement
Plan immediately.
Address the overly-generous
automatic step raises, seniority
pay, sick leave payouts at retire-
ment, post-retirement benet
package, expensive health in-
surance, bonus days and other
perks that those who are paying
our salaries are going without in
the private sector. All benets,
both union and non-union,
should be re-addressed imme-
diately regardless of current
agreements. To not do so only
raises the probability of a future
forced reduction in costs via em-
ployee reductions.
Appoint a commissioner and
each of the other ve Constitu-
tional O cers to bring recom-
mendations back to the Board
that will moderate the rather
rich and disparate employee
benet packages from one o ce
to another.
Please let me know how I
may assist you in this endeavor.
e burden of weathering this
present scal crisis is rightfully
on the shoulders of all of us who
have been entrusted by the tax-
payers. Let’s together do that
which is hardest. Let’s cut gov-
ernment now.
Sincerely,
John A. Crawford
good fscal health is cutting the size of government
using the senses and the seven steps to close sales
Senses cont. on page 10
10 The Nassau News | March 11, 2010
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ty air-bags in the dash and side panels of this
model,” “this car has a no hassle warranty that
will cover you for three whole years.”
ese are just a few of the things you might
hear (and probably have heard) at a car dealer-
ship. Regardless of what type of business you
own or work for, you can benet by asking a lot
of questions when in the interview process of
selling your idea, product or service. e inter-
view, in my opinion, is the third most impor-
tant part of a sale. e rst most important part
of a sale is asking for the money, also known as
closing the sale. Even though closing the sale
is near the end of the sales process, I feel it is
the rst most important because you are ask-
ing a potential client to trust you and like you
enough to invest their hard-earned money in
your product. Believe it or not, the number one
reason salespeople fail is because they don’t ac-
tually ask the customer to buy their product or
service. Some sales people do a great job build-
ing the relationship up to the closing, and then
don’t ask a direct closing question. You HAVE
to ask them to buy it!
e second most important part is, the rst
15 seconds someone sees you. In a sales envi-
ronment, most people unknowingly determine
whether or not they like you or are comfort-
able around you in the rst 15 seconds of lay-
ing eyes on you. Be careful what you wear, how
you carry yourself, how you greet someone and
SMILE warmheartedly. As they say, “a smile is
contagious.” Don’t run up to them and shake
their hand like you’re going to rip their arm o.
Walk steadily, not too fast, keep eye contact,
smile, reach your hand out slightly and rmly
but gently shake their hand while you are intro-
ducing yourself. is is more important if your
potential client is a woman. If you slap your
hand out there too fast and hard, they will feel
as if you are showing dominance over them.
ey won’t think that, but they will feel that.
Keep your voice soft as well. You want them to
feel comfortable and “in control” throughout
the whole process. People don’t buy things be-
cause they are forced to, they buy them because
they want to. If they do buy because they felt
forced into it, they may never shop with you
again. It’s all about providing a comfortable,
pleasant buying experience for your customer.
ink about it, no one likes to be forced into
anything. Want a good example? Paying taxes,
even though we all understand that paying
taxes is a vital part of a free society to continue
to be free, we do not like being forced to pay
them. Nor do we like being forced to pay even
more taxes when tax rates are raised, especially
when they are raised because the people we have
elected are spending the money as if there is no
limit. But, that’s a subject for another column.
e sales or relationship building process
should be approached in an orderly fashion.
I’ve mentioned the most important three steps,
but they are not the only steps. Nor do they
make the other steps unnecessary. e seven
steps to closing any sale are:
Introduction, interview, presentation, over-
coming and handling objections, trial closing,
closing the sale and follow up to thank the cus-
tomer for buying from you. ese steps are part
of almost any kind of sales process out there.
Introduce yourself. Ask a lot of questions.
Present your product or service. If they have
objections or concerns, nd a solution for
them. Ask subtle trial closing questions: If I can
arrange the delivery date to t your schedule,
would you give my product a try?” CLOSE
THE SALE: “If you would give me your ap-
proval on this line, I will have our delivery de-
partment process your order.” Finally, follow up
with the customer to thank them for their busi-
ness. Handwritten letters ALWAYS work best.
I wish I could go into more detail on each of
these steps, but if you would like to learn more,
I would recommend you read Tom Hopkins’
book “Selling for Dummies,” or Brian Tracy’s
“Be a Sales Superstar.” Both of these authors are
great motivational speakers as well as great sales
trainers. ey dier slightly on how they get
their message across to you, but both seem to
really want to help you become a better sales-
person and feel better about yourself at the
same time. As Bill Kley, my rst sales manager
over a decade ago, always said, “e harder I
work, the luckier I get, so get out of your car,
and go sell something!!!”
senses
Cont. from page 9
Test Your
Knowledge
TRIVIA BY MAGGIE
“THE TRIVIAMEISTER”
1. In England this
snack food is
called “crisps”.
2. What FL tree is the
University of FL
asking people not
to use as mulch
anymore because
we are decimating
the native tree
population?
3. In mph, how fast
do nerve impulses
such as pain travel
to your brain?
4. What animal hair is
most often used in
violin bows?
5. For Kids Only:
When is a kiwi not
a bird?
A N S W E R S : 1 . P o t a t o C h i p s 2 . C y p r e s s 3 . 1 8 0 m p h
4 . H o r s e ( t a i l ) 5 . W h e n i t s a k i w i f r u i t
Test your knowledge every Wednesday at 7
p.m. at the Crab Trab in downtown Fernandina
Beach. (One of these questions will be
featured at the next trivia show.)
March 11, 2010| The Nassau News 11
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unfurnished apartment very nice 1 bedroom 1
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services
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Our current circulation is over 20,500!
Just think…20,500 FREE newspapers throughout the
county that could have YOUR advertisement in them!
NAME OF NEWSPAPER CIRCULATION
The Nassau News 20,500+
Fernandina Beach News-Leader 12,200
Nassau County Record 4,800
Westside Journal 12,150
For advertising information and rates, contact
Lamar Williams at lamar@thenassaunews.com,
904-225-5100, or 904-349-1405.
Callahan and Hilliard areas call
904-879-0596 or 904-386-2403
(Fernandina Beach News-Leader, Nassau County Record, and Westside Journal circulations are
based on information provided by the Florida Press Association. www.press.com)
The Nassau News
ADVERTISE TODAY
Shirley Fountain
904-386-2403 • 904-879-0596
or email sfountain@thenassaunews.com
Lamar Williams
904-225-5100 • 904-349-1405
or email lamar@thenassaunews.com
OR
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Fernandina Beach
Personal Branding WorkshoP
Thursday March 18 at 6 p.m.
Mygani Design Studio, a brand consulting frm, will
hold a personal branding workshop for professional
women at the Fairfeld Inn & Suites, 1300 Airport Rd.
For more information please contact (904) 860-8440 or
visit www.mygani.com.
Medical ToWn MeeTing
Monday, March 22 from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
William McGrath, MD, Latoya Kuester, MD, and Ann
McGrath, ARNP, CNM, will discuss “Current Topics in
Women’s Health,” in this month’s Medical Town Meet-
ing sponsored by the Nassau County Medical Society/
Baptist Medical Center Nassau. The free program will be
held at the Hospital. Light refreshments will be served.
No reservations required.
HILLIARD
easTer egg hunT
Saturday, March 27 at 11 a.m.
The First Alliance Church, 37207 Mill Street is inviting
children three to 10 years of age to an Easter Egg Hunt.
Pepper the Clown will also be entertaining the children
with his artistic animal balloon creations.
Free Movie: Where The Wild Things are
Saturday, April 3 at 3 p.m.
The Friends of the Bryceville Library will show”Where
the Wild Things Are” at the Bryceville library, 7280
Motes Rd. Popcorn and soft drinks will be provided as
well.
KINGSLAND, GA
keagan BeneFiT ride
Saturday, March 13 at 10 a.m.
The Swamp Rats Riding Association invites you to
a beneft ride for our little friend. Keagan is a special
needs child with cerebral palsy. Insurance does not
cover all costs for her therapy sessions. All proceeds to
go Keagan’s parents. Registration is a St Marys Water-
front Park from 10 to 11 a.m. Kickstands go up at 11:15.
Tickets are $15 per bike/$5 per passenger. $10 each
additional poker hand. There will be live entertainment
and food at the end of the ride.
Contact Too Tall at 904-413-2057 or Shooter at 904-
229-2739.
5Th annual runaBouT
in The royal disTricT auTo shoW
Saturday, March 20
Annually, over 120 participants and 3,000+ specta-
tors fll the streets of downtown Kingsland to enjoy
auto’s ranging from vintage to modern-day muscle
cars! You can also enjoy free, live entertainment, test
out the local food favors, shop and cheer for your
favorite elected ofcial at the annual Mayor & Council
Lawnmower Race. This year there will also be a health
& wellness fair and a CCHS Sidewalk Chalk Art Contest.
Visit www.KingslandDDA.com or call 912-729-2848 for
more information.
YULEE
arT exhiBiT aT The nassau cenTer gallery
Thursday, March 11 from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
A reception will be held to meet Professor James
Kemp, curator and collector of the Talismans of the Far
East Art Exhibit. The exhibit, consisting of talismans
from 24 religions will be shown until March 30 at the
Betty P. Cook Nassau Center Gallery, 76346 William
Burgess Boulevard in Yulee. Call 904-548-4432.
BoWling TournaMenT
Saturday, March 13 at 1p.m.
The Tournament Bowling Club of Jacksonville will
be sponsoring a Women’s Bowling Tournament at the
Striker’s Family Bowling Center. Our opening ceremony
will be held at that time. This tournament will involve
Women’s Bowling teams from around the state of
Florida, Georgia and South Carolina.
Please come out and cover this event for your local
newspapers and learn more about what the Tourna-
ment Bowling Club of Jacksonville, is doing for the
Jacksonville and Nassau County Communities.
For more information about the organization please
see our website at www.tbcjax.org or contact our
President Janette Wanton at 904-764-7848 or me the
Tournament Director Winifred Favors at 904-955-8338.
c.c.W Pro WresTling reTurns To yulee 
Saturday, March 20 at 7:30 p.m.
Pro wrestling will return at the Yulee Middle School.
In the explosive Main Event an eight man Tag Team
Match as Rock and Roll Chris Turner, The Marcs Broth-
ers, and Booger takes on John Douglas, Scotty Biggs,
Kaos, and Kevin Toole and also on the card Southern
States Champion Maddog Miller puts his title on the
line against Jarrod Micheals, Cuzin Ricky Jay takes on
Otto Riley, Kevin Kantrell battles high fyer Skylark. Plus
many more matches with such stars as Riot, Cheyne
Miles, Jonathon Wells, Blaine Rage, Samantha Steele,
and a host of others. Tickets are $6 in advance and $7
at the door you can purchase advanced tickets at Yulee
Middle School. Portions of the proceeds will beneft
Y.M.S athletics. Visit www.ccwrestling.biz for more
information.
scavenger hunT To BeneFiT vieTnaM veTeren
Saturday, March 27 at 10 a.m.
Rain or shine there will be a scavenger hunt through-
out diferent businesses throughout Yulee. Registra-
tion will be held in the Yulee Target’s parking lot. Entry
fee is $10 per person. Winner receives $250! For more
information call Kim at 904-759-7565.
regisTraTion deadline For
arBorisT cerTiFicaTion Training
The four-session certifcation training is being held
on April 1, 8, 13 and 22, from 5 until 9 p.m.  All four
sessions must be attended to qualify for the exam. Cost
is $50 per person. If you would like to purchase your
books, contact Becky Jordi at 904-548-1116.  Registra-
tion deadline is March 26. 
calendar of events March 11th - April 22nd
FERNANDINA BEACH
HIllIARD
kINgslAND, gA
yulEE