PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - MAKE IT COUNT.

pro.motion© Career Management Program

Your Guide to Effective Performance Management
Company Mission & Vision Goals & Strategic Objectives Individual Objectives & Action Plan Professional Development Plan Midyear Review Self Appraisal Year-End Appraisal Coaching & Feedback ...and much more!


 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
rights
reserved.
 www.terrikern.org
 
















PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


Table
of
Contents

What
Is
Performance
Management?................................................................................. 3

Figure
1
­
Overview
of
Performance
Management ................................................................ 4


Glossary
of
Terms ................................................................................................................... 5
 Company
Vision
&
Mission....................................................................................................7

Figure
2
­
Sample
of
Coca­Cola's
Mission
&
Vision
Statement ........................................... 7


Goals
&
Strategic
Initiatives..................................................................................................8

Figure
3
­
Sample
of
Organizational
Goals................................................................................ 8
 




Figure
4
­
Sample
of
Coca­Cola's
support
of
Org
Goals..........................................................9


Individual
Objectives
&
Action
Plan................................................................................10

Figure
5
­
Cascading
Alignment
of
Objectives .......................................................................10
 Setting
Objectives:
Planning
&
Measuring
Results ..............................................................11
 Figure
6
­
Critical
Business
Area
Quadrant
for
Objective
Setting...................................11
 SMART
Goal
Samples....................................................................................................................11
 Categories
of
Measures .................................................................................................................12
 Figure
7
­
Components
of
Objective
Setting:..........................................................................13
 Learn,
Act,
Plan ................................................................................................................................13


Professional
Development
Plan.......................................................................................14

Figure
8
­
Professional
Development
Plan
Target...............................................................15
 Self
Reflection
&
Input
from
Others..........................................................................................15
 Professional
Development
Objective
&
Action
Plan ...........................................................16
 New
Skills,
Knowledge
&
Abilities.............................................................................................17
 Change
Behavior .............................................................................................................................17
 Figure
9
­
Example
List
of
Behavior ..........................................................................................18
 Increased
Performance ................................................................................................................18


Midyear
Review......................................................................................................................18
 Self
Evaluation........................................................................................................................19
 Year­End
Appraisal...............................................................................................................20
 Coaching
&
Feedback............................................................................................................20
 What's
Next?............................................................................................................................21
 Your
Performance
Management
Checklist...................................................................22
 
 

 
 



 


pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


2


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT



 What
is
Performance
Management?


Performance
 Management,
 in
 every
 organization,
 is
 defined
 as
 the
 sharp
 focus
 of
 all
 resources
 toward
 its
 short‐term
 and
 long‐term
 goals.
 
 
 Every
 firm
 has
 one
 that
 is
 either
 formal,
informal
or
both.

If
you
dread
year­end
performance
evaluations,
never
get
one
 or
 always
 get
 the
 same
 rating,
 this
 publication
 is
 for
 you.
 
 Any
 performance
 management
 process,
 when
 successful,
 enables
 every
 employee
 to
 contribute
 by
 strengthening
the
link
between
the
Company's
goals
and
their
own
objectives.

Thus
ones'
 activities
 are
 contributing
 to
 the
 overall
 success
 of
 the
 firm.
 
 It
 should
 be
 simple
 and
 seamless,
 a
 critical
 business
 tool
 that
every
 employer
 uses
 to
gain
 a
 competitive
 edge
 and
 ensure
 its
 longevity.
 
 
 The
 cycle
 is
 never
 ending
 ‐
 it's
 a
 constant
 push
 toward
 results
 and
 excellence.
 
 It
 is
 a
 shared
 responsibility
 between
 company,
 manager
 and
 employee;
 an
 annual
cycle
that
really
has
no
starting
or
stopping
point.

The
best
place
for
you
to
jump
in
 is
at
the
Objective
Setting
part
of
the
cycle.


 In
 over
 twenty
 years
 of
 working
 with
 all
 levels
 in
 an
 organization
 many
 people,
 including
 leaders,
 don't
 know
 the
 difference
 between
 a
 goal
 and
 an
 objective.
 
 This
 is
 critical
 information
to
have
when
managing
and
leading
a
performance
management
cycle
because
 company
 goals
 should
 cascade
 down
 into
 the
 firm
 and
 culminate
 into
 individual
 and
 development
objectives.

This
publication
will
teach
you
how
this
works
and
how
it
applies
 to
you.

It
starts
with
a
glossary
of
terms
so
that
you
clearly
understand
the
meaning
of
each
 component
of
the
cycle;
how
the
performance
management
cycle
is
a
constant
and
critical
 business
process,
putting
all
resources,
activity
and
attention
on
the
goals
of
the
firm.
(See
 Figure
1.)

This
publication
is
designed
to
help
you
take
control
of
your
own
performance
 management
 which
 will
 help
 you
 excel
 in
 your
 career
 which
 is
 part
 of
 the
 pro.motion®
 Career
Management
Program.
 By
 the
 end
 of
 this
 publication
 you'll
 know
 how
 to
 effectively,
 efficiently
 and
 successfully
 direct
performance
management
for
yourself
and
your
Company,
regardless
of
whether
it's
 practiced
in
your
organization.



pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


3


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


Figure
1
­
Performance
Management
Overview


Company
 Mission


Company
 Vision


Company
 Goals


Strategic
Initiatives


Individual
 Objectives
&
 Action
Plan

Year‐End
 Appraisal


Coaching
 &
 Feedback


Professional
 Development
 Plan


Self
Appraisal


Midyear
 Review



 
 RESULTS
=
RETURN
ON
INVESTMENT
=

 SHAREHOLDER
VALUE
=
EMPLOYEE
REWARDS



pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


4


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


Figure
2
­
Glossary
of
Terms


Term


Definition
 
 
 Key
actions
identified
to
support
achievement
of
an
objective.

Action
plans
 guide
daily,
weekly
or
monthly
activities
necessary
to
achieve
the
 objective.


 Coaching
and
feedback
can
be
formal
or
informal
and
should
occur
 regularly
and
frequently.

This
is
the
most
critical
part
of
the
entire
cycle.

It
 comes
from
bosses,
peers,
clients
and
anyone
else
that
can
help
you
 achieve
your
objectives.

When
you
need
help,
to
learn
a
new
task,
have
a
 problem
to
solve
or
an
obstacle
to
overcome,
a
trusted
coach
helps
guide
 the
way
to
help
you
become
a
better
decision
maker.
 Changes
to
a
plan
and
the
objectives
or
their
measurements
to
help
the
 employee
successfully
achieve
results.
 The
annual
compensation
process
where
the
employee
is
given,
or
not
 given,
an
increase
to
their
base
pay
and
a
payout
of
variable
pay,
such
as
an
 annual
bonus.

This
usually
occurs
at
the
end
of
the
business
cycle
and
is
 determined
by
the
profitability
of
the
Company
for
that
cycle
year.
 The
result
or
achievement
toward
which
effort
is
directed;
an
outcome
to
 be
achieved
if
the
vision
is
to
become
real.


A
goal
is
a
broad
statement
of
 what
a
company
and
individual
hopes
to
accomplish
and
create
the
setting
 for
objectives.
 Examples:

grow
profitability,
maximize
net
income,
improve
customer
 loyalty
 A
formal
review
between
employee
and
manager
in
the
middle
of
the
 appraisal
year
to
determine
the
degree
to
which
the
employee
has
or
is
 poised
to
meet
their
objectives.

If
not,
a
corrective
action
plan
(not
 progressive
discipline!)
should
be
made
to
help
the
employee.
 A
company
story
and
ideals
in
less
than
30
seconds:
who
the
Company
is,
 what
it
does,
what
it
stands
for,
and
why
it
does
what
it
does.
 Specific,
measurable,
operational
item
to
be
accomplished
in
order
to
 achieve
the
goal.

There
may
be
multiple
objectives
for
each
goal.

 Objectives
should
be
described
as
outputs
or
outcomes
and
serve
as
the
 basis
for
evaluation.

Objectives
for
a
department
or
division
or
function
 serve
as
the
basis
for
individual
objectives.
 Examples:

if
an
organization
has
a
goal
to
“grow
revenues”.
An
objective
to
 achieve
the
goal
may
be
“introduce
2
new
products
by
20XX
Q3.”
Other
 examples
of
common
objectives
are,
increase
revenue
by
x%
in
20XX,
 reduce
overhead
costs
by
X%
by
20XX


Action
Plan


Coaching
&
Feedback


Corrective
Action
 Employee
Rewards


Goal


Midyear
Review


Mission
 Objective




 
 



pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


5


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


Term


Definition
 
 
 The
sharp
focus
of
all
a
company's
resources
toward
its
short‐term
and
 long‐term
goals.

 Different
from
CORRECTIVE
ACTION.

Progressive
Discipline
occurs
when
 an
employee
lacks
the
skill
and/or
motivation
to
achieve
results.

The
 elements
of
progressive
discipline
are
typically
a
verbal
warning,
written
 warning,
final
warning
and
termination.
 The
degree
to
which
the
objective
was
met;
typically
partially
met,
met,
 exceeded
or
not
met
at
all.
 Mirrors
the
year‐end
appraisal
with
one
important
exception
‐
the
 employee
does
NOT
rate
their
own
performance.

Rather,
they
indicate
the
 degree
to
which
they've
achieved
each
objective
agreed
upon
throughout
 the
appraisal
year.

Employees
can
complete
this
on
the
year‐end
appraisal
 form
or
as
a
supplement
to
the
appraisal
form.
 At
the
end
of
the
business
cycle
of
a
company,
after
all
debts
have
been
 paid,
money
remains
if
the
Company
is
profitable.
This
money,
the
free
 cash
flow,
is
for
the
shareholder
or
shareholders.

 Initiating
a
planned,
calculated
action
that,
when
achieved,
has
significant
 impact
on
the
organization's
results.

Strategic
initiatives
require
cross‐ functional
support
to
succeed.
 
 A
vivid,
imaginative
conception
or
anticipation.

A
picture
of
the
Company
 in
the
future.

The
inspiration
and
the
framework
for
all
strategic
planning.
 A
formal
discussion
at
the
end
of
the
appraisal
year
memorialized
in
a
 document,
usually
a
form
provided
by
the
Company.

Once
the
self‐ evaluation
is
given
to
the
manager,
it
is
reviewed
and
the
manager
takes
 the
information
into
consideration.

The
manager
then
indicates
whether
 they
agree
or
disagree
with
the
self‐appraisal
and
indicates
it
on
the
 appraisal
form.

The
manager
then
rates
the
employee
either
by
individual
 section
or
overall,
or
both.


After
the
appraisal
is
completed
the
manager
 meets
with
the
employee
to
review
the
entire
Year‐End
Appraisal,
finalize
 it
by
both
parties
signing
it
and
giving
the
employee
a
copy
for
their
 records.

There
should
be
NO
surprises
here
­
it
should
be
a
review
of
 all
the
talking,
meeting,
feedback
and
coaching
that
has
occurred
 between
the
manager
and
employee
during
the
appraisal
year!

It
is
 the
manager's
responsibility
to
make
sure
a
copy
is
sent
to
HR
for
the
 personnel
file.


Performance
 Management
 Progressive
Discipline


Results
 Self
Appraisal


Shareholder
Value


Strategic
Initiative


Vision
 Year­End
Appraisal



 
 


pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


6


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT



 Company
Mission
&
Vision



 Whether
 you
 work
 for
 yourself,
 a
 small
 business
 or
 a
 large
 company,
 knowing
 the
 vision,
 mission
 and
 goals
 are
 the
 critical
 first
 step
 to
 effective
 performance
 management.

How
can
you
know
how
high
to
set
your
bar
if
you
don't
know
what
 the
goal
is?

So
often
times
people
go
through
the
daily
grind
without
a
purpose
and
 the
 only
 end
 goal
 their
 main
 objective
 is
 to
 make
 it
 to
 Friday!
 
 There
 are
 many
 companies
 out
 there
 who
 do
 not
 do
 a
 good
 job
 of
 communicating
 their
 vision,
 mission
and
goals
to
the
employees
in
the
organization.

Clear
communication
is
one
 of
the
factors
of
engaging
employees
‐
clear,
concise
and
relevant
communication
of
 the
mission
and
vision.
 
 Let's
look
at
Coca‐Cola's
Vision
&
Mission:
 

Figure
2
­
Mission
&
Vision
of
Coca­Cola


Our
Mission
 Our
Roadmap
starts
with
our
mission,
which
is
enduring.
It
declares
our
purpose
as
a
company
 and
serves
as
the
standard
against
which
we
weigh
our
actions
and
decisions.
 



*
To
refresh
the
world...
 



*
To
inspire
moments
of
optimism
and
happiness...
 



*
To
create
value
and
make
a
difference.


Our
Vision
 Our
vision
serves
as
the
framework
for
our
Roadmap
and
guides
every
aspect
of
our
business
by
describing
what
we
need
 to
accomplish
in
order
to
continue
achieving
sustainable,
quality
growth.
 



*
People:
Be
a
great
place
to
work
where
people
are
inspired
to
be
the
best
they
can
be.
 



*
Portfolio:
Bring
to
the
world
a
portfolio
of
quality
beverage
brands
that
anticipate
and
satisfy
people's
desires
and





 needs.
 



*
Partners:
Nurture
a
winning
network
of
customers
and
suppliers,
together
we
create
mutual,
enduring
value.
 



*
Planet:
Be
a
responsible
citizen
that
makes
a
difference
by
helping
build
and
support
sustainable
communities.
 



*
Pronit:
Maximize
long‐term
return
to
shareowners
while
being
mindful
of
our
overall
responsibilities.
 



*
Productivity:
Be
a
highly
effective,
lean
and
fast‐moving
organization.



 Upon
 review,
 you
 can
 see
 that
 both
 the
 mission
 and
 vision
 of
 Coca‐Cola
 are
 both
 very
 well
 written.
 
 They
 are
 clear,
 concise,
 inspire
 emotion
 and
 project
 a
 positive
 attitude.
 
 The
 vision
 focuses
 on
 employees,
 customers,
 distributors,
 product,
 environment,
productivity
and
the
big
P
=
profit.


Reading
these
paragraphs
gives
 you
 a
 real
 sense
 of
 what
 this
 global
 giant
 is
 all
 about.
 
 It
 provides
 clarity
 and
 consistency
from
all
employees
around
the
globe,
in
other
words,
unity
of
vision.
 
 

pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


7


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


 
 Know
your
Company's
vision
and
mission
statement.

One
great
resource
to
help
 you
find
your
firm's
mission
and
vision
is
on
your
employer's
website.

Many
times
 both
are
published
on
the
Internet
or
intranet.

If
you
are
not
able
to
get
your
hands
 on
either
mission
or
vision,
or
if
neither
is
published
anywhere,
ask
your
manager
to
 help
you
put
this
framework
together
so
you
have
some
sort
of
foundation
to
work
 from.

Recommend
to
him
or
her
that
she
respectfully
suggests
to
senior
leadership
 to
create
a
mission
and
vision
or
if
both
exist,
effectively
communicate
both
to
the
 rest
of
the
staff.




 


Goals
and
Strategic
Initiatives

Don't
be
fooled
by
the
CEO
who
doesn't
know
the
difference
between
a
goal
and
an
 objective
 ‐
 you
 will
 be
 crystal
 clear
 between
 the
 two
 after
 completing
 this
 publication
so
that
you
don't
get
the
two
confused.

Goals
are
a
broad
statement
of
 what
 is
 to
 be
 achieved
 within
 a
 1
 ‐
 5
 year
 period.
 
 Remember,
 they
 support
 the
 vision
of
the
organization
and
are
the
conduit
to
which
the
vision
becomes
a
reality.


 They
 are
 usually
 not
 measureable
 and
 create
 the
 foundation
 for
 the
 objectives.

 Coca‐Cola
 is
 involved
 with
 a
 worldwide
 organization
 to
 help
 the
 development
 of
 third
 world
 countries.
 
 They
 do
 this
 because
 Coke
 plants
 are
 housed
 in
 these
 countries
 at
 drastically
 lower
 operating
 costs.
 
 Coke
 is
 heavily
 involved
 with
 the
 United
Nations
in
creating
and
executing
third‐world
development
goals
via
the
UN
 Millennium
Development
Summit.

Let's
look
at
a
really
great
example
of
goals
that
 were
 developed
 for
 the
 UN
 Millennium
 Summit
 and
 the
 transformation
 of
 these
 goals
to
Coke's
own
mission,
vision
and
corporate
goals:


Figure
3
­
Sample
Organizational
Goals
­Millennium
Development
Goals
for
the
United
Nation
involving
 Coka­Cola

What
are
the
Millennium
Development
Goals
and
the
Call
to
Action?
 The
Millennium
Development
Goals
(MDGs)
are
eight
goals
to
be
achieved
by
2015
that
respond
to
the
world's
main
 development
challenges.
The
MDGs
are
drawn
from
the
actions
and
targets
contained
in
the
Millennium
Declaration
that
was
 adopted
by
189
nations
and
signed
by
147
heads
of
state
and
governments
during
the
UN
Millennium
Summit
in
September
 2000.
 The
eight
goals
form
a
blueprint
agreed
to
by
all
the
world's
countries
and
leading
development
institutions:
 Goal
1:
Eradicate
extreme
poverty
and
hunger
 Goal
2:
Achieve
universal
primary
education
 Goal
3:
Promote
gender
equality
and
empower
women
 Goal
4:
Reduce
child
mortality
 Goal
5:
Improve
maternal
health
 Goal
6:
Combat
HIV/AIDS,
malaria
and
other
diseases
 Goal
7:
Ensure
environmental
sustainability
 Goal
8:
Develop
a
Global
Partnership
for
Development
 The
MDG
Call
to
Action
was
launched
in
July
2007
by
UK
Prime
Minister
Gordon
Brown,
speaking
alongside
UN
Secretary‐ General
Ban
Ki‐moon,
with
the
support
of
14
heads
of
state
or
governments
and
21
private
sector
leaders,
to
encourage
the
 international
community
to
accelerate
progress
to
reach
the
MDGs.



 

pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


8


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


 
 In
 this
 statement
 of
 goals
 there
 are
 no
 desired
 outcome
 and
 do
 not
 make
 any
 indication
 of
 how
 to
 get
 to
 the
 outcome.
 
 Further,
 Coca‐Cola's
 Chairman
 and
 CEO
 Neville
 Isdell
 joined
 more
 than
 80
 other
 global
 business
 leaders,
 UN
 officials
 and
 African
heads
of
state
in
London
for
a
high‐level
dialogue
on
the
role
businesses
can
 play
in
meeting
the
UN's
Millennium
Development
Goals
(MDGs).

He
drilled
down
 and
 created
 specific
 goals
 for
 Coca‐Cola
 to
 support
 the
 MDGs.
 
 They
 are
 the
 following:


Figure
4
­
Coca­Cola's
Specific
Goals
based
on
their
involvement
in
the
UN's
Millennium
Development
 Goals
)

The
Coca‐Cola
Company
will
launch
a
pilot
program
in
Tanzania
 to
study
how
to
enhance
the
model
to
create
more
jobs,
provide
 additional
skills
training
and
drive
entrepreneurship
and
 prosperity
in
local
communities.
 Lessons
learned
in
the
pilot
will
be
applied
over
the
next
three
 years
in
Coca‐Cola's
distribution
network
across
Africa,
with
the
 goal
of
achieving
the
following
by
2010:
 Establishing
between
1,300
and
2,000
new
independent





























 distribution
businesses;
 Creating
between
5,300
and
8,400
new
jobs;
and
 Generating
between
$320
million
and
$520
million
in
new
 revenue
for
local
economies.

*Source
‐
www.thecoca‐colacompany.com


In
this
statement
there
is
no
"how"
but
just
"what"
and
it
is
targeted
for
2010
(this
 was
published
on
May
6,
2008.)

Company
goals,
or
the
"how,"
are
achieved
through
 strategic
 initiatives.
 
 Another
 goal
 of
 Coca‐Cola's
 is
 to
 become
 environmentally
 responsible.
 
 Remember
 their
 mission
 to
 refresh
 the
 world?
 
 And
 their
 vision
 to
 build
 and
 support
 sustainable
 communities?
 
In
order
 to
do
this
they
must
reduce
 emissions
 from
 equipment,
 plants
 and
 use
 bottling
 products
 that
 are
 environmentally
 friendly.
 
 A
 strategic
 initiative
 may
 be
 to
 start
 a
 worldwide
 recycling
 program
 and
 use
 100%
 recycled
 bottling
 materials.
 
 
 Other
 strategic
 initiatives
may
include:


• 


Promoting
a
shift
to
low
or
non‐Global
Warming
Potential
refrigerants
in
point‐of‐

sale
cooling
technology.

They've
co‐founded
an
organization
called,
Refrigerants.


 • 


Coca‐Cola
has
also
partnered
with
the
Alliance
to
Save
Energy
on
the
Watergy
 program
in
South
Africa
and
with
Solar
Light
for
Africa
on
a
solar
water
pumping
 and
purification
project
in
Uganda.
 • 


Finally,
Coca‐Cola
is
also
working
with
WWF
on
GHG
emission
reduction
efforts
as

 part
of
a
broader
partnership
that
also
includes
watershed
protection
and
projects
 in
the
agricultural
supply
chain.


•Source
‐
www.thecoca‐colacompany.com



pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


9


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


 
 Be
a
champion
of
goals
and
initiatives.

Become
familiar
and
well
versed
with
 your
Company's
goals
for
the
next
(at
least)
18
months
and
the
strategic
initiatives
 that
are
in
motion
that
support
the
goals.


 Individual
Objectives
&
Action
Plan


Up
 to
 this
 point,
 your
 job
 has
 been
 to
 gather
 information;
 now
 your
 work
 begins.

 Your
 individual
 objectives
 should
 be
 aligned
 with
 your
 manager's,
 your
 department's,
your
office,
and
your
Company.


Alignment
ensures
all
effort
is
going
 toward
the
result
of
achieving
the
goal.

This
will
support
the
mission
and
make
the
 vision
 a
 reality.
 
 It
 all
 flows
 in
 the
 same
 direction
 together.
 
 Anyone
 that
 has
 ever
 rolled
 their
 eyes
 at
 this
 process,
 or
 performance
 management
 overall,
 does
 not
 understand
that
it
is
the
root
of
your
Company's
and
your
personal
success.


Figure
5
­
Cascading
Alignment
of
Objectives


Mission


Vision


Goals


Strategic
Initiatives


Individual
Objectives


Results



 
 Figure
 6
 illustrates
 the
 cascading
 alignment
 of
 objectives
 and
 how
 each
 one
 supports
the
overall
results
of
the
firm.


Effective
objective
setting
means
that
each
 employee
 has
 measurable
 individual
 objectives
 that
 are
 focused
 on
 helping
 the
 Company's
overall
goals.

Each
employee
should
have
a
clear
understanding
of
his
or
 her
 own
 performance
 accountabilities.
 All
 employees
 should
 have
 a
 clear
 understanding
 of
 how
 performance
 against
 these
 objectives
 will
 be
 evaluated
 and
 rewarded.


 
 
 

pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


Rewards


10


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


 
 Setting
Objectives:

Planning
&
Measuring
Results


Your
 objectives
 should
 reflect
 how
 you
 could
 drive
 goals,
 profitability,
 and
 related
 business
 results
 relative
 to
 your
 role
 within
 your
 Company.
 
 They
 should
 be
 measurable
 so
 that
 you
 and
 your
 manager
 can
 gauge
 your
 accomplishments.

 Always
use
this
rule
of
thumb:

select
two
or
three
objectives
in
each
of
these
critical
 business
areas.


Figure
6
­
Critical
Business
Area
Quadrant
for
Objective
Setting


Financial
Results


Client
Value


Action
Plan
 Operational
 Excellence
 Personal
Capability



 
 Create
 an
 action
 plan
 for
 each
 objective.
 
 Next
 are
 the
 steps
 to
 accomplish
 each
 objective.


The
acronym
SMART
(you've
seen
it
a
million
times!)
is
not
a
cliché.

It's
 truly
an
effective
way
of
building
objectives
that
support
the
organization
and
help
 you
stay
on
track.

For
each
objective
and
step
of
the
action
plan
follow
these
SMART
 guidelines:
 



 Specific:


Objectives

Is
the
objective
completely
 understood
between
you
and
your
 manager?
 Example:

Decrease
or
remove
potential
 customers'
resistance
to
buying
our
 product,
leading
to
a
20
percent
 increase
in
sales
closed
within
in
six
 months
or
less.
 How
will
you
know
when
it's
been
 achieved?

Will
you
be
able
to
 measure
the
degree
to
which
it's
 been
achieved?
 Example:

Increase
product
market
share
 by
13%
by
the
end
of
2010.


Action
Plan
Steps

Map
out
specific
activities
that
need
to
be
completed.;
 these
are
tactical:
 



*
Advertise
in
10
magazines
per
month.
 



*
Distribute
product
samples
to
20
clients
weekly.
 



*
Offer
free
online
seminars
to
potential
clients;
one
per
 month.
 
 Put
measures
around
each
tactic
that
will
help
achieve
 the
overall
objective.


 



*
Distribute
free
samples
or
discount
coupons
at
high
 school
football
games.
 



*
Sponsor
an
event
attended
by
teens
by
the
end
of
the
 quarter.
 


Measurable:




pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


11


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT



 
 Ambitious:


Objectives

Is
this
objective
a
stretch?

Is
it
too
 little?

Too
much?
 Example:

Realize
an
expense
cost
savings
 of
25%
by
year­end.
 Is
the
objective
aligned
with
the
 objectives
of
my
 manager/department/company?
 Example:

Become
the
employer
of
choice
 in
appropriate
industry
by
returning
 correspondence
with
all
applicants
 within
48
hours.
 By
when
must
I
achieve
the
 objective?
 


Action
Plan
Steps

Objectives
that
stretch
outside
of
our
comfort
zone
are
 what
take
us
to
the
next
level.



If
last
year's
cost
savings
 was
25%
‐
can
you
stretch
it
to
30%?

Timeframe
in
 which
you
can
reach
the
stretch
goal?

Be
realistic,
but
 push
yourself.
 The
objective
has
to
be
in
alignment
with
each
of
the
 other
levels
of
objectives
to
be
relevant.

Remember
that
 each
person's
success
is
a
success
for
the
Company.
 • Build
a
tracking
database
by
October
31;
 • Start
tracking
all
applicants
by
November
15;
 • Create
and
distribute
an
automated
email
for
 applicants
by
November
30.
 Each
tactic
in
the
action
plan
should
have
a
time
around
 it
as
highlighted
in
orange
above.


Relevant:


Timely:



 Measuring
Success:

Measuring
the
effectiveness
of
objectives
is
not
always
an
easy
 task.

To
simplify
it,
ask
yourself
this
question
‐
is
the
measurement
for
the
objective
 crystal
clear
to
you
and
your
manager?


A
great
measure
for
success
is
both
concise
 and
 memorable,
 integrating
 the
 sales,
 revenue,
 and
 production
 goals
 you
 are
 striving
to
achieve.

 
 Most
importantly,
your
measure
of
success
needs
to
reveal
whether
you
are
moving
 closer
 to—or
 further
 from—your
 objectives.
 
 Typically,
 measures
 fall
 into
 the
 following
categories:
 


Activity
Based
 Cost
Based
 Percent
Based
 Number
Based
 Other
Measures


 
 


• Meet
with
10
clients
per
month.
 • Attend
CE
classes
 • Perform
all
duties
as
directed
 • Cut
expenses
by
$100K
 • Increase
revenue
by
$50K
per
quarter
 • Reduce
paper
waste
by
$5K
 • Decrease
defects
by
10%
 • Increase
customer
satisfaction
by
3%
 • Grow
pronit
on
my
business
by
5%
 • Increase
new
clients
by
15
per
quarter
 • Get
at
least
1
employee
into
the
management
 training
program
 • Time
saved
 • Productivity
increased
 • Customer
Feedback


pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


12


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


 Activity
based
measurements
are
generally
not
effective
when
they
are
the
only
 measures
of
objective
success.

An
employee
could
be
engaged
in
all
the
wrong
 activity
and
not
getting
the
desired
result.

I've
seen
many
employees
at
all
levels
of
 an
organization
measure
activity
and
not
anything
else
because
they
don't
know
 how
to
create
effective
objectives.

There
are
three
components
to
completing
your
 part
of
the
individual
objectives
&
action
plan:


Figure
7
­
Components
of
Objective
Setting


Learn
 • Company
Goals
 • Strategic
Initiatives
 • Department
Goals
 • Manager
Objectives
 • Review
your
 company's
PM
 process
and
the
 forms
associated
 with
it


Plan
 • Read
this
guide
 thoroughly
 • Schedule
a
meeting
 with
your
manager
 to
dicuss,
renine
and
 agree
to
your
 objectives
 • Meet
with
your
HR
 Manager
to
help
you
 understand
the
 process


Act
 • Complete
your
 company
created
 objective
forms
 • Send
your
draft
to
 your
manager
so
he
 can
review
it
prior
 to
your
meeting
 • Prepare
your
action
 plan
for
the
meeting
 • Ask
for
resources
to
 help
you
achieve
 your
objectives


Learn,
Plan,
Act.




Learn.

After
gathering
your
Company's
mission
and
vision
statements,
it's
time
to
 review
and
understand
the
department's
goals
as
well
as
your
manager's
objectives.

 Regardless
 of
 whether
 your
 manager
 has
 given
 you
 their
 objectives
 or
 not,
 it
 is
 strongly
 recommend
 you
 complete
 your
 own
 with
 the
 information
 you
 have.


 Collect
 all
 the
 forms
 that
 apply
 to
 your
 Company's
 performance
 management
 process;
these
forms
could
include
a
balanced
scorecard,
self‐appraisal,
formal
year‐ end
appraisal,
definition
of
raters,
and
development
planning.


Plan.

Starting
by
reading
this
guide
will
help
you
have
a
deeper
understanding
of
 what
 performance
 management
 is
 all
 about
 and
 how
 your
 Company
 measures
 up.

 Knowledge
is
power
and
the
more
information
you
have,
the
more
confidence
you
 will
gain
which
will
help
you
manage
your
own
career
path.

Now
is
the
time
to
ask
 your
manager
for
a
copy
of
her
objectives
so
that
you
can
draft
your
own
based
on
 theirs.
 
 Schedule
 an
 objective‐setting
 meeting
 with
 your
 manager
 (for
 at
 least
 one
 hour)
to
discuss,
refine,
and
agree
to
your
objectives.


Act.

Complete
a
draft
of
your
objective
form
(we
will
cover
how
to
write
effective
 objectives
in
the
next
section.)

Send
your
draft
objectives
and
action
plan
(which
we
 will
 also
 cover
 in
 the
 next
 section)
 to
 your
 manager
 so
 she
 can
 review
 it
 prior
 to
 

pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


13


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


 your
meeting.

Identify
what
support
you'll
need
from
your
manager
and
other
team
 members
to
achieve
the
objectives
you've
prepared.

What
resources
will
you
need?

 What
 feedback
 will
 you
 want?
 
 Prepare
 this
 for
 your
 meeting
 with
 your
 manager
 and
 present
 a
 business
 case
 for
 getting
 the
 resources
 you
 need,
 especially
 if
 the
 resources
 are
 outside
 the
 norm
 (i.e.
 training,
 seminars,
 travel
 ‐
 anything
 that
 will
 cost
money.)

Meet
with
your
manager
to
get
agreement
on
your
objectives
and
an
 action
 plan.
 
 Lastly,
 submit
 your
 completed
 form
 to
 1)
 your
 manager,
 and
 2)
 to
 Human
Resources
to
be
placed
in
your
personnel
file.




Important
Note:
 
This
is
a
working
document
that
should
be
reviewed
frequently
 for
updates
and
changes.

One
common
misconception
about
objectives
is
that
once
 they're
written
for
the
year
they
are
set
in
stone.

Nothing
could
be
farther
from
the
 truth.

Keep
the
document
where
you
can
see
it,
read
it
and
edit
it
as
you
need
to.

 This
will
keep
you
motivated
to
complete
your
objectives.


 


Professional
Development
Plan

If
 we
 have
 learned
 one
 thing
 from
 the
 massive
 collapse
 of
 Wall
 Street,
 it's
 to
 keep
 ourselves
 marketable.
 
 
 I
 have
 talked
 to
 so
 many
 people
 who
 were
 laid
 off
 in
 this
 tragic
economic
environment,
loyal
employees
who
worked
for
the
same
company
 for
years,
moved
up
the
management
ladder,
were
making
a
good
living
with
good
 benefits,
 only
 to
 be
 in
 some
 cases,
 let
 go.
 
 Others
 made
 their
 way
 up
 the
 ladder
 switching
to
multiple
firms.

They
rolled
their
sleeves
up
and
got
the
job
done
but
 their
skills
and
learning
remained
stagnant.

These
people
are
now
competing
with
 younger
workers
who
are
technically
savvy,
sport
MBA's
and
have
twice
the
energy.

 One
of
the
biggest
mistakes
those
workers
made
was
not
making
time
for
their
own
 development
 or
 evolving
 their
 skills
 and
 experience
 both
 inside
 and
 outside
 the
 firm.

There
are
now
more
candidates
than
jobs
available
and
hiring
managers
have
 their
pick
from
a
bigger
pool
than
ever
before.

Focusing
on
your
own
development
 is
essential
to
your
longevity
and
success
in
your
career,
you
need
to
be
a
big
fish
in
 a
 big
 pond.
 
 Additionally,
 I've
 talked
 to
 people
 who
 are
 perfectly
 happy
 in
 what
 they're
doing
and
just
want
to
grow
and
develop
in
the
role
they're
in.

They
don't
 want
to
be
a
manager
or
move
up
the
ladder.

They're
job
fits
perfectly
into
their
life
 and
they
have
a
great
balance.

I
applaud
those
people
for
knowing
what
they
want
 and
a
professional
development
plan
is
a
great
tool
to
use
to
keep
your
skills
sharp.
 
 There
is
nothing
more
valuable
to
professional
development
than
self‐awareness.

A
 professional
 development
 plan
 is
 the
 tool
 by
 which
 we
 identify
 our
 strengths
 and
 build
on
them.

Our
weaknesses
are
revealed
to
us
in
a
productive
and
meaningful

 way.
 
 Increased
 performance
 is
 at
 the
 core
 of
 the
 Professional
 Development
 Plan
 Target
(Figure
9.)

Let's
explore.
 



pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


14


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


Figure
8
­
Professional
Development
Plan
Target


Increased
Performance


Changed
Behavior
 New
Skill,
Knowledge
 and
Ability
 Development
 Objectives
and
Action
 Plan
 Self
Renlection
&
Input
 From
Others



 
 Self
 Reflection
 &
 Input
 From
 Others.
 
 
 This
 is
 a
 critically
 important
 activity
 for
 your
career.

You
need
to
ask
yourself
the
following
questions:
 
 • Even
though
I
might
not
like
my
work
all
the
time,
do
I
love
what
I'm
doing?
 • Will
I
be
satisfied
in
this
profession
until
I
retire?
 • Am
I
at
the
professional
level
I
want
to
be?


 • What
 could
 I
 accomplish
 further
 that
 would
 really
 change
 my
 life
 for
 the
 better?
 • What
 skills
 will
 someone
 in
 my
 profession
 need
 a
 year,
 2
 years
 or
 5
 years
 down
the
road
due
to
legislation,
technology,
and
other
outside
influences?
 • If
 I
 choose
 to,
 do
 I
 have
 the
 right
 skills
 for
 the
 next
 level
 ‐
 whether
 a
 management
or
technical
role?
 • Am
I
an
expert
in
my
profession?

How
do
others
see
me?
 
 This
is
the
time
to
figure
out
what's
important
to
you,
where
you
are
and
where
you
 want
to
go.

The
exciting
thing
about
a
development
plan
is
that
the
sky
is
the
limit
‐
 so
go
for
it!


What
is
a
360­Degree
Feedback?
 
 360‐degree
feedback
is
a
great
tool
to
get
input
from
others
and
I
highly
recommend
 conducting
one
every
18
months.

The
first
time
I
ever
participated
in
a
formal
360‐ degree
feedback
was
brutal.

I
had
never
had
anyone
say
anything
remotely
negative
 about
me
(to
my
face,
anyway)
and
I
wasn't
mentally
prepared.

It
was
very
early
in
 my
career
and
I
just
assumed
everyone
liked
me.

Most
did.

However,
not
everyone
 thought
 I
 was
 great
 at
 my
 job.
 
 
 One
 area
 that
 struck
 me
 hard
 was
 someone's
 perception
that
I
didn't
have
a
strong
work
ethic.

When
I
investigated
why
that
was,
 

pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
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All
Rights
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15


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
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YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


 it
 was
 discovered
 that
 not
 everyone
 knew
 I
 left
 work
 an
 hour
 earlier
 every
 day
 because
I
came
in
an
hour
earlier
than
my
peers
did.

I
needed
to
get
home
to
my
 daughter
 who
 was
 in
 the
 3rd
 grade.
 
 I
 worked
 from
 home
 at
 night
 and
 on
 the
 weekends
so
I
was
putting
in
about
60
hours
a
week.

This
situation
caused
a
blind
 spot
 that
 resulted
 in
 me
 being
 much
 more
 communicative
 about
 my
 schedule
 and
 more
collaborative
about
the
things
I
was
working
on.
I
believe
I
changed
that
old
 perception
and
I
still
practice
that
to
this
day.

The
organization
did
a
fantastic
job
 keeping
anonymity
around
each
comment
that
peers,
managers,
clients
and
others
 would
 make.
 
 That
 way,
 you
 could
 be
 totally
 honest
 with
 your
 feedback
 making
 it
 into
a
positive
experience.

So
much
so
that
to
this
day
I
think
about
it
and
try
and
 figure
out
who
gave
the
feedback.






Development
 Objectives
 &
 Action
 Plan.
 
 Once
 you've
 really
 reflected
 on
 where
 you
are
and
where
you
want
to
be,
and
you
gathered
other
perspectives
from
your
 boss,
coworkers,
clients
and
other
important
professional
people,
you're
now
ready
 to
 make
 a
 plan.
 
 A
 Professional
 Development
 Plan
 should
 address
 the
 gap
 in
 skill,
 knowledge,
ability
(which
together
are
called
competencies)
and
behaviors
that
will
 take
you
to
where
you
want
to
go.

Many
times
bosses
will
want
to
throw
training
at
 an
 issue,
 they
 employee
 checks
 the
 training
 off
 of
 their
 list
 and
 nothing
 changes.

 Attending
training
is
an
activity;
the
new
competencies
and
behaviors
you
learned
 from
 training
 are
 only
 effective
 if
 you
 apply
 them
 and
 moving
 through
 the
 target
 (Figure
 9)
 will
 ensure
 you
 successfully
 apply
 what
 you've
 learned.
 
 Increasing
 competencies
and
changing
behavior
is
a
complicated
business
that
requires
a
true
 strategy.




The
good
news
is
that
development
objectives
&
action
plan
work
exactly
like
your
 annual
objectives
&
action
plan
‐
the
objectives
are
focused
on
closing
the
gap
that
 you
identified
in
the
self
reflection
&
input
step.

You
put
SMART
goals
around
each
 objective
then
an
action
plan
to
support
it.

Here
are
things
to
include
in
your
action
 plan:
 • School
‐
is
it
time
to
go
back
to
school?

Or
perhaps
one
or
two
classes
that
 would
 help
 you?
 
 Find
 out
 if
 your
 Company
 will
 reimburse
 you
 for
 your
 tuition.
 • Seminars
‐
when
choosing
a
seminar,
make
sure
the
outcome
will
specifically
 address
the
gap
you've
identified.



 • Mentoring
‐
is
there
someone
within
your
organization
that
you
could
meet
 with
regularly
that
will
help
you
gain
competencies,
change
behavior
or
give
 you
honest
and
confidential
feedback?

Perhaps
there
is
someone
outside
the
 organization
that
can
help
as
well.
 • Job
Shadowing
‐
this
is
such
a
great
way
to
give
someone
a
realistic
picture
of
 what
goes
on
day
to
day
in
the
life
of
the
role
you
want.

I
used
to

job
shadow
 students
who
wanted
to
work
in
HR
‐
it
was
an
eye
opening
experience
for
 them.

Experience
is
knowledge
and
it's
a
great
tool
to
add
to
your
plan.

 

pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


16


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


 • Reading
 ‐
 Publications
 are
 windows
 into
 the
 world.
 
 Get
 recommendations
 from
your
boss
or
other
coworkers
that
you
respect
as
to
what
publications
 are
 worthy.
 
 If
 you're
 not
 a
 reader,
 get
 the
 audio
 version
 and
 listen
 to
 it
 on
 your
IPod
or
in
the
car.


 Professional
Groups
‐
Networking
in
your
area
of
expertise
and
industry
is
a
 must.



Professional
Groups
have
sub‐committees
that
you
could
participate
 on
and
get
great
experience
with
project
planning
and
giving
presentations.

 Be
 Creative
 ‐
 Think
 of
 other
 ways
 you
 can
 get
 just‐in‐time
 training
 via
 the
 Internet,
 Continuing
 Education
 at
 your
 local
 college
 or
 through
 your
 Company.



New
 Skills,
 Knowledge
 &
 Abilities.
 
 
 The
 last
 step
 is
 where
 most
 development
 plans
 end.
 
 The
 sad
 thing
 is,
 most
 people
 don't
 meet
 their
 objectives.
 
 Here
 is
 the
 advantage
 you
 have
 over
 everyone
 else
‐
 you'll
 finish
 your
 development
 plan
 AND
 you
are
armed
with
the
target!

After
you
meet
each
objective
you
need
to
identify
 what
 new
 skills,
 knowledge
 and
 ability
 you've
 gained.
 
 Write
 it
 down
 and
 share
 it
 with
your
boss,
coworkers,
clients,
and
other
important
people.

Did
you
learn
a
new
 soft
skill?

What
technical
skill
did
you
gain?

What
do
you
know
now
that
you
didn't
 before?
 
 How
 are
 you
 able
 to
 apply
 that
 knowledge
 to
 your
 job
 or
 your
 firm?

 Remember
 that
 skill,
 knowledge
 and
 ability
 =
 competencies.
 
 Identify
 one
 skill
 objective
for
each
objective
you've
created
and
use
your
action
plan
to
gain
it,
and
 then
share
it
with
the
people
who
work
with
you.


Changed
Behavior.

This
is
where
you
apply
your
competencies
and
increase
your
 performance.

Changing
your
behavior
doesn't
mean
you're
doing
something
wrong
 and
you
are
being
punished,
but
rather
you're
learned
something
new
and
are
now
 able
 to
 perform
 and
 a
 higher
 level.
 
 Most
 people
 are
 external
 facing
 or
 internal
 facing.

Those
who
are
in
support
roles
have
customers
within
the
organization,
but
 they're
customers
nonetheless.




Behaviors
 are
 essential
 to
 strengthening
 your
 professional
 growth.
 
 It's
 important
 how
you
achieve
your
professional
objectives
because
certain
behavior
is
critical
to
 your
 success.
 
 The
 following
 are
 examples
 of
 essential
 professional
 behaviors
 one
 might
gain
from
achieving
their
professional
objectives:
 
 
 



pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


17


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


Figure
9
­
Example
List
of
Behavior


Collaboration 



Process
 Improvement


Eliminating
 Barriers


Innovates
 Products 



Displaying
 Creativity 



Problem
Solving


Self
Connidence


Create
Valued
 Insights


Knows
and
Uses
 Best
Practices


Attuned
to
 changes
in
their
 profession
 Delivers
on
 Objectives
and
 Targets


Uses
the
Best
 Technology


Uses
Intellectual
 Capital


Vocal
Advocate
 for
the
Team



Manages
Change


Executes
 Flawlessly



Not
all
of
these
may
be
appropriate
for
your
situation,
but
you
get
the
idea.

You
 must
have
the
right
behavior
to
get
to
where
you
want
to
go,
or
to
grow
where
you
 are.


Increased
Performance.

This
is
where
your
transformation
hits
the
pavement.

If
 you
follow
through
on
all
the
rings
in
the
target,
it
is
guaranteed
your
performance
 will
increase.

People
will
see
the
change
in
you
and
their
perception
will
change
for
 the
better
too.

This
is
what
separates
the
marginal
performers
from
the
true
leaders
 ‐
meeting
and
exceeding
performance
every
time.




 


Midyear
Review

A
midyear
review
is
pretty
self‐explanatory.

Some
companies
have
a
formal
review,
 while
some
informally,
some
not
at
all.


It
is
important
to
take
time
to
sit
down
with
 your
boss
and
review
your
objectives
together
to
make
sure
you
are
still
on
track
to
 achieving
 your
 goals.
 
 Change
 happens
 every
 day
 and
 as
 mentioned
 earlier
 in
 this
 publication,
 this
 is
 a
 working
 document
 that
 should
 be
 updated
 and
 comply
 with
 your
 changing
 business
 needs.
 
 Regardless
 of
 whether
 or
 not
 your
 company
 participates
 formally
 in
 midyear
 reviews,
 schedule
 an
 hour
 or
 a
 lunch
 with
 your
 boss
and
check
in
with
her
to
review
the
form.

If
they
are
not
in
the
same
location
 schedule
phone
time.

The
old
adage
"no
news
is
good
news"
does
not
apply
to
your
 career.

Open
communication
and
clear
understanding
is
the
key
to
success.



pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


18


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


Self
Evaluation


About
 a
 month
 before
 the
 year‐end
 performance
 evaluations
 are
 completed
 by
 all
 managers
 in
 your
 company,
 it
 is
 important
 for
 you
 to
 complete
 a
 self
 evaluation.

 Similar
to
every
step
in
this
publication,
your
company
may
or
may
not
practice
the
 formality
 of
 it.
 
 As
 the
 cycle
 is
 a
 shared
 responsibility,
 and
 by
 the
 way
 it
 is
 YOUR
 evaluation,
you
should
have
input
into
the
year‐end
review
of
your
results.

This
is
 when
all
the
hard
work
you've
put
into
learning,
planning
and
taking
action
pays
off.


 
 The
self
evaluation
is
pretty
simple
‐
you
indicate
the
degree
to
which
you
achieved
 each
of
your
objectives.

You
have
clarified
with
your
manager
how
your
success
is
 going
to
be
measured.

There
are
four
indicators
for
the
self
evaluation:
 
 Objective
Not
Met
 
 Objective
Partially
Met
 
 Objective
Met
As
Expected
 
 Objective
Exceeded
 
 It
 is
 just
 that
 simple.
 
 In
 addition,
 you
 want
 to
 give
 some
 context
 around
 how
 you
 arrived
at
each
indicator.

For
objectives
that
are
not
or
partially
met,
you
may
want
 to
give
your
manager
information
that
will
help
you
meet
the
objective
in
the
future
 by
telling
her
what
obstacles
prevented
success.

Perhaps
your
objective
was
related
 to
 someone
 else
 completing
 a
 project
 or
 your
 workload
 was
 such
 you
 could
 not
 complete
all
the
work.

You
may
also
want
to
speak
to
the
successes
you
have
had
 and
 even
 give
 your
 manager
 all
 the
 information
 about
 how
 you
 were
 able
 to
 accomplish
your
objective.

The
self
evaluation
is
all
about
you,
and
there
is
nobody
 better
to
toot
your
own
horn
than

 YOU.
 
 Take
 advantage
 of
 this
 great
 opportunity
 to
 reflect
 on
 your
 appraisal
 and
 evaluate
yourself.


Not
only
will
it
enlighten
your
boss
but
also
it's
part
of
the
self‐ discovery
process
and
you
will
gain
a
lot
from
it.

Don't
forget
to
include
what
you've
 achieved
 on
 your
 Professional
 Development
 Plan
 and
 the
 changed
 behaviors
 that
 have
helped
you
succeed.


*Important
 Note:
 
 It
 is
 not
 recommended
 you
 rate
 yourself
 on
 the
 self
 appraisal.

 It's
 your
 manager's
 job
 to
 rate
 your
 performance.
 
 There
 is
 always
 an
 element
 of
 subjectivity
 in
 raters
 and
 following
 all
 of
 the
 steps
 in
 this
 cycle
 minimizes
 this.

 Rating
 yourself
 creates
 opportunity
 for
 conflict
 between
 you
 and
 your
 manager
 ‐
 this
cycle
is
designed
to
be
collaborative.
 




pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


19


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT



 Year­End
Appraisal


The
 proper
 way
 to
 deliver
 a
 year‐end
 appraisal
 is
 to
 schedule
 a
 meeting
 between
 manager
and
employee.

The
appraisal
should
be
delivered
to
the
employee
at
the
 beginning
 of
 the
 meeting
 and
 time
 should
 be
 given
 to
 read
 it
 over.
 
 
 I
 always
 recommend
 to
 my
 managers
 that
 they
 include
 the
 employee's
 self
 appraisal
 comments
and
indicate
whether
they
agree
or
disagree
with
them.

They
give
detail
 on
why
or
why
not,
what
are
their
own
observations,
and
data/examples
to
support
 their
assessment.

There
should
be
NO
SURPRISES
HERE
‐
I
can't
stress
that
enough.

 This
 should
 be
 a
 conversation
 and
 documentation
 reviewing
 all
 the
 conversations
 and
meetings
that
have
taken
place
throughout
the
course
of
the
year.

Sharing
the
 responsibility
 of
 the
 cycle
 makes
 it
 easier
 on
 the
 manager
 and
 gives
 the
 employee
 control
over
his
or
her
own
career
path.

It
shouldn't
be
a
dreaded
annual
event
that
 managers
 take
 a
 week
 and
 a
 half
 to
 write
 up;
 rather
 the
 employee
 takes
 the
 lead
 with
 the
 self
 appraisal
 and
 the
 manager
 inserts
 their
 comments
 and
 supporting
 data.
 
 The
 manager
 rates
 the
 employee,
 delivers
 the
 rating,
 both
 sign
 off
 and
 the
 document
 goes
 to
 the
 employee,
 the
 manager
 and
 to
 HR
 to
 be
 placed
 in
 the
 employee's
personnel
file.




If
you
don't
agree
with
your
boss'
assessment
and
don't
want
to
sign
the
form
you
 don't
 have
 to.
 
 It
 doesn't
 negate
 the
 rating,
 however.
 
 A
 signature
 on
 a
 document
 only
 means
 that
 it's
 been
 delivered
 to
 you;
 it's
 not
 an
 indication
 of
 agreement.
 
 
 If
 you
 don't
 agree,
 you
 can
 write
 to
 your
 manager
 and
 copy
 your
 HR
 manager
 ‐
 ask
 that
 your
 statement
 be
 placed
 in
 your
 file
 with
 your
 appraisal.
 
 Although
 it's
 not
 going
to
change
the
rating
it
will
be
on
record
that
you
don't
agree
and
why.


 


Coaching
and
Feedback

At
 the
 heart
 of
 any
 successful
 organization
 is
 the
 ability
 of
 the
 leaders
 to
 create
 a
 vision,
set
goals,
and
align
everyone's
effort
in
getting
there.

They
have
to
be
able
to
 assess
 ‐
 and
 communicate
 ‐
 where
 efforts
 are
 effective
 and
 where
 they're
 not.
 
 A
 good
coach
creates
an
overall
plan
and
gives
everyone
the
information
and
tools
to
 contribute
 to
 the
 plan.
 
 Any
 successful
 sports
 team
 has
 a
 great
 coach.
 
 They're
 an
 advocate
 for
 each
 player
 and
 they
 make
 decisions
 and
 give
 the
 tough
 messages.

 They
also
strive
to
find
their
players
doing
things
right
and
tell
them
when
they
do.

 Additionally,
you
have
to
be
willing
to
take
the
feedback
from
your
boss,
coworkers,
 clients
as
well
as
other
important
people.




A
 good
 manager
 provides
 coaching
 and
 feedback
 consistently,
 formally
 and
 informally.
 
 Every
 time
 they
 walk
 to
 your
 desk
 and
 ask
 you
 a
 question,
 share
 information
 or
 meet
 with
 you
 they're
 providing
 you
 with
 knowledge.
 
 Some
 managers
 love
 leading
 other
 people,
 and
 some
 don't
 ‐
 they
 landed
 there
 because
 they
didn't
think
there
was
any
other
path
to
move
up
in
the
firm.

Some
managers
 

pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


20


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


 change,
some
are
stuck
in
the
1950's.

A
good
coach
is
always
up
on
the
latest
trends,
 technology,
needs
of
clients
and
other
departments.

They
promote
cross‐functional
 collaboration
 and
 they
 challenge
 you
 to
 think
 and
 act
 differently.
 
 They
 catch
 you
 doing
 things
 right
 and
 tell
 you
 when
 you're
 off
 the
 mark.
 
 They
 don't
 wait
 for
 a
 formal
evaluation
to
do
it
‐
they
give
it
on
the
spot
and
frequently.

They
talk
to
you
 live
 and
 not
 through
 email.
 
 They
 learn
 as
 much
 from
 you
 as
 you
 do
 from
 them,
 they're
not
afraid
that
you're
out
gaining
competencies
they
might
not
ever
have.

A
 good
 coach
 identifies
 strengths
 among
 team
 members
 and
 assigns
 work
 based
 on
 that.

They
are
mentors.


You
know
what
a
good
coach
is,
your
boss
is
either
a
good
coach
or
not.

Don't
wait
 for
him
to
come
to
you
to
talk
about
your
performance.

Take
control
and
initiate
it.


 


What's
Next?

Schedule
 time
 to
 sit
 down
 with
 your
 manager
 and
 review
 the
 Performance
 Management
 program
 in
 your
 company.
 
 Understand
 the
 steps
 and
 how
 you
 can
 participate
 as
 much
 as
 possible.
 
 Also,
 take
 some
 time
 to
 talk
 to
 your
 Human
 Resources
 Manager
 so
 he
 can
 fill
 any
 gaps
 in.
 
 Sometimes
 managers
 themselves
 don't
 fully
 understand
 the
 PM
 program
 so
 your
 HR
 support
 people
 are
 a
 great
 resource
to
gather
as
much
information
as
you
can.




Professional
 Development
 Plans
 sometimes
 cost
 money.
 
 
 Ask
 your
 manager
 if
 he
 can
create
a
training
budget
for
you
to
take
a
class,
seminar,
or
pay
for
member
ship
 to
a
professional
organization.

Training
may
involve
travel
so
be
sure
to
ask
for
that
 as
 well.
 
 
 Prepare
 a
 budget
 request
 by
 getting
 prices
 on
 the
 development
 that
 relevant
for
you
and
bring
it
to
your
meeting.

Sometimes
there
are
forms
to
be
filled
 out
to
get
approval
and
your
HR
department
should
have
those.


If
your
company
does
not
reimburse,
check
with
your
tax
professional
to
see
what
 expenses
can
be
deducted
from
your
income
tax.

Job
related
training,
when
not
paid
 by
your
company,
may
be
tax
deductible.


The
most
important
thing
to
remember
is
that
Performance
Management
does
not
 belong
to
the
company
‐
it
belongs
to
you,
the
employee.

Own
it
and
lead
it.


 
 


Have
questions?

Contact
Us!
 info@terrikern.org


You
have
now
officially
started
your
pro.motion™
through
 Performance
Management
and
are
on
the
road
to
taking
your
 career
back!


Congratulations!




pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


21


PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
­
MAKE
IT
COUNT.
 















YOUR
GUIDE
TO
EFFECTIVE
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT


Your
Performance
Management
Checklist
 

Obtain
a
copy
of
your
company's
vision,
mission
and
goals.

Check
your
company's
website
or
 intranet
site
for
them
or
ask
your
manager.
 
 
 Ask
 your
 manager
 for
 a
 copy
 of
 his/her
 objectives.
 
 Have
 her
 explain
 the
 department's
 priorities
 relative
to
the
company's
goals
and
their
objectives.
 
 
 Create
objectives
and
a
corresponding
action
plan.

Follow
the
SMART
process
outlined
on
page
11.


 
 
 Create
a
Professional
Development
Plan
draft
and
budget
request
to
review
with
your
manager.
 
 
 Set
up
a
meeting
with
your
manager
and
review
the
following:
 • Are
the
objectives
aligned
with
the
company's
goals
and
manager's
objectives?
 • Is
there
an
objective
in
each
of
the
Objective
Quadrants?
(Figure
7.0)
 • Are
there
no
more
than
three
objectives
in
each
Quadrant?
 • Are
they
SMART
‐
are
the
measurements
clear
and
agreed
upon?
 • Do
you
have
a
realistic
action
plan
for
each
objective?
 • Can
 your
 manager
 budget
 dollars
 for
 development?
 
 Can
 they
 give
 you
 time
 off
 to
 attend
 class
or
seminars?
 
 Agree
on
the
Objectives,
Action
Plan
and
Dates.

Also
finalize
your
Professional
Development
Plan.


 • Set
the
date
when
the
plan
will
be
finalized
and
submitted
to
your
manager
 • Make
revisions
as
needed
throughout
the
year;
get
your
manager's
agreement
and
give
them
 an
update
copy
 
 If
 necessary,
 meet
 with
 your
 tax
 advisor
 to
 see
 what
 out
 of
 pocket
 expenses
 for
 your
 Professional
 Development
Plan
are
tax
deductible.


 
 Apply
for
grants
for
professional
classes.
 
 
 Build
a
team
around
you
to
help
you
succeed
that
will
give
you
regular
coaching
and
feedback.


 
 
 Find
a
mentor
within
your
organization
who
is
willing
to
support
you
in
your
development.
 
 
 Talk
to
your
manager
regularly
about
your
progress
‐
initiate
the
conversation
if
you
need
to.
 
 
 



pro.motion
Career
Management
Program
 This
program
may
not
be
reproduced
without
our
prior
written
consent.
 Copyright
2010
Terri
Kern.

All
Rights
Reserved.


22


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