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CENTRE

for
REFORMATION

STUDIES

VICTORIA

UNIVERSITY
^1

^0!.

(Snglisjj
Scd
COMMITTEE

DIKECTOE:

OF MANAGEMENT:

FREDERICK

TEEASUBEE:

J. FURMVALL,

HENRY B. WHEATLEY,

ESQ.
ESQ.

HON. SEC.: "W. A. DALZIEL, ESQ.,9, MILNEESTREET,


LONDON, N.
J. MEADOWS COWPER, ESQ.
REV. DR. RICHARD MORRIS.
ALEXANDER J. ELLIS, ESQ.
.T. A. H. MURRAY, ESQ.
DANBY P. FRY, ESQ.
EDNYARD \\ PEACOCK, ESQ.

HENRY BUCKS GIBBS, ESQ.

KKV. WALTER W. SK'KAT.

REV. BARTON LODGE.


REV. J. RAWSON LUMBY.

HENRY S\VEET, ESQ.


W. ALOIS WRIGHT,

(Withpower to add Workers to their number.)


BANKEBS:

THE HEAD OFFICE

OF THE UNION BANK

OF LONDON,

I'UINCES STREET, E.C.

PTJBLISHEES: TRUBNER k CO., 57 Si.59, LUDGATE HILL, E.C.

THEEarly EnglishText Societywasstarted in ISOt for the purposeof


bringingwithin the reachof the manytlie hithertoinaccessible
treasuresof
Old English literature, and of clearing*England from the reproach under
which slie has so long restedof caring little for the monumentsof her early

languageand life. During the ten years of its existencethe Societyhas


been successfulin issuing to its subscribers a large number of Texts illus-

trating the language,the history,the belief, andthe habitsof our ancestors.


The publicationsof the Societyappealto those interestedin the history of
their native language and land; to men who can trace in these records
the intimate connection which exists betweenthe present and the past, and
who can seein such records the deadpast becomea living reality;

The publicationsof The Early EnglishTestSocietyare dividedinto Four


Classes.I. Arthur andotherRomances.II. \\rorksillustratingour Dialects

andtheHistoryof ourLanguage,
includinga Seriesof re-editions
of our
early Dictionaries. III.

Biblical Translationsand Religious Treatises.

IV. Miscellaneous. (The Extra Series, which commencedin 1867, is intended for re-editions.)
The Publications for 1SCGare out of print, but a separate subscription

hasbeenopened
fortheirimmediate
reprint. TheTYxtsfor 1864,andall
but three for 18G5,have beenreprinted. Subscriberswho desire the Texts

of all or any of theseyears shouldsend their namesat onceto the Hon.


Secretary,as manyadditionalnamesare requiredbeforetheTexts for 1866
can be sent to press.

The Subscription
is 1 If. a year [and1 l.. (LargePaper,2 12s.6aT.)
additional for the EXTRASERIES],due in advanceon the 1st of JANUARY,
and should be paid either to the Society's Account at the Head Office of tht
Union Bank, Princes Street, London, E.G., or by Money Order (made payable at the Chief Office,London, and crosst 'Union Bank ') to the Hon.
Secretary,W. A. DALZIEL, Esq., 9, Milner Street, London, N. (United-

States Subscribers,who wish their Texts postedto them,must pay for


postage 5s. a year extra for the Original Series,and 3s. a year for the

Extra Series.) TheSociety'sTexts arealsosoldseparately


at the pricesput

after them in the List at the end.

The followingSummaryof the Society'sfirst Ten-Years'work is taken


from theCommittee'sTenth Report,January,1874:-

2. TJieSociety's
first TenYears'Work.

. 2. ThoSode^fffint TenTea/rf Work. Last yearclosed


the Society'sfirst Decade; and it maythereforebe well to
look back over its work since,in February 1804, its Founder's
first Circular went out, announcing1that "A few of the members of the Philological Society, being anxious to continue

the publication of Early English Texts,which that Society


latuly commenced,but has now for a time resolved to discontinue, have formed a committee for the purpose of collecting

subscriptions,and printing thciv\vith Early English M.SS."


1. To start with money. Our Early English Text Society
lias spu-ntin its ten years 8700 in producing Texts. Hero
uru the figures :

s.

1864 Moneyspentin printing, 5rc.


:. 13-i
1865

5
15

1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1371

1873

7
10

649

10

SIS
iocs
000
1475
1154

11
0
16
0
11

6
G
1
0
11

957

Ib73

d.

1117
i

11

With this moneythe Societyhas produced1(1,100pngcsof


Texts, including Introductions, Notes, Glossaries,&c., besides
1000 and more pagesof Reprints, Reports, Air.
Ni ,;>,i,U]i, as to Language,-the point from which the
Sociuty started, the illustration of which has been, and must
be, the justification for the publication of many Texts of littlo
literary or historic merit;-the Society hasbrought out, of the.
loth century.1 Kins Alfred's AYest-Saxon
versionof Gregory'sPastoral
Care,editedfrom 2 MSS. by Mr Henry Sweet.
llth century.2Homily de OctoJ'iriis (in First Seriesof O.E. Ilomilie-).
id. Pr ]{. Morris. Iloiuilv on the Discoveryof the Cross(in
No. 46), ed. Rev. Dr 11. Morris.

]2(li century (specialTransitional period). Proseand Terse from tlie


unique Lambeth MS. 187, in I>r K. Morris's Old Engli;li
Homilies (First Series).

12th century. Old English Homilies(from the uniqueTrinity MS.),


Second Serii ~, ed. IV Jiirliard

Morris.

13thcentury,First half: St Marliarete,


the first Text (fromtheunique
MS.), ed. llcv. T. 0. Cockayne.
1 The Blickling Homilies of 971 A.D. are nearly all printed.
1 For the llth century, other Texts are preparing.

2. Chronological
List of ourfirst TenYears' Texts. 3
1230 ? Tlali Meidenhjid,"West-Midlandversion,ed.Rev.T. 0. Cockayne.
St Juliana, from 2 MSS., cd. Rev. T. 0. Cockayneand Mr E.
Brock.

Poems,&c.,in the latter partof theFirst Seriesof ' Old English


Homilies,1ed. Kev. Dr Moms.

121G-50The Moral Ode,later version,in 'Old English Jlisccllany,'


ed. Rev.

Dr 11. Morris.

3 Hymnsin O.E.Horn.II.(from theunique


MS.),ed.DrR.Morris.
13lh century, secondhalf:

Genesis
andExodus(fromthe uniqueMS.),ed.Rev.Dr Richard
Morris.

Bestiary, Old Kentish Sermons(both from unique MSS.), Religious Poemsfrom the JesusMS., in Dr R. Morris's ' Old English Miscellany.'

HaveloktheDane(fromtheuniqueMS.)rrd.Rev.W. W. Skeat.
Alfred's Proverbs,in Dr R. Morris's ''Old English Miscellany.'
King Horn, &c., cd. Rev. J. R. Luniliy.
]4th century.1 St Margarete,2nd Text, ed. Kev. T. O. Cockayne.
1340 Dan Michel's Ayenbiteof Inwyt (from the uuiqueMS.), ed. Rev.
Dr Richard

Morris.

1340-90 Poems on the Cross (in 'Legends of the Holy Rood'), ed.
Rev.

Dr R. Morris.

1340, ah. Hampole'sEnglish ProseTreatises,ed. Rev. G. G. Perry.


1350 ? The Alliterative Romance of William of Palerne, or William aud

the "Werwolf(from the unique MS.), ed. Rev. W. W. Skeat.


1350 ? The Alliterative Romanceof Josephof Arimathie, or the Holy
Grail; from the uniqueMS., ab. 1390, ed. Rev. \V. W. Skeat.

1360,?Early EnglishAlliterativePoems,and Sir Gawayne


and the
,,

Green Knight (from the uniqueMS.), ed. Rev. Dr R. Morris.


The Alliterative Movte Arthure (from the unique (Thornton)
MS., ah. 1440 A.D.),ed. Rev. G. G. Perry, re-ed.Mr E. Brock.
? Religious Pieces in Prose and Verse from the Thornton MS., ab.

1440 A.D., ed. Rev. G. G. Perry.


? The Alliterative GestHystorialeof the Destructionof Troy (from
unique MS.), cd.lateRev. G.A. Panton,and D. Donaldson,Esq.
1302 The Alliterative Vision of William concerning Piers the Plowman,
first cast, or Text A, from the Vernon MS. ab. 1390-1400, ed.
Rev. W. W. Skeat.

1375 Barbonr'sBruce,Part I. (from theonly2 MSS.andoldestprinted


editions), ed. Rev. W. W. Skeat.
1377 William's Vision of Piers Plowman, Text B, ed. Rev. W. W. SkeaL
13SO? Chaucer's Boethius, ed. Rev. Dr R, Moms.

1389 English Gilds, their Statutes and Customs, Sec.;ed. Toulmiii


Smith, Esq., with Dr L. Brentano'sHistory of Gilds, &c.

1300? The Staciousof Rome,ed.F. J. Fupnivall,Esq.


1391 Chaucer's Astrolabe, ed. Rev. W. W. Skeat.
1 The earliest English version of the Cursor Mundi, in the Edinburgh
MS., is believed to be about 1300 A.D. The Cotton text is not much later.

2. Chronological
List of ourfirst Ten Tears'Tests.

1393 "William'sVision of Piers Plowman,Text C, ed.Rev.W. W. Skeat.


1394 Pierce the Plowman's Crede,ed.Rev. W. W. Skeat.

1399Richard
theRedeles
(inPiersPlowman,
C),ed.Rev.W.W.Skeat,
from the uniqueMS.

1415 TheCrownedKing (in PiersPlowman,C), ed.Rev.W. W. Skeat,


from the uniqueMS.
1420 ? Mirk's Duties of a ParishPriest, ed. E. Peacock,Esq.

1420? Palladiuson Husbondrie


(from the uniqueMS.), ed.Rev.B.
Lodge, Part I. (all the Text).
1430? The Alliterative ChevelereAssigne,from the unique MS., ed.
H. H. Gibbs,Esq.
1430? Political. Religious,and Love Poems,ed. F. J. Furnivall, Esq.
1430?Lydgate'sOrderofFools,&c.fin No.VIII.),ed.F. J.Furnivall,Esq.

1430? Hymnsto the Virgin andChrist,tbe Parliament


of Devils,&u.,
ed. F. J. Furnivall, Esq.
1430-50 Poemson the Cross (in 'Legends of the Holy Rood'), ed.
Rev. Dr R. Morris.

1440 TheKnight dela Tour Landry,fromthe uniqueMS., ed.Thomas


Wright, Esq.
1440? Arthur, from the unique MS., ed. F. J. Furnivall, Esq.
1440 ? Merlin, from the uniqueMS., ed. H. B. Wheatley,Esq.
1440 ? Generydes,from the unique MS., ed. W. Aldis Wright, Esq.,
Part I.

1460? TheBokeof Curtasye


(fromSloane^MS.,
1986,in Babees
Book),

ed.F. J. Furnivall/Esq.
1460? RatisRaving,and other pieces,Bernardusde Cura Rei Famuliaris, ScotchProphecies,
&c., ed. Rev. J. R Lumby.
1460? Urbauitatis, &c. (in BabeesBook), Stacionsof Rome, &c., ed.

F. J. Furnivall,Esq.
1460-70 John Russell's Boke of Nurture (in BabeesBook), ed. F. J.
Furnivall, Esq.
1460-70 For to Servea Lord, from a copy'ofthe uniqueMS. (in Babees
Book), ed.F. J. Furnivall, Esq.
1460-70 The Good Wife, Stans Puer, &c. (in 'Queene Elizabethes

Achademy
'), ed.F. J. Furnivall,Esq.
1460-70TheBookof QuinteEssence,
ed.F. J. Furnivall,Esq.
1462? The Wright's ChasteWife, ed. F. J. Furnivall, Esq.

1478? Caxton'sBookof Curtesye,


3 versions
(two from MSS).,ed.P
J. Furnivall,Esq.
1500 ? Lancelotof tbe Laik, from the uniqueMS., ed.Rev.W. W. Skeat.
1500? Romanceof Partenayor Lusignen,from theuniqueMS., ed.Rev.
W. W. Skeat.

1500? Scotch
Poem
onHeraldry
(in No.VIII.), ed.F. J. Furnivall,
Esq.
1513 The Boke of Keruynge,from AVynkynde Worde'stext (in
Babees
Book),ed.F. J. Furnivall,Esq.
1520-6Livesof Josephof Arimathaea,
from Wynkynde Worde'aand
Pynson'scopies(in No. 44), ed. Rev. W. \V. Skeat.

1528-53A Supplycacyon
of the Beggers,
thePooreCommons,
&c.,ed,
F. J. FurnivallandJ. M, Cowper,Esqs.

2. Our Ten Years' Texts classtby Dialects.

1530 OureLadyesMyroure,ed.Rev.J. H. Blunt.


1542-7AndrewBoorde'sIntroductionandDyetary,with Barnesin the

Defence
oftheBerde,ed.F. J. Furniv'all,
Esq.

1549 The Complaynt


of Scotlande,
with 4 contemporary
EnglishTracts,
1542-48,ed. J. A. H. Murray,Esq.
1550?^Starkey'sEnglandin Henry VIII's time,a Dialoguebetween
PoleandLupset,fromthe uniqueMS., ed.J. M. Cowper,
Esq.
1550-1 Robert Crowley's 31 Epigrams,Way to Wealth,&c., ed. J. M.
Cowper,Esq.
1550-77 Hewe Rodes'sBook of Nurture (in BabeesBook), ed. F. J.
Furnivall, Esq.
1552 Sir David Lyndesay'sWorks, ed.F. Hall and J. A. H. Murray,
Esqs.,5 Parts.
1556-68 William Lauder'sPoems,ed.F. Hall andF. J. Furnivall, Esqs.,
2 Parts.

1557 F. Seager'sSchooleof Vertue (in BabeesBook), ed. F. J. Furnivall, Esq.


1560 ? Sir Humfrey Gilbert's ' QueeneElizabethesAchademy,' &c.,
ed. F. J. Fumivall, Esq.
1565-92 Awdelay's Fraternitye of Yacabonds,Harman's Caveat,&c.,
ed. E. Viles and F. J. Furnivall, Esqs.

1570 Levins'sManipulusVocabulorum,
ed.H. B. Wheatley,
Esq.
1599 Thynne'a Animaduersionson Speght's Chaucer,ed. Dr G. H.
Kingsley.
1616 The Times' Whistle, and other Poems,by R. C. (from the unique
MS.), ed. J. M.-Cowper,Esq.

1617? Hume'sOrthographic
andCongruitieof the BritanTongue(from
the uniqueMS.), ed.H. B. Wheatley,
Esq.
1619 The Bookeof Demeanor(in BabeesBook), ed.F. J. Furnivall, Esq.

Of theseworks the speciallydialectalonesare the following :-

I. NORTHERN

DIALECT.

1340? Hampole'sProseTreatises.
ReligiousPiecesfromthe ThorntonMS.
1375

Barbour's

Bruce.

1460? RatisRaving; ScotchProphecies,


&c.(Nos. 42, 43).
1500 ? Lancelot of the Laik.

1500 ? ScotchPoemon Heraldry (in No. VIII),


1530-50 Sir D. Lyndesay'sWorks.

1549 TheComplayntof Scotlande.


1556-68

Wm. Lauder's
II.

Works.
MIDLAND

DIALECT.

A. Host-Midland(a Northern ; b Southern); B. TTeitMidland.


A. East Midland;

b Southern Division.

12th cent. Old English Homilies, SecondSeries (from the unique


Trinity MS.), b.

6 2. Our TenYears'TextsclmstbyDialectsand Subjects.


13th cent.Bestiary(in ' Old EnglishMiscellany
'). *"
1250V C'liesis

and Exodus, b.

Fragmenton p. 200of Old EnglishMiscellany,


b.
1280? Havelokthe Dane, b. but originally a, North East Midland.
B.

jr,,f

1230 ? Hali Meidenhad.

Wooingof our Lord, in First Seriesof Old English Homilies.


1360? Early Kngli-h Alliterative Poems(Lancashire).
,,
Sir Gawayne and the Green Knight (Lancashire).
1400 ? ' Cross' extract from the Bodleian MS. of the Cursor Mundi, in

' Ix'Lrendsof the Holy Rood.'


1340?

William

and the Werwolf.

13(10? Gest Hystorialeof the Destruction of Troy (Northern part of


the We^t-Midland area).
III.

SOUTHERN

DIALECT.

12th-cent.LambethHomilies,in Old English Homilies,Fir-t Series.


li'.m'r

Old Kent i>h Sermons (in Old English Mi-cellany, No. -I'.M.

|:;>HI? MoralOde,andPoemsfromthe Jesus


MS. (in Old Eng.Misc.).
I34n Dan Michel'sAyenbiteof Inwyt.
The rest of our Texts areeither uncertain,1or may be said to be in
that mixt dialect, mainly Midland, slightly Southern,which became,
with
Chaucer,the standardlangu

Tliirdlij. Arranging the Society's books by Subjects, we


find

in

Romance(for LegendteeTheology).

Manners and Customs.

1250 ? Kin? Horn, Floris and Blaucheflour.

1440 The Knight de la Tour Landry.


1440-15(13 Bailees Book, Bokes of

VXi ? Ilavcliik the Dane.

Norture, Kervyng, Cortasye,

13UO? Ge-t Ih-tnriale of the Destruction of Troy (alliterative..

13GO?
Morte Arthure(MS. 144U),
altive.

and Demeanor, &c.


1460 ? Pilsrims' Sea Voyage (in ' Sta-

cionsof Rome/).
14H2 Wright's Chaste Wife."

ChevelereAssigne(alliterative). 147>Ai.\t'iii'sBook of Curtesye.


13GOSir Gawayne and the Green 1500? Bernardus de Cura Rei FamuKnight.
William of Palerne.

Earis.
RatLs Raving, and other Pieces.

1375? Barbour'sBruce,Part I.
1300 ? Joseph of Arimatliie,

1540? QueeneElizabethesAchademy,
or the

Holy Grail (alliterative).


1440Arthur.

144'iMerlin.

1440
Generydes.
I.'I.ID Lancelot of the Laik.

&c.

12G5-1550
Accountsof Italian andGermanBooksof Courtesy,by W.

M. Rossetti,and E. 'Oswald,

Esqs.

l."i.01'artenayor Lusignen.
1 Mr Skeat feels certain that the original of the Alliterative ' Joseph of
Arimathea' wasNorthern or Midland, but which he cannot say,on account of
the Southern ecribe's alterations of its language and forms.

2. Our Ten Tears' Textsclasstby Subjects. 3. Summary. 7


Social and Political History.'
Morals, T/xotogy and Legends.
1389 English Gilds, their Statutes 10th cent. K. Alfred's ' Gregory'sPas-

and Customs,
AM:.

1399 Richard

tho Redeles.

1415 The CrownedKing.

1420 Palladius on Ilusbondrie.

toral Care'.

1200 Hali Meidenhad.

-i-inte Marherete,&c.

l-2'.'.nI,in' iif St. Juliana (legendary).

1440i Political, Religious, and Love 1250-1300Early English Homilies, 2


Poems.

Series.

1500? Early Scotch Prophecies (in


Bemardus).
1523-53Supplycacyonof the Beggers,
PooreCommons,&c.
1535-50Lyndesay*sMunarche.
1535-50Lyndesay'sSatirical Poems.
1540? Stew-key'sEngland in Henry
VIII's

time, II.

1542-7Andrew Boorde's Introduction


and Dyetary.
l."<19The Complayntof Scotlande.
1550-1 R. Crowle/s 31 Epigrams,Way
to Wealth, &c.
1556 Lauderonthe Dewtie of Kings.
15G5-92Awdelay's Vacabondes,and
Barman's Vacabondes.
1563

Lander's

Minor

11-15cent. Legendsof the Holy Rood,


&e.
13th cent. Old English Miscellany.
1340 Hampole'sEnglish Prose Treatises.
1340 Dan Michel'sAyenbite of Inwyt.
I:;.">")
Genesisand Exodus.
1360 Early English Alliterative Poems.

1362-1393'William's Vision of Piers


Plowman,3. versions.
1394 Pierce the Plowman'sCrede.
1420Myrc's Duties of a Parish Priest.
1430Hymns to the Virgin and Christ;
the Parliament of Devils, &c.
Stacionsof Rome,&c.
1530Oure LadyesMyroure.

Poems.

1616 Times Whistle, &c., by.R. C.


Philosophy and Science.

Grammar, Criticism, &c.

13SO? Chaucer's Boethius.

1570 Levins's Manipulus Vocabulorum.

1391 Chauceron the Astrolabe.


14651 Book of Quiute Essence.

1599Thynne's Animadversions on
"Speght'sChaucer.
1617 Hume's Orthographic and Congruitie of the Britan Tongue.
A.-Saxon

to

1874.

Mr

A. J. Ellis'a

Early English Pronunciation.

3. final iinn-i/ innl Effectof the Society'sTen-Years' Work.


For the History of our Language the Society hasproduced tho
most important 10th-century Text, in which Mr Sweet has for
the first time pointed out the characteristics of Alfred's English. For the llth century our Society hasbeen prevented, for
want of funds, from printing more than two Homilies. For
the 12th century, in the latter half, it has produced the only
Texts of the specially Transition Period of our Language, of
unequalled value for the history of our inflexional formations,
and for the first time brought to light by the skilled eye and
hand of the Rev. Dr R. Morris.

For the 13th and 14th centuries

the Society has produced a series of most valuable dialectal


Texts which, under Dr R. Morris's editing, have made far
clearer than ever before, the three great divisions of our
dialects, and the subdivisions of each,but specially of the Midland, the most important of the three. For the 14th, and also
the later centuries, from the 15th to the early part of the 17th,

3. SummaryandEffectof our Ten Years' Work.

the Societyhas produceda very largonumberof excellent


Texts in the standardlanguage,at and after the period of its
formation,togetherwith the earliestEnglish rytning dictionary, a Grammarof JamesI'stime, and Mr Alexander J. Ellis's

masterlytreatiseon the pronunciationof our language,from


Anglo-Saxon to Victorian times, "Early English Pronunciation, with especialreferenceto Chaucer and Shakespere." It
can be truly said that no other Society like ours has ever been
able to do so much for the History of English, as our Early
English Text Society has.
If wo turn to the Lives of our Forefathers, the Books they
read, the Societiesthey belonged to, the Ways they had, the
Beliefs they cherisht, the Superstitions they clung to, the
Evils that beset them, the same fact stares one in the face;
the Early English Text Society have produced a set of Texts
that can challengecomparisonwith thoseof any other Society;
they know that their own cannot be beaten. For Story, take
Havelok, Arthur, Merlin, Lancelot, Gawayne, King Horn,
Troy-book, William of Palerne, Partenay; for Society, take
our English Gilds, William's ' Vision of Piers Plowman ' (in
Mr Skeat's noble edition), Political Poems,Lyudesay's scathing satires, Lauder's Poems, Starkey's England, Andrew
Boorde's picture of the England and Europe of his time,
Awdelay, Ilarman, Crowlev, ic. : for Ways of Women and
Men, the curious pictures of the BabeeaBook, John Russell,
Hugh Rhodes,Ratis Having, Times' Whistle, &c.; for Faith
and Superstition, the long series of'theological Texts the
Society has publisht; and let us all be glad that we have

had time and powerto do so much. Not only has our Society producedits own fine series of Texts; but it has also
given birth to other Societies, whose publications are carrying out its purposein other directions; to other books that
bring its teaching within the reach of every student and boy
in the British Empire, the United States, Germany, and

Austria. From the Early English Text Society sprang,in


1867, its own Extra Series; in 1868, the printing of tho
Percy Folio MS.; the Chaucer Society, the Ballad Society,
the Spenser Society, and the Roxburghe Library; in 1871
the Hunterian Club; in 1873 the PalfeographicalSociety, the

English Dialect Society,and the New ShakspereSociety.


From the Early English Text Society,by membersof it,
have also gone forth, in 1866, Dr Richard Morris's Aldine
edition of 'Chaucer's Poetical Works'; in 1867 his Claren-

don-Press' Selectionsfrom Chaucer'(nowin its 3rd edition) ;


in 1867his 'Specimensof Early English' (vol. 1 now in its
2nd edition ; vol. 2 now in its 3rd); in 1869 his Globe edi-

3. SummaryandEffectof our TenYears' Work.


tion of 'Spenser's Works';

in 1872 his 'Historical Acci-

denceof the English Language'; in 1870Mr Skeat's'Vision


of William concerningPiersthe Plowman' (for the Clarendon
Press); in 1871 his 'Specimensof English Literature A.D.

1394-1597'; in 1872 his 4-Text edition of St Mark (two


texts Anglo-Saxoii, two Early English, for the Cambridge

Press); in 1871Mr Earle's 'Philology of the English Language'; in 1873 Mr Kington Oliphant's ' Sourcesof Standard
English'; in 1871-3 Dr Stratmann's 'Old English Dictionary of the llth,

12th, 13th, 14th, and 15th centuries';

1871 his edition of'The Owl and Nightingale';

in

in 1871 Dr

Matzner's ' AltenglischeSprachproben


'; and in 1873 his
' Wcirterbuch,'

Part 1; in 1873 Dr Mall's edition of 'The

Harrowing of Hell'; Dr Zupitza's ' Altcnglisches Uebungsbuch,' &c. Truly the effect of the Society's work is a thing
for every Englishman to rejoice over. As a ' Leader ' in the
Daily News, of Nov. 20, 1873, on the Director's appeal
for money-help to the Early English Text Society, says,
our Society " has wiped away, as Mr FURNIVALL
proudly
boasts, the old well-deserved reproach of indifference to the
sources of our own language; it has stirred up the study of
English historically; it makes possible a knowledge of the
language ; it makes accessiblethe most valuable documents
of that history ; and it showshow, in the teeth of ignorance,
civil war, and obstacles of all kinds, literature,

that is, the

power of expression, went on growing, now slowly, now


quickly, putting forth in this direction and that, tiny tendrils
which were destined to grow in time into great branches,
laden with the fruits of labour and genius. No single form
of literature springs suddenly into existence, and the old
familiar phrases, such as that which used to describe CHAUCEE
as the Father of English Poetry, have to be abandonedaltogether, or used in a modified sense.
" But the Society has yet other claims upon us, in addition
to those which appeal chiefly to students of literature. It
is to such works as are issued under its auspices that we
must look, far more than to the State records, for the social

history of the country. In the ' BabeesBoke,' the ' Boke of


Norture,' the ' Boke of Carving,' the statutes of the English
Guilds, and the ' Supplycacyon of the Beggars,' we may read
the very mind of our forefathers, the way in which they

regardedthe commondutiesand responsibilitieswhich make


up every-daylife, their methodsof makingexistencecomfortable, gentle, easy,and cultured,their way of dress,their protection and advancement of the arts; how they ate, drank,
talked, and slept. And if there linger among us any relics

10

4. Tlte Duke of Manchester's Commemoration Fund.

ofrthat most ancient religion, the worship of ancestors,Mr

FTKNIVALL'S
appealfor help should touch us there. But,
indeed,his Society is doing so great a work for all the English-

speakingraceon both sidesof the Atlantic, that its claims


reach higher than mere pride or patriotism."

4. Why then hasour Society,which has doneso much,


need to ask urgently for more money, for a continuous supply
of fresh Members and Funds ''. Simply becauseit lta$done so
much, and wants to do much more.

The material it has

supplied to scholarshas beenquickly condensedand arranged


for the use of all readers, by Dr Richard Morris, Mr Skeat,
Mr Murray, Mr A. J. Ellis, Mr Earle, and Mr Kington
Oliphant, here; by Dr Stratmann, Dr Stiirzen Becker, Drs
Miitzner and Goldbcck, Dr Mall, Dr Horstmann, Dr Zupitza,
on the Continent; by the late lamented Prof. Hadley, Prof.
March, Prof. Whitney, Prof. Child, and others, in America.
The Committee have always been eager to put in print the
utmost amount of MS. every year. Sharing that eagerness,
and relying on the payment of arrearswhich ought to have
come in, but did not, the Director authorized the issue of more

Texts to the subscribersto the Original Seriesthan those subscribers had paid for. He was therefore obliged to strive to
make up the deficiency by an Extra Fund, which the Duke of
Manchester was kind enough, with his unfailing good-will
towards the Society, to head, and which was meant to raise
200, but had only brought-in the sum of 90,17s. by the 31st
of December, 1873.

Still the balance is needed.

We want

all the money that can possibly be got. And the Committee
trust that every Member will try to give or get a donation in
the 'Duke of Manchester's Commemoration Fund,' in aid of

the Society. Many people who are not Members of the Society might be induced to subscribeto the Fund, if Members
would but explain to their friends and acquaintancesthe pur-

pose,nature,and extentof the Society'swork. Thefollowing


donations and promises have been received :SUBSCRIBERS

TO THE

DUKE

OF

MANCHESTER'S

COMMEMOR-

ATION FUND, TO 31sTJANUARY,1874.


ITn Grace the Duke of Manchester

. .

10

His

. .

10

Grace

the

Duke

of

Devonshire

s. d.
i) D
ii

ii

The Must Nnlile the Marquis of Rip^n


The Rev. W. H. Thompson,D.D., Master 0
Trinity G>ll>"_y,
Cambridge
Richard Johnson,1

10 8 0

A Friend

10
10
10

J.

. .

S. B

Prof. F. J. Child, Harvard


Triibuer & Co., ML
C. Chilcls, Esq.
John Lister, Esq. . .

CorneliusPayne,E <j.

10 0 II
10 i) Ii

5
5
5

D
0
II

II
0
0

5 0
0 II
D II

5 a 1)

4 CommemorationFund. 5. SecondIQ-ycars' Work. 11

l,

William Euing, Esq.. Glasgow

5 i) 0

Thus. IIu.'lK ,Esq., -UP. . .


J. L. Tralk.nl, Esq.
W. G. Stone,Esq.
R. S. Turner, E-q.
Robert White. Esq.
F. J. Funiivall, Esq.

3
3
2
o
2
2

(I
i
2
o
0
0

0
o
0
I)
(1
II

The Rev. E. Turin-

II

F. Harris, Esq.
A. Macmillan,Esq.

2 it 0
1 1 1)

G>1. Thos. Brooke


..
Prufes.sur Henry Morl-v

5 0 II
3 3 II

..

Prof. A. W. Ward

The Rev. E. A. Abbott, I). D.

1 1 II

I>r Ernest Adams


Miss A. M. Richardson

1
1

. .
. .

1
1
1

0
0
0

Pripf. JosephPayne

1 1 0

Mr Burnous

1 0

The Rev. Wm. Williamson


The Rev. Canon Toole

1
1

1
1

Edwin Lloyd, Esq.

..

J. Oakey,'Jr., Esq.

0
(1

1 1 (1

1 1 0

Rev. H. 8. WilcockB

J. W. Hales, Esq.
II. C'audlcr,Esq.

1 1 II
1 0 (1

..
146

II

5. Sl-rtdt of UK-:Sfidcfi/'s S<rr,lt,lTm-Yr,,^' Worl: Wo


have, may be, done from a fourth to a third of our work.
At any rate we give a sketch of that which lies at once before

us,just to showwhat our Editors can andwill produceif our


Members will find them money enough, and what will, if

printed, probably leaveonly a Third like Ten-Years'Work to


finish the task the Society has set itself, the printing of the

whole of the unprintedMSS. of Early English:l1874.

AlliterativeTroy-Book,Tart II.

1Vita'sDay of Doom,Sco.

Four-Text Cursor fJm/Ji^ Part I.

Thomas of Ercildouu's It vines and

ISlicktingHomilies,Pt I now ready.


Prophecies.
I'alladius, Part II.
Generydes,Part II.
Merlin, Part IV.
1875.

Four-Text CursorMitncJi,Part II.


Blicklintr Homilies,Part II.

The Pystil of SweteSusane.


Lyndesay,Part VI.

Lay Folks'Mass-Book.

Gospelof Xichodemus.

Piers PlowmanNotes, Part I.

Maydenston'sPoems.

1It .would be difficult to estimate the value of tlie -work in -which the

EarlyEnglishText Societyhasbeenengaged
for severalyearspast.. . .

We rejoice to seethat they haveresolvednot to rest satisfiedtill Englishmenwill be ableto sayof their early literaturewhat the Germanscannow
say of theirs : ' Every work of it's printed,andeveryword of it's glossed.'
It is a nobleresolve,and onewhich it is the duty of everystudentof the
language,and everyonederivingpleasurefromits literature,to lenda helping handto encourage.-W.W. Tullochin Belgravia>
March, 1S71>
p. US.

12

5. Sketchof our SecondTen-Tears' Work.


1876.

Four-Text CursorMundi, Part III.


Piers Plowman Notes, Part II.

Charlemagne Romances, I:
Ferunibras.

Old EnglishHomilies,III.

.Slfric's MetricalHomilies.

Cato's Morals.

Sir

1S77.

Four-Text CursorMundi, Part IV.


Charlemagne
Bomances,Part II.
The Legendof Ypotis.
The Kule of St Benet (5 Texts).

CatholiconAnglicum.
Psalters, Anglo-Saxon and Early
English.
GawainePoems.

1878.

Troy - Book (Bodleian Library), Meditacionson the Lord's Supper


Part I.
(perhapsby Robert of Brunne).
Awdelay'sPoems.
Barbour's Lives of Saints,I.
Shoreham's
Psalms.
Anglo-SaxonHomilies, I.
1879.

Troy-Book (Bodleian),Part II.


Barbour's Lives of Saints,II.
Guy of Warwick, I (Caius Coll.,
Cambr.,and AuchinleckMSS,).

YernonMS. Poems,I.
The Siegeof Jerusalem.
Anglo-SaxonHomilies,II.
Elutherius(Mr Wynne'sMS.).

1880.

Guy of "Warwick,II.
Jon the Gardener,&c.
Northern Versionof DeGuileville.

Vernon MS. Poems,II.


William of Nassington.
Anglo-SaxonHomilies, III.

1881.

Barbour'sTroy-Book.
Hampole'sPsalms.
VeruonMS. Treatises.

Lives of Saints,Southern,I.
Anglo-SaxonOrosius.
Early English Psalters.
1882.

Lives of Saints, II.

Peter Idle's Poems.

Adam Davie'sPoems.

Anglo-SaxonHomilies, IV.

Siegeof Jerusalem.

Aiionyinous
Poems.
1883.

Lives of Saints,III.

A Troy-Book.

George
Ashby'sActivePolicyof a Anglo-Saxon
Miscellanies.
Prince.
Bonaventure's
Life of Christ engVegecius
of Knyghthood
andChyu- lisht.
alrie.

The Rule of the Moon, &c.

Then Hampole'sotherversionof his Prick of Conscience,


Mr Small's
' Metrical Homilies' MS., Trevisa'sGlanville, Myrc's Liber Festivalis,

E. E. Homilies,MSS.on Cookery,Medicine,Alchemy,
Astrology,and
Superstitions;
Mandeville,
Hoccleve,
Lydgate,VerseDeGuileville,
Lone-

5. Sketchof our SecondTen-Years' Work.

13

lich's 'Merlin,' the imprinted AlexanderRomances(in MS. in Scotland),


Lord Bath's Early English imprinted MSS. (if he will give us leave).
Then we have two or four texts of the Ancren Riicle to print, Wyclifs
Testamentsand imprinted works,so as to completea uniform Svoedition
of the wholeof Early English Literature to Gascon'stime.
EXTRA

SERIES.
1874.

Lonelich'sHistory of the Holy Ellis's Early English PronunciaGrail, Part I.


Barbour's Bruce, Part II.

tion, IV.
Brinklow's Tracts on London, &c.
1875.

Lonelich's History of the Holy

Starkey's Description of England

Grail, Part II.


Alexander Romances, I.

to Hen. VIII.,

Purt II.

1876.

Lonelich's History of the Holy


Grail, III.

Early English Pronunciation,V.


Alexander Romances, II.

1877.

Arthour and Merlin (from the AlexanderRomances,III.


Affleck MS.).
Early Holy-Laud tracts.
1878.

Le Morte Arthur, &c.

The Duke of Orleaus'sPoems.

The Douce Merlin, &c.


1879.

Auchinleck MS. Romances, I.:


Sir Bevis of Haintoun, &c.

Gcsta Romanorum.
1880.

Auchinleck MS. Romances, II.:

Book of Noblesse.

Sire 'Degarre,' &c.


1881.

Partenopeof Blois; with ' Perti- Bokenam's


Lyvysof Seyntys.
nope.'
Northumberland
Household
Book
1882.

Ritson's Romances.

Early Educationand Grammartracts.


1883.

Romancesfrom the Lincoln's Inn


MS. 150.

Caxton'sCurial, and Book of Good


Manners.

6. Difficulty of meetingSubscribers'opposingWishes.
Complaints of two opposite kinds as to our Texts have reaclit
the Committee's ears. One comes from the workers, the
students, who echoMr Kington-Oliphant's words in his Sources

14 6.Members'
opposing
Wishes. 7. OrdinalScries,
1874-5.

o/ Standard
Enylith,p. 320,note,"I wishthey [the Committee]wouldprintmoreworkswrittenbefore1400,andfewer

workswritten afterthat year." With this wishthe Committee

heartilysympathize,
andwouldbeonlytoogladif theydared
gratifyit. Nothingwouldhavepleased
thembetterthan to
havebegunat the earliestAnglo-SaxonMS., and printed
everythingsteadilyin order. But the other complainthas

warned them that such a coursewould have halved or thirded


the number of our subscribers; and the late decreasein tho

Society'slist of members
sincetho earliestTexts havein-

creast in number, has shown the necessity of restoring, if

possible,tho originalproportionbetweenlater and easier


Texts-often more attractive in subject-and the earlier and

harder ones,whichare,with rare exceptions,theologicaland


dull, though of extremeinterest in point of language. The
Committeelive in hopethat the feelingof duty to the Society
and to its purposewill moreandmoremakememberswilling
to helpit, thoughthey themselves
happento feel no special
interest in any one year's Texts; meantimethe Committee
will try their best to meettho wishesandtastesof thebulk of
the Society'sMembers,whoseforbearancethey cravein this
difficult task, and whom they remind that interesting inedited
MSS. of Romance and Adventure, of social Life, and Fun,

are rare indeed, and grow rarer year by year. But the ono

great fact remains,that till all our early MSS. are printed,

tho History of the English Language cannot be fully known,

the Society'swork cannotcometo an end.


Tho Pull t'fi-if!'>n*
for 1874<J-1875(Ori'jinul Series)are:5(1.The GestHyatorialeof the Destructionof Troy, in alliterative verse;; edited from
the mm,!!"
the lair

MS. in the Hunterian Museum, Glasgow, by D. DONALDSON,Esq., and

K. v. (i. A. PAJJTO.V. Purl II.

10s. Gd.

1874

67. The Eirly English Version of the " Cursor Mundi," in four Texts ; edited by the Rev.
R. MORRIS, LL.D.
Part I, vrith 2 photolithographic
I*. The BUckling Homilies, edited from the Marquis

facsimiles.
of Lothian's

10s. 6rf.
Anirlo-Snxon

1874
MS. nf

(in A.D.,In- tlx- R<'V.H. SIOEEis,LL.D. (Witb a photolithograph.) Parti. 8s. 1^71

59. The Early English Version of the "Cursor Uundi," in four Teits ; edited by the Rev. R.
M'iKKis,

M.A., LL.D.

Part II.

15s.

1875

CO.Meditacyuns on the Soper of our Lorde (perhaps by Robert of Brannc), edited from the
MSS. by J. M. COWPEB,Esq. 2s. 6d.
1875

Cl. TheRoniance
andProphecies
of Thomasof Zrceldoune,
printed from five MSS.; editedby
Dr. JAIIES A. H. MTEEAY.

10s. 6d.

1875

T?iePublications
for 1874$ 1875 (Extra Series)are :XX. Lonelich'sHistory of the Holy Grail (ab. 1150.!>.),from the French proseof R. do
Borron; edited from the unique MS , by F. J. FI'GNIVALL, M. A Parti
XXI. Barbour a Bruce. J':irt 11., --d. bv the Rev. W. \V. SILET, M.A. 4s.

Us

^7-1
187*

XXI f- HenryBrinklow'sComplaynt
of RoderyckMors,for the Etedreneof evdCustomi (ab.
' Ed.
131- : and TheLamentacionof a Christianagainst the Citie of London,A.D. 1543.
by J. M. CovtTLH. Ksq. yj.
XXIII. Early English Pronunciation, hv A. J. ELLIS, F.R.S. Part IV.

10s.

197.4

1874

XXIV. Lonefich'sHistory of theHoly trail. Part II. 10s.


1^71
XXV. TheRomance
of Guy of Warwick,the 15th-cent.version,edited from the Cambr.
Univ. MS., by Prof. J. ZCPIIZA, Ph.D.

Part I.

2(js.

175

of ii;c <arln(BngltsbCcvt &oricig's$oohs.


ORIGINAL
SERIES
(One guinea a year).
The Publication! for 1864 (21*.) are :1. Early English Alliterative Poems, ab. 13SOA.D., ed. E. Morris.
2. Arthur,

ah 1 UO, oil. F. J. Furnivall.

16*.

4s.

8. Lauder on the Dewfce of Kyngis, &c., IDof,, f>d.F. Hall. 4*.


4. Sir Gawayne and the Green Knight, ab. 13GO,
ed. E. Morris.

10s.

The Publications: for 1865 (21.) arc.-5. Hume's Orthographic and Congruitie of the Britan Tongue, ab. 1017,ed. II. B \Vhcatlcy.

4s.

6. Lancelot of the Laik, ab. ISOrt, ed. Rov. \V. W. Skeat. 8s.
7. Genesis and Exodus, ab. 12.10, cd. R. Morris.
(Ikjirinttng.)
8. Morte Arthure, ab. 1-140,eil. E. Brock.
7s.

9. Thynne on Chaucer'sWorks, ab. IMS, ed. Ilr Kingsley.


](). Merlin,

ab. 1MO, Part I.. i-d. H. I!. \VVieaUi-v.

11. Lyndesay'iMonarche.&o.,1552,Part I., ed. F. Hall.

12. The Wright's ChasteWife, ab. 1162, ed. F. J. Furnivall.

TJif Publications for 1806, out of print,

1g.

are:-

IS. SeinteMarherete, lidil-KWn, od. Rev. O. Cnckaynr.


It. King Horn, Fiona and Blancheflour, 4tc., cd. Rev. J. R. Lumby.
15. Political, Religious, and Love Poems, oil. F. J. Furnivall.
IB. The Book of Quinte Essence, rib. 1 Ml-70,

I'd. F. J. Furnivall.

17. Parallel Extracts from 29 MSS. of Piers the Plowman, ed. Rev, \V. Vt. Skcat.
18. HR!' Meidenhad,

ab. 1200, ed. Rov. O. Cockayne.

19. Lyndesa.y'aStonarche, &c., Part II., cd. F. Hall.


20. Hampole's English Prose Treatises, ed. Rev. G. G. Perry.
21. Merlin,

Part II.,

cd. H. B. AVheatley.

22. Partenay or Lusignen, ed. Rev. W. Mr. Skeat.


23. Dan Michel's Ayenbite of Inwyt, 1340,ed. R. Morris.

The Publications for 1867 (one guinea, lessWo. 24, 25, 26, cut of print)

are:-

24.Hymnsto theVirginandChrist;tie Parliament


of Devils,&c.,ab.14.".",
ed.F.J. Furnivall. 3s.
25. The Stacionsof Borne, the Pilgrims' Sea-voyage,with Clene Maydenhod, ed. F. J. r'nrmvall.
1*.
26. Religious Piecesin Prose and Verse, from R. Thornton's MS. (ah. Ulu., ed. Rtv.G. G. 1'crry. 2s.
27. Levins's Manipulus Vooabulonun, 1D70, ed. H. B. Wheatli-y.
28 William's
Vision of Piers the Plowman, 1.302 A.D.
Part

I.

12s.
The earliest

or Ternon

Text;

Text A. Edited by Rev. W. W. Skeat. 6s.


29. Early English Homilies (ab. 1220-30 A.D.) from unique MSS. in the Lambeth and other
Libraries.
Part I.
SO. Pierce the Plowman's

Edited by R. Morris.
7,.
Crede, ed. Ecv. W. W. Skeat.

2s. '

The Publication* for 1868 (one guinea) are:31. Myrc's Duties of a Parish Priest, in Verse, ab. 1110 A.D., ed. E. Peacock. 4..
32. The Babees Boke, Urbanitatis, the Bokea of Norrure of John Russell and Hugh Rhodes, the Sokes
of Keruyng, Curtaaye, and Demeanour, &c., with some French and Latin Poems on like
subjects, ed. from Harleian and other MSS. by F. J. Furnivall.
15s.
S3. The Knight De La Tour landry (from French of A.P. 1372),:ib. 1410 A.r>. A r.-iHnT'N Hook for
bis IfcinirhtiTs, cd. from Hurl. Ms. ITcil and L'axton's version, by Thomas M'riirM. s,s.
Zl. Early English Homilies /ln'i\,rc 1300 A.IX) from unique MSS. in the Lambeth and oilier
Libraries.

Part 11.

Edited

by E. Morris.

35. Lyndesay's Works, Part 111.: The Historic


Hall

8s.

and Testament of Squycr Mcldruin,

cd. F.

i.

The Piihticatifinffor

ISr.O (one rj>/inea} are:-

30. Merlin, Part III.


Edited by H. B. "Wbeatley, Esq.; with an Essay on Arthurian Localities,
by J. S. Stnnrt Glennie, Esq. iL'.t.
37. Lyndesay's Works, Part 1^., containing Ano Satyre of the Three Estaits. Edited by
P. Hall. Esf|. 4s.
33. William's Vision of Piers the Plowman, Part II. Teit B. Edited from the MSS. by the Rov.
\\'. AV. Skeat. M.A.

Ills. ij,l.

39. The Alliterativo Romance of the Destruction of Troy, translated from Guido de Colonna.
Edited by D. Donaldson, Esq., and the Rev. G. A. Panton. Part I. 10s. 6tl.

The PuVlicationi for 18JO(oneguinea') are:40. English Gilds, their Statutes and Customs. 13S9A. D. Edit cd by the late Toulmin Smith, Esq.,
and Miss Lncy Toulmin Smith, with a Preliminary E^sny,in 5 parts, on ' The History and
Development of Gild*, and the Oricin of Trades-l'iiions,' by Dr Lujo Brentano. 21s.
41. William lauder's Minor Poems. Edited by F. J. Furnivall, Esq. 3s.
42. Bemardus De Cura Rei Famuliaris, with some Early Scottish Prophecies, ic. From a MS.
KK. 1. 5, in the Cambridge University Library- Edited by J. E. Lumby, M.A. 2s.
43. Ratis Raving, and other Moral and Religious Pieces in Prose and Verse. Edited from the
Camb. Univ. MS. KK. 1. 5, by J. E. Lumby, M.A. 3s.

Tlie Publications far 1871are (fur oneguinea) :44. The Alliterative Romance of Joseph of Arimathie, or The Holy Grail:

a fracrnent from tho

Vernon MS.; with Wynkyn de Wordy's and Pyuson's(i.D. 1526and 152DLives of Joseph"
edited by the Rev. AV. W.'Skeat, M.A.

6s.

45. King Alfred's West-SaxonVersionof Gregory'sPastoral Care,edited from 2 MSS.,with an


English translation, by Henry Sweet, Esq., of BaJliol College, Oxford.

Part I.

l(ts.

List of theEarly English TextSociety'sBooks.


46.Legends
of theHlyRood,Symbols
of thePassion
andCross.Poems
in OldEnglishof thellth,
Hth, and 15th centuries.

Edited from MSS. by Rev. R. Morris, LJ..D.

10*.

47. Lyndesay's
Works,Part V., containinghis Minor Poems,edited by JamesA. H. Murray, fcsq.,

with a critical Essay hv I'mfe-snr Nichol


,. 3.
43. The Times' Whistle, and other Poems, by R. C., 1616; edited by J. 51. Cowper, Esq. 6t,

The Piilitii-iitiiinit for 1872 are (fur one guinea) :43.An OldEnglishMiscellany,containing a Bestiary, Kentiah Sermons,Proverbsof Alfred, Reliirious I',,.-insof tin" Kith ci-ntiiry, edited from the MSS. by the Kev. H. Morris. I-L.D. His.
5ii. King Alfred's West-SaxonVersionof Gregory'sPastoralCare,edited from 1!MSS.,with an
KnirlMi translation, by Hfiiry Sweet, E~q., Balliol College, Oxford. Part II. !"..
61. The Life of St Juliana, J \ersi, .us, with translations; edited from the 3ISS. by the Rev. T.
O. Cockayne and Mr. Brock.

2*.

62.PalladiusonHusbondrie,from the uniqueMS., ab. 1420A.D.,ed. Rev. B. Lodge. Part I. 10s.


Tlie Piiti/ii-n films fur 1873 are (for one guinea) :63. Old English Homilies, Serifs II., from the unique lath-century MS. in Trinity Coll. Camhriduc, with a photolitho^raph : three Hymns to the Virjrin and God. from a unique 13lh-

centurv MS.at Oxford.:i photolithographof the musicto two of them,and transcriptions of


it in modem notation by Dr. KnuiAi-i/r, and A. J. ELLIS,Esq., F.R.S.; the wholeedited
by the R<-v. RICHARD

MORRIS, LL.D.

8s.

61. TheVisionof PiersPlowman,Text C (completingthe 3 versionsof this great poem),with on

Aut'.tyi.e ; and tw-i unique .-illiierath e ]>oi'ins : Eichard the Eedeles (liy William, the author
of the l',.s/,,,, : and The CrownedKing; edited by tin- Kev. W. \V. SKKAT, M.A. ia.
65. Generydes,a Komarice, edited from the unique MS., ab. 1440A.D., in Trin. Coll. Cambridge,
by \V. Anna WJUGIIT, Esq., M.A., Trin. Coll. Cambr. Part 1. 3*.

EXTRA
SERIES
(One guinea a year).
TJie Publications for 1867 are (for one guinea) :I. William of Paleme ; or, William and the Werwolf.
College, Cainlirid|.-c.

lie-edited from the unique MS. in King's

by the Rev. W. W. Skeat, M.A.

13*.

n. Early English Pronunciation, with especial reference to Shakspere and Chaucer, by A. J.


Ellis,

F.R.S.

Part I.

10*.

The Publicationsffrr
m.
IV.

1863 are (for one guinea) :-

Caxton's Book of Curtesye, in 3 Versions: 1. from the unique print in the Camh. Univ.
Libr.;
2, the Oriel MS. 79 ; 3, the Balliol MS. 354. Ed. by F. J. Fur-iiivull,
Esq., M.A.
5i.
Havelok the Dane. Re-edited from the unique MS l,y Ihe Kev. W. \\. Skeat, M.A., with
the' sanction and aid of the oricinal editor. Sir Frederic Madden.
10s.

V Chaucer'sBoethius. Edited from the two best MS.S. by R. Morris, LL.D. 12s.
VI. ChevelereAssigne. Re-edited from the unique MS. by II. H. Gibbs, Esq. 3s.

T/te Publications for 1869 arc (for one guinea) :VTI. Early English Pronunciation, with especial reference to Shakspere and Chaucer, by A. J.
Ellis, F.RS.
Part II.
lm.
Vm.
ftueene Elizabethes Achademy, a Book of Precedence, tc.

Edited

by F. J. Furnivall,

Esq.,

with 1'X-avs on early Italian and German Books of Courtesy, by \V. M. RiM-tti, Esq., and
E. Oswald, I'Nq. . IS*.
IX. Awdeley's Fraternitye of Vacabendes,Barman's Caveat, 4c. Edited by E. Viles, Esq., and
F. J. Furnivall, Esq. 7s. 6d.

The J['i/!i}ii'ntitiasfflr

1870 are (for one yitinra) :-

X. Andrew Boorde's Introduction of Knowledge, 1547,and Dyetarv of Helta, 1542; with Barnes hi
the Defence of the Berde, 1542-3. Edited,
by F. .1. Funiivall,
M.A.
IKS.

XI. Barbour's Bruce. Part I.


W. \V. Skeat, M.A.

with

a Life of BOOIxlJE,

and an account of his Works,

Edited from the MSS. and early printed editions, by the Rev.

12v.

Ttie Publication!! for IS^l are (for one guinea) :-

X1T.England
in Henryviu.'s Time:a Dialogue
between
CardinalPoleandLupsct,mainlyon
the Conditionof England, written by ThomasStarKev,Chaplainto Henry VIII.

Editeil by

J. M. Cowper, Esq. Part II. 12s. (Part I-, fi'arki>v s Life and Letters, is in preparation!)
XLTI. A Supplycacyonof the Beggers. by Sim..11Ki-li. 15->-!i A.V.. edited by F. J. Furnivall, M.A.;
with A Supplication to our Moste SoueraigneLorde; A Supplication of the Poore Commons; and
The Decaye of England by the Great Multitude of Sheep,edited by J. M. Cowper, F.sq. 6s.
XTV. Early English Pronunciation, with especial reference to Shakspere and Chaucer, by A. J
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10s.

The Publicationsfor 1872are (for oneguinea) :XV. RobertCrowley'sThirty-oneEpigrams,Voyceof TheLast Trumpet,Wayto Wealth, &c.,1550-1
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XVI. Chaucer's
TreatiseontheAstrolabe,1391A.p. Ed. from MSS.by Rev.W. Skeat, M.A. 10s
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photolithographicfacsimilesby Cookeand Fotheriugharu. 24*.

[reds Sjinnne's

(Bmblctms
anb drpigrames,

BERLIN:

ASHER & CO., 53 MOHRENSTRASSE.

NEW YORK:

C. SCRIBNER & CO.; LEYPOLDT

PHILADELPHIA:

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& CO.

& HOLT.

and (L^inramcs.
*
S"*r

Psal:

Quum defccerit virtus mea,


ne derelinquas me,
Dornine.

[A.D.leoo,BY

FRANCIS
MNCiSTER

THYNNE,

HEBALD, AUIHOB 01 " ANIMADVXRSIOX6 OH BPEGHl'S EDITION OF CHAUCZH3


WOBE2I K9S," ETC.]

EDITED

BY

F. J. FURNIVALL,.M.A.,

CAMB.

LONDON:
PUBLISHED

FOR

THE

BY 1ST.
TEUBXER

EARLY

ENGLISH

TEXT

SOCIETY,

& CO., 57 & 53, LUDGATE HILL.


KDCCCLXXVI.

Herat.

Ode 8 : lib : 4 carmin.1

Donarempaterasgrataqwe
com[m]odus,
Censoriue, meis sera sodalibus j

Donarem tripodas, prtemia fortiu?


Graiorum ; nequetu pessimamuneruw
Ferres, diuite me scilicet artiuw

Quasaut Parrliasius protulit, aut Scopas*;


Sed non haec mihi vis ; nee tibi taliuw

Res est, aut animus delitiaruwi egens.


Gaudescarminibus : carminsepossumus
Donare, &c.
Ad

C. Marcium

Censorinum.

The next two lines of the original are left out:


Hie saxo, liquidis ille coloribus,
Boilers none hominem ponere, nunc deum.

JOHN CHILDS

AXU

SON, PB1MEK8.

FOREWORD

S.

THISText owesits printing, not to its own poeticalmerits,but


to its adding somewhatto our knowledgeof Francis Thynne,the Chaucer-commentator,the author of the Aninui'lrersions of 1599
on Speght's CJiauc<;r,-of whom and whoseworks I have given such
a full account in my re-edition of those Animadversions for the
Society's Eeprints1.
The Eniblernesand Epigrames are both dull and poor; but they
contain the wife-worrid Thynne's opinions on wives-who 're always
necessaryevils, the best is bad ; who 're good when they die of old
age, better when they die after some time during your life, and best
when they die at once (p. 59);-his lines on some of the friends of
himself and his patron Sir Thomas Egerton, Lord Chancellor, " in
those yonger yeareswhen Lincolns Inn societie did linke vs all in
one cheyneof Amitie "-Thomas Valence2,p. 47; (Francis) Meringc3,
p. Gl; Browne, p. 62;-a note of an old London inn, 'the Rose
within Newgate', p. 75, where friends then gatherd and chatted;
a few illustrations of Shakspere-' glassevessells for banquettinge
are dailie had in pryse', for FalstafFs ' Glasses,glassesis the only
1 This re-edition

is more than

four times

the size of our 1st edition,

and

contains the only known fragment of the Pilgrims Tale. Memberscan have
it at half-price, 5s., with Gd. more for postage.
2 See Notes, p. 101.

3 "Among the Lincoln's Inn Admissions,the namesof John Browne and


Francis Meringe hoth appear in the list, 23 January, 4 Philip and Mary,
A.D. 1558. There is also a Thomas Browne, admitted 13 Octr., 3 Eliz.
A.D. 1561. I observe in the list of 3 Eliz. the name of William Goldbourne,
admitted Febr. 15, with the names of John Browne and Thomas Egerton as his

manucaptors."-Martin Doyle, Steward. The namesof Waterhouse, p. 60 ;


Stukelie, p. 71 ; AVillford, p. 73 ; Garrett, p. 75 ; Humfrie Waldroun, p. 76 ;
Burrell, p. 77 ; Eldrington, p. 94, do not seemto be in the Lincoln's Inn lists,
so far as Mr Doyle's searcheshave extended.

VI

FOREWORDS.

drinking1', 2 Hen. IV, II. L 151; ' Dictinian Diana', for Holofernes's'Dictynna, goodmanDull', Love'sLab. Lost,IV. iL 37;an opinion,interestingfor Bacon'scase,of a Judge'sfriend, writing
to the highest Judge in the land, showing that bribery of Judges
was an openly recognizdmatter2 here in England; and lastly, a set
of mentions of, or poems to, the English writers whom Francis
Thynne honourd-Chaucer (though Lydgate's Temple of Glass is
wrongly assignd to him on the authority of Sir John Thynne's MS
still at Longleat3), p. 62, 71, 77, 3; Spenser(on 'Spencers Fayrie
Queene'), p. 71 ; Gascoigne(his Steele Glasse),p. 62,1. 11 ; Arthur
Golding, p. 77, L 16 ; Camden (on Mr Camden's Brltania), p. 93,
95 ; and Leland, p. 95. To me, an Egham man, the ' Gallopinge'
poem on p. 80 is interesting, from its mention of Hounslow Heath,
which I Ve so often driven over, and where my father, riding many
years ago, was accostedone evening by a highwayman, who was
shot a few minutes after, by Lord StowelL
The motive of Francis Thynne in presenting his autograph poems
to his patron, Sir Thomas Egerton, was doubtless, gratitude, both in
its ordinary meaning of ' thankfulness for past benefits', and in its
extraordinary senseof ' a keen senseof future favours'. It is pretty
clear from Thynne's 13th Embleame, ' Liberalitie', and his Cist,
' Benefitts ', that he expected Egerton to give him something,-hard
cash,no doubt-and that soon, for he adds the reminder,
. . hee gives twice, that quicklie and with speed
bestoweshis guift to serve our present need.-L 47-8.
In the Ivy poem,p. 82,1. 5, we get a glimpse of Francis Thynne's
ivy-coverd ' howse in Clerkenwell Greene', then a pleasant suburban
1 Seethe capital bit on this in Harrison's Description of England, p. 147
of my edition for the New bhakspere Society; and Stafford's Cunceifte, p. 51,
New

Sh. Soc.

1 Soethe old ludge, once fullie fraughte


with guiftes and briberie,

Or his luditiall office buyes,


with him there is noe hould ;

Will not beeasilieleddby guiftes

for heethat buiesis forct to gell

But hee that commeth new in place,

Takes all and more ; and, for reward,

and new corrupted Judge


and thirsteth after gould,

is made a sinfull drudge.

* See Mr Bradshaw's note in my edition of F. Thynne's Animadversion!


n. 30.

FOREWORDS.

Vll

village, in which he finally settl'd down, and where-of drink and


gout, as is suppos'd,-he died in 1604. Whether his 71st Epigram,
'The Courte and Cuntrey', p. 88-91, represents his own case and
opinions I cannot tell: its arguments are the regular stock ones of
the time; and I can hardly think that he, living at Clerkenwell,
and going in to the Heralds' College regularly to his work, could
pretend to be a countryman as oppos'dto a Londoner.
The Text is printed from Thynne's autograph MS, belonging to
Lord Ellesmere, who has been kind enough to lend it me to print,
for which I thank him much. The italics in words are expansions
of MS contractions; words wholly in italics are those written by
Thynne in a larger hand than the rest of his lines.
My thanks are due, and are hereby tenderd, to Mr Martin Doyle,
the Steward of Lincoln's Tnn, for searching the early Admissionbooks for me; to Colonel Chester, for his identification

of Thomas

Valence; to Mr P. A. Daniel for his many kind bints and notes;


and to Mr W. G. Stone for his Index
17te Arboretum, Leamington,
Good Friday, April U, 1876.

and notes.

CONTENTS.

EMBLEMES.

(1) PietieandImpietie,p. 5.

(20) Vsurie,p. 20.

(2) Vertue should not be condempned for one smale


imperfection,p. 6.
(3) Temperance
abatethfleshlie
Delightes,p. 6.

(21) Myrtilus Sheilde,p. 21.


(22) VayneOstentations,
p. 21.
(23) Losseof hurtfull thingesis
gayne,p. 22.
(24) Internall vertues are best,

(4) Death and Cupid, p. 7.


(5) Art, the antidote against
fortune, p. 8.
(6) Labour quenchethLecherie,
p. 8.
(7) Fortune, p. 9.

p. 23.
(25) Threates of the inferior to
be contemned,p. 23.
(26) Philosophic, p. 24.
(27) Societie, p. 25.
(28) Counsell and vertue subdue

(8) Bryberie,p. 10.


deceipfullPersons,p. 25.
(9) Immortallitie of the Sowle, (29) Pleasuresto be eschewed,
p.
p. 11.

(10) Sottedloue,p. 12.


(11) Pride,p. 12.
(12) Patience,p. 13.
(13) Liberalise, p. 14.
(14) Vertue of Herbes,p. 16.
(15) Wine, p. 16.

26.

(30) Vnitingeof Contrariesmake


soundJudgement,p. 27.
(31) Eeuenge,p. 27.
(32) Peace,p. 28.
(33) Pouertie,p. 29.
(34) Syluerworlde,p. 29.

(16) Mann,p. 17.


(35) Enuye,p. 29.
(17) Witt, p. 18.
(36) Our termeor limit of life
(18) The subiect (follows the
notremoueable,
p. 30.
Prince,as the Heliotrope (37) Godslowliepunisheth,p.
31.

doesthe Sun),p. 18.


(38) Dull witts,p. 32.
(19) Diligenceobtayneth
Kiches, (39) The wretchednot to be
p. 20.
Dobliegreiued,p. 32.

CONTENTS.

EMBLEMES.

(40) Noe impuritie in heauen,p.

EPIGUAMtS.

(52) The Meane (between ex-

33.

tremes), p. 40.

(41) Honor and rewards nour- (53) Not to climbe ouer higho,
ishi;th artes, p. 34.

p. 41.

(42) Eloquence,p. 34.

(54) Monumentof a harlott, p.

(43) Art cannot take awaye the

vice of nature,p. 35.


(44) Fortune,p. 35.
(i.">)Ganymede,
p. 36.
( I'i) Eloquentwisdome,p. 36.
(47) Poetrye,p. 37.
(48) Eusignes of the Clergye, p.
37.
(49) Flatterers, p. 39.
(50) Our betters or enemiesnot
to be prouoked with
wordes, p. 39.

41.

(55)
(56)
(57)
(58)
(59)

Earthlie mindes,p. 42.


The oldeTestament,p. 43.
Sophistrie,p. 43.
Ingratitude,p. 45.
Children in yuuth to be

(60)
(Gl)
(62)
(63)
(64)

framed, p. 45.
Of the same,p. 46.
Eenefitts, p. 4G.
Prodigalitie, p. 47.
TomrTliornasValence,p.47.
Strangers more freindlie to

(51) Wisdomeand Strengthare


to be loyned, p. 40.

vs then our owne kinde


and kindred, p. 49.

EPIGEAMES.

(1) The Armes of England, (9) The wayeto gett and keepe

p. 53.
frendes,
p. 57.
(2) Crisopeia,
p. 53.
(10) Of Stumblinge,
p. 58.
(3) Vpon the armedStatueof (11) First gucstes
at a feaste,p.
Venus, p. 54.

58.

(4) Sundrieandstrange
effectes(12) Whenawife isbadd,worse,
of wyne, p. 54.

and worst.

When she is

(5) Coutenininge,
p. 56.

good,better,andbeste,p.

(6) What maketh menn forgett

59.

themselues,
p. 56.
(13) A Puritane,p. 59.
(7) Thingesnot to be recalled, (14) Of heauieand light, p. 59.
p. 56.
(15) Waterhowse, p. 60.
(8) The vnapt not to be forced (16) A preist which knewe not

to learninge,p. 57.

anieletter, p. 60.

EPIGRAilLS.

(17) Theheddand the tayle,p. (46) "Woodcocks,


p. "4.
60.

(47) Kissinge,p. 74.

(18) Cause
of adeere
yeare,p.61. (4t>)Whiteheares,
p. 73.
(19) Pinkes,p. 61.
(49) Cutters,p. 70.
(20) Shoinge,
p. 62.
(50) Thedeceased
Pretor,p. 7-i.
(21) Glasses,p. 62.
(22) Oneassuredhe -waselected,
p. 63.
(23) Cham(Ham), p. C3.
(24) Fayth, p. 63.
(25) Cuttingeof tyme, p. 63.
(26) A tenchanda wench,p. 64.
(27) "WTioe
arehappie,p. 04.

(51) ToHunifrieWaldronu,p. 70.


(""'2)Fortune,p. 77.
(53) To his freind Burrell, p. 77.
(54) Issues,p. 78.
(55) Manage,p. 78.
(56) Sweetemouthes,p. 79.
(57) Fooles,p. 79.
(58) Gallopinge,p. 80.

(28) Linguistes, p. 65.


(29) Drinkinge, p. 65.
(30) Enuye, p. 66.

(59) Churches,p. 81.


(GO) Menn before Adame, p. 81.
(01) luye, P. 82.

(31) Mann mustprovidefor bodie (62) Icstinge,p. 82.


and sowle,p. 66.
(63) Honor, p. 83.
(32) Mongers,p. 67.
(64) Temperance,
p. 83.
(33) Tyme, p. 68.

(C5) Doinge notlnnge, p. 85.

(34) Receiptsandexpenses,
p. 68. (66) Astrologers,p. 85.
(35) Counterfetts deuoure the (67) TheheibeJUiusantePatrem,
whole world, p. 69.

(36) That one thinge Produceth


annother,p. 69.
(37) A longenose,p. 70.
(38) SpencersFayrie Queene,p.
71.

p. 86.

(68) MonstrousChilde,p. 86.


(G9) A godly Maim, p. 87.
(70) Kindred, p. 88.
(71) The Courteand Cuntrey,p.
88.

(39) Martine, p. 71.


(4.0) Vsurers,p. 71.
(41) Grace,p. 72.
(42) Cardinge,p. 72.
(43) Eeelinge,p. 73.
(44) A Rose,p. 73.

(72) The number 1, 2, 3, 4,


p. 92.
(73) Mr Camdens
Britania,p. 93.
(74) Solomonswitt, p. 94.
(75) Leylandesrightefull ghost.
p. 95.

(45) Sovringe,
p. 73.

(76) QuietandRest,p. 96.

ill

INDEX OF FIRST LINES.

EMBLEMES.
riox

(8)
(33)
(44)
(60)
(10)
(1C)
(53)

After his Fathers funeral!, when as Tiberius went


As fishe Remora staies the Shipp
...
...
As gouldeu Sonne doth worke from out the Skye
As tender whelpe, whome natures skill hath taught
Autoritie and Loue will scarceagree
Behould, mann is the litle world
...
...
Bellereplwn, which ruld without offence
...

...
...
...
...
...
...
...

10
29
35
40
12
17
41

(30) ComfortingCeresloynd with hoppsof bitter taste ...


(31) Dianiane dogge,with blinde furie inflamed ...
...
(6) Dictinian Diana, which of Phoebus
borrowethlighte ...

27
27
8

(51)
(15)
(29)
(36)
(9)
(59)
(26)
(64)
(63)
(17)
(5)
(32)
(23)
(57)

40
16
26
30
11
45
24
49
47
18
8
28
22
43

Doe tell, rude verse,why that pure virginn fayre


...
ffayne wouldst thow know wherfore the god ...
...
ffonde Paris, in vnbridled age doth chuse
...
...
ffrom neck it hath the humane shape,the rest a piller stone
In former age, the Efhnikes, false gods servinge
...
In yongest yeares,when will and strength doe want ...
loues sonne, the valiant Hercules
...
...
...
My loved frend, and lovinge therwithall
...
...
My Valence,to thy learnedvewe this skillessevers I sende
Nothing more smooth then artificiall glasse ...
...
On rolling ball doth fickle fortune stande
...
...
Pluto, the god of worldlie wealth
Producinge earth inrich'd, makes rich againe
...
Saturns daughter, and loue his lealious wife ...
...

INDEX

OF FIRST

LINES.

EMBLEMES.

xiii
PA&B

(41) Shewemee,sweetemuse,why thow and all the rest ...

34

(42) Some learned menn affirme by abstrucuskill ...

...

34

(50) StrymonianCranes,which by their ayerieflight


...
(24) Sweettastingaple, which this faire virginn beares ...

30
23

(47)
(39)
(40)
(38)
(62)
(52)

...

37

...

3:2

...
...
...
...

33
32
47
40

(21) The famoussouldier,Myrtiliis the Knighte ...


(4) The hatefull Dmfh loynd to the Godof loue ...

...

21
7

(43) The healthfull bathe which daielie wee doe see


(2) The heavenlie pallas of Celestial! skye
...
(25) The melitane dogge, bredd onlie for delight ...

...
...
...

35
6
23

(35) The mightie lone from highestheavendid sende

...

29

The artificiall Scale composd of goukl


...
The birde of lone, the Eagle of flight most free "
The blinded boye, which with his peircinge darts
The cheife of gods, the mightie loue ...
...
The craftie Fox, with longe and bushye tayle
The Danlinn Pltilomell, whosewarblinge voice

(11) The morrall Seneca,whose penn intreatinge matters graue 12


(56) The Oke, bearing a corne, loues sacredtree ...
...
43

(12) The patient Socrates,true mirror of our life

...

...

13

(27) The purple Hose which first Damasco bredd ...


...
25
(7) There is a birde which takes the name of Paradise the faire 9

(49) Thereis a kinde of men,whomehell hath bredd


...
(34) The sacredCrowneadorningcurledhayre ...
...
(61) The silver Moone,Diana Virgine bright
,..
...
(19) The simpleCock,that with a hungrieminde ...
...
(58) The stam'ringeCuckooe,whoselewd voicedoth greeve
(18) The statlie flower that faire rich India yeldes...
(55) The statelieStagg,whosehomesthreatenthe skye ...

39
29
46
20
45
19
42

(46) Thetalkingbyrd,whichgloriouslyis cladd ...


(28) ThevaliantknightwhomePerseus
wife did love
(20) Thewealthiemannwith blessings
greatindued
(3) ThowCithereane
Venus,
I wouldknowe
(48) Thowdoestdemaund
of me ...
(22) Weedailieseethefruitfull PJtoelms
tier
(37) "Whatdoththe waightiemillstonemeane

36
25
20
6
37
21
31

(1) WhenfalseSynon,
with tongue
of guilefulltale

...
...

...

xiv

INDEX

OK FIRST LINES.

EPIGBAME8.
tie*

(14) "WhilsteprudentEjiiJuure, the learnedleeche


...
(54) "Whosetombeis this? whosebonesdoth this contayne

16
41

(13) Why doe these virginns faire, the Gracesthree


(45) Yea, impure mindes whom vncleane lusts defile

14
36

...
...

EPIGEAMES.

(26)
(65)
(37)
(6)
(41)

A Catholike and a Protestant -werefrendlie sett at raeate


A CrabbedCobler, and his slothfull wife
A knight that should with curtesie a ladie entertayne
Alluring bewtie, with her cristall face ...
...
...
A man of lewd living all vertue sett at naught
...

(32) A messeof mongerson Holbornehill ...

...

67

A noble Earle, to vertue allwaies bent


...
...
An Auncient knight of ffee and of renowne ...
...
Antomedonthe GreekePoet doth tell
As wearie bodie doth restore his strength with rest ...
At the Piosewithin Newgate, ther frendlie did meete f

79
08
64
96

(34) A tutor, gluttinousand prodigall


...
...
...
(67) A vertuousLadie, skilfull herbaliste ...
...
...
(52) Blinde Fortune,vritk her fondeand sencelesse
sence...
(13) DameLais is a puritaneby religion ...
...
...
(55) Deepewitted menn,b'experience
hauecontrived
...

68
86
77
59
78

(68)
(3)
(74)
(19)
(58)
(9)
(20)
(60)
(16)

86
54
94
61
80
57
62
81
60

(56)
(33)
(27)
(76)
(48)

...

64
85
70
56
72

Did Learned Quid live, with poetrie divine ...


...
ffayre Venus,tell whye dost thow Armor beare
...
ffreind EHrington, thow art as wise ...
...
...
Friend Meerhig, I deeme you smell verie sweete
...
fFrom"Windsoreridinge, to the statelie towne ...
...
Fyne witts, much art, sweet tongues,and flatterie
...
Good Browne, thow doest complaine with heavie cheere
Good Moses(which didst write by sprite of God)
...
Good zealouspreist, thy hart more than thy skill
...

(17) Greatwasthe gloriousfame,mostworthie knight

75

...

60

(69) He is a godlie mann, that doth with tongue and minde

87

INDEX

OF

FIRST

LINES.

EPIGRAMES.

XV
PAGU

(46) He is as wiseas a "Woodcock,


all weedoesee...
(57) Hee wasnot wise,his witt hath him deceyved
(23) In all the courseof thy vnhappieyeares
...

...
...
...

74
71'
G3

(49) lack, I here thow hast leaft thine ould trade ...

...

7<3

(43) lohn, thy wife, to.live doth takegreat payne


(42) Kate is a goodhuswife,as all men saye
...

...
...

73
72

(66) Malevolent Saturne, vnhappie stair


...
...
(39) Menn say thow art call'd the Rich Martine ...
(2) My dolefull muse, bewayle in mournefull rimes

...
...
...

83
71
53

(12) My frend, yf that my Judgementdo not fayle

...

59

(71) My yonge and youthfull yeares

88

(72) Onesimplethinge cannnothingeworke


...
...
(24) Our SaviourChrist,with wordsof greifecomplayned

92
03

(14)
(38)
(40)
(45)
(59)
(11)
(25)
(4)
(31)
(29)
(36)

Philosophers were fooles, that taught of ould ...


...
Eenowmed Spencer,whose heavenlie sprite ...
...
Stukelie the vsurer is dead, and bid vs all farwell
...
Sweete flowers growewhen gardenerssowesthe seed ...
The Auncient Saxonsdid full Christianlie
...
...
The buzzingeflye which falls in everie thinge
...
The Curious gavdiner,with his cruell Shires ...
...
The drunken menn, whome ghittonie doth iill
...
The fairest Creature which the beavenlie hand
...
The first delightinge draught
The frutefull peacebegetts desired plentie
...
...

59
71
71
73
81
58
63
54
GG
63
69

(63)
(64)
(73)
(54)
(35)
(53)
(10)

The gloriousQueene,honor, desir'dof all


...
The heroikevertuesCardinaU
The holie licor, whosemysteriesdivine
...
The loyfull motherbringsforth nianiefaire yssues
The kinge deuouresthe husbandman
The loathedpovertiestill shall theefeede ...
The prowdehorsethat treadeswith stateliepace

83
83
93
78
69
77
58

...

...
...
...

...
53
(1) Thesacred
Lyonof Iitdeasprincelielyne . ...
(7) Thestoneoncecastout of thehandor slinge
...
56
(21) Thesundriesortof glasses
whichart dothput in vre
62
(61) ThowBacchus
plant,whichallwaiesgreene
dostspringe 82

(18) Thow fondlie askestme, as though I werea god

..,

61

XVI

INDEX

OF

FIRST

LINES.

EPIGRAMES.
MM

(22)
(30)
(47)
(62)
(50)
(8)
(28)
(75)
(5)
(70)

Thow greatlie bragst how that thow art assur'd


...
Thow monster of mankinde, obscurerof good name ...
Three pleasant gentlemen vpon the waye
...
...
Three things there be which maie susteynenoe leste ...
Thy vertue, not thy vice; faith, not dissembling speech
To Salamancayf thow send an Asse ...
...
...
Tvroe gentlemen at meate by enterchaunge ...
...
"What Endare phytonesse,what envious hart ...
...
"Whoedoeth contempne the worlds fond vanitie
...
Why kneele you heere, faire Ladies, thus amased ...

(44) Willford, thow lovesta pleasantRoseveriewell

63
66
74
82
76
57
65
95
56
88

...

73

(15) With milder sport, and not with bitter speech

...

60

(51) Yf reasonsworthie mindeprescribethis reede

...

76

To the right honorable


his Siuguler
goodLord, Sir ThomasEgerton,
Knight, Lord Keper of
the greateScale.
IT hath byn, my verie good Lord, a thinge allwaies
vsed (and therfore to be pardoned,sincecustoinemaketh
one other nature, and the Lawe sayth, Comunis error

facit ius) that as well the learned, throughe the height


of their witts, as the vnlearned, through the desire to
houlde the course of the worlde, haue delivered their

conceitesto the viewe of all menn, for as sayth Perseus:


Scribimus indocti docfiquepoemata passim.
A thinge trulie verefied in mee, whoe, like blinde
Bayarde,as an owle amongst birdes, am comvppon the

stage(in the troopeof learnedpoemsof manyedivine


conceites)playeng the part of the poet Codrus Meuius
and Bauius mentioned by IttuenaU, Virgill, and Horace,
for which yet I dare not crave pardon (that fait being

inexcusable)becauseit was in my choicewhether I


would vtter my follies or not; and then willinglie

comitting a fault (for it is soemuch a fault as it is


voluntarilie donn) I cannot with reason craue patience

or pardonntherof, wherfore"I must abidethe censure[" leaf


2,
and taxe of jour lordships sLngulerJudgement,although you maye lustlie dealewith me as SiUa did
with a badd poet,to whomewriting anEpigramagainst
Scilla, of boghedverses,someshort and somelonge,
Scylla commandeda reward to be given to him, to
thend he should never after composeanie more verses.
EMBLEMS.

DEDICATION

TO

SIR

THOMAS

EGERTON.

w^t'ch yet, yf your ILord-shipshould vse towards mee,I


"would not (with Actius the poet) repent mee of these
my harshe rimes, because I maye hope hereafter to
wryte fair better ; for your Hardship well knoweth
that our witts, inventions, and writings, are compared
to the frutes of trees which at their first encreasingare

hard, harsheand bitter, but in the end (by the comfort


of the beneficiallsonne)are madesofte,swete,and acceptableto the pallate. But yf it should not fortune

mee hereafterto attayne a dellycate style, or more


wittie invention,to satisfieyour lardahips expectance,
Yet I hopeyou will takethesein good part, following
the exampleof Lisander, whoedid soelove and embrace
Poetrie (evenof the worst sort) that he allwaies had the
badd Poet Chyrill with him in his warres,And with
silver fylled the Cappof Antiochuswhoehad written but
[" leaf3] homelie

verses *in his commendations

: for w/< i'ch cause

I presumeto consecrateto yowr Lonfc/,//>the naked (for


soeI doe terme them, becausethey are not clothed with
engravenpictures) emblemesand Epigrams,what soever

they be,partlie drawenout of histories,and partlie out


of Phisicall Philosophic, but tending to moralitie, and

for the most part endingein necessarie


preceptes,and
perswatione
to vertue.w/a'chI doubtnot but yor L<a<lshipp will acceptein suchsorteas mayebe answerable
to yowrhonorablecurtesey,and my desire,wherof the
firste is wont

not to reiecte what

before

I haue ofiVx <\

vnto you, and the otheris readieto merit the continuance of that w/uch your Lordship hath before vouchsafed vnto mee, soe that I cannot dispaire but that

your "Lordshipwill takethem in better partethen th<-y


deserve.

And that the rather, because some of them

are composedof thinges donn and sayedby such ;i-<


were well knowne to your Lordshipp, and to my self in

thoseyonger yeareswhen Lincolns Inn societiedid


linke vs all in one cheyneof Amitie; and someof them

DEDICATION

TO SIR THOMAS

EGERTON.

are of otherpersonsyet liv/ng, w/<i'chof your Lordship


areboth loved k liked. "Butyf all thesecauses
should
not move yo;<rLordahip vnto their likinge, yet this
goodwouldgrowevnto you by 'thesefollies,that they [" leafs,back]
will give you causeof myrth, in notinge the lightnes
and vayne conceitesof the autor, which might have
employedhis cndevoursin more graveand beneficiall
studies.

To discourse of the nature of Emblemes or Epigramms,what thinges be required to perfect them, and
to what end they should be made,is nedeles to yowr
"Lardahip,becausePaulus louius, Lucas Contlles,Cladius Miuoes vpon Alclat, & divers other menns labors
intreating therof, are not vukuowen to you whose Judgment and leruing hath peirced the depth of vniuersall
knowledge ; & therfore in vaine for mee to bring owles
to Athens, or add water to the large Sea of your rare
lerning, in superfluous itterating that wherof you are
not Ignorant, beinge one whoe hath adorned your excellencie

of lawe With

bewtifull

flowers

of all ^hilo-

sophicall doctrine, as well divine as humane.


Thus, my good Lord, in all dutifull love commendinge these my slender poems(which may be equalled
w/th Sit Topas ryrne in Chaucer) vnto youi good
likiuge, and comitting me to your honorable good
favour and furtherance (to add oyle to the emptie
lampe of my muse,for maynteuanceof the light therof,
wA/ch without the comfortable heate of yowr honorable

patronagewill soonebe extinguished)I humblie take


my leaue. from my howsein ClerkemvellGrene,the
20 of December"

1600.

Youre lordshippes in all dutye,


Francis Thnne
1 MS. Pholosophicall

' The '20', ' December', and words after <1COO',


were filld
in after the test was written, and in paler ink.

(I) Pietie and Impietie.


When falseSynon,with tongueof guilefull tale,
had causd the monstrous

woodden

horse of Greece

to enter Troy wales, the bitter bale


of Priams state, flaminge in everie peece,
throughe raginge fiers, Eneas, full of pittie,

his sonne and father ledd forth

of the Cittie.

He bare his aged Syre on shouldersstronge,-

oh sweete burdenn ! the wfo'ch the sonne did crave,-

and in his hand, Aschainus ledd alonge.


oh Fathers love ! which never end maye haue.
10
his father, him self, his sonne,throughe Grecian foes
Eneas leades,when hee from Troye goes.
12
A lovinge deedeof famous pietie,
when strength of youth releeveth feeble sprite;

13

a naturall deed of sonne his love and dutie,

to helpe his syre,w/u'chbrought him into light;

16

for w/fi'ch this holie mann doth iustelie gaine


renowned fame,for ever to remayne.

18

But thow, oh wicked monster of beastlie minde,


Cruell and blodie Nero, the dreggesof kinges,
contrarie to Nature, and fleshlie kinde,

19 peaf,bck]

(with greefeI doeabhorrto wright thesethinges) 22


didst noe whit shame,thy mothers wombe to teare,
to seewhere shee did such a viper beare.
24

EMBLEAMES.

2.

OXE SMALL

FAULT.

3.

TEMPERANCE.

"Wherforeto thee is left perpetuall shame,


to kill thy mother, to answerethy desire.
But to Eneas, doth growe eternall fame,

25

that sav'dhis agedfather from the fire :

28

hee, for reward, raised Troy walles againe;


thow, for reward, in heastlie sort wert slaine.

30

(2) Vertue shouldnot be condempned


for one smale imperfection.
The heavenlie pallas of Celestiall stye,
resoundeswith pleasant notes of musicks skill;
the godds and goddesses,with mellodie,
to Genius doe sacrifice their

fill.

They leave the Care they had for earthlie tkmges;


they daintie feastesfreequent with sweet delight,
pefs]before whose eyesfaire Venusfreshlie springes,
in apt measuredaunsing, with comelie sight.

Shee footes it soe, with crowne of flowers in hand,

that all the godds extoll her for the same;


but beinge prais'd by that moste sacredbande,
Homus beginns her daunsinge
-.-- for to blame.

And findingefault,-I

12

knowenot well wherfore,

still redie, what best is, for to deface,affirmd the slipper which faire Venuswore,
with craaking noyse, her dauncinge did disgrace.

(3) Temperance
abatetbfleshlie
Delightes.
Thow CithereaneVenus,I would knowe,

why thow, and Cupidhouldingeof his bowe,

16

EMBLEAME3. 4. DEATH AND CUPID.

soe pensive bee, and over fier doe stande,

warmingof thy feete,and warmingof his hande?


Oh why ] doth love and luste feeletheir decaye,
Yf Ceresand lacchushe awaye?
Where Schemesdoth raigneamongstthe wise,
there lust and hurtfull pleasures
still doefrise.

They finde noe foode, nor anie warrs, can make

[ieaf5(bcio

againstthe modestwhich sparingdiet take.


but if that wealth and dronkennes bearestroke,

they, wicked warresof Lecherie,provoke.

12

(4) Deathand Cupid.


The hatefull Death loynd to the God of lone
in one Cabine setled themselvesto sleepe;
both had their bowesand shaftes,their might to prove ;
the one gaue mirth, the other forct to weepe.
4
Thus blinded love, and death at this time blinde,
by chance doe meete, by chancedoe harbor finde.
6
But starting forth of this their former rest,
heedlesse,the one, the others weaponscaught:

the gouldenshaftesfrom Cupid,Deathberefte;


the dartes of Death, dame Venussonne had raughte. 10
thus contrarie to kinde, and their nature,

Cupiddoth slea,and Death doth love procure.

12

Ould doatingfooles,morefit for Caromshipp,

13

that feele the goute, to grave w/o'ch take their waye,


doe fall in love and youthfull-like doe skippe,

deckingetheir headswith garlandsfreshand gaye. 16


Their yearesand daiesthey easeliedoeforgett,
[ief6]
and from their harte, colde sottishe sighes do fett.

18

But striplinges and yonge boyes that wounds receive


by yonge Cupid, then Nestor, yet more oulde,

EMBLEAMES.-6.

ART.

8. LABOUR.

against their kinde, their wished lift doe leave,


and vnto Acheron the waye doe houlde.
22
But Cujnd, cease! and Death, thine owne stroke give !
Let yonge menu love, let ould menn ceaseto live. 24

(5) Art, the antidoteagainstfortune.


On rolling ball doth fickle fortune stande;
on firme and setled square sitts Mercurie,
The god of Arts, with wisdomesrodd in hande :
w/u'ch covertlie to vs doth signifie,
that fortunes power, vnconstant and still frayle,
against wisdome and art cannot prevaile.

4
6

ffor as the Sphere doth move continuallie,


7
and showesthe courseof fickle fortunes change,
soe doth the perfect square stand stedfastlie,
and never stirrs, though fortune liste to range.
10
[leafe,back]wherefore,Learne Artes, which allwaies stedfast prove;
therbye, hard happesof fortune to remove.
12

(6) Labour quenchethLecherie.


Dictinian

Diana, which

Of Phoebusborroweth lighte,
The glistring Queeneof Woodes and groves,
and Ladie of the nighte,
Pursues

the Hart-whose

nimble

doe make him seemeto file,with bowe and howndes, whosethundringe voice
doth Eccho in the Skye.
Tonge Cupid is not farr behinde,
but followeth

feete

on as as faste.

He shootes,but leavesno wound; in vaine


his fierie dartes are caste.

12

EMBLEAMES.-6.

EXERCISE.

7. FORTUNE.

If Ignorant of causethow bee,


why loue can take not holde

Of chastand travelingsDiane,
Of this thow maiste be bolde :

1G

It is, for that shee not consumes

her golden time in vaine,

Nor Idle thoughtsof wanton youth


doeharborin her brayne;
ffor, flienge Canker of slothfull eise,
in huntinge spends the daye,
Wastinge her time with those delights,
to beate fond thoughts awaie.
"Whoe therfore

wiselie

20
Hear
7]

24

seekes to shunn

the force of Cupids Ire


vse exercise,flie Idle thoughtes;
soe shalt thow quench his fire.

28

(7) Fortune.
There is a birde w/n'ch takes the name

of Paradise the faire,

Which allwaies lives, beatinge the winde,


and flienge in the Ayre.

For envious nature him denies

the helpe of resting feete,


wherby hee forced is, in th'ayre
incessantlie

to fleete.

Soethe vncertaine light and wilde


fowle fortune variable,
whoe onlie in vnconstancie

doth sheweherself most stable,


Doth never, in one pace or sorte,
prove constant in her power,

But doubtfull, fleeting hereand there,


still changingeveriehower.

12
peaf7,

16

10

EMBLEAlfES.

7.

FORTUNE.

8. BRIBERIE.

Wherefore the cunninge Smirnians


her Image carved out,
"With feete cut from her leggs, and sette
on ball turninge aboute.
And for she could not setled stande,
they sayd, as doth appeare,
' Sweet Fortune, thow dost flie in th'ayre,
like birde depainted here.'

20

24

(8) Bryberie.
After his Fathers funerall,
"when

as Tiberius

went

Vnto his howse, his tender harte

with, pittie did relent;


For, seeingeof a wretched mann
with scabbsand sores opprest,
On whom the suckinge flies did feed,
not suffringe him to reste,
[leaf8] Hee calld his servant, willinge him
to drive awaye with speed,

Those Cormorantes which eate his fleshe,


and forced him to bleede.

12

The mann obayed: but when he would


haue beate those flies awaye,

Thee wretched sowle did him forbid,


and mourninglie did saye:
" Yf that these gorged gnawinge flies,
full glutted with my bloode,

16

"Were beaten from their place of praye,

newe troope, not half soegood,


Leane and greedie,with hungrie mawes,
would then renewemy paine,
and suck my blood even to the death,
not sparingeanie vayne.

20

24

EUBLEAMES.-8.

CORRUPT JUDGES.

9. IMMORTALITY.

11

Soe the old ludge, once fullie fraughte


with guiftes and briberie,
Will not be easilie ledd by guiftea
to wrest the lawes awrye.

28

But hee that commeth newe in place,


and thirsteth after gould,
Or his luditiall office buyes,
with him there is noe hould;
for hee that buies, is forct to sell;

and new corrupted ludge


Takes all and more; and, for reward,
is made a sinfull drudge.

32

36

(9) Inunortallitie of the Sowle.


In former age, the Ethnikes, false gods servinge,
this solempneCeremonievsed to their dedd,
That when the paled corps went to buryenge,
a lawrell Crowne they wreathed about his head.

The causewherof being asked by Adrian,


the famousEmperour of the Romaine state,
Btjas replied : ' because that then, ech man
whome death reduceth to that happie state,

' forsaken hath all worldlie wretchednes;


they feele noe greefe, or sorrowesheavie payne;
wherfore, since they attaine such blessednes,
11
this garland shewesthe Crowne w/i /ch they doe gayne.'
Then since those vertuous Ethnickes, with such loye
addornd the funeralls of deceasedwighte,
Whose faithelessesowles,feirce Pluto did destroye,for vnto them was shut the gate of lighte,16
Why should we faithfull CJtristiansbewaile
our loved frendes, and celebratewith greefe-

the mannedeceased,
with scapingSatansgayle,
leaveswoe, and winns a place of sweetereleefe,-

20

12

EMBLEAME3.

10. SOTTED LOVE.

11. PRIDE.

Since vnto vs is made assuredpromise


for to enioye the vision of gods sight,
and to ascendcelestiall place of blisse,
our god to praise, in whome wee shall delight.

(10) Sotted

24

lone.

Autoritie and Loue will scarceagree,


and in one placeare neuer found to bee;
for decencie must serve to ech estate,

and ech must live according to his fate.


Kice Sardanapalus, tk'assirian Kinge,
a mann effeminatein losse livinge,
doth fall in love, and loves so fooh'shlie
that hee forgetts his state and maiestie.
, back]For, leaving of the kingdomes needful! charge,
and Heroike deedes,his kingdome to enlarge,
(oh sottishe loue !) hee whollie followeth luste ;
hee followes Venus; in her doth hee truste ;

12

hee locks himself from other companie;


and fan abasinghis Eegalitie,
not like a valiant mann, but all from kinde,
in woemens workes doth cheefest comfort

finde :

16

hee cardes,and spinnes with distaffe in his hande;


hee workes and sowes,fast wrapt in Venusbande.
"\Vherfore yf thow wilt gayne an honest name,
and deedesperforme to winn eternall fame,
20
Let "Wemennnever soebewitch thy witt,
as thow

be forc'd from

thine

owne kinde

(11) Pride.
The morrall Seneca,whose penn
intreatinge matters graue,
I finde, amongst his learned workes,
this worthie

tale to haue :-

to flitt.

EMBLEAMES.

11. PRIDE.

12. PATIENCE.

13

Therewasa kinge of higherenowne,


which Justice did vpholde.

to him, three sonnsdid naturegive,


of couragefeirce and bould.

To echo,the choiceof birdesheegaue,

Oaf10]

wherbye that hee might learne,


the severall

humors

of their

minde

and manners to discerne.

12

The eldest, of his haughtie harte,


the Eagle prowd did chuse.
the second,of fiers disposition,
the hawke would not refuse.

16

The yongest, of a myleder minde,


the vulgar thrushe did take;
On whome the kinge bestowd his crowne,
and him

his heire did make.

20

ludge what the kinge ment by this guifte,


for I maye not discloseit.
And thow perhapps maie be deceived
in thinkinge for to glose it.

24

(12) Patience.
The patient Socrates,true mirror of our life,
whoe for the godds did yeald his heavenlie breth,
twoe vnkinde wives did nourishe foolishlie,-

the first was blinde, the other had bleare eyes,-

of whome,goodmann,he badlie wasintreated.


JSTot
once, nor twice, but allwaies when they raged,
neafio,
badtj
the one would beastlie spurne him like a dogg;
the other would belabour him with her fists;
8
all w/u'ch hee bare with vertuous patience.
with bitter words, but being fiercelie baited,
hee was enforct to leave the vnquiet howse;

whoe,goingforth, did rest him at the dore,

12

14

EMBLEAMES.
13. LIBEHALITIE
(THE GRACES).

"wherelong hee could not quiet sitt at ease,


but that these sprites, these furies fowle of hell,
did add more ill to former wickednes;
for as hee satt with calme and gentle minde,
they on his hed did lothed vrine cast,
and shrewdlie

16

wett him to the tender skinne.

But hee, w/n'ch made of this a lestinge sport,


as well aquainted with such brain sick witts,
vsed not revenge,but smilinglie did saye,
that after thunder, Rayne did still descende;
for hee these wives did keepe, for to envre
his vertues rare, and patienceto encrease.

20

24

(13) Liberalitie.
"Why doe these virginns faire, the Gracesthree,
loues daughters,borne of Eurinome the brighte,
Clear
11]On goddesseVenuswaite in theire degree,
Since they from seedof heavendid take therelighte ? 4
becausefrom these the fruites of love proceed,
and loue is wonne by ech theire several! seed.
6
Their Rosiall faces,shap'd are after one,
as sister twinned, by reasonought to bee;
the twoe, allwaies the third doe looke vpon;
their youthfull age and bewtie doe agree:
"Winged at feete they are; they naked stande,
ech halsing other with their cristall hande.

10
12

The first "Tvherof,Aylaia is named,


13
and worthie place doth hould amongst the reste ;
A peerlesseLadie, in ech place well famed,
shining in honnor deepeharbored in her breste.
16
the next, Thalia, which meaneth, as someteache,
faire flower of youth, and elloquenceof speach..
18
The third, w/u'ch wee call the faire Ephrosine,
to her sisters in vertue not behinde,

19

EMBLEAMES.
13. LIBERALITIE
(THEGRACES).15
doth signifie(as learnedmenndefine)
the pleasant mirth and frute of frendlie minde.

22

thus theseCharites,thesefaire gracesthree,


the formeof love, and guiftes,presentsto mee.

24

But why arethey naked,without attyrel


becausethey showethe playnesse
of the harte,

25 Deafn,

quite naked of decyte, and free from hire;

for in all guiftes,this Is the chefestparte,


28
that what we give,be donn&with meeregoodwill,
with simple and pure minde, devoid of ill

30

Or ells because
vnthankfull menn by kinde,

31

whoe naked are of curtesie and love,

Will naught bestowe,to shewea gratefull minde;


besides all w/n'ch, as wee continuallie prove,
the gracescoffers are emptie and naked found;

34

for thankfull

36

menn, with wealth cannot abound.

Whye are they virginns fayer, freshe, and bright?


for that therby wee covertlie are tould,
that of the frendlie guiftes receyvd, (by righte)
perpetuall memorie wee are bound to hould ;
for, freshe in thankfull

37

40

minde, wee must conceive

the deeperecord of favours wee receive.

42

"Why winged are their feete like mercurie?


becausethat, whoe doth guiftes or thanks impart,
must not deferr the same, but spedilie

43

performethe frute of his well willinge harte;


46 Deans]
ffor heegivestwice, that quicklieand with speed
bestoweshis guift to serveour presentneed.
48
Soelovinglie, why arethey loind in one1

49

ech one, in armesembracing of her mate ;


and allwaies twoe, the third looking vpon 1

It shewes,that frendesmustlive without debate, 52


that guiftes receyved, be paid with vsurie,

and that true frendesfayle not in miserie.

54

16

EMBLEAMES.

14. VEETUE OF HERBES.

16.

WINE.

(14) Vertue of Herbes.


"\Vhilste prudent Epidaure, the learned leeche,
the sacredherbes in fertill soyle doth seche,
with stedfast eye casteon the Tallies deepe,
& tall yonge ladd,--which, kepte the fearfull sheepe, 4
adorned with crowneof herbesfaire, freshe, and greene,
of straungedevise, most orient to be seene,This Epidaure beheld in greate despite,
with Basilinke to vse most cruell fighte ;
8
which poysoningbeaste,this manne(with Mars his blowc)
did prostrate on the ground, and overthrowe.
Then Epidaure (iudginge somevertue rare
within the garland w/a'ch the heardmanware,)
12
[ief12,back]Drewe nere, and by faire wordes did frendlie crave,
that hee, of him this herbie Crowne might haue.
wherto the herdman yealded his consent,
and then a freshe to basiliske hee went,

16

with that feirce beaste,movinge new fight againe,


in w/'ch the sillie

mann was easelie slaine.

"whichdonne, the phisition begann to saye,


' within this bowe, most secretvertue laye ;'
20
and with this garland freshe,in everie Ioj-nt
the bodie of deadeherdmann did annoynt.
forthwith the mann (a thinge to all menn straunge)
began to live, and life for deathe did change.
24
Such vertues doth the power of god divine,
for our releife, to yearthlie herbes assigne;
wherbye wee maie from menn.diseasestake,
Recover health, and dangersgreat forsake.
28

(15) Wine.
ffaynewouldstthow know wherforethe god
last borne of loue his Thye,
Is winged on his hed, and whye
swifte Pegasestandeth bye.

EMBLEAMES.

16. MANN.

17

And why the horse of true honnor


conioyned is to Bacchus,

The followingverse,the springeand cause


therof

shall here discusse.

When people with Amicla did


the grapes to Bacchus bringe,

She said,' faire Bacchus,I seewinges


from out the hedd to springe;
Oh Bacchus,thow haste quivering winges,
and

heares

that

crowned

12

bee

with greene Ivye ; let Gorgon horse


allwaies

associate thee.

16

ffor Bacchus doth increase the blood,


and force to vs it lendes;
To melancholic harts, both mirth
and cooller freshe it sends.

20

It raiseth vpp dull mindes from Earth,


to enterprise great thinges;
It comforteth the weake sinnowes,

and strength to witt it bringes.


This doth the swifte Pegasinehorse,
conioynd with Bacchus tell,

24

But yet to vsewine moderatelie,


for soe shall witt

excell.'

28

(16) Mann.

dear
is,tack]

Behould,mann is the litle world,


as Gretiane gaue him name,
And as the ould Philosophers

did signifiethe same.

ffor as the Sunn and Moone, bright lights,


doe shine in azured Skye,

Soe hath the mann two sparkling eyes


w/a'ch vnder forehedd lie.
EMBLEMS.

18

EMBLEAilES.

17. WITT.

As goulden Sunn, with purple beames,


in morning freshe doth springe,
And going vnder Tlietis bedd,
on -world the shadedoth bringe,
And soedoth rise and sett to vs,

12

as other plannetts all,

Soemannby byrth doth rise and springe,


by death doth sett and fall.
The moving windes in skies that rowle,
both hott and colde are founde;
and in the mouth of breathing mann,
both

colde and heate abound.

16

20

Our bones and membersare the earth,


the ayre in Lunges doth swell,
The mouth and brayne doe water holde,
the fire in hart doth dwell.

2t

Thus mann is moyst, earthlie, and hott,


w/th water, earth, and fire,

Be three the noblest Elements,


w7*/ch

nature

cann

desire.

To infancie comparedis
the spring, sweet, freshe, and gaye;
the pleasantsommervnto Youth,
where strength and couragestale;
The ripenesseof manns firme estate
doth fruitfull Autumne holde;
As crooked Age well likned is
to winters

frost and colde.

28

32

36

(17) Witt.
Nothing moresmooththen artificiall glasse;
morebrickie, yet therenothingmayebe founde;
nothingemorewhite or fairer is on grounde
then congealdsnowe,yet naughtlessefirme canpasse.4
Soe, shining and fayre witts, in which abound

EMBLEAMES.

18. HELIOTROPE

AND

SUBJECT.

Invention, quick conceit,and answering,


threecheefestthinges,true praisedeservinge,
hauetheir desert,and mostdoerun awrye,
Sincefinest white doth soonesttakeall staines,

19

and finest witts are ficklest of their braines,


whoseself-conceit ru}rnes them vtterlie ;
much like the Bees,whosehonnie breedestheir paines 12
by surfetting theron Immoderatelie,
for, from her sweete,cornsher perplexitie.
Thus these rich witts, w7n'chfondlie deeme
they all menn doe exceede,
10
By trusting to themselvestoo much,
doe fayle themselvesat neede.

(18) The subiect.


The statlie flower that faire rich India yeldes,
vrhich goulden Heliotropium wee name,
the glorious Marigolde of fruitefull feildes,
the courseof all his flowring time doth frame
after the light of Phoebusnorishinge flame,
on wTu'chshe waites with still attending eye,
windinge her self like sonne,circularlie.

Of w/'ch effect, the name she doth obtayne,


& Heliotropium, of sonne is calld.
ffor, when bright Elios with the fierie wayne,
nf is]
his fower feirce steedesin purple morne hath stalld, 11

Then this strangeflower (wi'th Sablenight appalld)


spreddsforth her goldenlockes,but hidesher face
when Phebus bedds, as fearing somedisgrace

14

Thus doth this noble flower, her homagedue,

15

paieto her Lord whomesheedoth imitate,


Houldingethat waie wfo'chher doth still pursue;
whose pliant minde, to vs doth intimate,
that as this flower, by natures hidden fate

18

20

EMBLEAMES.

19. DILIGENCE.

20. YSURIE.

doth followe still the turning course of Sunn,


wherin she pleasures till her life be donne,

So pliant subiects follow still,


whilst rulinge Prince doth live,
The good or badd examplesw/a'ch
his customd actions

22

rive.

25

(19) Diligence obtayneth Riches.


The simple Cock, that with a hungrie minde,
on sluttishe dunghill scrapte, in stedfast hope,
for his releefe, somefeeding grayne to finde,
being forct to seekewithin that litle scope
[leafi:.,tackj to hym assignedby fortunes luckye lott,
a pretious lewell for his paine hee gott;
"which,though to him smale profitt it did give,
vnskillfull what the price therof mighte bee,
yet did it shewethe godds,for to releeve
the

needie

soule

whome

wee in labour

see

turmoyle with swetting face, for to sustaine


his pore estate with such a luckie gaine.

4
6
7

10

12

("20) Vsurie.
The wealthie mann with blessingsgreat indued,
raising his mightie halls to looke alofte,
whome never yet hath povertie pursued;
yf that his greedieminde be sett to ofte
to searchfor gaine, to fill his hungrie hart,
somefroward chancethe godds to him impart.

ffor a rich vsurer, w/<*'chhordes of gould


entombed from somein armed chest dyd keepe,
not well content such heapedwealth to hould,
but vndenninding earth, did often creepe

4
0

10

in dungeonsdeepe,and minesof silver bright,


to rake for that w7a'ch was his harts deli "hi.

12

EMBLEAMES.

21. MTRTILUS SHEILDE. 22. OSTENTATIONS. 21

But lust Pluto, a ludge of rightfull rede,


when as this mann had entredgouldenCave,
his due desert,that wasfor him decreed,

13

as luste revengepermitted him to haue,

1C

for heeby clodd (er heemight that auoyde)


of fallinge earth, was suddenlie destroyd.

18

Thus doe the goddsto such as they enrich,


when thanklessepersonsallwaieswill appeare;

19

for thoughe to daye they send never soe mich,


yet when they please,they can with frowning cheere22
spoyle them from all, but moste where they doe see
vnsaciate mindes still griping for to bee.
.24

(21) Myrtilus Shcilde.


The famous souldk-r, Mjrtilus the Knighte,
whose conquering uiinde did never stoopeto feare,
in manye conflictes the Garland Palme did beare,
as well on Land, as in the Maryne fighte,
such was his force, such was his wan-like might,
still savinge his life by his helpfull Sheilde,
both in the swelling Seaand bloodie feilde.

On Land his faithfull

8 [leafic, back]

sheild did him defend

from dobled strokes of stronge revenging foes;


and in mercilesseSeasdevouringe woes,
this sheild, from drowninge, him to shoaredid sende,
and brought him safevnto his lourneis ende :
12

in all mishapps,at everietime of neede,


this worthie

Sheild

did allwaies

stand in steede.

So, my good Lord, be you, I craue,to mee,


Afirtilus sheild, where soemy bodie bee.
1C

(22) VayneOstentations.
TVee dailie see the fruitfull

Pfifbits fier,

how richlie it bringsforth the-wishedharvest,

22

EMBLEAME8.

23. tOSSE OF HURTFULL THIXGES.


"

"whichplenteouslie augmentsthe ownershier,


one hundred foulde contentinge his request,
"with his full earesstill bending to the ground,
"wheriugreate store of grayne in tyrne is found.

4
6

But bragg amongst the come aspiresproudlie,


on emptie earelookinge abouethe reste,
advancingehis highe crestepresumptuouslie
even to the starrs, as though he were the beste,
whoe, beinge lighte, and fruitlesse of all grayne,
for want of waight, showesall pride is vayne.

10
12

[lean?]goe hee whome litle learninge doth commende,


13
is puft alufte with pride of highe conceite,
and deemeshis witt maye with Minerve contende,
and scooleMercurie with some queinte deceit;
16
but whoethat braggs,and deemeshimself most learned,
most voide of art, by wise men is discernde;
Since he is allwaies somwhat, himself that nothinge
deemes;

and he is nothinge found to be, himself that somwhat


seemes.

20

(23) Losseof hurtfull thingesis gayne.


Producinge earth inrich'd, makes rich againe
the toylinge laborer hopinge fruitfull gayne;
but yf neglect, it vnmanurde growe,

corruptingeweedesand harmefullplants do flowe.

with wrootinge groyne, with feirce and warlike bore-,


turnes vp and betters that bad lande before,
destroyengthose vnprofitable springes,
to frutefull land -which such annoyance bringes,

"whichis not losse, but bettringe to the feilde,


more holsome frute then redie for to yeilde.

wherfore from thee, yf taken bee the thinge


w/i/ch needlesseis, and doth not profitt bringe,
12
;L-afi7,
back]nor lossenor greife, let that be vnto thee,
for weedespluck'd vp, hurt not the ground, wee see.

EMBLEAMES,-24.

INTERNALL VERTCES. 25. INFERIORS* THREiTS.

23

(24) Internal! vertues are best.


Sweettasting aple,which this faire virginn beares,
In cristall hand doth shinewith pleasingehewe,
for in th'externall forme,to eyeappeares
a glistring cullor wAich1 doth delight renewe;
4 [' us.with]
but vnder that thinne Coate, fayre nature hides
more gratefull frute, w/a'ch shee for ruann provides.
Then thow, whome nature outwardlie hath graced
with comelie shape,externall forme to winne,

trust not therto ; it wilbe soone dufm"<<1,

as of noe vse, like to the Aples skiun.


wherfore with vertue cloathe thy inwarde minde,
that th'outward shape therbye maye comfort fynde; 12
ffor what availes the gorgious showe
of Apples outward skynn,
Yf the internall frute conteyne
not pleasing taste therin ?
1C

(25) Threates of the inferior to be contemned.


The melitane dogge, brcdd onlie fur delight,
whose force is smale, though voice be lowde and shrill,
with often barkinge putts greate doggsto flighte,
incensd with rage,as though he would them kill.
4
Yet thoughe hee threaten with moste cruell voice,

leppingeand runningein hastefor to devoure


the bloodie mastife, it lies not in his choice,
as wanting both a naturall strength and power.

ffor thosegreatedoggesw7n'chflie not thencefor feare,


contempne his threates, scorning revengeto seeke,
knowing the force and strength which they do beare
is overmuch

for him

w/tz'ch is so weake.

Soe hee whom strength and wisdome doth adorne,


the brawles and anger of the weake doth scorne,

12

24

EMBLEAHES.-20.

rEILOSOPHIE.

since all the power wherin they doe abound,


consiste in wordes, which vanishe with the sound.

Ilean8.back]

16

(OQ)Philosophic.

loues sonne,the valiant Hercules,

"whose
vrorthyetravaylingpeyne,
by his twelve labours, vnto him

immortal!famedid geyne,

made this the best and last labour,

as glorie of them all,


That triple hedded Cerberus
hee made to bee his thrall,

The mightie cheynedporter of


The darke infernall hell,

"wherethinges obscureas dampned sprites


in darke oblivion
vihich

imvardlie

dwell.

12

to vs vnfoulds

Philosophies triple kinde,


wherin doth rest the triple good
of our celestiall

ininde,

1G

ffor as three hedds of Cer1-r/i.f

doe from one boddie growe,


Soefrom abstrusePhilosophic,
three several! springs doe flowe :

20

Divine, humane, and naturall,

wherin consist the parts


[leaf19] of heavenlie and terene creatures,
and of all learned artes,

w///ch are not conqueredwithout


great paynesof daye and night,
as Hercules by painful! toyle
brought Cerberusto light,

'24

28

That sharpelabourbeingethe last,


as cheefest and the best,

therin, all former labours of


the bodie for to reste.

32

EMBLEAMES.

27. SOCIETIE.

28. COUXSELL.

25

(27) Societie.
The purple Rosewhich first Damascobredd,
adorndwith cullor gratefull to the si-lit,
hath in it self a fragrantsmellsdelight,

wherbye two sencesof the mann is fedd.

thougheotherthings to suchfaire shewehaueright,


yet inaye they not equall this Rosie flower,

whosedayntiesmell therin hath cheefestpower.

Soetwo faire dowries vfhich mann doth enioye8


true perfecte love, and suer fidelitiefirmelie preservehumane societic,
[leaf19,back]
their frends assistingin ech hard annoye,
11
when want of ech brings noe securitie ;
both w///uh, this damaskerose doth well vnfoulde,
as honest hart, w/</chfayth and love doth houlde. 14
ffor as the rose, depriv'd of pleasing smell,
retayning yet the cullor for the eye,
or havinge smell, wanting righte bewtie,

1j

is not a rose, for both in that must dwell,


or ells it cannot other flowers dene,-

18

soeour societie, without love and fayth


is never perfect, as true reasonsayth;
ffor where is perfect love, there trustie fayth is found,
and where assured trust doth dwell, there love must
needs

abound.

23

(28)

Counselland vertue subdue deceipfull Persons.


The valiant knight whomePerseuswife did love,

whome she exilde for hee would not consent,

which tooke his name, as the effect doth prove,


of Bcllerus, a prince to mischeife bent,
whose wicked deedesthe CorintJicsdid susteyne
whilste over them his tyrannic did Eaigne ;-

2G EMBLEAME3.-28. COUXSELL.29. BAD PLEASURES.

ffor when his Heroikehand had Bdler slayne,


he called was Bellfpheron the worthie,
8
whose chefestglorie and fame w/i/'ch he did gayne,
was, when he slue Chimera valiantlie,

The Lician monster, that people \fhich destroyed,

and the Seacoasteson everiesideannoyed.

12

ffor Bdleplieron, this Cliimcr (as he fledd)


pursued on Pegasus,the horse of fame,
(w/</ch of Medusasslater first was Lredd,
for vertuous duedesdoe breed immortull fame),

13

1C

and him, with force of rninde and warlike hand

did slea, for naught maye strength and witt w/thstand.


Soe you, my Lord, borne vp on Peyaswynge,
10
doe fill the Earth and ayre with worthie prayse;
your rare exploytes, wA/eh of your vertue springes,
on Fameshorse are spredd abroadallwaies,
2:2
since you haue slayne, by great advice and skill,
those EmjUah Chimera which this land did fill.

24

(29) Pleasuresto be eschewed.


ffonde Paris, in vnbridled age doth chuse
the life which seldomsorteth to good ende;
[leaf20,took] fTorin yonge yeares,whoe vertue doth refuse,
and doth on fading pleasuresstill attende,
can neither witt, nor wealth, nor honour, gayne,
nor happie life in worldlie caresattayne.
He chose Venus,-which 'madnes' is expounded,
and ' wanton life of pleasures' doth expresse;
he left Pallas, on w/</chis rightlie grounded
the contemplation of all perfectnes;
he scorn'd luno, \\-hich 'wealth' doth signifie,
"with thactive life meanethat to multiplie.

4
6
7

10

Then shonnedelight, yf richesthow doecraue,


Or perfectwisdomethow do seeketo haue.
14

(30) Vnitinge of Contrariesmake


sound Judgement.
ComfortingCeresloynd with hoppsof bitter taste,
and fairewaters,by art producesweetliquorsat the last,
not much inferior to Bacchus pleasantwyne,
as Emulus vnto that loyce w/a'ch art doth well refine ; 4
for the sharpe taste of hopps, the water and the corne
doe mittigate, and make that sweet, vfhich bitter was
beforne:

"which doth vs teach the waye, ech causeto handle well,

and howein knotteddifficultsa lodgementright to tell; [leaf


21]
for loyning contrariesin peyse of equall weighte,
9
comparingethe effectsof both, the truth appearethstraite,
So addinge hard to softe, and bitter to the sweete,
compoundsa meane between them both, fur Judgment
alhvaies meet.

12

(31) Reuenge.
Dianiane dogge,with bliude furie inflamed,
fearinge the hurled stone \v7iich him offended,
\rith sharpe and threatning teeth whollie inraged,
doth bite the stone, on that to be revenged,
ludginge noe other thinge but that dead stone,
of that his hurt, to bee the causealone.
"which fonde revenge doth others mirth provoke,
vnto himself much greatnr hurte increasinge,

for guiltlessestonecannneverfeelethe stroke,


allthough the doggceasenot his cruell bitinge.
wherbyeweelearne,not rasherevengto take,
of that w///ch of it self noe hurt doth make ;
tfor not the stone, but flinginge hande,
the iust revengedoth crave,
and actors, not the instruments,

due punishement should haue,

4
6
7

10

14

28

EMBLEAilES.-32.

PEACE.

neaf2i,bcio
Since to our selvesmore further paynes
of grcife wee shall procure,
yf rashe revenge,on guiltlesse cause,
wee striue to put in vre.

18

(32) Peace.
Pluto, the god of worldJie wealth,
"which vnder yearth doth houlde
his goulden limittes and his bounds,
with manie hills of goulde,
there governs at his cursedwill,
and goulden guiftes greate store,
with heapedRiches doth possesse
a thowsand

fould and more.

vnder whose feete, Bellona lies,


still thirstinge after warrs,

a furious spoyler, and the cause


of all

tumultuous

larrs.

] 2

But fayre sweetPeacedoth lead Pluto,


and draweth him with right hand,
And in lefte hand, Amalthca,

the fruitful! home, doth stande;


ffor all thinges doe then flowe at large ;
Bacchus and Ceresraigne ;
pear22]
Then Halcyon daies, then quiet rest,
their triumphes doth retaine.
Then blodie Mars, cast to the grounde,
to peacedoth yeald his sword;
but perfect peacedescendsfrom him
"Uliich was his fathers worde,

And first appeasdthe Angrie god


when hee, the loste mankinde
with peacefull concord, to our good,
for evermoredid bynde.

16

20

24

28

EJIBLZAJ1ES.

33. POUERTIE.

31. SVLUER HXIRLDE.

2'J

(33) Pouertie.

As fishellvinorastaiestheShipp,
which ells with prosperous
wynde
Would saylevnto the port of rest,
sweetecomfort for to finde,

Soehatedpovertie,with greife
of fortunes hard disgrace,
The Labors of the vertuous minde

doth vtterlie deface:

ii'or none soenoblevertue doth dwell in aniewight,

butwantobscures
it, forcinghimto silence
wt'thdispight.
(34) Syluer worlde.
The sacredCrowne adorning curled hayre,
and christall hand welding the kinglie mace,
the mounting Eagle w7//ch Giinum^le did beare,
are ensignesof the mightie loue his grace.
All w/ii'ch doe shewethe sylver world fore past,
when Cuntrey Swayne prepared the happie soyle,

and with his seede the Earth did overcaste,

which yoked oxe did teare vp with his toyle.


Before w/u'eh tyme the fertyle earth gaue out
her blessedfrute, thoughe she vntilled laye,'

And Saturnegrave,the world did rule about,


the gouldenagevrhicb did to vs bewraye;

12

But when that loue begann his Silver raignc,

and had expeldehis father from his lande,


the feildes were tylld with greate & sweating payne,
and Wearied Oxe and horse, did mourning stand. 1C

(35) Enuye.
The mightie loue from highest heaven did sende

the fayer Phoebus,


thesegratcfull newesto tell

30

EMBLEAMES. 35. ENUYE. 36. TERME OF LIFE.

to wicked virginns, in vice which did excell,


this greate favour that hee to them would lende,

[icf23] That for herself, what anie one did crave


of him, her fellowe, duble that should haue.

fforthwith, the monster vilde of all mankinde,

which gnawesher harte,and tearesour worthie fame,


etepteforth and said, 'Apollo, graunt this same,
that I oneeyemayeloose! for soeI tinde
10
my felloweshall looseher twoeeyesand sight.'
all w/u'chshespakethroughenvieand despight. 12
Thus fretting envie, loyeng in our payne,
pininge her self when good to vs doth growe,
and fatting fast when hiirte or losse doth flowe,
in all mischeif findinge her chefest gayne,
of her own hurte, nothing doth force at all,
yf double that vnto her neighbour fall.

13

16
18

(36) Our terme or limit of life not remoueable.


ffrom neck it hath the humane shape,
the rest a piller stone :
Thus Terminus the god is made,
of all the godds alone ;

Pear23,back]Whome, when the ruler of the stairs


beheld with scornefull face,

Hee willd him to depart the feilde,


and leaue to him the place.

But Terminus, all confident,

did bouldlie to him saye,


' I yeald to none ': the septred loue
could not drive him awaye.

12

Hee standeth fixte, not to be moved,


whome wee cannot iutreate

with price, nor prayer, with wordes, nor giftes,


nor yet with angrie threate.

16

EMBLE.VME3. 37. GOD SLOWLIE PCNISHETH.

31

Soearethe fixed bondsw/u'chgod


doth limit to our daies,
not to be changed or removed,
to lengthe them anie waies.

20

(37) God slowlie punisheth.


What doth the waightie millstone meane,
not turned by the wynde ]
Of heavenly god it signifies
the nature and the kynde.

The father of celestiallsprite,

deaf
24J

of mortall menn the Kinge,


His thunder bolts doth rarelie shoote,
or lightnings downe doth flinge.
With slowe and stealingepace, the wrath
of god doth on vs fall,
As one which gentlie doth expect
that wee for mercye call.

12

But when continnued patience


doth breake his former bande,

His anger is to furie turnd,


he strikes with heavie hande ;

and with iust doblinge of the payne,


the grevous punishment
doth recompencethe long delaye,
vnlesse wee doe repent.

18

20

ffor as millstone, once forct to turne

by rageof boystrouswinde,
without regard,echosubiectthinge
doth into powdergrynde,-

24

Soe clemencieof god, once broke


by our continuall sinne,
Doth vs torment with greater yre,
our sowles theibye to winne.

28

32

EMBLEAMES.- 38. DULL WITTS. 39. THE WRETCHED.

Peafii.'.,,.k]

(38) Dull

witts.

The cheife of gods, the mightie loue,


conceivedin his brayne,
And in newe sort did beare a childe,

yf Poets trulye fayne.

But when that wonderfull burthen,


to worlde he could not leaue,
The fierie god, the lame Vulcan,
with

Axe his hed did cleave.

Then Armed Pallas lepped forth,


true wisdome by her kinde,
for not of fleshe doth wisdome growe,
but of the preciousniinde ;

12

flbr triple power of heavenlieminde-,


which in the brayne doth dwell,
doth make vs like the triple god,
in wisdome

to excell.

16

Some kinde of men there are, whose witt

soe pore wee often see,


As, but with payne and longe dayes toyle,

naughte-will engendered
bee;
ffrom whome

their

wisdome

20

must be drawen

(sincethey want learnedspeeche)


As Pallas -wasfrom loue his hedd,
as doth this Embleme teache.

24

(39) The wretchednot to be Doblie greiued.


The birde of loue, the Eagle of flight most free,
"with manye bites, the naked hart doth teare,
of wretch Prometheus,hanging on the tree,
wA/ch for our skill doth this good lesson beare :

In this sorte not to rexe with doble greefe


A wretched mann deprived of relcufe,

EMBLEAMES.

40. NOB I5IPDR1TIE

IX HEAUEN.

33

But rathershowld,with wordsof myledestkinde,


a plaistergive, to curehis greevouswound;
for to the same,sweetpittie doth vs bynde,

Since in godds nature dailie that is found,


and his preeceptes,in tables graven in stone.
gives vs in charge, the wretched to be none.

10

ffor heewhosetenderhart with pittie diglite


vnto the sickedoth reachehis helpingeayde,

13

12

and partner of the waight of burdened wighto

doth easehis paynewhenhee is overlayed,


16
Amongstthe heavenlieSaintsshall firmeliegayne
Deaf
25.ba
A memorablename, still to remayne.

18

"(40) Noe impuritie in heauen.


The blinded boye, w/i ich w/th his peircinge darts
and tender stroke, the heavenliegodds did wound,
felt greate delight to scorchetheir pliant harts,
since fellowe like amongst them he was found;
but when both sexesof gods did feele such blowe,

oft timesgreatewarrsamongstthemselvsdid growe. 6


Then prudentloue, seingethat fyerie broyle

to rise by weaponsvrhich Cupido bare,

fearingethe goddswouldone annotherspoyle,


the bowesand shaftes from Cupids backe he tare;

10

and with greatereason,for that boyesdisgrace,


did throwe him downe from out that sacredplace; 12
ffor the first father -whichhath made the skye

13

must keepethe heavenliefeilds mostcleane& pure;


SoeLucifer, the prowde,clyming on hye,
was castefrom heaven, in hell for to indure;
for naught vncleane, as sacredletters tell,
in this most holie Cittie once may dwell.
EMBLEMS.

1C
18

3 1 EMBLEAMES. 41. ART'SHELPS. 42. ELOQUENCE.

(41) Honor and rewarde nonrisheth artes.


Shewe mee, sweetemuse, why thow and all the rest
wA/ch hi'avi iili>j spheresdoe guide with harmonic,
were fostred vp with milke from Christall hrest

cSEuphemen distillinge plenteouslie.

Our nurce, her name doth well the samevnfold,


yf wiselie thow the sencetherof dost knowe,
for EnjjIiKiii'jii, uone other thinge doth hould,
but this wA/eh from that greekisheman doth flowe. 8
Since Eii/ili'mm doth onelie signifie
good fame, good name,a good report & prayse,
true honour, due reward, and perfect glorie,
w/</ch nourishe Artes, and learned men allwaies.

12

ffor without that, who, learning would applie,


or wearehimself with paine & miserie1

14

(1-2) Eloquence.
Some Learned menn affirme by ahstruceskill
that Proteus, god and author of eche thinge,

[leaf26,back]who into severall formes, at his owne will,

oft turnd him self, as did occasionspringe,


exprest a man, wA/ch fullie could expounde
ech severall thinge w7*/chwas in nature founde.

Some sayedhe was a man of pretious witt,


and greatlie skilld in kinglie government;
for they wA/ch at the Helme of state doth sitt,

must see wherto their subjects most are bent,


and turne him self into eche severall minde,

10

yf calmed realme he wishe, or hope to finde.

12

But I this Proteus severall formes doe deeme,


the force of Eloquencefor to vnfould;
for as he oft did make his shape to seeme

13

a beast,a fowle,greeneearth,or watercowlde,

16

EMBLEAMES.

43. ART AND NATURE.

41. FORTUNE.

35

Soe devyne Eloquence,mens mindcs doth change,

Even as it lists, to like of thingesmoststraunge. 18

(43) Art cannottake awayethe


vice of nature.
The healthful!

bathe -which daielie wee doe see

to cure the soresand fleshe of lothsome skinn,


cann never make the Negro white to bee,
or dense the harlot from her loathed sinno,
ffor such defaults

as nature

dothe committ

[icaf27j

in the outward shape w/'ch she doth vs impart,


or such defaults as growe by minde or witt
cannot be cured by anie outward art;
ffor though a time wee bridle natures strength,
She will break forth, and houlde her courseat length.

(44) Fortune.
As gouldenSonnedoth worke from out the Skye
divers effectes,and those exceedingestraunge,
Soewandringe fortune, by incertaintie,
workes her effecteswith sundrie kindes of change.

ffor somm she doth oppressewith miserie,

ffrom dunghill, raysingesometo heapesof gould


Someshe castesdowne from great nobilitie,
and makes a clowne a noble place to hould.

SheegivesKingdomes,sheetakesthem backeagame,
her wheele still turnes, not havinge anie staye;
she subvertes all, even as she pleaseto fayne ;
and as with ball, soe with the world doth playe.
1'2
In honnors Chaire, then seethat thow sitt faste,
Least with

her checke shee mate thee at the laste.

14

36 EMBLEA1TES.45. GANYMEDE.46. ELOQUENT


WISDOME.

(45) Ganymede.
, back]Yea, impure mindes whom vncleanelusts defile
against the rightfull courseof natures kinde,
w/<ichperverslie your pleasantwitts beguile,

"with lone his loue,w/u'chGanymededid finde,


4
demethat sweetfayre w/izchforct the goddsto love,
was sacred,and noe common lust did prove.

wfa'ch Ganimedehis name doth well expiesse;


7
for that, a prudent mann, doth signifie,
who doth his minde to Heavenlie things addresse,
and flies to Heaven by livinge vertuouslie,
10
then "which,on earth, nought cann be fairer founde,
causingegoddeslove to vs for to abounde.
12
Then with

true wisdome

see

godds favour thow deserve,


In goulden cupp, with heavenliediinke
of Xectar, him to serve.

16

(46) Eloquent \visdome.


The talking byrd, -whichgloriously is cladd
By natures guise in robe of Emeraud greene,
(.leaf
28]And Tyryan feathers gorgiousto be seene,

with humanetongueand voicew7'chart doth add, 4


of eloquent mann the worthio Tipe is hadd,
Such one as Tullie sayeshe never found,
thoughe in sweet speechlearn'd oratours abounde.

The Sea Tortoys, his howsewTh'chbeareson back,


8
foure footed, shell clothed, and of fearefull sounde,
short hedded, Snake necked,without bowells fownde,
of hideous sight, and w7n'chwarm blood doth lack, 11

whoseArmor naughtcanpeirce,of pasemostslack,


true wisdomes
signedoth vnto vs present,
And stayedmindeto perfectwisdomebent.
14

EMBLEAME8.

47. POETEYE. 48. THE CLERGYE.

Our Parrotthen, vpon this Tortoysplac'de,

37

15

to TSdoth note, by Eyiptian niisterie,


the sound effect of wisdomesveritie,
with Mercuries flowing tongue most swetelie grac'd, 18
w/(/ch loynd in one, can never be defac'd;
wherof a truer mirror none maye knowe
then you, in whome such famousguiftes doe flowe : 21
Then live in hapie health,
since Mercuries worthie Arte,
And learn'd Mineruas skill,
doth harbour in your harte.
25

(47) Poetrye.
The artificial! Scalecomposdof gould,
the shyning mettall to Phebus consecrate,
doth fayre imprint the figure he doth hould
in plyant waxe, to secreciededicate;

that wax, transformingto his formearight,


a gladsomepleasureto a Curious sight.

And golden Poet fedd with Appollos muse,


by his Emphatick verse of heavenlie kinde,
such charming power in reader doth infuse,
and grave such passionsin his pliant mynde,
that he is metamorphos'dwith delight
into the autors secretthoughts and sprighte;
ffor why, such enargyeand life

10
12

doth in learn'd verse abound,

That sence,and witt, and hart, it doth


both ravishe

and confounde.

(4S) Ensignesof the Clergye.


Thow doest demaund of me,

why this right hand doth houlde

16

38

EMBLEAMES.-48.

EXSIGJTESOF THE CLEHGYE.

the slipperie Ele, w/a'ch tumes himself


in circle manifouMe ;

[leaf29] And whye the guelye arnie

in midst of Sheild is placed,


Of Asured cullour, whosebright shine
the firmament hath graced.

The blewisheScuttchiondoth present


the vawted Skye,
Deenotinge that the spirituall man
should love the things on hye.
The reddishe

1'2

cullor doth declare

the modest shame

which in his countenance should dwell,


a vertuous

life to frame.

The Ele prest with the hand,


doth teach him to refrayne
His lipps and tongue from vttring wordes
deceiptfull, false, or vayne.
This must the learned

cullor

20

Clarke

allwaies record in mynde,


yf of Saluation, carehe haue,
or comfort hope to finde;
ffor as the slipprye Ele
not prest, doth slide awaye,
So doth the slipprye tongue, the thoughts
of inward minde bewraye.
[leaf29,back] The white

16

24

28

of Ele

declares that all his deedes

Should be white, pure, and Innocent,


w/<i'ch from his hart proceedes.
Thus yf he frame his life,
unbraced

still

32

is hee

Of godd and of the world, to wA/ch


he shall example bee.

36

E11BLEAMES.

49. FLATTERERS.

60. NO PROVOCATION.

39

(49) llatterer*.
Thereis a kinde of men,whomehell hath bredd,
Deceit hath nourc'd,and doblespeechhath fedd;
naked of vertue, and impudent of face,
abhord of all, exilde from everie place,
ffalse flatterers nam'd, themselveswA/ch change
to every fashion, though never soe strange.
Thesedoth the lishe Pulipus represent,
in his conditions w/V.hbe impudent,
Turning his cullor to everie kinde of Hue,

of everie obiect offerd to his vit/we,

wherbye he maye, with 1>;iytof duked change,


deceyvethe fishe w///ch in the deepedo range,
12
Therbye more lightlie for to winn hi* prujv,
[leaf30]
to gorge his gluttenous mawe with fnodualhvaye.
Soe the false Parisites.themselvesdoe wynde
to divers formes, as tyine and place they fynde,
]G
Changinge themselvesto ech mans scverall vayne,
foode, wealth, or clothinge, tlicrbye to attayne,
Deceyvinge such as in them put their trust,
paynelesseto serve their Hungrye mawe & lust,
20
and without labour to releeve their need,

worse then the Crowes on carrion wA/'chdoe feed,


fur they, dead bodies onlie doe devoure,
when these, the livinge doe consumeech hower.
21

(50) Our betters or enemiesnot to be

prouoked with wordes.


StrymonianCranes,w/'chby their ayerieflight
preserv'dthe wise Deucalionfrom the flood,
are taught by naturesbeneficialllighte
to seekhelping art for their bettergood;
for which, when they crossefrozenTannin hill,
echone,a stonedoth carrie in his bill,

40

EMBT.F.AME3. 61. TVISDOMEAND STRENGTH. 62. THE MEANE.

Wherby they stopp the lowde voice of their crye,


leastewhen they passethat huge and raggedmounteyne,
Deaf
so,back]The Queeneof birdes, their foe, should them discrie, 9
and their voyce make them praye to love his swayne;
but having overgonethat dangerousplace,
they leave those stones, and forth direct their pace. 12
Soe men, whomo ait and nature doth adorne,

should silent be, for feare of followinge hate,


and not with wordes, their betters for to scorne,

or ells their foes by tongue to Imtate.


10
for gentle speech,or silence,at the length
doth swageor keepe vs from our Enneniics strength,

which overpas'd,weemaiewith couragebould


keepeon the courseof life wee meaneto hould.

20

(51) Wisdomeand Strengthareto be loyned.


Doe tell, rude verse, why that pure virginn fayre,
borne of loues brayne by helpe of Vulcans skill,
camearmed forth into the Shining ayre,
not borne of Humane fleslie by natures will,
but whole begott of heavenlie seedeand light,
being Pallas and Minerua call'd by right.
It shewesthat wisdoms doth from good discend,

4
G
7

not borne of fleshe, nor bredd of Earthlie kinde.

that shee camearmed forth, it doth pretende


that wisdome without strength is but a wynde;
and strength without wisdome,subversion brings,
but loyn'd in one, doe conquer hardest thinges.

(52) The meane.


The Daulian PhiloineU, whosewarblinge voice
descantsthe musick of natures sweetedelight,
in her self notes soegreatlie doth reioyce,

that with the samesheputts her life to flight,

10.
12

EMBLEAMES.-53.

CLIMB NOT TOO HIGH.

64. A HARX.OTT. 41

soeswetelieyealdesthis nightingaleher sprite;

And vegitiveplantes,wateredwith themeane,


doespringe; but overmuch,doewither cleane.

Soetheexcesse
in everieEarthliethinge,
andtheextreame
in everiefadingekinde,

vncuredhurt vnto it self doth bringe,


and extreamegreife vnloked for doth finde;

11

ffor learnedFlaccusputts vs still in minde


that witt is follie, and right iniusticenamed,
and vertue vice, beyond the meaneonce framed.

14

(53) Not to climbe ouer highe.


Bellerephon,which ruld without offence,
whome fretting envie could not make to yealde,
nor Fret us wife to incest could incense,

nor triple monster force to flie the feilde,


Did once ascend to his immortall

fame,

the horse of honnor stabled in the skye ;


but not of power, that vntam'd beasteto tame,

hedlongeis throwneto groundmostworthilie.

Then thow wTu'chdoste highe dignities attayne,


and clothed art with honnors purple gowne,
aspire not higher, least to thy bitter payne,
with extreame shamethow hedlonge tumble downe, 12
By fall, pervertinge former good
for which thow hast byn praysed,
And blemishing those worthie partes
which thee to honnor raysed.
16

(54) Monument of a harlott.


Whose tombe is this 1 whosebonesdoth this contayne]
the Ephereian Lais here doth lie,
whose peerelessebewtie, wanton Greecedid stayne
Oaf32]

with her higheprys'd excessive


Lecherie;

42 BMBLEAMES. 64. A HARLOTT. 65. EARTHLIEM1XDES.


but wo, alas ! sham'd not their destiiiie

to cut her fatall thred w//ich wassoe faire,


to whome to C'ljrluth all men did repayre.

No, she was with crooked age foreworne,

her frowinced face her bewtie had defac'd,

And like a woman w/</chweare all forlorne,


and that of Venusnowe noe more was grac'd,
her christall glasseon Venuswall she placed,
as lothinge in that mirror for to prye,
her wrinkled eyesand cheekesfor to espie.
Vppon whosecurious tombe, engraven by skill,
did stand a ix-irceand cruell Lyonesse,
w/(/ch did the simple Earn, even at her will,
hould by the Loynes with clawes of bludinesae;
"whichvnto vs this morrall did expresse,
that by the Loynes she still did hould and keepe
her fonde lovers, as Lyonessedoth the Sheepe.

11

14
15

IS

21

(,j.j) Earthlie miudes.


The statelie Stagg, whosehomes threaten the skye, 1
is sencelessedombe, not hearinge anie sounde
of hungrie doggerthat seekeshim eagerlie,
or hunters voice w/i/ch doth in woodesrebounde,
4
whilst hee with grynding teeth feedeson the ground,
except he first his hed from Earth erect,
wherby the hearingesencemaye them detect.
7
Soe mortall men, full fraught with worldlie toyes,
8
whoseearthlie niynde, howsd in such brutish wight,

(beastliefeedingon fleshliefadingeloyes,)
cannot conceivethe words of heavenliespright,
nor heare the gladsomevoice of heavensdelight,
Leaste to the skye his hanging hed he raise,

11

from earthof Sinn, and sowlescorruptingwaies.

14

EMBLEAMES.-66.

THE OLDE TESTAMENT. 67. SOPH1STRIE. 43

(56) The olde Testament.


The Oke, bearing a corne, lows sacredtree,
w///ch, to wise Greekes,the Oraclesdid lend;
the Ayerye spredding beech,whose arms wee see,
frise clothed frut vnto the world doth sende;
4
In former Ages, and Earths infancie,
[leaf
when eche Creature to natures lawe did bend,
with their swete nourishing mast fedd plcnteouslie
our Auncient Syres, of other food deprived;
8
But wee, through CoddesseCereshelpe revived,
comforting corne for Sustenanceobteyne,
A pleasant foode, more exellent by kinde.
Soe nowe these trees noe needfull vse doe gayne, 12
but that to shadeand buildinges they are sign'd,
"which Moseslawe to vs doth signifie,
that was but mast, as stifneckd lewes maye finde,
and shaddowesof the followinge veritie ;
16
for nowe the immortall sonne of deitie,

Our Sauiour Christ, the autor of all good,


with rare bountie doth give abundantlie
his heavenlie corne to bee our dailie food;

20

wherbye wee leaue that mast and Jewish meate,


and hould that elder lawe confirm'd by blood
of beastes,and w/i/ch but shaddowesdoth repeate,
as figures onelie of Christes healthful! lore,
24
"whichis the perfect meate, whosesigne the lewes did
eate before.

(57) Sophistrie.

nearss,back]

Saturns daughter, and loue his lealious wife,


Queeneof Riches, pleasure of this life,

the angrieluno by her queiut device,


self loving Syrennfalslye did intyce

in songewith the sweetemusesto contend.


these Syrens were, as autors doe p/'ttend,

44

EMBLEAMES.

67. SOPHISTBIE.

faire virgings, -whichin squamousfishe did end,


and fishe with virgins facesforth did send:
TVemenlacking natures feete of righte,
and fethered fowles wanting winges for flight,
"which,though nature denye soeto combyne,
yet were they such as wee do here defyne,

12

conteyned in the holie number three,

whosenames,significant are knowen to bee :


Parthenos virginn, with sweeteLigia,
and the most daintie white Leucosla,
who doth in false bewitching tunes excell,
wherby they sacredmusesdid compell
with them to singe, victorious crowne to gayne;
w/u'ch learned muses did at first disdayne,
all though at length they yealded full consent,
and to their witlesse challeng did relent;

16

20

arsi] when with their shrill and most celestiall sound,

those prowde Syrensthey easilie did confound,


by iustice lawe; for whoe maye well compare

24

the muses musick naturall and rare,

to the deceitful! Captious Syrens skill,


with which they all lascivious earesdoe fill?

28

The muses then, full victors in the feilde,

vnplum'd those Syrens whome they forct to yeald,


and from them all their glorious fethers take,
wherof triumphant crownes they dulie make;
32
w/n'ch mithologians thus doe moralize :
the muses,note the doctrine of the wise,
and perfect wisdome, "whichvictoriouslie
triumphes on crag'd deceitfull Sophistrie,
3G
"\v/u'chby false Syrenswe doe signifie.
for what ells doe their fethers notifie,

but foolishe words, wanting true reasonsground,


w/ti'ch light, like fethers toste in wynde, are founde ? 40

thesedoth true wisdomeoverthrowein Scorne,


and with faire crowne therof, her hedd adorne.

EMBLEAMES.-68.

INGRATITUDE. 69. CHILDREN'S FKAMING. 45

(58) Ingratitude.
Thestam'ringeCuckooe,
whoselewdvoicedoth greeve1

thedaintieeareswith herfowlenotedismay'd,
In the Currucasnestedoth her releeve,
Suckingethe Egges-whichthat heysugehath laid;
in lue wherof,her owneeggshedoth leave,
wherbyeshedoth the gentlebird deceyve.

Deaf
si,back]
4
6

"Whichthat simpleheysugefindingein place


(poresillie foole,not knowingeof this guile),
doth lovinglie nourishewith moothersgrace,

hatchinge those Eggesthat did her bed defile,


10
by dailie food them fostring, as they were
of her owne kinde, and her true forme did beare. 12
But these vile bastards,as they growe in strength, 13
and fethered are with winges of trecherie,
their nource and moother doe assault at length,
with thankles mouth tearing her cniellie,
16
till peecemealethey devoure ech severall part,
and suck the blood of their damesloving hart.
18
Soe, wicked menn, the bastards of mankinde,

19

whome neither love nor reasonn cann alure,

whome others great rewards, to them should bynde,


becausetheir life is nourished by their cure,
22
Acteons curres, and thanklessemenu doe prove,

woundingtheir patronswhomethey oughtto loue. 2i

(59) Childrenin youth to be framed.


In yongestyeares,whenwill andstrengthdoewant,
doe frame the child like to the growinge plant,

w/i/ch yongeand tenderthow maistwrye and bende


vnto what forme thy fancie shall intende;

but oncea tree, and growento height of strength,


noe force cann make him bowe or bend at length.

46

EMBLEAMES. 60. CHILDREN'S FRAMING. 61. BENEF1TTS.

(GO) Of the same.


As tender whelpe, whome natures skill hath taught 1
by her instinct to hunt and chuse the game,
to his perfection never yet is broughte,
nor for to doe his maisters will can frame,

till first his tutor, crossehis necke doe tye


a litle bat, to frame his whelpe therbye.

fifor that Invres and teacheth him, to beare

the Yoke in youth, which age would not Indure,


and doth compell him to obedient feare,
w/ii'ch in his agehe never should procure.
in youth then, hangeabout the child his neck

10

the staffe of feare, his stubbornes to check;

Soehe shall learne, in age for to obaye,


ar35,
back]In youth that first was taught the readie waye.

14

(Gl) Benefitts.
The silver Moone, Diana Virgine bright,
on mortall creatourspowred her moystening light,
wherwith she doth adorne the Sable nighte,
whose sleepingemantle dimms the peircinge sight ;
w7'chgladsomeshine she takes abundantlie
from her beloved spowse,who favourable
doth spredd his goulden beamesmost liberallie

on that faire Phnl>?e full of curtesie.

Thus, like the liberall moone, wee should bestowe


the bennefitts which from highe love doe flowe
vnto vs mortall creatures here belowe,

vpon our neighbours,whome wee needieknowe,


SOT soe the

beneficiall

12

heavens

doe teach vs by their kynde,


whose comfortable vertues, wee

doe by their influence finde.

16

EMBLEAMES.

62. PRODIGALITIE.

63. M THO8. VALENCE.

47

(02) Prodigalitie.
The craftie ffox, with longe and bushje tayle,
doth allwaies clcnse and sweepethe durtie soyle,
wherat the mockingeApe begann to Eaylo,
for that his heavie tayle was clogging toyle
and in his chasedid put him oft to foyle,
when he was quick, and niinblie, clym'd ech tree,
as being taylesse,lighter for to bee.
But scoffersmust rescoffedbe againe;
for subtile fox, with answer soone replied,
and rightlie said it was noe heavie payne
to beare those thinges w/( i'ch nature did provide,
our open shame,and fowle mishapes,to hyde ;

v<*w
1

7
8

11

for better was, to cover secretlie

the hinder partes, then shewethem lothsomlie.

14

Thus did the foxe the truer cause defende,

15

since much better are superfluities


vrhich vs adorne, and profitt doe pretende,
then want of thinges to hide deformities.
So prodigall men, w/th their extremities,
ffarr better are in spending lavishlie,

18

then he that wants

21

to serve necessitie.

And witlesse vnthriftes, which

[leafsc,back]

superfluouslie do spende,
Doe much more good then such
as hordimre

do attende.

(63) To mr Thomas Valence.


My Valence, to thy learned vewe
this skillesse vers I sende,

the fruit of my well wishing hart,


and guifte of faythfull frende ;
doe take it with like lovinge minde,
to aunswer my desart,

25

48

EMBLEAMES. 63. TO M THOMASVALENCE.

whome frowninge fortune hath denied


a hetter to imparte.
The frutefull bough of sacredOlive,
the braunch of peacefull tree,
the leavesof oylie healthful frute
that allwaies greenewilbe;
Which never lose their naturall shewe,
whoseleavesdoe never fall,
ffor wfo'ch the Romansin lessetriumphes
were crowned therwithall,

12

1G

pear
S-] As were the troopes of valiant knightes,
because this holie tree,
To warlike

Pallas

consecrate

ys allwaiesfound to bee;

20

vpon w/n'ch sacredflorishinge bough


I offer to thine eyes
A gentle Swarmeof Wittie Eees
and honnie bearinge fires,

By wJa'cli,as former learned menn


did vnto vs present,
Prosperitie of dailie health,
and minde to quiet'bent;
So by the sameI wishe to thee
like health and quiet minde,
with good successe,wherby thow mayest
perpetuall comfort finde;
Like Olive never to decaye,
but allwaies freshe to springe,
In peaceof minde, in peaceof tyme,
Eternall peaceto bringe ;
ffor yf we warr within our selves,
distract with everie thought,
Desired health doth still decaye,
Sicknes is dailie wrought.

Then to this peaceand quiet rest


is loyn'd sweetenutriment,

24

28

32

36

40

EMBLEAME3.-64.

STRANGERS OUR FRIENDS.

ffor whoe delights in bitter foode,


to shorter life is bent;
ffor that our Auncient fathers ment,
by addinge to this tree
Dedalan bees, bright Phclus babes,
which good phisitions bee.
Since from the Olive, oyle distills,
the Beessweet honie give,
both vrhich, the weake and fuble parts
with

comfort

40

44

. 48

do releeve.

52

'And who, longe life,' saiesDcmocriti',


' would winne for payne and toyle,
must moyst his inward parts w/th honnie,
and outward parts with oyle.'
So shall continuall prosperoushealth,
longe life for vs obtayne,
w/ch as before, soenowe to thee,

56

I freindlie wishe againe.

CO

(64) Strangers more freindlie to vs then our


owne kinde

and kindred.

My loved frend, and lovinge therwithall,


the sameeven nowe w/i ich former tymes did finde,
against true freindshipps bande, howe maye it fall
that I should shewemy self soefair vnkinde,
as to lett slipp our frendship out of minde 1
wherfore this Embleme, "which I frcndlie ment,
take with like love as I the samepresent.

The pretie youth, Telcmacliusthe fayre,


the pledgemostdeereto Vlisseseloquent,
and chaste Penelope,w/n'ch with despaire

did feedher hungriesutorshote intent,

11

and never would to theire desire relent,

did fall from crooked shore,sitting at ease,


into the raveninge wombe of rnging Seas.
EMBLEMS.

14

50

E1IBLEAMES. 64. STRANGERSOUR FRIENDS.

fforthwith, full fraught with love and pietie,


the Arioniaii

15

D<il[ilnits were at hand,

whosegentle barks receyv'd him lovinglie,


and from the deepe restored him to land,

18

Savinge his life; wherbye wee vnderstand,


That straungersto our kiude and to our bloode,
then our owne kinde and kinn, do vs more good,
Peafss.back]

And

that

th'

vntamed

Seas

i'2

breed fishe of better kinde,

Then pleasant Earth doth yealde


vs rnenn of lovinge minde.

\_LeafW is blank, both sidet.']

25

EPIGRAMS.-1.

THE ARME3 OF ENGLAND. 2. CKISOPEIA. 63

y i Qi a m m
(1) TheArmesof England.
Thesacred
Lyon of ludeasprincelielyne,
Vfhichweldesthescepter
of thegloriousskye,
of lessesrootethe flowersmostdivine,
whoseheavenliesmellfeedesour mortallitie,
protect (mosteworthie Queene)from all annoye
Thy Realme,thy Lyons, and thy flowersof loye.

(2) Crisopeia.
My dolefull muse,bewayle in mournefull rimes,
1
with sighinge penn, with Inke of deepelament,
the bitter galls of our vnhappie times,
and pore estateof those to vertue bent;
4
for he whome vertue hath to honnor raised,
treades downe all those w/t/ch are for vertue praised. G
0 Seaof sorrowe ! wherin wee sayle w/th greife,

O gulfe of greife! wherin weedrownewith payne,


since vertue cannot finde her due releeife,

but to faire Crisopeia shee retayne,


whoe sotts him soe with her bewitchinge sight,
that but she speake,vertue doth looseher right.

10

Ye noble mindes, reiect yor worthie partes,

13

let valour sleepe,your Heroikedeedeswill fayle;


ye sacredwitts with yoiiT celestiallartes,
despiseechmuse,sciencewill not prevaile;
ffor neither Mars, nor sweetMineruasquill,

cannreaperewardin his longepractised


skill.

peaf,bck]
12

16

18

54

EPIGRAMS. 3. STATUEOF VENDS. 4. WTNE.

Then woe to vertue ! woe our miscreant


thrice

daies !

19

woe to them wbome vertue doth adorne !

faire Crisopeiawith her goulden Rayes,


ech wight of worth doth taunt with bitinge scorne, 22
for vertue looseth what she well deserveth,

hee onelie gaines,who Crisopeia serueth.

24

without her bewtie, none maie favour praye;

25

without her meane, all labour is in vaine;


vertue, stand back, vnles shee make the waie;

valour and learninge, give place vnto her trayne.


thus, muse,far well thow seestthy fatall ende,
faire Crisopeia will not bee thy frende.

at4i]

28
30

(3) Ypon the armedStatueof Venus.

ffayre Venus,tell whye dost thow Armor beare,


1
and cloggsthy self with heavie Coate of Steele;
thow art not Mars, thoughe his attire thow weare,
nor warlick broyles thow ever yet didst feele;
4
sweet speech,good lookes, allurements of delight,
are weaponsservingebetter for thy fight.
6
In vaine, therfore, thus feircelie art thow armed,
7
for natures harnessebest beseemesthy kinde;
with blowdie weaponswhy shouldestthow be charmed,
wherin

small comfort

thow

dost ever finde?

for naked and vnarm'd, with bewties sheilde


thow uiadest the god of battell for to yeilde.

(4) Sundrie and strange effectesof wyne.


The drunken menn, whome gluttonie doth fill
with wynes excesse,doe sundrie passionshoulde :

the onelookeshighe,and will not be controlde;


one other singeswith loftie voice and shrill;

10

12

EPIGBAMS.-4.

STRANGE EFFECTES OF WTXE.

one other mournes, shedding tearesmanifolde ;


with blasphemie,some one his sowle doth kill.

55

Sommeone,with stretchedhandsto god doth praye; Deaf


11,
back]
one, as his humor is, seekespeaceto make;
one other, noe man for his frend doth take ;

onenimblie dances,or ells doth skipp and playe;


soinme, verseswrite, for their swete Ladies sake,

and summfor hastdoe often loosetheir waye.

12

Summ cannot speake,sum stammer at ech worde, 13


summ whoopeand hallowe, and braye w/th open throte ;
summ, filthie talke doe vse in bawdries note;
one doth dispute till hee laye vnder borde;
16
mongstbrambells summ runn, till they tearethere coate,
summ frett and fume, and naught but blowes afford. 18

Onefalls to Lecherousactes,like beaste,past shame;


annothct cannot hould himself from sleepe;
summ other rowles his eyes like masedsheepe;
summ finde greatefaultes, and othersmoe doe blame; 22
somme,for Ms life cannot his counsell keepe,
and sonim backbite

all others with

defame.

24

One, as he goeth, endenteth with his feete;


25
one gapesand yawnes, stretchinge his slothfull arme;
one thinkes he is a witch, and straight doth charme ;
one other scoffes at ech whome he doth meete;

28

one other spuesout right, but thinkes noe harme;


p>f
42]
and sometherebye with death and sicklies meete. 30
w7n'chseveral! force, in wyne is never founde,

31

for simplieof it self it worksnoeill,


but sheweswhat humors doth the person fill,
and what conceites doe in his braines abounde

34

yf heedoegorgeit in at his ownewill,


vntemperatliehis sencesfor to wounde.
Thenyf thy self thow wilt not oncebewraye,
Shonnwynesexcesse,
v?hi'chtakesthy witts awaye.38

5G

EPIGRAMS. 5. CONTEMNIXCE. C. TEMPTATIONS. 7. THINGS GONE.

(5) Contenminge.
"\VTioedoeth contempnethe worlds fond vanitie,
whoe doth contempne that fleshly part of his,
whoe doth contempneno man in miserie,
and doth contempnethat hee coutempnedis :
by these ccntemptesshall make himself regarded,
and at the last with heavenlie loyes rewarded.

4
C

whoe doth contempnereligion and her sawes,


7
whoe doth contempnecorrection of his will,
whoe doth contempnethe prince, the crowne,the lawes,
[leaf42,tack]and doth contempnethe hclpe of learned skill:
10
by thesecontemptes,to his reproche doth gaine
hate, shame,and greife, w/th everlastingepayne. 12

(C) What maketk menn forgett tliemselues.


Alluring bewtie, with her cristall face,
the heate of youth euflamingeloftie minde,
the favour of the people,and their grace,
the greate presumptionof the strength wee find,
the store of wealth, the pride of hawtie harte,
and swelling skill of learning and of arte,
The Princes love (protecting of our will),
the stubborne furie of disturbed brayne,
eagerdesire for to revengeour will,
and fretting envie with scornefull disdaine,
makes vs forgett our selves,and takes awaye
sweet reasonsvse, our onelie helpe & staye.

4
6
7

10
12

(7) Thinges not to be recalled.


The stone once cast out of the hand or slinge,
the tyme once past consumingeverie thinge,

the foolishewordesvrhichthroughethe lipps doeflie,


the broken Hymen of virginitie,

EPIGRAMS.-8.

THE VNAPT. 9. TO KEEP FRIENDS. 57

by witt, by art, by pleasure,or by paine,


cannot returne, or ells be calld againe.

then well foresee,beforethy handdoe ought,


spendnot the gouldentyme on things of naught,

premeditate before thow speakein haste,


doe keepe thy bodie allwaies cleaneand chaste;
Soeshalt thow live free from the worlds distresse,
and in thy self thy self full well possesse.
12

(8) The vnapt not to be forcedto learninge.


To Salamanca yf thow send an Asse,

to Oxford,Cambridge,Paris, or dowaye,[Douai]
or that by travel! to farthest lands hee passe,
or in the princes Court longe tyme doe staye:
yf, when he went, he were an Asse, noe art
will make him horse, for felde, for waie, for curt.

4
G

Then spareyour cost, yf nature give not witt,


7
to send your sonns vnto the learned scooles,
for to the same,yf nature make not fitt,
doe what you cann, they still shall prove but fooles; 10
then tourne ech witt to that "which nature will,

els fondlie thow thy sonne and cost dost spill.

feafi3,

12

(9) The wayeto gett and keepefrendes.


ffynewitts, muchart, sweettongues,and flatterie, 1
doe gaineand keepevs frendes,as somemen saye;
but these are vaine, as proofe doth testifie,
without large giftes, w/i ich makes the readie waye ;

for though that Homercomewi'th learnedhande,

yf naughthe give,withoutdoresniaiehestande. 6
This then must be the surestgrounde,I finde,
to winn

and hould

such frends as wee desire:

58

EPIGRAMS.

10. STUMBLIXGE. 11. FIRST GUESTES.

first give thow much, be plyant to their miiide,


take naught of others,fewe thinges doe thow require, 10
%v/ti'ch
if with heed thow wiselie dost retayne,
a heapeof frends thow worthilie shalt gayne.
12
TVee all doe love to take, as loue doth teach,

13

w/n'ch dailie guiftes and sacrifice doth crave;


Nonn loue to give, but such as cannot reach
the full effect of that w/</chthey would haue ;
trust Quid then, whoe spake what he did knowe :
it shewesgreat witt, large giftes for to bestowe.

16
18

(10) Of Stumblinge.
The prowdehorse that treadeswith statelie pace,
and champeshis foming mouth on goulden bitt,
adorn'd with curious trapping and pleasant grace,

of his braue looke his humor for to fitt,

with his fower feet, when hee doth prance and playe,
stumbles and falls in lourneyeng of the waye.
G
"Whatmarvaylethen, though worldlie men and proude, 7
."ulorn'd with sacred reason of the minde,
In whome the heavens and earth themselves doe shrowd,

with his twoo feet, as nature hath assign'd,


10
In lournyeng to the place of heavenlie loye,
doth fall and stumble, through the worlds annoye! 12

(11) First guestesat a feaste.


Thebuzzingeflye w?(?ch
falls in everiethinge,
the
the
the
the

megerdogg that hopes to gorge his mawe,


wandring mynstrell, redie for to singe,
roaging beggarliving without lawe,
Parasite smell-feast,w/a'ch newesdoth bringe,

and caresnot whomehis flattring tonguedoth stinge,


, back]allthough vnbidd, like vnto shamelesbeastes,
"with hast come first vnto all solempnefeastes.

EPIGRAMS.

12. A WIFE.

13. A PURITAXE.

14. UEAUIE.

59

(12) When a wife is badd, worse, and worst.

When sheis good,better, andbeste.


My frend, yf that my ludgementdo not fayle,

as one well taught by longe experienceskill,

thy wife allwaiesis but a needefullill,


and beste is bad, thoughe faire she beare her saile,
but vs'd not well, she worser is to thee,

but worst of all when best she seemes to bee.

Thy wife is goodwhen sheeforsakesthis light,

and yealdes by force to natures destinie,


she better is (thowe livinge) yf she die,
but best when shee doth soonesttake her flight,
for soeto thee thine easesheedoth restore,
"which soonest hadd, doth comforte thee the more.

10
12

(13) A Puritane.
Dame Lais is a puritane by religion,
Impure in her deedes,though puer in her talke,
And therefore a puritane by condition,
or pluritane, \vhich after manie doth walke;
for pruritie of wemenn, by lecherousdirection,

seekespluritie of mento workesatisi'action.

(14) Of heauieand light.


Philosophers
werefooles,that taughtof ould
that naughtcannworkebis naturescontrarie,
Sinceexperience
(bestproofe)haththemcontrold,
that heaviemakeslight, and light makesheavie;

for alight pursemakesa heavieharte,weefinde,


andheaviepursedothmakelight hartandminde.

3 |>af453

CO EPIGHAM3.

15. WAltRHOWSE.

16. A PHEIST. 17. HEDD & TAYLE.

(15) Waterhowse.
TVithmiM i ppit,andnot with bitter speech,

licence me ln-ru witli tliee somewhat to playe.


doe take it well, I frcndlio thee beesech,
I thinke but mii-r.li what soemy perm bewraye,
not meaning the t'uflend in anie \vaye,

vponthy name,allthoughrny penn do straye.

for since w/th Bacchus luice thine inward part


is dailie moystened,for thine owne delighte,
Oef
ts,back]and that the blood of Earth revives thy hart,

clensingethy sowleshowseboth dak-and night,


thow rather' wynehowse,'
for thy live-liespright,

10

then ' waterhowse,'shouldst termed be of right.

12

(16) A preist which knewenot anie letter.


Goodzealouspreist,thy hart morethan thy skill,
thy zealemore than thy learning or thy witt,
the sacredearesof mightie luue must fill,
or ells for god thow wilt be nothing fitt.

Of holie Pawle, yet thow the heavenlie voice


cannst ringe alowd, and sound this sentencetrue,
' the Letter kills,' whe-rbythow maiest reioyce,
that of one Letter

the forme thow

never knewe.

ffor least that this deade letter should thee kill,


thow didst beware the letters for to learne,

and that aptlie, since of godds holie will


the quickning spirrit thow never couldst deserne.

(17) The hecldand the tayle.


Great was the glorious fame, most worthie knight,
stout Perseus,when with thy warlike knife
thow strakest of the monstershedd, in sighte
of vglie Gorgon, then bereav'd of life ;
but fair more famousshould haue byn thy glorie

yf thow hadstcutt of the tayle-sof the Clergie.

12

EPIGRAMS.

18. CAUSE OF A DEERE TEARE. 19. FINKES. 61

(18) Causeof a deereyeare.


Thow fondlie askest me, as though I were a god,

what causeththis continueddearth,and plagueof love


his rod.

yf I the truth maietell, althoughit purchaseblame,


I will not spare to speakemy thought,but yet to thy
defame:

Th'inseasonable
yeare,this dearth doth not procure,
nor the discurtesieof heaven,vrh/ch thus wee doeIndure,
nor Saturns cursed starr, nor barraynesseof land,
nor want of heedie carefullnes of things wee haue in
hand,

nor loue his iust anger powr'd out on mortall wightes


for these our manie heaped sinns, and for the fleshe
delights;
but thow dost plague vs all, and force vs for to die,
through murdring death, and famins rage, by thy
extremitie;

12

for since the greediemawesof thee, thy sonns and kinne,


cann never well be satisfied with that they dailie winn,
but that they horde, they scrapeand gripe all that they Deaf
46,back]
maie,

to sett them selvesin highe estateby cvi'iir: mannsdecaye,


devouring all the paynes w^'ch others don imploye,
howe maie it chuse, but derth and want, :\11 others

must destroyed

18

(19) Pinkes.
ffreind Mt^riny, I deerneyou smell verie sweete,
that are soefull of Pinkes from hedd to the feete;

Yet if everiePinke of yo;/r hatt, doblet,and hose

were decked with a garden Pinke to savo?/ryour nose,

Youmightstandfor amayegame,
whatsoyoudothinke;
for thoughethe flowersweresweet,your follie wold
stinke.

62

EPIGRAMS. 20. SHOINGE. 21. GLASSES.

(20) Shoinge.
Good Browne, thow doestcomplaine w/th heavie cheere,
the Shomakershoesthee not to thy minde.
the fault is not his, as it maie appeare,
that with straite shoesthy foote hee doth bynde,
4
for hee makes them small like thy foote in ech thinge,
since, in shooing thee, hee must shooe a goslinge.
G

(21) Glasses.
[leaf47
j The sundrie sort of glassesvrhich art doth put in vre
for our delights, in severallkindes, sweetepleasuresdoe
procure:

the daintie Ladies, loue in lookinge glasseto prye ; 3


the glasseperspective,is desyrd of learnd Pholosophie;
greatestates,their windowes deck w/th glasse,for their
delight;
the searchinge Chimists, for their art, haue glasses
strange of sight;
the hurning glasseis made,a thinge of rare devise;
and glassevessellsfor banquettinge are dailie had in
pryse ;

besides,there is of glassea temple faire and brighte,


w/rf/ch learned Chaucer builded hath w;'th penn of
heavenliespright;
And gascoigne,for his sport, hath madea glassein verse,
vcher wee maie see our owne defaults, vrhich there he
doth reherse ;

12

but all these curious glasses,or anie of like kinde,


or other strangeproportionw/t/ch art or wealthmaiefinde,
Cannot content my fiende ; hee hath them in disdayne,
hee them reiects as frivolous,

he houlds them all in

vayne,

16

for, of all sorts of glassew/ii'ch give forth anie shine,

my frend loves,cutne hower,t j hauea Veniceglasseof


wyne.

18

EPIGRAMS.-22.

ELECTION. 23. HAM. 21. FAYTH. 25. TIME.

63

(22) One assured be was elected.


Thow greatliebragsthow that thow art
assur'd thow

art elected :

Chaungebut oneletter, and thow saiesttrue,

pear
47,back]

because thow art eiected.

ffor, knocking at the heavenliegate,


to enter as right heire,
Thow art repulsd as bastard childe,

and driven to deepedespaire.

(23) Cham.
In all the courseof thy vnhappie yeares,
noe kinde of vertue in thy life appeares;
ffor thow art Cham, or ells Chamm-swicked brother :
he did deride his father; and thow thy mother;
his curse was greate; and soe will fall to thee,
that

scoffes at her which

still

should

honnored

bee.

(24) Fayth.
Our Saviour Christ, with words of greife complayned,
that when he came to ludge the world by fyer,
that fayth should not be found to his desire,

soegreatlieshouldthe Christianfayth be strayned. 4


but if he nowe the same would come to finde,

he shouldseefaythesmorethen standeWithhis minde;


ffor greaterand morefaiths in yearth,
[leaf
l
with menn did not abounde,

Soe contrarie, soe confident,

soepleasantto beefounde.

10

(25) Cuttinge of tyme.


The Curiousgardiner,with his cruell Shires
1
doth cutt the wholsometyme,and her sweetflowers;
"whichhee doth cutt soelonge,till tyme at length
cuts of his life by doomeof heavenliepovnes,
4

64

EPIGRAMS.-26.

TENCH AND WENCH.

27. THE HAPPIE.

for tyme, in tyme cutts him w/th full despight,


that first hy tyme cutt tyme from his delight.

(26) A tench and a wench.


A Catholikc

and a Protestant

"were frendlie sett at meate,

for hoth whose dinner was prepared,


both fyshe and fleshe to eate.
They both, as did their consciencebidd,

feed on the several! dishe :

The Protestant vpon the fleshe,


the Papist on the fishe.
pear,back] At length the Catholike complaind,
our wautoun

times to bee

disordered in everie thinge,


as dailie

hee did see :

12

' ffor nowe our Protestants,' (said hee,)


'w/ii'ch newe Religion take,
Twixt Pigg and Pike, twixt Carpe and Capon,
not anie difference make.'

To whome the other replied :

1C
' wee

make

such difference of their kinde

As Papists doe twixt tench and wench,


to serve their

wantoun

minde."

20

(27) \Vhoe are happie.


Antomedon the Greece Poet doth tell,

and rightlie, yf the samebe wayed well,


that firste he happie mann is sayed to bee,
"which oweth nought, and is from borrowinge free;

Next, heewhomewedlocksfetters doth not strayne;


the third, whomechildrenscaresdid neverpayne.
but if he bee soe madd to take a wife,

to ridd himself from his most quiet life,


yf shee be rich, and therwith sooneto die,

heehappieis, to gaineher wealththerbye.

10

EPIGRAMS.-28.

LINGUISTES.

29. DRINKINGE.

65

(28) Linguistes.

df^

Twoegentlemenat meateby enterchaunge


of frendlie speech,the tyme to entertayne,
a womann did commendfor vertues straunge,
as one that too much learning did attaine,
being a greate linguist, whych praise doth gaine ;
for of the tongues shee nothinge was to seeke,
since she was skill'd

in Hebrew

and in Greeke.

The other said, " marveyle not much


that they such cuninge take,
fibr nature, by a speciall grace,
great linguists doth them make."

11

(29) Drinkinge.
The first delightinge draught
doth well thy Pallat please;
The seconddoth thy hart comfort,
and thy could stomakeease.

The third doth make the pleasant wyne


well knowne vnto thy skill;
The fourth encreasethsuddaine mirth,
and pleasure doth distill.

The fifte the braine doth heate,

cur,back]

throwout in everie parte;

The sixte doth makethe[e] verielearn'd


and cunningein echart.

12

The seaventhmakesthe[e] like [a] horse


that runnes without a rayne;

The eight, thy sencesdoth confound,


and takesawayethy brayne.

16

The ninth doth makethe[e] like


a swyne to fyle the place;
The tenth doth make thee worse then niadd,

and hated with disgrace.


EMBLEMS.

20

66

EPIGRAMS.-30.

ENUYE. 31. PROVISION.

Then flye excesseof wyne,


which is not worthie blame,

ffor thow, not that, doste causethis ill,


to thy perpetuall shame.

34

(30) Enuye.
Thow monster of mankinde, obscurerof good name,
thow hated childe of pride, and autor of thy shame,
"whosehearesare stinging snake.%whoseface is pale &
wann,

w/th scornfull eyesand browes,disdaining eume mann,


w/th canker taynted tethe, and poysoned tongue of
spight,
5
with vile detracting lipps, defaming eur/'ie wightr,
pea/50]with breth of Sulphures smell, fedd with revenges
desire,

w/th brests defyld w/th gall, and hart of flaminge Ire,


"whosenayles are harpies clawes,and bodie leane and
spare,
9
"which never smiles, beinge still opprest w/th greife &
care,

whose frettinge pynes thy hart, and eates thy flesh


awaie,

still feeding on thy self, till thow dost cleanedecaye12


like burning Aetna monte, "w/u'ch with his stinking
fumes

feedes on it self, and w/th his flame it self consumes.

thy force ech sowle doth feele, thoughe, to thy better


paine,

15

except the mann deiect, whome fortune doth disdaine.

(31) Mann must provide for bodie and sowle.


The fairest Creature w/u'ch the heavenlie hand
created,hath the cheefestthinge hee made,

EPIGRAMS.

31. PROVISION.

32. MONGERS.

67

the Lord of Ayre, of Earth, of sea,and Land,


and of ech earthlie thinge w/*ich once must fade,
composedis of bodie form'd of claye,
and sowle divine which never shall decaye.

4
G

His sacredminde, sprung from celestial! seede,


doth him

forwarne

to lifte

the same on hie.

his earthlie bodie, which elements doth feede,


makes him to thinke on thinges, and that be worldlie.
Thus sowle and bodie, vnited by their kinde,

[icafso,
tack]

makes mann both heaven and earth allwaies to mind.

But soeto minde them both, as not ezcesse


in either, fall contrarie to their due,
for all extreames,the vice doth still expresse,
the (meane)is that which wee ought to pursue;
then, since god wilbe serv'd with both together,
vse well the one, to helpe and serve the other.

13

16
18

(3.0) Mongers.
A rnesseof mongerson Hulborne hill,
the dolefull waie vnto the hatefull place,
where malefactors, much against their will,
cutt of their times with shameand fowle disgrace,
were frendlie mett, ech other faire greetinge,
asking what craft ech vsed for his livinge. "

Onesaidhe wasof the ffellmongers


trade;

4
6

one other, that he Ironmonger was;


the thirde, that hee was costardmougerslade;

the fourth, that he was a fishmongersasse;

10

to -whomea fifte, as by them he did walke,


with listening eare enclining to their talke,

12

did saye," excludeme not, I craue,from out the rest, oaf


for of yowr tradeI am the Quintessence,
14
since I am a monger good as the best,

and of my flesheand purse,of Lardgedispence."

16

68

EPIGRAMS.

33. TTME.

34. RECEIPTSAND EXPENSES.

" what mongermaiest thow bee," did one replie,


"vnknowne as yett to all this companie?"
{forthwith the mann, as pertest of them all,
sayed hee a whoremongerwas knowne to bee;
" I will not loosemy place in mongershall,
being prentise once, although I now be free."
then all shookehands, as nere of kinde to other,
biddinge him wellcome as their loving brother;

18
19

22

whoe, to confirme this knott of knaveric,

vnto the tavernehastedspedilie.

26

(33) Tymc.
An Auncient knight of ffee and of renowne,
with

his

Ladie

to dinner

sate him

downe:

they sett; the hungrie knight did bid his mann


somepottage sett, with vrhich the knight begann;
but eatingefast and over greedilie,
a little herbe did take his courseawrye,

[leaf51,back] w/j/'ch made him coffe, that chok'd he was, he said.

Yet the good Ladie, thenvith not dismayed,


" Sir, it is tyme, it is but tyme,'1replied.
the payned knight, the more, for anger, cried
that chok'd he was; but his Ladie, that ment

but well, saied "it is but tynie, sir, be content!"

12

whereatthe knight the moredid coffeand strayne,


ffor Anger of her speechthen of the payne ;
for where her wordesthe herbe tyme did intend,

heethem mistooke,and deern'dsheesoughthis ende,


since wronglie hee conceiv'd therbye that shee
thought it but tyme that he should choked bee.

(34) Receiptsand expenses.


A tutor, gluttinous and prodigall,
was by the ludge assignedto a pupill,
who in excesseand ryot spendingeall,
with daintie fare his hungrie mawe did fill.

18

EPIGRAMS.-35.

COUXTERFET1.1. 36. PRODUCTION. 69

The ludge, oflended with this lewde expencb,


wilde the tutor a good accompt to make ;
but he replied, without all reverence,
" there is naught left, arid this count must you take." 8
The Augrie ludge perceyvinge this deceipt,

[leaf52]

would knowewhat he receyu'dand howetwasspent:


the tutor, gaaping, said, " her's the receyte
and her's th'expence," notinge his hinder vente.

12

(35) Counterfetts cleuoure the whole world.


The kinge deuouresthe husbandman;
fond youths do spoyle the kinge;
The vsurer consumes those youthes.

the preist decayedoth bringe


To vsurers; and whores consume
the preist with filthie lust;
The bawd eates vp the gayninge whore
who putteth her in truste;
The taverner beggarsthe bawde;
and next is swallowed vpp
The taverner, by Parasites
w/a'ch hangevpon the cupp.
The needie Parasites

12

in th'end

are spoyled by lothed lyce ;


The Ape, rnann counterfetter, eates

thosevermynat a trice.

1C

So that the beastlie, mocking Ape,


wA/ch mowes at everie thinge,

By circulationdoth consume
"thekingedomeand the kinge.

[ieaf52,backj
20 .

(3G)That onethingeProducethannother.
The frutefull peacebegettsdesiredplentie;
desiredplentie bringsforth lothsomepride;

70

ZPIGBAMS.-38.

rit.JDL'CTIGN. 37. A LONG NOSE.

the lothsom pride makesmen by warr to die ;


longe warrs causewofull povertic ech tyde,
and povertie makes frutefull peaceto springe:
thus the worlds whecle is turn'd in everie thinge.

4
C

The fruitful! earth gives forth sustayning grasse;


7
sustaining grassedoth feed the norishing beasts;
the nourishing beaste,into manns flesh doth passe;
and glotinous mann, that feedesw/th, daintie feaste, 10
dissolved is to frutefull yearth in hast;
for what feede vs, one vs doth feed at last.

1'2

Thus runns about by dailie circulation


ech earthlie thinge createby heavenliehand;

13

for ones curmption is others generation,


as natures la we hath linked w/th her band ;

16

then happie thow, if sowle in true degree


doe end in god, from whome it cameto thec.

18

(37) A longe nose.


A knight that should w/tli curtcsie
a ladie entertayne,
at her longe nose begann to scoffe
with words of some disdaine,

and said, ' yf your longe nose were not


a bulwarke

of defence

To gard yowr lipps, they should be kiss'd


before wee parted hence."
' why, sir,' quoth shce,' sparenot therfore,
yf nosesuch hindrance bee,
you maie, where hindred nose doth want,
with

ease freelie kisse mee.'

The scoffingknight thus retaunted,


in furie flange awaye,
But with replyeng scoffebefore,
he thus to her did sayu:

12

jg

EPIGRAMS.-38.

SPENCERSFAYRIE QUEENE. 39. 40. USURERS. 71

' Madame,it greatlieforcethnot,


for sweetnesof your breth,
Whether I kisseyowrlipps above,
or ells your hipps beneath.'

20

(38) SpencersFayrie Qucene.

[leaf
53,
back]

RenowmedSpencer,whoseheavenliesprite
ecclipseththe sonneof formerpoetrie,
in whomethe musesharborwi'th delighte,
gracinge thy verse with Immortalitie,

Crowningthy fayrie Queenew/th deitie,


the famous Chauceryealds his Lawrell crowne
vnto thy sugred penn, for thy renowne.
Noe cankred envie cann thy fame deface,
nor eatinge tyme consumethy sacredvayne;
noe carpinge zoilus cann thy verse disgrace,
nor scoffingeMomus taunt the With disdaine,
since thy rare worke eternall praise doth gayne ;
then live thou still, for still thy verse shall live,
to vnbome poets, w/</cli light and life will give.

7
8

11

14

(39) Marline.
Menn say thow art call'd the Rich Martine,
in Latiane speechwho art Martinus nam'de;
but wholie they mistake thie name, I wynne,

if to thy gainethe samebe dulie fram'd,

for Martinus thow shouldst be termed right,

in hordinggoulclwhich hastsoegreatedelight.

(40) Vsurers.

[leaf
Ml

Stukelie the vsurer is dead, and bid vs all farwell,

who hath a lourueyfor to ride vnto the court of hell;

yf aniewouldhis letterssendto Plutoes


divelishegrace,
hut:\vilbe messenger
therfore,and bearethem to that
place;
4

72

EPIGRAMS.

41. GRACE. 42. CARDINGB.

but yf he anie answercrave, of letters sent from hence,


he must some other post provide, w/a'ch male returne
from thence,

for Stukelie once arived there, cannot come back againe,


since Pluto, for his needfull vse, doth meane him to
retaine.

(41) Grace.
A man of lewd living all vertue sett at naught,

wasrestedby Sergiantat mace,andvnto prisonbrought,


who beinge sett at large, the Bishop would him trye,
and him to common pennance put, for dedes of
Lecherie.

his aged mother, greved of her sonns open shame,


w/th gentle speechof moothersloue, his lewd follies did
blame,

and said ' that want of gracedid force him soeto fall;
"wherforehee dailie, on his knees, for needfull grace
must

call."

her scoffingesonne,which scorn'd his mother with disdaine,

said ' hee would rather hang, than seekefor anie grace
againe;

for seriaunt gracehis mace,his purse had sucked drie,


and the Archbishopps reverend grace had sham'd him
penlie;
12
[leafM,backjAnd therefore since these twoo before, him did deface,

he soe,past grace,bequeath[d]them both vnto the


divells grace.'

11

(42) Cardinge.
Kate is a goodhuswife,as all mensaye,
for shee doth nought but card all the longe daie,

whoein continual!cardinghath suchdelight,


that, besidesthe daie,shewill cardin the night.

EPIGRAMS.-43.

REELINGE, 44. A ROSE. 45. SOWISGE. 73

ffor cardinge,to her is but a pleasantplaye,


and when she playes she is cardingeallwaies.

Yet by her cardingshehath little winninge,


for of her cardingnevercoro[e]thspinninge;
8
Soesheis a huswife,but noegoodhuswife,I trowe,
for of goodhuswifescardinge,spinningdoth growe.

(43) Reelinge.
lohn, thy wife, to live doth takegreatpayne,
a good huswifes name therbye to gaine;

for shespinnesand Eeelesasfast as sheemaye,


but cheefliein reelingespendingthe daye;
for, once haue sheesett the pott at her hedd,

sheneverlins reelingetill sheegoeto bedd.


(44) A Rose.
Willford, thow lovest a pleasantEose verie well,
both for the faier cullor and the sweetesmell,
for thow canst not bee without a rose in thy bedd,
to colle the, and to laye her arme vnder thy hedd. 4
Yet is not thy Rose,flower of Carnation hue,
nor perfect white, nor redd, but yellowishe and blewe,
and therfore most meete to serve in the night,
7

for otherEoseswouldshameherif shewerein the light.

(45) Sowinge.
Sweete flowers growe when gardenerssowesthe seed;

the plowmansowesthe grainewherby weelive;


and man sowesthat wheron mankinde doth breed,
soethat their sowing, his like doth allwaies give.

But weemen sowe fair different from these kindes,

both workes and wordes w/u'ch send forth paine and


greefe,
for with there words they vex their husbandsmindes,

wt'th needlesowinge,not gayningetheir releife.

74

EPIGRAMS.-46.

WOODCOCKS.47. KISSINGE.

They sowediscorde, with tongue of false report;


their needle sowinge,doth breed but more expence;
they sowedeceyt, and make therof a sport;
their needle workes are but a showespretence.
12
Deaf
i;, back]Then lett not wemenn sowe,yf thow bee quiet bent,
for of their doble sowing, growesnaught but discontent.

(4G) \Yoodcocks.
He is as -wise as a Woodcock, all wee doe see,
because everie woodcock is as wise as hee,
w///ch wee knowe to be true, and tbat the rather,
for that Alderman

woodcock

was his father :

A thinge of greateworth, that woodcocksare made


the governoursof Citties and the Marchants trade.
Then woodcockon his side, by birth and by witt,

makes him as wise as a woodcock his birth for to fitt;

for if naught ells causd him a woodcock to bee,


yet since he is borne a woodcockin everie degree,
he cannot degeneratefrom woodcockskinde,
11
and therfore aswise as a woodcock you shall him finde.

(47) Kissinge.
Three pleasantgentlemen vpon the waye
did meetethree rnaidesthat went them forth to playe ;
the menu of ech other would gladlie knowe,
vrfi ich of the maides he would

kisse in the rowe.

- 4

the maydes,like goselinges,after other went,


noe whit mindinge the menn nor their intent.
But of the menn, the first amongst the rest,
[iefP6jthat with his fellowes scoffinglie would lest,

said ' hee would kisse the pretie maide before,'


not meaning for to meddle wrth anie more.

the othersaid,' yf he might hauehis wishe,

thebrownewenchin themiddlehewouldkisse;' 12

EPIGRAMS. 47. KISSINGE. 48. WHITE HEARES.

75

the third, as liked bestvnto his minde,

13

said ' hee would kisse the blobcheckt wench behinde.'

Nowe,fellow Garrett,of the would I crave,


w/i/ch of thesethreethe sweetestkisseshouldhaue;
for the wenchesbreath, formost of the three,
smelled verie ranke in the highest degree.

17

(48) White heares.


At the Rose within newgate, ther frendlie did meete,
fower of my ould frends, ech other for to greete:
one had a black beard, but white was his hedd;
one other, white hedd, "with a beard w/'ch was redd;

the third had yellowish hedd, but his beard somewhat


white;

the yongest had silver berde, and hedd agreeingrighto.


thus sett at their cupps, they thought to devise
howe these severall white

heares in them did arise.

the black berd and white hedd begann for to saye,


' his hedd was elder then his berde by twentie winters
daye,
ffor where nature by age doth soonestdecaye,
[leaf50,back]
graye hearesspring vp, -whichage doe displaye.'
12
the other white hedd with the reddishe beard, tould,
' that his hedd was not white because he was ould,

but for that he had more labored, by studie Ms brayne,


then his teeth by eatinge, his hedd white heares did

gayne.'
10
the third, with yellowishheddandbeardsomwhatwhite,
Philosopher-like, this causedid recite,
' I see it perfect true, for soeyou agree,
that what is labored most will weakest bee;
and what of mann is most weake by kinde,

20

soonestgrayehairesin that part you shall finde;


then vsingemy teeth morethan my witt, by right,

my berdethenmy witt, mustneedes


be morewhite.'

76

EPIGRAMS. 19. CUTTERS. 60. 61. HOMFRIE WALDROSK.

the last, with a ieste to knitt vp the game,


25
this reasonfor himself begannfor to frame,
' homes and hoore harescomm not by age, menn tell,
and that by my self I haue tried verie "well,
for havinge both agreeingtogether,
29

Caresgauethe one,andmy wife gauethe tother.'

(49) Cutters.
' lack, I here thow hast leaft thine ould trade;
thow wilt noe more becomea ripiers lade.'
Deaf
57]' In fayth, good "Will, thow sayesttrue,
for I haue left mine ould occupation for a newe,

for I cann braue it in the streetes w*'th the rest,

beinge a right cutter, as good as the best.'


' A cutter ! what cutter, I praye the, maye that bee1
a.cutter of Queenehithe, or a garment cutter, tell mee,8
A Swashebuckler cutter, or one of the cutthrotes,

or a garden cutter, or a false cutter of groates1


Or art thow such a cutter as ostelersand tapsters be,
or a woode cutter, a stone cutter, or a heare cutter, letts
see?'

12

noe, in faith, "Will, for better or worse,

I am none of these, but a plaine cutpurse ;


a life of such pleasinge,that I never feele payne
till the rope and the gallowesdoe hinder my gaine.' 10

(50) The deceasedPretor.


Thy vertue, not thy vice; faith, not dissemblingspeech;
thy goodnes,not thy flowings goods,made thee this
honor reach.

(51) To Humfrie Waldronn.


Yf reasonsworthie minde prescribe this reede,
and lustice

bidd ecb. one with

lust

desart

EPIGRAMS.

51. HUMFRIE

WALDROXtf.

62.

63. BURREI.L.

for to requitewith like, the frendliedeede,


in outwardsheweand inward faithful! harte,
then must I yealdvnto your gentleheste,
and streynemy quill to answereyowrrequest.
VVherinwith slender phrase I gentlie craue
your skillfull muse to pardon skillesse write,
and rather waie the honnest minde I haue,
then simple quill which rashelie doth recite
what Idle brayne hath fondlie found at large,
w/a'ch I present, our freindshipp to discharge.

77

4
[leaf
57,back]
6
7

10
12

A ffoolishe Cherill I maye seemeto bee,


13
that shamenot to present vnto thy sight
Sir Topas ridinge rime not meet for thee,
Nor Gouldings learned vewe, that famous wight,
1(3
whosehawtie verse,with sugredd words well knitt,
bereavesthe sameof Chawcersflowing witt.
Then frendlie take in gree this frendlie verse I frame,
and thinke, to his Perithoits, that Theslus writes the
same.

20

(52) Fortune.
Blinde ffortune, with her fonde and sencelesse
sence,

regardingnoughtthe worth of aniewight,


w/;ich heedleslie her riches doth dispence,

not forcingewhethersheedoth wrongeor right,


4
Enricht by sucheas vicesdo adorne,
Thegoodreiectingewith mostbitter skorne,
[leaf
68]
"Whichgrowes,for that noeperfectgoodsheknowes,
beingeoneliefedd with vaineand outwardshowes. 8

(53) To his freind Burrell.


The loathedpovertiestill shall theefeede
yf poorethow be in anietime of life,
By byrth, or fortune, or for want of heede,
for vnto such, rewards are nothinge rife,

78

EPIGRAMS.-54.

ISSl'ES. 65. MARRIAGE.

since,in this thanklesseage, none wealth attaine,


but such as riches haue, and giue for gaine.
Then must thy hard and woefull state
of shamefastpovertie
Embracepatience, since vnto thee
welth will not multiplie.

(54) Issues.
The loyfull mother brings forth manie faire yssues,
the learned lawyer brings his causeto good yssues,
the skilld Phisition makesfor goute runninge yssues,
the faulting luror is amerc'd in much yssues;
4
the large expencesare counted needlesyssues;
but yet, of all the yssueswee hauein anie kinde,
noneis more baddthen yssuingfrom our land, wee n'nde,
for soeour witt and wealth from vs sooneyssuesthen, 8
wA/ch lost and brought to naught, w'are scornedof all
menn

eif59,back]Such yssuethey obtcyne,their birth right \rh ich doesell,


on w7a'chyssuethe verdit hath condempnedmee riglit
well

(55) Manage.
Deepe witted menu, b'experiencehaue contrived,
1
that mariagegood and quiet is ech hower,
where the mans heringe organsare deprived
of their right vse and sound receyving power,
4
and where is seeledvp the womans percing sights
that sheemaie not behould her husbandssweetdelights. C,
ffor since nature hath madethat sex most fraile,
7
and subiect to tormentinge lelousie,
vpon ech guiltles signe they will not fayle,
their loving husbands to suspectfalselie ;
10
yet if she could not see,but were by nature blinde,
such fonde conceites she would not harbor in her minde.

EPIGRAMS.

66. SWEETE MOUTHE9.

67. FOOLES.

70

And if suspectedmann were dombe to heere

13

the lealousbrawleaof his vnquiet wife,


ech would embraceand hould the other deere,
wherbye they might obtayne a quiet life,

16

without w/u'chrare effects,swetemanageis a hell,


but linked with these guiftes, doth Paradice excell. 18

(50) Sweete mouthes.


A noble Earle, to vertue allwaies bent,

with rich and scoffingeknight on hunting went:


the Buck wasrows'd,the houndsvncopledbee,
who with swifte course,to flie did seenieto mee,
and eger of the game,in their full crie
wz'th dobled voice lowd ecchoed in the skie,

whose pleasantmusick did the earesdelight


of Earle and all the rest, except the knight,
that pleasuredmore in purchasing and gayne
than hawkes or hounds, or in such toyes vaine.

of whome the Earle demanded curteouslie,

when endedwas the hounds long solempnecrie,


' yf those faire doggs,with their reioicing voice,
had not sweete mouthes as hounds of rarest choice ;

12
'

wherto the knight gaue answerescoffinglie,


' hee did not knowe till hee the same should trie,

16

for anie of them he never kissed there,


and soe knewe

not how sweet that there mouthes were.'

wheratgoodEarle,which tookeit in disdaine,


from moved chollar hardlie could refraine,

20

but said ' if that you kist them not before,

you maiewith easekissethem behindethe more.'

(57) Fooles.
Hee was not wise, his witt hath him deceyved,
that would bee wise, and not a foole be deemed,

[leaf
59,
back]

80

EPIGRAMS.

67. FOOLES.

58. GAIXOPINGE.

but I, wfo'ch haue the truth by witt conceyved,


doe holde it best a foole to bee estemed,

the causewherof by reasonis perceyved,


ffor wisdome knowes, of fooles is endlesse number,
that in their

follie foolishlie

doe slumber.

Then is it best to be of that consort

7
8

and sweete societie w/j a'chmoste doe hould ;


the fewest menu to wisdome doe resort,
and leste in number soonest are contrould;

11

soe least are least estem'd in everie sort;


then must the wise, wfo'ch is the lesser number,

be comptedthose "which,all the world doe cumber. 14


Create {Franchisesthe fooles are knowen to haue,

15

becausethey swaye in all the greatestpart:


the wise stand back, forc't of the fooles to crave,

thoughe fooles cannot ludge of their good deserte, 18


yet must those fooles their vertuous life deprave,
for they stand warme, are fedd and cloth'd of beste,
when wise menn begg, or are with famin prest.
'21

(58) Gallopinge.
ffrom windsore ridinge, to the statelie towne,
the seateof ffamouskings and Inglands pryde,

in hast, I niett, in midst of Himslowe downe,

a gentle youth wfo'ch postinglie did ride,


a frend of mine, whome I forc'd there to staie,
to knowe the causehee ridd soe fast awaye.

"Whoe said, " muse not, I frendlie the require,

to seemee gallop with soelight a hedd,


since I fair lighter am in this retyre,
then when to London I my Tourney spedd;
ffor when I went, my creed 12 partes did holde,
but one is lost, soe I more light and bould,

10

the twelfeis gone,eleavenI keepein store,


Clirist went not vnto hell: what wouldyou more1" 14

EPIGRAMS.

59. CHURCHES.

60. MENN BEFORE ADAME.

81

(59) Churches.
The Auncient Saxonsdid full Christianlie,
to shewetheir fervent zealeand zealouslove,
erect most statelie churches plenteouslie,
as holie place ordain'd for god above.

But nowe le mondereuerse,the world turn'd upside


downe,
our Scismatikcs

will

haue noe church

in Cittie

or in

to wne.

K"oeChurch! alas! what doeI sayel I lye ;

they sett vpp churches twentie for their one,


8
for everie private howsespirituallie
must bee their church, for other will they none,
Excepte the open felds, or ells false Ethnicks groves of
trees,

where sencelesseas the sencelessewoods they flock


like swarms of bees;
12
there sowe they Sataiis damning seedes,of w/'ch disBention springs,
(tearing Christes vndivided coate), wA;'ch all to ruyne
bringes.
14

(60) Menn before Adame.


Good Mosef (\\hicb. didst write by sprite of God),
somemakes thy witt as watrye as thy name;

thy art, to serpentsw/u'chdid turne thy rodd,


thy sacredquill, w/ii'ch newborneworld did frame, 4
are nothinge worth; thy ludgements are but lame ;
ffor the Italian

redie witt doth sett the vnto schoole,

and Francis George,in his scripturesproblemes,makes


the a foole.

Thow couldstnot see,(which everiethinge didst see,8

of newspronge
worldCreateby louehis hand,)
that beforeAdame,(calldfirst mannby thee,)
weremaniemenu(whichby thy wordsis skande), 11
EMBLEMS.

82

EPIGRAMS. 61. 11"YE. 62. IESTIXQE.

for some Italians thy words so vnderstaud,


And Francis George doth, Talmude like,

by thy penn thee confound,

14

Province that manne Atidrogenon

was first made out of grownde :


But lett those wranglinge witts, that seeme
to teach goddsheavenlie sprite,
Eewarehis scourgingrodd deprive
them not of senceand light.

17

20

(61) luye.
Thow Bacchus plant, w/u'ch allwaies greene dost
springe,
1
Poets reward, and glorie of their penn,
the touchstoneof wyne w/<i'ch to the sprite doth bringe
a quickning force to rousethe witt of mcnn,
4
why dost thow clyme my bowseso spreddinglie,
and yeald thy sacreddbudds soefrutefullie 1
6
In vaine thow doest ascendthese rurall tyles
7
"whichprofound Virgill never yet behelde,
nor wantonn Quid, whoserare penn compyles
strangechangedshapesw/a'chabstrusescienceyeald, 10
nor wittie Flaccus did hangehis harpe here,
nor doth Tilullus gold in this appere.
12
ffor in this cottagerurall muse doth reste ;
here dwelleth GTierill, and Topas the knighte;
Deaf
ei,hack]pore oten ryme is onelie here exprest,
noe helicon verse or muse of rare delight;

13

16

but since thow hast this rusticke wall adorned,

doe florishe longe, all though my verse be scorned. 18

(G2) lestinge.
Threethings therebe w/i i'chmaiesusteynenoelefte 1
or foolishe

blerrdshe of our Idle

braine :

EPIGRA>fS.

63. HOXOR.

61. TEMPERANCE.

the honestfamewherwith our life is Llest;


our godliefaith, for that mayehide noestayne
of heresie,or falsereligionsbayne;
Next, watrisheeye,wherofechlitle gall
doth hurte the sight and dangersth'ye withall.

83

(63) Honor.
The glorious Queene,honor, desir'd of all,
wherto ambitious mindes greatlie aspires,
still gapinge, that on them her rayes maye fall
with glorious stiles to answer their desires,
which hautie hart by price and prayserequires,
is seldomefound, as grave ancients devise,
of such as gredilie wold to honnor rise.
ffor shee enquires of those sheenever sawe,
she followeth them that from her faste doe fiye,

7
8

she honnors such from her w/'ch doe withdraws,

she loveth all that naught esteemesher glorie,

[leaf62]

11

she calls for them that scorns her vanitie,


she trusteth those whome she did never kuowe,
and such rewards

in whome

hidd vertues flowe.

14

This contemplative Philosopherstould


15
With all their skill, vnknowinge her true kinde;
for other coursedoth this faire Ladie hould,
sinceto her glitteringe bowres newesteppsaresigned, 18
whertoe nowe none the redie waye cann finde,
but suche as enter with a keye of gould

by falsefaire shewesor flatteriesmanifold.

(64) Temperance.
The heroike vertues Cardinall,
wherof the learned write,

Doe from right kinde degenerate,


and with themselvesdo fighte.

21

84

EPIGRAMS.

64. TEMPERANCE.

If heavenlietemperancedoe not
their Rygor moderate,
As the true arhitrer
true stickler

and the

of their bate.

bck]ffor Justice without temperance


shadowesrevengingeIre,
And

fortitude

without

the same

is rashe vnquenchedfyre.

12

Soe wisdome wanting the due force


of temperance,wee trye,
Egregious follie to he deem'de,

and cosoninge
subtiltie.

16

when hee w/'ch hath true temperance,


all vertues doth embrace,
Is wise, is iust, is valiant,

and honnored in ech place.

20

Since this faire Queene,dame Temperance,


attended

is alhvaies

"with rare and honnorablemaydes

deservingworthieprayse;

24

ffor lawded virgin modestie,


and blushefull shamefastnes,
And holie abstinence, the nourse

of all true godlines,

28

Pure honestie, wise frugallness,


and right sobrietie,
The Angeliike continencie,
and fames eternitie,

32

Pef63]Doe dailie followe Temperance,


as handmaides ever preste,

And worthie membersof that Queene,


for to performe her hest,

35

EPIGRAMS.-65. DOINGENOTHINGS.66. ASTROLOGERS.


85

"Whoe,for their Ladiesliverie,


her ensigneand her worde,
To shewe how her wise actions

doewith her speechaccord.

40

This famoussentence
bearevppon
their

sleeves embrodred

still

(Not to much), which wise Pitacus


fram'd to her sacred will.

44

(65) Doingenothinge.
A Crabbed Cobler, and his slothfull wife,

w/tt'chwouldnot labourfor to gett her meate,


from words to blowes did often fall at strife;
but as the husband did her feircelie beate,
this question shee did oftentimes repeate:
' why doe you thus torment me in my life,
Since I haue nothinge said, nor nothinge donne?'
but he, continuinge still as he begun,

Said, ' for that cause onelie he made bis blowes soe rife.'

_(66)Astrologers.
Malevolent Safurne, vnhappie starr,
hath loste the vse of ferce and cruell sight,

Ne cann from stone a childe discerne from farre;

the shamefastemoone cann w/th her bashefull light 4


seenaught but what is pure and virgin bright;
the thundringe loue, w/th loue doth onelie minde
his white Europa, though a mortall wight;
the warlike Jlaiv, to coolehis youthfiill kinde,
8
doth Fenzwhalse; and lustfull Venus,Mars doth bynde.
The Lawrell Pliebus, with his glittering hedd,

10

the gloriousgod that rulesin fyerie chaire,


doth onelie thinke on Daph nesplesantebedd ;
to Herseuslove, doth Mercurie repaire,
the wittie sonne of Maya the faire :

14

86 EPIGRAMS.
- G7.FILIUS ASTE PATREU. C8. MOXSTEOUS
CHILDE.

thus all the plannetts are employd in skye ;


wherbye thow maist (Astrologer) dispaire,
by their aspectesor workinge power, to trye
whoe doth the Cuckold make, and thy hed hornifie. 18

(07) The herbey?///^ ante Patrcm.


A vertuous Ladie, skilfull herbaliste,

in Chimick art whoe takes noe meanedelight,


whome modestiewith good report hath bliste,
and wifelie dutie hath adornedrighte,
4
of gentleman (that learned would bee deem'd,
as by his trio, verba he had seem'de,)
Demanded ' if the herbe most rare of sight,
and of all Artistes greatlie esteem'de,
which JHiue ante pat rem they doe hight,
were to him knowne ' : who said, with couragebould,
his deepeinsight in herbes for to vnfould,
' it is, madame,well knowne to everie wight,
12
to be sonne of Aittijjater, as learned men doe houlde.'

(68) Monstrous Childe.


Did Learned Quid live, wi'th poetrie divine,

his Metamorphosishe would a newe refyne,


and add this prodigie, as vncouth as the reste,
3
of his transformedshapesvrhich there he hath expreste;
ffor here, though bodiesweseto other forms not chang'd,

irarct,back]Yet is this followingetruth asfair fromnaturestrang'd,


That the celestial! saints which doe adorne the skye, 7
should from the heavensdiscend,and children multiplie;
for why sainte Peters sonne, a thinge to fewe men
knowne,

inaintainda child w//ich he supposdto beehis owne,


yet others had more righte to her by kindlie knott;
soe easilie one others child falls to our lott.

12

This is a thingevnvsd,a Saint a sonneto haue,

andheedeformed,
notshap'dasheavenlie
bodiescrave,

EPIGRAMS.-68.

MONSTBOD3CHILDE. 69. A GODLY HANK.

"whoe,thoughof heavenlieseed,yet was he foule


beguylde,
that fondlie nourishedas his, oneotherschilde,
16
exceedinge
aniechyld w/'chnaturescoursedoth give,
for lightlie shecouldbearethe tallestmanii on live;
soe bigg her bone in bredth,soemonstroussheedid
seeme,

19

that ech,noechilde,but perfectwoman,did her deeme.


Thus nature changinge kinde,
these monstersforth doth sende,
Saint Peters sonne, a woman childe,
w/u'ch could w*'th menn contende.

24

(69) A godly niann.


He is a godlie mann,that doth with tongueandminde
and sincere hart, the heavenliegod
adore in his true kinde,

That liberal! is to pore, that Justice doth maintaine, 4 Pef


s]
And beinge chosenfor a ludge,
" takes noe reward for gayne ;
That is not moVd w/th loue, or doth for anger hate,
And as infectinge poysonn, shunns
8
fonde scouldingeand debate;

That hath a good"foresightin what he takesin hand,


that rashelie nothinge doth attempte
"w/uch reason maie withstande ;

12

That chooseth honnest frends, for to conversew/th all,

whosesageand true advisemayehelpe


in dangerswhen they fall;
That vtters w/th his tongue, but what his hart conceives,
And doth envie that wicked speech,
17
"which other menn deceyves ;-

Thisis a godliemann; but I thinkenoneis found,


In whome these sacred vertues doe

in their full powerabounde.

21

87

88

EPIGRAMS.

10. KINDRED. 71. COCRTEA>'D CUNTREY.

(70) Kindred.
Why kneele you heere,fairc Ladies, thus amased, 1
"beforeApollo, as though you sacrificedt
These litle babeswithin yowr armesthus foulded,
in weepingesort soepiteouslie disguised?
4
[tear
65,back]what secret greife of fortunes evill change
hath happened you 1 declare, and bee not straunge. C

Wee herelamentnoefortune of mishapp,

wee crave noe goodesfrom godds for to discende,


ne doe wee wishe our Ennemies to entrapp,
nor seekerevenge of such as vs offendf,
but of most fowle incest wee feele false fame,
and craueApollo to rid vs from the same.

10
1-

ffor these two babes wfo'ch here thow dost behould,

are our owne sonns by fleshlie generation;


they are brothers to our husbands,of this be bould,
and vncles to ech other by procreation ;
16
their mothers and grandmothersthow shalt vs finde
in lawfull manageand courseof honnest kinde,
18
\fli /eh wee beseechApollo for to shewe,
19
who leavinge that to earthlie menu of skill,
wee thee desire,yf ought therof thou knowe,
the sameto tell accordingeto our will;
22
Soe shall wee sound thy worth and learned name,
Since thow shalt cleere vs from

incestuous

shame.

(71) The Courteand Cuntrey.


My yonge and yuuthfull yeares,
that once drewe forth my life
In pleasantgameof ffancies trayne,
where pleasuresall were rife,
Haue nowe forsaken quite
their ould and wonted trade ;

My strengthis gone,my mirth is past,


my wantonn daies doe fade.

24

EPIGRAMS.-71.

THE COURTE AND CUNTRET.

89

ffor where I often vsed,


amongst the Courtlie sort,

In Idle play, through bewtieshue,


with loving talke to sport,

12

Nowe am I shakenn of,

My faltring tonguedoth staye,


Vntimelie thoughtsof suchmishapp
hath wornesuchtoyesawaye,
And I must rest at home,
lock'd from my pleasurespaste;
They scorneme nowe whome I disdaind:
this is my fall at laste.
ffrom Court to cart I flye,
a longe but easieleppe ;
I liste noe more with glosinge speech
on fortunes wheele to stepp.
She did advanceme once,
to throwe me downe againe,
But through her spite and my good happ
more quiet I attaine.
The little shrubbs that growe
hard by the tender grasse,
Abide the force of blusteringe winde,
when greater trees doe crashe.
The

lowe

and

meane

16

20

[leafee.back]
2-1

28

32

estate

is surest thinge, I finde ;


The Courtlie life vnstedfast is,

morefleetingthan the winde.


Therespendthey all they haue,

36

and more, if need require;

They gapefor this, they watchfor that,

theyfolloweechdesire.

40

They frownevpon their frends,


and fawne vpon there foes;

They envieall the favored,

theyscornethemannin woes;

44

90

EPIGRAMS. 71. THE COURTE


AND CDNTRET.

They pressevponthe prince,


they glosefor hopeof gayne;
OeafC7]
tbey hate the wise,they ride the fooles,
they laughe and kme in va'ine.
They seekewith greatestshewe
for to maintaine their route ;
They pinche and spare,they carke and muse,
to bringe the sameabout.

48

52

Thus, vnder all this shewe

and troope of goulden sights,


They doe possessevnrestfull daies
and thowsand woeful! nights.
fibre loe, this goulden miserie,
as I doe finde, is naught,
But highe disdaine loynd with distresse
and manie mourning thought.
"U'herasmy Cuntrye life,

5C

60

"w^'ch nowe I take in hand,

Bringes quiet rest, a carelesseminde,


it needes noe lustie

band.

64

Wee envie noe estate,

wee loue the porest sorte;


We lavishe not 111gotten goods,
wee keepe a meaner port.
Wee spend as reasonbidds,
wee entertaine

68

our frend

at67,back]In honnest state; and when you lack,


then must wee seemeto lend;

72

w/u'ch is farr better case,


at neede allwaies to haue,

Then for to spend without a reine,


and then haue need to craue.

76

Our garments are not gaye,

our garnershaue the more;


wee seeke noe statelie halls, nor hante

the Princes Court therfore,

SO

EPIGRAMS.-71.

THE COURTEAND CUNTREY.

91

But live in poreestate,


more quiet in our brest
Then those whome dailie service doth
procure soe much vnrest.

84

Wee passethe silent night


wt'th his vnbroken sleepe;

Wee easeour heaviemindewith mirth ;


of loue wee take noe keepe.
I therfore flie the presse
and troope of Courtlie trayne
And scornetheir pride that scornemy fall,
to rest from restles payne.
I leaue the Courtlie

88

92

life

to those that skillesse are,


And hedlonge runn by others harms,
that soone will

not beware.

My cottagedoth content
my well contented minde;
My wantoun yowth is gone, and nowe
grave thoughts in hedd I finde.

[leaf
96

100

Thus well I tried haue,

that my mishappe hath wrought,


More quiet state for my behoofe
then I had ever thoughte.
In happie tyme, therefore,

101

I banishd such a life,

whereno thinge certainemaiebe found,


where all things are but strife.
Thus, carefull Court, farwell!

108

and wellcome Cuntrie state,

where thow shalt live at quiet rest

from all envyengehate.

112

92

EPIGRAMS.72.THENUMBER
1, 2, 3, 4.

(72) The number 1, 2, 3, 4.


Onesimplethinge cannnothingeworke,
yt maie not stand, but fall

Twoemaieboth muchand greatthings doe;


but three maie compasseall.

eatas,back]And fower, I trulie finde to bee


perfection of ech thinge,
ffor in the sameconteyned is

what heavenand earthmayebringe.

Woe, then, to him that is alone,


Kinge Da uids sonnecold saye,
for yf he fall, he wanteth helpe
to raise him or to staye.

12

But where twoe things doe meetein one,


as nature help'd by art,
There mann maye prove miraculous,
through his celestial! part.

16

But rightlie yf these worthie two


themselvesfrom Center spred
To three kinds of Philosophic,
newe Creatures

maie be bred.

20

ffor if divine Philosophic,


the natural! and morrall,

ffrom Center spred themselvesabrode


and then in Center fall,

24

There wilbe vnion of these three,


Sol, June, and Mercuric ;

ffor in the heaven and Earth three things


the truth do testifie:

pear
eg]All w/u'ch Saint lohn did trulie knowe,
and therefore rightlie tould
That three is one, and one is three,
vrhich fewe menu cann vnfould.

28

30

EPIGRAMS.-73.

CAMDENSBRtTANIA.

93

But if with all this secrett three

the numberfowerbe placed,


In Tetragramaton I finde

the worke shall well be graced.


Add thereforeoneto three and fower,1

36
[' ?u>2,3,i = 9]

makinge the number tenn,


In which

enclosed is the skill

fast lock'd from common rnenn.

40

Take this my sweeteconceyt in worth,


though worthlesse vnto thee,
"whosesacred witt, with abstruse skill

is fraught in ech degree.

44

(73) *MrCamdens Britania.


The holie licor (whosemysteriesdivine
to VenusSquireconsecrate
areseene)

another letter I

1c

needesnot the Poets braunch (touchstone of wyne),


the Clyming Ivye allwaies freshe and greene,
4
In Sommersscorchingeheate and winters could,
to make that wyne the better to be sould.
6
And learned Camden,with his searching witt,
whose deepestudie, by .traveils carefull payne,
hath from errors and mace3of Dedal us pitt,

7 [learea.back]
['maze]

(for Cuntrieslone,) drawnevnto light agayne


worthye Antiquities, wherofbefore
nonesayedthe like, or shall doeaniemore.

10

This PJiilopolites needeth not, I saye,

13

12

My rough pensill to portrait his desart;

but asgoodwynecommends
it selfallwaie
without the Ivye signe,soein noepart
he needesnoe prayse,syncethat his learnedquill

16

with flowingstylehis prayses


dothdistill.
fibr by his guidetheRomannamesdoelive,

18
19

and ancientthings consum'dby cancredbyte

9-4

EPIGRAMS.-73.

CAMDES.

74. SOLOMONS WITT.

of ould Injurious tyme, he doth revive,


in Latianc tongue, a worke wAi'ch hreedesdelight
and Cuntries good, to such as will embrace
soerare a gemm not found in other place.

22
24

His deepeconceit I highiie doe admire,


25
his strange Invention I knowe not howe to praise,
the truth of things whereto he doth aspire
is past my reach to sheweby anie waies;
28
what will you more1 breifelie, this thing I teach,
hee hath donne that w/</ch noe mann ells could reach.

Euy then this worke ! doe read and reade againe! 31


esteeme the mann, as hee doth rnerrit well!

requite with thanks the frute of Endlessepayne


represseenvye ! in vaine ! since I knowe well,
34
to seekea knott in rushe thow rnaist contend,
and teare w/th spite what thow canst not amende. 36

(74) Solomons witt.


ffreind Eldrington, thow art as wise
As Salomon, menn sayo,
ffor thow art like to him in witt,
in earnestand in playe.

But what is like, is not the same,


as all menn well
Soe thow

doe finde :

hast not Solomons witt

in all points of his minde.

Yet in one thinge thow dost the height


of his rare witt expresse,
In chaungeof Venussweetedelights
and Lecheries

excesse.

12

[leaf70,back]In other thinges thow art not hee,


noe more then is an Ape,
"Whoe is like thee in Peevishe

and in deformed shape.

witt

16

EPJGRAJI3. 76. LEYLANDES RIGHTEFULL GHOST. 95

ThusmustI playewith thy fynewitt,


to answerethy fonde leste,

That scoffesat everiemeanerwitt,


w&i'ch wisemenndoe detest.

20

(75) Leylanclesrightefull ghost.


What Endorephytonesse,
what envioushart,

what fourth furie, what rage of witlesse braine


Doth vex my sprite against his due desart,

and forceme causelesse,


wronglieto complaine
1
oneguiltlessehand,wfo'chdoth myefameretaine,
all thoughedetractingepenn wrth deepedespite

cannot behould the heamesof Englands lighte.

My name,my fame,my labors,and my penn,

my indisgested worke of highe conceit,


came not to be obscur'd in thanklesse Denne,

ffor he (whome skillessemalice through deceit


sekesto entrapp w/th hooke of scorning beyt)
doth gratefullie receyvemy buryed name,
w/ich otherwise had perished to my shame.

11

By him I live, by him the world doth knowe,


by him the heauensand humaneLawesdoefinde

15

near
71]
14

that he hath, fair beyond my broken shewe,

his Cuntriesglorie in oneworke combinde,


18
w/th gratiousstyle, and spriteof heavenlieniinde,
"w/i/ch both to mine and his immortall praise,

in spite of spite, will honnoredbeeallwaies.

21

And therefore, in most humble sort, doe sue

22

that Learn'd Camdenhis right guerdonmayehaue,


and that thoseconiuringewordsmaietindether due,
w/iich vex my sprite,and raiseme from my grave, 25
whoe never deem'd his learning to deprave
ffor I confesse,he rarelie doth compleate
that famous worke w7i/ch I could not entreate.

28

96

EPIGRAMS. 76. QUIET AND REST.

(76) Quiet and Rest.


As wearie bodie doth restorehis strength w<t/i rest,
as fertill soyle sometimesvntild doth prove the best,
As laboringe beastes,the ox, the horse,must quiet haue,
as toylinge daie, the restefull night doth dulie crave, 4
As bowe still bent, in time is weake

and looseth strength,


As Sommers flowers in Winters

rootes

doe reste at length,Soe must the rulinge minde, the seate

where reasone reynes,

with quiet recreateit self


from former paynes.
ffor what wants interchanged rest
will weare awaye,
And restles paines, both witt and wealth,
doth soonedecaye.
Then cease,thow wearie muse, all \vaies
to beate thy brayne
And weare thy paynefull hand,
w///ch never reaped gaine ;
Since all thy sweating toyle finds but

I2

16

20

such hard event

As damned SisijJius,

most bitter punishement,


Wherbye thy goulden tyme
thow thriftelesse dost consume,
Like GebersCooke,to waste thy wealth

in Ayeryefume.

24

28
Finis.

07

NOTES.
p. 2. Cftynll. " He (Lysander)always kept the Spartanpoet
Choerilusin his retinue, that lie might be ready to add lustre to Iiis
actions by the powers of verse.

And when Antilochus had written

somestanzasin his praise,he wasBOdelighted that he gave him his hat


full of silver." Lysander,Langhorne'sPlutarch.-S. See note on p.
77, I. 13, p. 104.

p. 6, 1.4. Genius. A Roman kept holiday and sacrificed to his


genius or guardian spirit on important occasionssuch as birthdays.
Hencethe phrase" imlulgere genio," to enjoy oneself.-S.
p. 7 (3), I. 6. Ceres. " It is an old and well-known sentence,

'Sine Cerereet Bacchofriget Venus' (love grows cool without bread


and wine)." Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy. Love Melancholy,
Numb. V., Subsect. 1.-S.
p. 16, 1. 8. Basiliske. "To come now unto the Basiliske, whom all
other serpents do flie from and are affraid of: albeit he killeth them

with his very breath and sinel that passethfrom him ; yea, and (by report) if he do but set his eie on a man it is enough to take away his
life."-Holland's

Pliny, torn. II., p. 356, ed. 1635.

"bred it is in the

province Cyrenaica,and is not above twelve fingers bredth long: a


white spot like a starre it carrieth on the head, and sets it out like a
coronet or diadem : if he but hisse once, no other serpents dare come
neere: hee creepeth not winding and crawling byas as other serpents
doe, with one part of the body driving, the other forward, but goeth
upright and aloft from the ground with one halfe part of his body : he
killeth all trees and shrubs not onely that he toucheth, but also that
hee breatheth upon : as for grasse and herbes, those he sindgeth and
bnrneth up, yea, and breaketh stones in sunder; so venimous and

deadly he is. It is received for a truth, that one of them on a time was
killed with a launce by an horsmanfrom his horse-back,but the poison
was so strong that went from his body along the staffe,as it killed both
horse and man : and yet a silly weazlehath a deadly power to kill this

monstrousserpent,as perniciousas it is [for manykings have been


desirousto seethe experience
thereof,andtlie mannerhowhe is killed].
Seehow Nature hath delighted to match every thing in the world with
a concurrent. The manneris, to cast theseweazlesinto the hole and
cranies where they lye, (and easiethey be to know by the stinking sent

of the placeaboutthem:) they arenot so soonewithin, but theyovercome them with their strong smell, but they die themselveswithall ;
EMBLEMS.

98

NOTES.

MALTESE

DOGS.

and so Nature for her pleasure bath the combat dispatched." Ibid. torn.
I., p. 206-7.- S.
p. -JiJ,No. '-'.'",1. 1. Tic M.l'iinne Dogge. "A Melitcan Dog, or a
little Dog fur a Ladies Lap." - MiiiaJntc, li.i'jii.
"A little pretty dog which women use to play with: a Fisting1
hound.

litaiH

canis."

- ''""<'"//, /'.?

Lat.

Dili.,

li'ii'i'.t.

"An animal once peculiar to Malta, is the Email dog with a long
silken coat, mentioned by Pliny, which Buffon calls bivhun ; but this

race of dogs is now extinct."- Pinny Cycloptedia.


" The little dogs and all,
Tniy. Blanch, and .S\\>-i.-t-lii/:irt,see. tliey bark at me.'' - Lear, III.
.....
" as full of quarrel and offenoe
As my young mistress' dog." - Othclln, II. 3.

6.

Probably the dogs referredto in the above two passagesmay have


been of the Maltese breed ; as also may have been the " Jewel " Proteus
sint to Sylvia, ami which was stolen from Launce by the haugmanbuys.- 1'. A. DANIEL.
" There is a Town in Pachynus, a Promontory of /""'/<
/'///
r
. .
M'/ifjun
(called .!/>lit'i2), from whence are transported many fine little
Dogs called, Jlelittcl Canffi; they were accounted the Jewels-'

of Women; but now [A.I>.1607]the saidTownis possessed


by Fishermen, uti'l tlit.'i'e is no sucli reckoning made of those tender Jiftle
Dogs,- for these are not bigger then common Ferrets, or Weasils,-

yet are they not small in understanding,nor mutable in their love to


men : for which cause they are also nourished tenderly for pleasure ;

whereupon came the proverb, Militma Catella, for one nourished for
pleasure ; and C'lnls Ji'jna throno, because Princes hold them in their
h.-ui'K titling upon their estate.4
" Tlieodorus, the tumbler and dancer, had one of these,
which loved him so well, that at his death he leaped into the fire after
Biondtu.
his body. Now a dayes, they have found another breed of
little Dogs in all Nations, beside the Mdilcean Dogs, either made so by
ar*' as inclsin& their bodies in the earth when they are
The nrt r
i
Whelps, - so as the}' cannot grow great, by reason of the
place,- or else, lessening and impayring their growth, by

some kind of meat or nourishment. These are called in Germany,


1 ? One to be handled. But the term may be su-ei-vitibleof a lesscleanly
interpretation. See the extract on page 100- "which tomefrumpingly tern
Fysth,,/ //,,,/."_
p. A. D.
-' M "lita is no doubt Malta, the island south of Pachynus.
3 Compare Proteus in 'Hie Tiro Gentlemen of Verona, IV. iv., "Launce.
M:IITV, Sir. I carried mistress Silvia the dog you bade me. Pro. And what
i i my little jricrl .' "

' S<->',
in Sh:iV " Dressesand Decorationsof the Middle Ages,"Yol.2, the
portrait of ConstanciaDuchessof Lancaster,wife of John of Gaunt, with one

elittle dogsin herlap: froman Illuminated


MS.in the Brit.'Museum

date

about

152y. -

P. A. D.

"TFJ?.

MAI.TOI;

noes.

09

Brrtckrn ftchogsJtuiulle
and G>ilxi-li<:iilini<11i-;
the I/nliiui.f, Il'-t/fulu1; other
Nations

have no common

name for tin's kind

that

I know.

Martial

made this DUtiijhon <,{a little French Dog; fur about Li- //s in /"';"
thr.-reare store of this kinde, and are sold very dear; sometimesfur tun
Crowns, and sometimes for more.

Delicias parvaj si vis nudire catella;,


Karranti brevis esl pagina tola mihi.

They are not above a foot, or half a foot long; and alu-ay the lesser
the more delicate and precious.

Their head like the head of a Mouse,

but greater, their snowt sharp,their ears like the ears of a Cony, short
legs, little feet, long tail, and white colour, and the hairs about the
shoulders longer then ordinary, is most commended. They are. of
pleasantdisposition, and will leap and bite without pinching, and Lark
prettily ; and some of them are taught to stand upright, holding up
their fore legs like hands; other to fetch and carry in their mouths,
that

which

" There

is cast

unto

them.

be some wanton women which

admit

them

to their beds,

and bring up their young ones in their own bosomes, for they are so

tender, that they seldom bring above one at a time, but they lose their
life. It was reported that when Grego in Syracuse was to go from
home among other Gossips, she gave her maid charge of two things:
one, that she should look to her childe when it cryed ; the other, that
she should keep the little Dog within doors."-Topsell's Hist, of Funrfooted Beasts (Ifi07), p. 128, ed. 1G.J8.
Ib. p. 135 ; from " the Treatise of English Dogs, first of all written in
Lfttln by that famous Doctor in Physick John Cay'2,and since translated

by A[braham]F[leming]," printedin 157(3,


blk. lr., 4to., 30 leaves.
"Of the delicate, neat, and prety kind of DOGS called the SPANIEL
GENTLE, or the COMFORTER;
in Latin, Mdilaus, or Futur.

"There is, besidesthose which we have already delivered, another


sort of Gentle Dogs in this our English soil, but exempted from the
order of the residue : the Dogs of this kind doth Callimachm call

Melitceos,
of the Island Meltta, in the sea of Sicily (which at this day is
named J/a/ta) an Island indeed,famousand renownedwith couragioua
and puissant Souhliers,valiantly fighting under the banner of Christ
their unconquerable Captain) where this kind of Dogs had their

principalbeginning. Thesedogsarelittle, prety, proper,andfine,and


sought for to satisfie the delicatenessof dainty damesami wanton
' Sottoln, a whelpe, a puppie, a sheapheardscur, a filthie dog. Also as

Bottarisxa [a kindeof lampreieor eele-poutf].-Flm-in. l.v.is. FulilnrcJla,a


little prettieilogge,a pluyin- dogge,a pupjm-sittingvpona womanscotes.-Jb.
2 Dr John Cains,born G Oct. 1510, at Norwich, di.-d l".i July I."::. I'liysician to Edw. VI., Mary, and Elizabeth. Gonville Hall, C:iniliridj:p, cnlari'i'd

by him, now knownas CainsColl'-.se.His real namewasKayeor Key,which


he latinized. Supposedby some,without much probability, to be the Dr Caius
of the " Merry Wives of Windsor."-P. A. D.

100

NOTES. MALTESEDOGS,ETC.

v unens u-ils, instrumentsof folly for them to play and dally withal, to
trifle away the treasure of time, to withdraw their mindes from more
c-i.iiiiiiei|.l.il,|o exercises, and to content their corrupted concupiscences
with vain di^jiort (a silly shift to shun irksome idleness). These puppies,
the smaller they he. the more pleasure they provoke, as more meet playfellmves f(,r minting mistresses to bear in their bosomes,to keep company
with.-il in their Chambers, to succour with sleep in bed, and nourish with
meat at bord, to lay in their laps, and lick their lips as they ride in their
\\T:IITLCi
ins : and good reason it should be so, for coursenesswith fineness
hath no fellowship, but featness with neatness hath neighbourhood
enough. That plausible proverb verified upon a Tyrant, namely, that
he loved his Sow better then his Son, may well be applyed to these
kind of people, who delight more in Dogs that are deprived of all
possibility of reason, then they do in children that be Capeable of
wisdom and judgement. But this abuse peradventure reigneth where
there hath been long lack of issue, or else where barrenness is the best
blossom of beauty."-Ib.
p. 135.
(I'.-ige 14U.) "A start to oul-landish DOGS in this conclusion, not
impertinent to the Authors purpose.
" Use and custome hath entertained other Dogs of an Out-landish
kind, but a few, and the same being of a pretty bigness, I mean Island1
Dogs, curled and rough all over, which by reason of the length of
their hair, make shew neither of face nor of body : And yet these Curs,
forsooth, because they are so strange, are greatly set by, esteemed,

taken up, and many times in the room of the Spaniel gentle or comforter.

The nature of men is so moved, nay, rather maryed to

novelties without all reason,wit, judgement, or perseverance,Eromen


allotrias, paroromen suggeneis
(lnt-l:imlisli toyn n-e tnkc iritlt dt?ig7itt
n/inys uf our oicii Xat'imt irr huce in despiyfit.

Which fault remaineth not in us concerning Dogs only, but for


Artificers also. And why ? it is manifest that we disdain and contemn
our own Work-men, be they never so skilful, be they never so cunning,
be they never so excellent. A beggerly Beast brought out of barbarous
borders, from the uttermost Countreys Northward, &c., we stare at, we
gaze at, we muse, we marvail at, like an Ass of Cu/nanum, like Thalet
with the brazen shanks, like the man in the Moon.

1 Icelanddogs,like our Skyeterriersnow.-F. "PisM. Pishfor thee,

Icelanddo;:! thou prick-ear'dcur of Iceland! (Itland Ff. IselandQq.)Hi nni 1", II. i. 44.

gee notes on this passage in Var. ed. 1&21."-P.

A. D.

Sir O. Smallshanks[to his intended]:


You shall have jewels,

A baboon,a parrot,and an Iceland dog.-MamAlley, iii. I.


-would

I might be

Lakea dog underher table,andservefor a footstool,


So I might have my belly full of that

Her Island cur refuses.-Massinger, Ph. Picture, V. 1.

NOTES.

MALTESE

DOGS.

HALCYON

DAIES.

101

"The which default Hippocratesmarkedwhen lie was alive, as


evidently appearethin the beginningof his Book Peri Agmon,so
entituled

and

named.

"And we in our work entituled De Ephemera Britannica* to the

peopleof Enylandhavemoreplentifullyexpressed.In this kinde,look


which is most blockish, and yet most waspish, the same is most
esteemed; and not among Citizens only, and jolly Gentlemen, but
among lusty Lords also, and Noblemen."

(Page 142, Jn. Cay, transl. by Abr. Fleming). "Now leaving the
surview of hunting and hawking Dogs, it remaineth that we run over

the residue, whereof somebe called fine Dogs,somecourse,other some,


Mungrels or Rascals. The first is Spanielgentle, railed CurtisAlclitceus,
becauseit is a kinde of dog accepted among Geutils, Nobles,Lords,
Ladies, &C.,who make much of them, vouchsafingto admit them so far
into their company,that they will not only lull them in their laps, but
kiss them with their lips, and make them their pretty play-fellows.
Such a one was Gorgons little puppy mentioned by Theocritus in

Syracuse,who, taking his journey, straightly chargedand commanded


his Maid to see to his Dog as charily aud warily as to his cliilde : To
call him in always, that he waridred not abroad, as well as to rock the

babe asleep,crying in tl^e Cradle. This PupperlyandpleasantCur,


(which somefrumpingly tearm Fysting Hound) servesin a manner to
no good use, except (as we have made former relation) to succovur
and strengthen qualing and qualming stomachs,to bewray bawdery,
and filthv abhominable lewdness (which a little Dog of this kinde did

in Sicilia) as ^Elianus in his 7 Book of Beasts, and '2.1Chapter,


recordeth."

p. 142.

p. 26, I. 15. Medusasslater. \Vhen Perseuscut off the headof the


Gorgon Medusa,Pegasussprang from the headlesstrunk.-S,
p. 27. Revenge." Also an hound is wrathful! ami malicious, so that
for to awreak himselfe, he biteth oft the stone that is throwen to him ;
and biteth the stone with great madnesse, that he breaketh his own

teeth, and grieueth not the stone,but his owne teeth full sore." 1582.
Batman vppon Bartholome,his Books De Proprietatibus Pifiuin, fau-ly
corrected,&c., leaf 355, back, col. 2.

p. 27. Revenge." Where-inthey resembleangry Dogges,which


byte the stone,not him that throwethit." Lyly's Euphucs,p. 223,
Arher's

ed.-S.

p. 28, 1.16. thefruitfull home. The hornof the goat Amaltheia


who suckled the infant Zeus, called cornucopia, the horn of plenty.-S.

p. 28 (32), 1.19. Halcyondales. ''This very bird so notableis


little biggerthan a sparrow: for the more part of her pennage,blew,
intermingledyet amongwith white andpurplefeathers,having a thin
smalneckandlong withall.-It is a verygreat chanceto seeoneof
theseHalcyones,& never are they seenbut about the settingof the

starVirgiliae,
[i. theBroodhen]
orelsneereMid-summer
or Mid-winter
:
' This work ought to be Englisht and reprinted.

102

X'JTLS.

THE

FISH

REMORA.

fur otherwhiles they will flic about a ship, but sooneare they gone
;nr.'iin and hiililcn.
They lay and sit about Mid-winter when daies be
shortest : & tlie time whiles they are broody, is called the Halcyon
daits, fur during that season the sea is calme and navigable, especially
in the coast uf isicilie." Holland's Pliny, tom. I., p. i!87.-S.
p. 29, 1.1. Jlcmora. "IT Also, kinde offish hath diuersitie of shape,
and of disposition, both in quality & in quantitie. For there is some
kinde of great huge tish, with great bodies & huge, as it were niouii-

tainesand hills, as Isi[dore]saith: suchwasthe whalethat swallowed


lonas the Prophet; his worn be was so great that it might be called
hell : for the Prophet saith : ' In that wombe of hell he heard me.'
And ther be some fish so small, & that vnneth they be taken with

hooks, as Isi[dore] saith .li. 12. Affurus is a little fish; & for littleness, it may 7iot be taken with hooks : and there it is said t/mt
En-liirias is a fish vnneth halfe a foote long, and hath that name, of
II. i-<Kiln, cleaning: for though he be full little of body, neverthcles he
is most of vertue : for he cleaueth to the ship, & lioldeth it still
i ll.istlv in the sea, as though the ship were on grounde therein.
Thuii^h windes blowc, and wanes arise strongly, and woode stormes,
that ships iiny nut inooue neyther passe. And that Fish lioldeth nut
still the shippe by any craft, but onely by cleauing to the ship.
I/iiini's call this fish Morun. Fur by strength he maketh the ship to
.stand, as it is said.

'"(Addition.
his \vrlin1

As touching this strange tish, whose smalnesse,with

uf .staieug ships, doth pa-se mans reason : the Grecians cal

Ethiii_!.<,uf the Latines Rcnujm, because .she doth stay ships. Oy/'i///x
and Ailtiiii write, that he delighteth must in the high seas: he is of
length a enln't, that is, halfe a yard, of a browne conlour, like vnto an
Kelu : dinerse opinions are of this tish, but all authours agree l/m\, tur
a manifest truth, such a kind ther is, whereof one of these Fishes stayed
the G-lh'V of C
'
P/ "" meruailing. sayth : 'Oh straungiand wundi-iTiill thing! that, all the windes blowing, and the most
furious tempests raging, notwithstanding the violence of the same, yet
duth tin- s nail Fish hulde sti adie the ship whereto he is fastened, so
secrete of nature, by the ordinaunce of God.' Moreoncr,
by trauailing the coastesof America, the later trauailers reporte to luim1'eltthe strength and vertue of the same kinde of fish.) "-1582.
Batman
vppuii Tiartholome, his Booke Z) Proprietatibua Rcrum, If. 199, col. 2.

p. 29, (33), 1. 1. Remora. " But to returne again unto our StayShip Eeheneis: Trebius Niger saith it is a foot long, and five fingers
thieke, and that oftentimes it stayeth a ship." Holland's Pliny, tom. I.,
p. i'4'.i. Pliny says that it stopped Caligula's galley once who " fumed
and fared as an Emperour taking great indignation that so small a

thing as it should hold him back perforce-notwithstanding there were


no fewer than foure hundred lusty men in his galley that laboured at
the ore all that ever they could to the contrary-it

resembled for all

the world a suailc of the greatestmaking." Tb. tom. II., p. 4-JC. S.

NOTES.

CRANES.

Jin

VALENCE.

103

p. 30 (3C), 1. 9. Terminus. "When the temple of Jupiter wasto be


built on the Capitoline hill, the other deitiesallowed their shrinesto be
removedto makeroom, but Terminusthe boundarygod refusedto yield."
Ovid, Fasti, II., 667-70.-S.

p. 33 (40), 1. 17. Rev. xxi. 27.-S.


p. 39, 1. 6. Cranecarrying a stonein its bill. Mr P. A. Daniel refers
to Lyly's Euphues,p. 216, 4K!, of Arber's reprint. " What I haiie done,
was ouely to keep my eelfe from slcepe,as the Cranedoth the stony in
hir foote ; and I would also, with the same Crane, I had been silent,
holding a stonein my mouth."-p. 216. " The tongue of a louer should

be like the poynt in the Dial], which, though it go, none can see it
going, or a young tree, which, though it growe, none can see it
growing ; hauing alwayes the stonein their mouth which tlic Cranes rse
when theyflye ouer mountaines,lent/ tin ij utake a noyse."-p. 416.
p. 40 (52), 1. 1. Daulis in Phocis was the scene of the murder of
Itys, for which crime Philomela was turner! into a nightingale.-S.

p. 41 (53), 1. 8. " Bellerophontried to ascendto heavenon the


back of Pegasus, but the winged horse threw him."

Find. Isth. 6.-S.

p. 47. Mr Thomas Valence,one of the Lincoln's-Inn friends of


Lord Chancellor Egerton and Francis Thynne. Mr Martin Doyle, the
Steward of Lincoln's Inn, has kindly seuixht the entry-books of the

Inn for me, and says: "I find the name of 'Thomas Vallence' (so

spelt) as admittedof the Societyon the 4th of March, 2 Eliz. [A.I'.


1560]. The entry is on p. 256 of the Black Book No. 4. His
manucaptors were Thomas Wotton and Thomas Morgan.
" In the Admission Book No. 1, on p. 4, and again on p. 45, there is

the signatureof ThomasValence' written with one I only.''


In Stow's Surveyof London (ed. Strype), vol. i., p. 734, under the
heading Monuments,in the Parish Church of St Dunstan's in the West, is
" In o"bitum Thomas Valentis, Lincolniensis
die Decemb. Anno

Hospitii

Socii.

iiu-iitin tiieeast

Hoc tumulo Thorn* requiescunt ossa Valcnti?,


Et parvum corpus parvula terra tegit:

end of the

ge(j metis, nuae melior

A small monuChancel, north.

Qui obiit

23

1601, aetatis 78.

pars est, expfr.-cjiie

..

i-j.it

seiiuluhri.

Intima despicieus, sidera celsa coht.

Colonel Chester-my kind helper about Win Thynne's will, &c.adds:

"This

monument also called Valence 'Esquire,' and gave his

arms,vis.Chequyorandsable,ona chiefgules3 leopards


facesfleureor.
Accordingto the parishregisterof St Dunstan,he diedat his rooms
in Lincoln's Inn, ' lying over the gate.'

" I may addthat he wasthe author of someLatin versesprefixed


to Cooper'sThesaurus,fol. 1573.
" I have his will-that

of Thomas Valence, of Lincoln's Inn, Esq.-

dated 14th Sep.1COO,


and proved31 Dec.1601,by his ' loving good
Cousin' John Williams, Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, and his

' trustyservant'JamesMarshallof Furnival'sInn,Gent. The only


bequest
in it is oneof 20*.tohis servant
AllanGilpin; butheexplains

104

NOTES.

HOLBORN

HILL.

ARTHUR OOLDING.

that he had the sameday disposedof his estate by a deedof gift, and
cites the Indenture tripartite, as betweenhim of the 1st part, his said
executors of the 2nd part, and Percival Willoughby of Middleton, CO.

Warwick, John Soutlicott of Bulwer, co. Essex, Thomas Denne of


Adesham, co. Kent, and Richard Carey of London, Esq., of the 3rd

part; and he intimate? that his estateis to be disposedof accordingto


the

directions

therein.

'" This Indenture will probably be found among the Rolls in


Chancery."
p. 48, 1. 15. In the lesser triumph called an ovation the successful general wore the Corona ovalis, a crown of myrtle instead of the
laurel wreath. There seems to be no authority for an olive crown, but
the olive branch was a symbol of peace.-S.
p. 53 (1), 1. 1. Fur the lion as the symbol of Judah, see Gen. xlix.
9.-S.

p. 53 (1), 1. G. The lions in the royal arms and the flour de lys.-S.
p. 58,1. IT. trust Odd.

Thynne perhaps refers to Art. Amat. III.,

C53-6.-S.

p. 62, 1. 9. Chaucer's Hous of Ft/me.


" But as I slept, me mette I was
AVitbyn a temple ymade of glas."-S.

p. 62, 1. 11. a ghisse in verse. A satire on contemporary manners,


&c., entitled the Steele Glas, published 1576, written by George
Gascoigne, ob. 1577.-S.

p. C7(32), 1.1. "Of all placesthey[criminals] hold Holbornehill


an unfortunate place to ride up. It seems they goe that way unwillingly, for they are drawne. They cannot misse their way to their
Journeys end, they are so guarded and guided."-London
and the
Countrey Carbonadoed and Quartred into severall Characters, by D.
Lupton, 1632.-S.
p. 70 (37). A free translation of an epigram by Sir Thomas

Store,which will be found in Caylcy's Memoirsof Sir ThomasMore,vol.


II., p. 325. Thynne has added the retort of the discourteous knight.-S.
p. 72 (42), 1. 3. carding, playing at cards. Compare the possible
sense of 'carded' in 1 Hen. IV., III. ii. 62, "carded his state," and
Ritson's note thereon :-" By carding his state, the king means that his

predecessorset his consequenceto hazard,played it away (as a man


loses his fortune) at cards." This is a much disputed passage; see
notes in \rariorum

Sh., ed. 1821.-P.

A. D.

p. 77, 1. 13. Cherill. " Cherillus, one no very good Poet, had for
every verse well made, a Phillips noble of gold," etc.-Puttenham,

Arber's reprint, p. 32.-P. A. D.


'Cherilus, who wrote a poem on the victory of the Athenians over

Xei-xes,and on the exploits of Alexander the Great. Only 7 of his


verseswere approved; and for these he received7 piecesof gold ; for
every other verse, a buffet.'-B.

N.

p. 77, 1. 16. Gouldings hunt <1 retre. Arthur Golding, a con-

NOTES.

COURT AXD

COUNTRY.

10."i

temporary of Thynne, translated Ovid's Metarnorplioses,


&c., Sec.,into

English. Puttenham(The Arte of EnglishPoesif,Arber'sed., p. 75),


aftermentioningDr Phaer'sVirgil, says,"Since him followedMaister
ArthnreGolding,whowith no lessecommendation
turnedinto English
tudetre the Metamorphosis of Ovide."

Webbe(Discourse
of EnglishPoetrie,Arber'sed.,p. 51),aftercriticizing Phaer'sVirgil, says," Master Golding-hath equally deservedcommendationsfor the beautifying of the English speeche."-S.
p. 80,11.11-14. The Apostlescreedis divided into twelve articles.
The youth perhapsmeans: Onetwelfth of rny creed I have ceasedto
believe in, He descendedinto Hell, for if Christ never saw London he
never

saw hell.-S.

p. 81 (60), 1. 7. Francis George. A Venetian, the author of a book


entitled Problemut.i in Sacrum Scripturam,Paris, 1574,the work probably referred to here.

" A Venetian monk, Francis Georgius, published a scheme of


blendedCabbalisticand Platonic, or Neo-PIatouicphilosophy,in 15-5."
Hallam's Literature of Europe.-S.
p. 82 (61), 1. 15. oten ryme. Pastoral poetry. Avena, an oaten
straw, was used poetically for the shepherd's reed pipe.-S.
p. 85, 1. 43. Pittacus. One of the seven wise men of Greece. The
maxim is first found in Theoguis.-S.
p. 86 (67), 1. 6. The tria cerln were the three words used by the
Roman pastor in a civil action, Do, Dico, Addico, the first in granting

permissionto try the case,the secondin giving judgment, the third in


assigningthe disputedproperty to one of the litigants. Their application here is not very obvious, but perhaps the gentleman satirized was
wont to lay down the law upon all matters under discussion with the
solemnity of a Judge.-S.

p. 88 (71). The Courte and Cuntrey. Comparethe interesting


tracts reprinted by Mr W. C. Hazlitt in his Roxburghe-Library
Inedited Tracts, 1868:-1.

'The English L'ourtiL-r and the Couxtiey-

gentleman: A pleasauntand learned Disputation betweenethem both :


very profitableand necessarieto be readof all Nobilitie and Gentlemen.
Wherein is discoursed,what order of lyfe best beseemetha Gentleman,

(as well for education,asthe courseof his wholelife) to makeliiin a


personfytte for the publiqiie seruiceof his Prince and Couiitrey'.
London, Richard lones, 158G;2. Nicholas Breton's 'The Court and Country, or A Pmefe Discourse
betweene the Courtier and Country-man ; of the Manner, Nature, and

Condition of their Hues. Dialogue-wiseset downe betwixt a Courtier

and Country-man. C'onteyning


many Delectableand Pithy Sayings,
worthy Observation.Also,necessary
Notesfor a Courtier'. London,
G. Eld.

1618.

p. 92, 1.9. Ecolesiastes


iv. 10.-S.

p. 93,1.3,4. Irye. ' Goodwineneeds


no bush.'The' Ivy-bush
'

was-I

believe is still-the

sign of many a tavern.-P. A. D.

10 ]

NOTES.

CAMDEX

AND BROOKSMOUTH.

p. f'."(7.".). In l.'-IH Ralph Brook, or Brooksmoutli, York Herald,


pulilished a book entitled, '" A Discoverieof certain errorspublishedin
print in the mm h commended Britannia,' in which, besidespointing out
errors in the Britannia, he asserted that Camdeu had obtained much of
his material from Leland. Leland had been commissioned by Henry
VIII. to make eolk-' tions for a history and topography of England and
AValcs, but at his death his unpublished MSS. were dispersed. Thynnc
.i.lmits that Camdeii was indebted to these MSS., but urges that by
his use of them

he rescued

L'jland's

"This R'-ifjih Di

work

from

oblivion.

as In- had wrote a very virulent Book

against Camden, i-ntitvd. .1 D^t-m; /"// r,f />/"<">/"..


and endeavouring
then in to charge his Brilniiii'in with many Errors, especially in Matters
of Genealogy and Heraldry; and that since Qin.-i-nElizabeth had made
him Clarentieux: So (',/,,/,/, nimh stly. but kaui^dly, answered that
angry Man, and vindicaU-d what he had writ : and set his Answer at
the

End of an Edition

of his /,',//"/,//<.'</.

yet another Piece apiiu<t <

An,m

.Hi

U. This

II< rail

wrote

c, peteiidmg to a SecondDis-

rovery of Errors in hi- /</"////,,//,W,and in Justification of what he had


published befnn.-; and that he had stolen from Li.luitd: Therein he
bath these Wnrds, (the very MS. was very obligingly shewn me by
./,,/, J//x//'s, ESIJ; Gm-lir King at Armsj

viz.:

""His new co.it',1 Hi '.tinin'iii, made and iliu'-t'd


nf industrious
Labours of John Lii/1'tm/, that great Scholar, and painful Searcher of
/.'//,//./</'*" Antiquities,-as may appear both by the said L<ylamla Six
Volumes, written with his own Hand, yet extant in Custody of Mr
< of tin/.'
'
""/"; as also by the said L v/.i//'x A"/</"-)">'//'","
(ii/'i, dedicated to the same King, annexed to the End of my late Discovery: Which Six Books or \'olnmes were i-opifd out by Jn/i/i .Vi/c-,

and by him soldto this /,""///<"</


J/.; [Cbnu2en]
lor an Annuityof Eight
Pounds per Annum ; which he did pay unto the said Slrnee,during his
Life;

as the said ./>///> .v.,./v himself, before his Death, confessed to

divers Persons of Credit ; lamenting the Wrong done to Lei/land, both


by that Learned Man ; and also by one Harrisnn of Tr//)A>v,,r,who
likewise had robbed L<'jl,,<l of the Islands adjacent to this Realm of
"n1; setting them in Tin!'in !.-Jn</,as his own Travels and Collection, &c. These Lines, reflecting unworthily upon Slow, as well as
C'liiinlfn, are easily answered; since both do freely acknowledge when
they have made use of L< i/lnul, by setting his Name in their Margins."
Life of Stow by Strype, prefixed to his edition of Stowe's Survey,
p. x-xi.--S.
p. 96, 1. 27. " Geber, a native of Harrau in Mesopotamia, lived in the
9th century. He wrote several works on the philosopher's stone."
D'Herbelot,

sub voce Giaber.-S.

INDEX.

8/22means
'page8,1.22'; 64(27)1 means
'p. 64,poem27,1.1.'

Acheron,
8/22.

basiliske,the,16/8,16; 97.

Acteonscurres,45/23.

bat, 40 (00), 6. "A Batte,ba-

Actius, 2.
Adame, 81 (GO),10.
Adrian, 11/5.
Aetna monte, 66/13.
Aglaia, 14 (13), 13.

culum."-Levins, Man. AV..E. E.


T. S.

bate, sb.84/8, debate.


Bavins, 1.

Bayarde, 1.
be,
18/27, by.
Alciat, 3.
bedd.s,
v. n. 19 (18), 14.
Alderman woodcock, 74 (40), 4.

Thewoodcock
seems
to havebeen beforne,27 (30), C,"before.
a type of folly. Bewicksays that
it is easily caught in snares. " O

Ldlrpheron, 26 (28), 8, 13, Bellerephoii,41 (53), 1; 103.

this
woodcock,
whatanass
it is."- Belleras,
25 (28),4, Eell.-r,20
Tamingof the Shrew, I. ii. 161.
Amalthea, 23/15; 101.

Aniicla,
17/9.

Androgenon, 82 (60), 15.


annoyance,22 (23), 8, harm.

Antiochus,
2.
Antipater,
80 (07),13.

(28), 7.

Bellona, 28/9.

blistc,
p.p. 86(07),3,blest.
blood of earth, GO(15), 9, water.
bogbed, ailj. 1.

horde,
sb.55/10,thetable.
bould,be,88/15,besure.

Antomedon, 64 (27), 1, Autome- bowe, si. 16/20, bough]


don.
bragg, *b. 22 (22), 7.

Apollo, 30 (35), 9; 37/7; 88

(70),2,12,19.

brainsickwitts,14(12),20.

Arioniandolphins,50/16.

brickie,adj. 18/2,brittle.

Aschainus,
5/9,Ascanius.
asured,
38/7,azure.

Brooksmouth,
Ralph,106.
Browne,
02(20),1.

Athens,3.

but to, 53/10,save,except.


Byas, 11/7.

Bacchus,17 (15), 6, 10, 11, 13,

17,26; 27(30),3; 28(32),IS. Cambridge,


57 (8), 2.
Bacchus
juice,60 (15),7, wine. Camdeu,
93/7; 95,23; 106.

Bacchus
plant,82(Gl),1,ivy.

cui-ke,
v. n. 90/51,tofretoneself.

108

INDEX.

Caronsshipp, 7/13.
Catholike,a, 64 (26), 1, 9.

Cerberus,
24/17.

Daphne,85/12.
Daulian Philomell, 40 (52), 1 ;

103.

j, 7 (3),G; 27 (30)1; 28 David,92/10.

(32),18; 43/9; 97.


Cham,63 (23), 3, Ham.
Charites,15/23,the Graces.
Chaucer,3 ; 62/10 ; 71 (38), 6 ;

77,18;104.

Dedalanbees,49/47.
Dedaluspitt, 93/9,the Labyrinth.
Democrites,49;53.
depainted,p. p. 10 (7), 24.

Deucalion,
39 (50),2.

Cherill, 77/13; 82 (61), 14; Diana,46(61),1; Diane,9 (6),


97; 104,Cboerilus.

15.

Chimera,
the,26(28),10,Chimer,Dianiane
dogge,
27(31),1; 101.
13, 24.
Christ, 43/18, 24; 63 (24), 1;

80(58),
14.

Dictinian Diana, 8 (6), 1.

difficults,
sb.27(30),8, knotty
poiuts.

Chl'istes undivided coate, 81/14.


sb.67 (32), 16, outhiy.
chuse,howe maie it, 61/18, how dispence,

canit beotherwise.

Chyrill

Douai,57 (8), 2.

SeeCherill.

Cithereane
Venus,
6 (3),1.
Cladius
Minoes,
3.
Codrus,
1.

Egerton,
SirThomas,
1.
eise,
tib.9/21,ease.
Eldrington,
94/1.

colle,
v.a.73(44),4,toembrace,
Elios,
19(18),10,Helios.
0. F. acoler.

cooller,
sb.17/20,colour.

Corinth,
42(54),7.

Corinthes, 25 (28), 5, the Corin-

thians.

endenteth with his feete, 55/25,

walks
onhisheels
v

Endore
phytonesse,
95/1,pythoness.
Eneas,5/5, 12,27.

crauking,
adj.6/16,creaking. England,
80/2;95/7.
crag'd,
adj.44/36,
rocky.
entreate,
v.
a. 95/28,
write,treat
of.
Crisopeia,53/10; 54/21, 24, 30. enure, v. a. 14/23. " Fare il callo.

cunning,adj. 10 (7), 17,wise.

Cupid,6 (3), 2; 7 (4), 9, 12,20,


23; 8 (6), 9 ; 9/26; 33 (40), 10.

Cupido,33 (40), 8.

Farela piega:to make


ahabit,to
enure."-1598
; Florio.

EphereianLais, 41 (54), 2. Ephyra

wasanothernamefor Corinth.

curious,adj. 63 (25), 1, pains- Ephrosine,


14 (13),19.
taking.

curruca,
45 (58),3, a bird.

cutter of Queenhithe, a, 76/8.

Epidaure, 16 (14), 1, 7, 11.

Ethnicks,11/1,13; 81 (59),11,

Damasco,25 (27), 1.

heathen.
Euphemen,34 (41), 4, 7, 9.
Eurinome,14 2.

DameLais,59 (13),1.

Europa,85 (66),7.

IXDEX.

103

extremities,
sb. 47/19,extrava-Gretiane,
17/2.
gance.

guelye, adj. 38/5, red, from gules.

Fames
horse,
26/22.

Halryondaies,
28(32),19; 101.

faulting, adj. 78 (54), 4, de- halse,v.a. 85 (66),9, to embrace.


faulting.

fellowe
like, adj. 33/4, as a
comrade.
fett, v. a. 7/18, fetch.
ffee, sb. 68 (33), 1, fief.

halsing,pres.p. 14/12. A.S. Italg,

theneck.

hante, v. a. 90/79, to haunt, fre"

quent.

Heliotropium, 19/2, 9.

films
ante patrem,86 (67), 9, a Hercules,
24/1,27.
herb.
Flaccus.

See Horace.

fleete,v. n. 9/8, to flit.

flienge,
pres.p. 9/21,fleeing.

Herseus,85/13, Herse.
heste, sb. 77 (51), 5, command.

A.S.has.

heysuge,
45(58),4,hedge-sparrow.

flitt, v.a. 12(10),22,toabandon.hier, sb. 22 (22),3, rental; deforce, sb. 55/31, effect.
forcinge, not, pres. p. 77 (52), 4,

notcaring.

for why, 86 (68), 9, wherefore.

rived from hiring out or letting


his land.

Holbornehill, 67/1; 104.


Homer,57 (9), 5.

Francis
George,81
(60),7,13;105. Horace,!; 41 (52),12; 82 (61),
frise, v. n. 7 (3), 8, freeze.
frise clothed frut, 43 (56), 4.

11.

hornifie, v. a. 86/18, to cuckold.


Hunslowe downe, 80 (58), 3,

frowinced,
adj.42(54),9,wrinkled.Hounslow
Heath,
Middlesex.
fyle, v. a. 65/18, to defile.

lacchus, 7 (3), 6.

Ganymede,
29 (34),3; 36 (45), India, 19/1.
4,7.
Garrett, 75 (47), 15.

Ingland. SeeEngland.
inures. Seeenure.

Gascoigne,
62/11; 104.

Italians, the, 82 (60), 12.

Gebers
cooke,96/27; 106.
itterating,in, gerund,3, in repeatglasseperspective,
sb.62 (21),4, ing. "Thisis theverycause
\vliy
a telescope.

glose,
v.n.90/46,
toflatter.
glosinge,adj. 89/23, flattering.
glose, v. a. 13/24, to gloss or
comment.

Gorgon,the,60 (17),4.
Gorgonhorse,17/15,Pegasus.
Goulding,77/16; 104.
Greece,
5/2.

weiteratethe Psalmsoftnerthan

any
other
partof
Scripture
besides.'-Hooker,
Eccl.
Pol., bk V.,
p. 233,ed.1676.
Jack, 76 (49), 1.

Jesse,53 (1), 3.
Jewes,the,43/15,25.
John,73 (43),1.
John,St, 92/29.

110

Jove, 112; inn:.). 2; -JU(34),


4,13; 30(30\ 11; 32 (38),1, 23;
32 (39 , 1 ; :;:; 10),7; 36| 15), 1:
40 (51),2j

13 (56 . 1 : i:: (57), 1;

.Mne,sb. 5 t 20, liolp. " I pray


you bemy mainTo brinsjmewln-rn
to speakwith Miulain Silvia."-T.
<;:;tt. ofj'., 1. iv. 13-14.

46
(01),Id; :,s 13; (in (16)3; Medusa,
26/15; 101.
61 (IS), 2, 9; M 60 ,9; v. ,06), 6.
Jove hi- Mvayile,40 (50), 10, the

eagle.

Joyce,.-"/>.
27 (30), 4, juire.
Judea, :..".I 1), 1 ; H>4,Judah.

June,20(29),11; 43(57),3.
.1HVClKlll, 1.

M.-ring, 61 (19), 1.

melitane
dogge,
the,23 (25),1;
98.
Mercurie, 8 (5), 2; 15/43; 22/
10; 37/18,23; 85,13.

^[erriuie,nil.H220,quicksilver.
in- 3ae, *"/'. 07,1, a party,
men of

Kale, 72 (42), 1.
keepe, take iioe k. of, /". a. 91
^s, lake no heed of.

Russians

late."-Luce's

left

us

" A

but

of

Labour Lust, \~. ii.

361.

Metallicirpljosfs, the, of Ovid referred to, 86 (68), 2.

kin.lt-,
*"/,.12 (10),22; 1:>13] Muvius,
1.
LO; 83 (64), 3; 85 (GO), 8,
nature.

niic.-h,21/21, much.
Minerve, dissyllable,

22/15,

leaste,
<-<nij.
42 (53),13,unless, Minerva,
37/-11
, 10/6;53/17.
except.

Leucosia,44/16.

Li-hi, 44/15.

Mumus,6/12; 71/11.

mongers, 67/1, traders.

A.8.

manger
e.

L'JIS,
i'.>/.73(43),6,ceases.
SeeMoses,
81(60),1.

indexto Tl,,' 7V,,/o'Whistle,E. E. mowes, v. n. 69/18, makes faces.


T. S., *. r. Linnc.

Tr. iiiune.

Lisander, 2.
London, 80 (58), 10.

Myrtilus, 21 (21), 1, 16.

losse,H'/j. 12/6,loose.
LucasContiles,3.

Xero,5/20.
Xestor,7/20.

Lucifer,33(40),15.

note,v.a. 44/34,denote.

lune, sb. 92,20, Luna, i. e. silver.

orient, most, adj. 10/6, luxuriant 1


Mars, 28/21 ; 53 17; 54 (3), 3;
85 (66), 8, 9.

Marshis blow, lf> 0.


Martine, Martinus, 71 (39), 1,

2, 5.

Maya,85/14.

Ovid, 58/17; 82/9; 86 (68), 1;


104.

Oxford,57 (8), 2.
Pallas, 26 (29), 9; 32/9, 23;

40/6;48/19.

luaye
game,
a,61(19),5.
parasite
smell-feast,
the,58(11),5.
meane,
the,41 (52),6,moderaParis,26/1.
tion.

Paris[the city], 57 (8), 2.

Ill

Parthenos,44/15.
PaulusJovius, 3.

quintessence,
i. e.the 5thessence,
amedicine
made
of themostpuIT-

Pawle
[St],60(16),5.

ofitsingredients."-Baileys
Zlict.,

Pegase,Pegas,dissyllables, 16
(15), 4; 26/1'J.

Pegasus,26 (28), 14.

Pegasine
horse,17/25.

fully working and acting particles

Vol. II.

raughti-,ji. /i. 7 (t), 10, seized.

SeeII,;i. I'/,, pt. 2,II. iii. .

Penelope,
49/10.

ivi),.,x/i.I'l (:.'<>),
13(counsel.

IVrithous,
77/20.

Remora,
29(33),1; 102,afish.

Perseus, 1, Persius the satirist.

n-t iyne, o. n. ~<?\


10, be a r<>Iln\v<
r
of.

"To Releyneto one, attingere

Perseus.SeePretus.
adaliquem."-/.<
rii,x.
Perseus,
60 (17),2.
ride,v. a. 90'47,deride.
Peter,St, 86 (68),9, 23.
ridingsrime,77/1."i.
peyse,s5.27
(30),9,poise,
balance.rijii'">',"-'''""'' (W\ 2,a hnwkorof
Phebee, 46 (61), 8, the moon.
Phojbus or Phebus, 8 (6), 2 " 19/
5,14; 29 (35), 2; 37(47), 2; 49/

47;85/10.

fish. Spelinausaysthe nameis derivtd

from the basket

in which

the

fish is brought to market,anglice,

a ripp.

Phoebusfier, 21 (22), 1, the sun. rnau'ingbeggar,the, 58 (11), 4.


Philopolites, 93/13, loving one's Eomans, the, 48/15.
fellow-citizens.
Rose,the, within Xewgate, 75/1,

Pitacus,
85/43;105.
pluritane, a, 59 (13), 4.
Pluto, 11/15; 21 (20), 13; 28/1,

13; 71(40),3,8.
Polipus,39/7,a fish.

atavern.

rosiall faces, 14/7.

Salamanca,
57 (8), 1.
Sardanapalus,
12/5.

port,90/68,bearing,
behaviour. Satan,
81/13.
portrait,v. a. 93/14,portray."I Satans
gayle[jail], 11/19.
labour to pourtraict in Artlmre, Saturn, 29/11; 43 (57), 1 " 85
beforehe wasking, the imageof a
(66), 1.
brave knight."-Preface
to the Saturns cursed starr, 61/7.
Fairie Queene.

presse,
sb.91/89,
crowd.
preste,
adj.84/34,
ready.

sawrs,
,<1>.
56(5),7,sayings.
Saxons,
the,81(59),1.

Priam, 5/4.

Scismatikesreferred to, 81 (59), 6.

Pretus,
25(28),1; 41(53),3. Scilla,
Scylla,
or Silla,1,SulLi.
Prometheus,
32(39),3.
Protestant,
a,64(26),1.
Proteus, 34(42), 2, 13.

seche,
v.a.16(14),2,seek.
Seneca,
12(11),1.
Sisiphus, 96/23.
sister twinned, adj. 14/8.

quintessence,
67(32),
14."Es-shadowes,
r. n.
84/10,
forebodes
]
sentiaQuinta[with Chymists],shamefastnes,
84/26,modesty.

112

INUFX.

skando,
p. p. 81 (60), II, under- Thetisbedd,18/11,the sea.
stood.
th'ye, 83 (62), 7, the eye.

slater, sb. 26/15, slaughter.

Tiberius, 10

Smirnians,the, 10 (7), 17.

Tibullus, 82 (61), 12.

Socrates,
13/1.
Sr,],
sb.92/26,
gold.

Topas,
Sir,3,77/15
; 82(61),
14.
Troy,
5/3,12,29.

Solomon, 94/2, 7.
Spencer,71 (38), 1.

Tullie, 36 (46), 6.

springes,
A 22(23),7,weeds. I'li.-es,49/9.
sprite,81(60),1,inspiration. ure,gl,.28 (31),20; 62 (21),1,
sprite, 95/3, ghost.
squamous,adj. 44/7, scaly.

use.

stickler,
sb.84/8.A stickler
in- Valence,
MrThomas,
47(63),
1;
103.
terposed
between
combatants,
who

hadfoughtlonjj enough,
with a vawted,adj. 38/10,vaulted.
stick.
The
word
occurs
in
Troilusvegitive,adj.
42(52),6,vegetable.
i^ressida, V. viii. 18.
Venus, 6/7, 15; 7 (4), 10; 12/

Stiymonian cranes,39 (50), 1.


Stukelie, 71 (40), 1, 7.

12 ; 14/3 ; 26 (29), 7 ; 54 (3), 1;

85 (66), 9; 94/11.

Synon,5 1.

Venus bande, 12/18, Venus's

Syrens, the, 43 (57), 4, 6, 24,

27,30,37.

fetters.

Venussquire,93/2, Bacchus.
viM<-,p. p. 30 (35), 7, reviled

Talmud,the,referred
to, 82 (60), Virgill, 1, 82/8.
13.
Taurus hill, 39 (50), 5.
Telemachus,4'.>8.

Vulcan, 32/7; 41 (51), 2.


wales, 5/3, walls.

terene,adj. 24/23,earthly.
TVU1,76/3, 13.
Terminus,30 (36), 3, 9; 103.
AVillford,73 (44), 1.
Tetragramaton,
93/35. The four AVindsore,
80/1.
letters
of the name Jehovah
in
wynne,v. n. 71 (39), 3, ween,
Hebrew.
Thalia, 14 (13), 17.

think.

Thesius,77/20.

Zoilus, 71/10.

JOHN

CHILDS

AND

SON, PBISTEKS.