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Properties of Matter

-Grade 3 Science

By: Whitney Bonick


March, 2011

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Tab
Concept Map
Unit Overview
Rationale
Learning Environment
-Space
-Time
Scientific Explanation
-What is matter?
-What are molecules and how do they look in each state of
matter?
-What are the three states of matter?
-What are properties of matter?
-What are the properties of solids, liquids and gases?
-What is the science behind Oobleck?
-What are changes of state?
-What is melting?
-What is freezing?
-What is boiling?
Materials and Resources
Adaptive Dimension
Technology-Enhanced Learning
Extensions
Professional Development Plans
Classroom Management Plans
Safety
Foundational Objectives
Essential Question
Unit Questions
Assessment and Evaluation Overview
Lesson Plans Overview
Three Week Block Schedule
1 Lesson 1: Introduction to Matter; and accompanying material

2 Lesson 2: Molecules; and accompanying material

3 Lesson 3: Discovering Solids; and accompanying material

4 Lesson 4: Discovering Liquids; and accompanying material

5 Lesson 5: Solids, Liquids & the Matter Fact Book

6 Lesson 6: Growing Crystals; and accompanying material

7 Lesson 7: Discovering Gases I; and accompanying material

10

11

12

Lesson 8: Gases II; and accompanying material


Lesson 9: Solids, Liquids & Gases Promotional Poster
Lesson 10: Oobleck; and accompanying material
Lesson 11: Changes of State; and accompanying material
Lesson 12: Freezing; and accompanying material

PROPERTIES OF MATTER
Unit Overview
This unit involves the examination of matter as indicated in the
Saskatchewan Evergreen Science Curriculum (as the renewed curriculum has
not yet been implemented in my class). More specifically, it explores what
matter is, the three states of matter and their properties, molecules in
relation to solids, liquids and gases, and changes of state, with a closer look
at melting and freezing (due to time constraints). The two main objectives of
this unit include:
1. Describe some characteristic properties of matter; and
2. Describe some changes in matter.
When the students have ample experience with the first objective, we
will then move on to introducing the second objective, although we will not
get through its entirety within this unit.
This unit has a large emphasis on experiential learning through handson activity and experiments, student interaction and discovery. Learning is
student-centred, with the teacher acting as a guide during experimentation
and an instruction when directed instruction is necessary.
Rationale
The science curriculum, and more specific this unit of matter, is an
important component of a childs learning. This unit taps into a childs
natural curiosity. It promotes curiosity and a willingness to consider new
ideas, scepticism in that no one is all knowing, and develops a childs ability
to question. Further, this unit allows children to further explore their world
and begin to identify patterns in a safe and healthy environment and can
provide children with an amazing amount of power that knowledge and a
desire to learn can bring.
This unit explores topics that are evident in everyday life, outside of
the classroom and science lab. It discusses content that is useful and
applicable to a childs life, whether now or in the future. Finally, it promotes
further learning and discovery into other areas not only in science, but in the
vastness of a childs world.
Learning Environment
Space:
The learning in this unit will take place in the classroom as well as the
multipurpose room. The physical layout of the class will have to be changed,
depending on the lesson. Some lessons require individual study or desk

work, while other require group work. On days where my lesson requires
group work, I will have the students move their desks together, work on the
floor, or work in the multipurpose room. As well, some lessons require a
space that as a large group we can sit and read a story, have a circle
discussion, or participate in movement as a large group. In these instances, I
will book the library or multipurpose room to meet our needs. Finally, on
days where my lessons include experiments, I will require the use of the
multipurpose room.
Time:
This unit will take place over a space of 12 lessons. Each lesson is
generally one hour or class period in length, with the exception of one lesson
which will take place over the course of two days. Additionally, the fifth
lesson in my unit is a work period where no new material will be taught, but
students will have the opportunity to complete existing work and clarify
anything they may not understand. If I find that students require another
work period further into the unit, I will include it where I feel it to be
appropriate as I have included an extra hour of class time to be utilized
wherever needed.
Scientific Explanation
A firm grasp on the following content is needed prior to teaching this
unit:
a) What is matter?
Matter is everything in the universe from the tiniest speck of dust to
the largest mountain and the stars in the sky. Matter is anything that has
mass and occupies space.
b) What are molecules and how do they look in each state of
matter?
All matter is made up of molecules. Molecules are tiny particles that
join together to make solids, liquids and gases. Molecules are always
moving.
The molecules in solids are very close together and have little space to
move around.
The molecules in liquids flow. How fast a liquid flows depends on the
strength of the molecule bonds. For example, honey is a liquid that flows
very slowly because the bonds are strong. It would take a lot longer to fill a
cup with honey than it would to fill the same size cup with water. The bonds
that hold the molecules together in honey are stronger than those in water.
The molecules in a liquid have room to move around.

The molecules in a gas are spread very far apart. The molecules float
around and spread out in all directions.
c) What are the three states of matter?
The three states of matter are solids, liquids and gases.
Solids take up space. They have a shape of their own and keep their
shape and size. Solids have no flow.
Liquids take up space. They have no shape of their own. They take
the shape of the container they are in. Liquids keep their size but change
their shape.
Gases have no constant shape or size. They completely fill any closed
container. Gases take up space.
d) What are properties of matter?
All matter has physical properties. Size, shape, hardness, texture and
colour are all examples of physical properties. We use properties to describe
solids, liquids and gases. Many properties are easy to see and describe. We
use these properties to identify the solid, liquid or gas. Physical properties
help us tell the difference between different states of matter.
e) What are the properties of solids, liquids and gases?
Some properties of solids include size, shape, colour, hardness,
texture, volume.
Some properties of liquids include thickness, thinness, colour, volume,
density.
Some properties of gases include scent, molecules, etc.
f) What is the science behind Oobleck?
Oobleck is a neo-newtonian product; it takes the form of both a liquid
and a solid. Corn starch is made of millions of tiny particles. When you add
water to the starch, the particles float freely, keeping themselves spaced
evenly apart (like the molecules of a liquid). Imagine the floating starch
particles are like our class going through a doorway. If everyone walks in an
evenly spaced line, the group of us will get through easily. But if everyone
tries to push through at one, we will get jammed in the doorway. The same
thing happens to oobleck. When you move the oobleck mixture slowly or
gently, as when you were stirring it or pouring it, the particles can slide
easily past one another. The mixture acts like a liquid. When you try to
move the mixture quickly or push on it too hard, the starch particles get
pushed together and the mixture acts like a solid.
g) What are changes of state?
A change of physical state happens with a substance changes from one
state of matter to another. For example, when ice (the solid form of water)
changes to liquid water, the water has changed state. Changes of state
normally happen when the temperature of a substance changes. As the

temperature increases, substances change from solid to liquid and then from
liquid to gas. As the temperature decreases, they change from gas to liquid
and then from liquid to solid. A substance always goes through changes of
state at the same temperature. For example, water always changes from ice
to liquid water at zero degrees Celsius.
Changes of state are physical changes. This means that when a
substance changes state, only its physical properties change. Its chemical
make-up stays the same. Changes of state are also reversible changes. This
means that if a substance changes state, it can change back again.
Not all substances can exist in different states. For example, if wood is
heated it never melts, but when it gets hot enough it burns. Burning would is
an example of a chemical change, because it creates a new substance. It is
also a permanent change, because the wood cannot be returned to wood
once it burns.
h) What is melting:
Melting is the change of state from solid to liquid. The temperature at
which this change happens is called a substances melting point. All
temperatures above the melting point, the substance will stay a liquid. All
temperatures below the melting point, the substance will stay a solid.
i) What is freezing:
Freezing is the change of state from liquid to solid. It is the opposite of
melting, and happens at the melting point as a substance cools.
j) What is boiling?
Boiling is the change of state from liquid to gas. It is the opposite of
condensing. A substances boiling point is the temperature at which it
changes from liquid to gas. All temperatures above a substances boiling
point, the substance will remain a gas.
All temperatures below the
substances boiling point, the substance will stay a liquid. Condensation is
the change of state from gas to liquid. It happens at the boiling point as the
substance cools.
Materials and Resources
Materials:

Books:
-Whats the Matter in Mr. Whiskers Room? by Michael Elsohn Ross
-powerpoint slides
-The Magic School Bus Gets Baked in a Cake Scholastic Inc.
-powerpoint sides
-Matter by Alvin Silberstein, Virginia Silverstein and Laura Silverstein Nunn
-Bartholomew and the Oobleck by Dr. Seuss
-powerpoint slides
-Solids, Liquids and Gases by Angela Royston

-States of Matter by Chris Oxlade


-Ice to Steam: Changing States of Matter by Penny Johnson
-Material Matters: States of Matter by Carol Baldwin
-Solids, Liquids, Gases by Charnan Simon
-Science Topics: Matter by Ann Fullick
-Physical Change: Reshaping Matter by Darlene R. Stille
-The Properties of Solids by Marylou Morano Kjelle
-The Properties of Liquids by Marylou Morano Kjelle
-What Is the World Made Of? All About Solids, Liquids, and Gases by Kathleen Weidner
Zoehfeld
-What are Solids, Liquids, and Gases? By Richard and Louise Spilsbury
-States of Matter by Lynnette Brent
-Mixtures and Solutions by Molly Aloian
-States of Matter by Suzanne Slade
-Matter by Fred Wilkin
-Liquid and Buoyancy by Barbara Taylor
-Sink or Swim! The Science of Water by Barbara Taylor
-Changing Things-Changing Things-Changing Things by Robin Kerrod
-Experimenting with Air by Gordon R. Gore
Equipment:
-computer/projector cart
-tea kettle
Materials:
-classification activity cards (15 sets)
-time filler activities
-white chart paper
-Matter Fact Book
-candle
-banana
-rice
-rock
-salt
-sugar
-book
-Ziploc bags
-toothpicks
-40 plastic cups
-safety goggles
-45 balloons
-30 plastic bottles
-paper towel
-10 ice cream pails filled with water (depth greater than height of cup)
-baking soda
-vinegar
-funnels (as many as we can find)
-15 spoons
-11 x 14 paper
-discovery cards: solids
-discovery cards: liquids
-construction paper
-Oobleck instructions
-pencils, markers, crayons
-newspapers

-cornstarch
-15/30 tin pans
-water
-food colouring
-Directions for growing crystals
-water
-sugar
-measuring spoon
-string (cotton or wool)
-glasses/beakers (30)
-pencils (30)
-scissors
-spoons
-food colouring
-8 x 11 white paper
-medallions
-instructions for making ice cream
-heavy cream
-sugar
-vanilla
-table salt
-ice
-large Ziploc bags (10 or 15)
-small Ziploc bags (30)
-spoons
-measuring cups
Websites:
-Molecules Video: http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity/states_of_matter/index.html
-Change of State video: http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/studyjams/matter_states/

Resources:
-Solids, Liquids and Gases by The Ontario Science Centre
-What Is the World Made Of? All About Solids, Liquids, and Gases by Kathleen Weidner
Zoehfeld
-Whats the Matter in Mr. Whiskers Room? by Michael Elsohn Ross
-The Magic School Bus Gets Baked in a Cake Scholastic Inc.
-The Properties of Liquids by Marylou Morano Kjelle
-The properties of Solids by Marylou Morano Kjelle
-Physical Change: Reshaping Matter by Darlene R. Stille
-States of Matter by Chris Oxlade
-Sugar Crystals on a String: http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/family/science-projects-for-kids-states-ofmatter2.htm
-Changes of State: http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/studyjams/matter_states/

Adaptive Dimension
In general, I have utilized multiple teaching strategies that reach all
learners in this unit. More specifically, I have incorporated numerous
instructional strategies into each lesson to maximize learning for all.

The learning environment, as stated earlier changes depending on the


lesson being taught. Much of the student work is done out of their desk, with
a balance of written, oral and performance tasks.
Currently there are three students in the class with Personal Learning
Plans. At this point I am unaware of what these learning plans entail as I
have not had a chance to work with the students at this point. Following the
first and second lessons, I will have a better idea as to the range of ability
amongst these students and will adapt my lessons accordingly.

Technology-Enhanced Learning
I will be incorporating technology into my unit in a number of different
ways. First of all, I have created a wiki of websites that students can go to
included in my extensions portion of the unit.
This websites will be
accessible to students when they have completed their work. I will also be
incorporating in large group discussions videos as well as using powerpoints
to enhance literature.
Extensions
At the conclusion of my first lesson, I will introduce my extensions area.
If students finish the required work prior to the end of class, they will:
1. work on any outstanding work for other classes;
2. if completed all other work, there are:
a) books about matter;
b) matter vocabulary match games (which will be introduced as students
delve
further into content)
c) crossword puzzles, word searches, etc. folder
d) Wiki Matter websites.
I chose to set up a wiki which will be bookmarked on each of the
computers. This will work well as on this wiki are websites I have found
which direct students in the areas we are studying rather than having them
exploring irrelevant websites.
Safety
Safety is a major concern in the classroom, especially in science. Prior
to any experiments, students will be reminded that, while we use most of our
senses in science and in discovering properties of matter, taste is not one of
them!

Further, safety goggles will be worn during all science experiments as


they are a necessary part of science.
Finally, as many lessons include coming into contact with food, prior to
these lessons I will obtain a list of allergies to verify that these lessons are
appropriate to teach. In the event that they are not, a suitable lesson will
replace the lessons that require food to be used.
Foundational Objectives
1.

Describe some characteristic properties of matter.


1.
Determine which properties of objects can be used to help
identify them.
2.
Develop skills in using a balance to measure the mass of matter.
3.
Recognize solids, liquids, and gases as states of matter.
4.
Examine some of the properties of solids, liquids and gases.
2.
Identify some changes in matter.
1.
Recognize that the state of matter is a physical property.
2.
Identify changes of state.
3.
Associate changes of state with temperature changes.
4.
Discuss ways of using changes of state to estimate temperature.
5.
Investigate some physical changes and some chemical changes.
Essential Question
What is Matter and what does it entail?
Unit Questions
a) What is matter?
b) What are molecules and how do they look in each state of matter?
c) What are the three states of matter?
d) What are properties of matter?
e) What are the properties of solids, liquids and gases?
f) What is the science behind Oobleck?
g) What are changes of state?
i) What is melting?
j) What is freezing?
Assessment and Evaluation

To demonstrate their learning, the following assessments will be


utilized:
Lessons 1 13: Matter Fact Book (Assessment for Learning)
At the end of each lesson, I will collect the Matter Fact Books. This
assessment for learning will show where the students are in the class:
-are all the students caught up or do they need more time to spend on
their Matter books?
-what concepts are the students grasping well?
-should I spend more time on a previous concept by including another
lesson on it (as a whole class or individual students)?
This marks can be used as assessment in the students daily work.
Lesson 8: Self Assessment Rubric (Assessment as Learning)
At the end of this lesson the students will assess themselves in their
confidence levels with respect to the content thus far in the unit. I will use
this to determine what areas I still need to focus on and what areas my
students feel confident in. This will place some responsibility upon the
students in indicate if, in fact, there are areas that they do not understand.
Coupled with the Matter Fact Books and my own observations, I will be able
to see what directions I need to take with the class as individuals and as a
collective group.
Lessons 9: Rubric (Assessment of Learning)
After introducing the task at the beginning of lesson 9, as a large group
we will discuss what we feel is important for their posters, such as having
necessary content, aesthetic appeal, pictures, title, etc. When we have
completed this list together (and we have discussed any additional items I
deem necessary) I will explain to the students that I will be using our list to
create a rubric that will be used to mark their posters. As this is a two-day
lesson, on the second day students will have the opportunity to look at the
rubric and compare it with their posters before handing in their final piece of
work.
Lesson Plans
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson

1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
7:
8:

Introduction to Matter
Molecules
Discovering Solids
Discovering Liquids
Solids, Liquids and the Matter Fact Book (work period)
Growing Crystals
Gases I Balloon in a Bottle, Empty Glass?
Gases II The Magic School Bus Gets Baked in a Cake

Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson

9: Promotional Posters (two days)


10: Bartholomew and the Oobleck
11: Changes of State
12: Freezing Making Ice Cream!

LESSON 1
Content: (Topic)
Matter Introduction
Whats the Matter in Mr. Whiskers
Room?

Instructional Strategies:
-Direct Instruction (questioning,
listening and viewing)
-Indirect Instruction (reflective
discussion)
-Interactive Instruction (brainstorming,
cooperative learning groups)

Objectives:
1. Describe some characteristic properties of matter.
1. Determine which properties of matter can be used to identify them.
3. Recognize solids, liquids and gases as states of matter.
Cross Curricular Competencies:
-Developing Thinking
-Developing Literacies
Prerequisite Learning:
N/A
Preparation: (Equipment/materials/set-up)
-Classification Activity Cards (10 or 15 sets)
-Whats the Matter in Mr. Whiskers Room? by Michael Elsohn Ross
-Powerpoint pages of Whats the Matter in Mr. Whiskers Room? (Flashdrive)
-Computer/ projector cart
-White chart paper
-Matter Fact Book cover page, page 2 (Matter)
Set:
Student
1. Introduce new topic today: Matter.
Engagement/
-Ask if any students know what the term matter means. Classroom
Management
2. Classification Activity Cards
Strategies
-Break students into pairs or groups of three. Give each pair
or group of students a set of classification cards.
-Voices Grade 3
-Students will group cards according to a characteristic of
their choice (students will decide their own characteristics -Have weaker
to use).
and stronger
-When a pair/group finishes their sorting, they will join
students repeat
another pair/group of students and share their categories
instructions
teaching the other pair/group why they chose their
categories.
-We will reconvene as a large group and list ideas on the

board as a class the ways in which we separated the cards.


-Brainstorm what we think the term properties means.
Development:
1. Read Whats the Matter in Mr. Whiskers Room? by
Michael Elsohn Ross
-Powerpoint presentation of pages to go with reading.
-On white chart paper make a list of all the things we
learned about matter from the story.
Main focus for todays class, make sure students
have said:
a) Everything around us is matter, and all matter
takes up space.
--discuss examples of matter, i.e., is ____ matter? Is a
shadow matter? (no.)
b) There are three types of matter: Solids, Liquids
and Gases.
--examples of each.
c) We can find out about matter by using our senses.
--We use our senses to determine properties of objects
that can be used to identify them.
--What are some properties we determine by using our
a) sense of sight
b) sense of smell
c) sense of touch
d) sense of taste
e) hearing.
2. Getting back to Classification Activity Cards
--Revisit the list of ways the students separated their
classification cards.
--Did any students classify their cards according to states of
matter (solids, liquids, gases)?
--Have students regroup their cards again according to
states of matter.
Closure:
1. Matter Fact Book
-Introduce Matter Fact Book
-Hand out Cover page and page 2 (Matter) to the class.
Students will first answer questions on the Matter page
before decorating their Cover page.
-Students will hand in their Matter Fact Books at the end of
the class.
2. Introduce Extensions

--If students finish their work prior to the end of the class,
they will:
1. work on any outstanding work for other classes;
2. if completed all other work, there are:
a) books about matter;
b) matter vocabulary match games (which will be
introduced as
students delve further into content)
c) crossword puzzles, word searches, websites, etc.
folder
Assessment:
At the end of each lesson, I will collect the Matter Fact Books. This
assessment for learning will show where the students are in the class:
-are all the students caught up or do they need more time to spend on
their Matter books?
-what concepts are the students grasping well?
-should I spend more time on a previous concept by including another
lesson on it (as a whole class or individual students)?

Sand

Sugar

Salt

Wood

Bicycles

Flowers

Baseballs

Dishes

Coconut

Spices

Rice

Hot
Chocolate
Powder

Instant
Coffee

Coffee
Beans

Ice

Chocolate

Butter

Wax

People

Vinegar

Salad
Dressing
Dish
Washing
Detergent

Water

Honey

Hot
Chocolate

Milk

Shampoo Chocolate
Syrup

Pancake
Syrup
Motor Oil
Ink

Pop

Orange
Juice

Apple
Juice

Air

Helium

Oxygen
Steam

Carbon
Dioxide

LESSON 2
Content: (Topic)
Molecules

Instructional Strategies:
-Direct Instruction (questioning,
listening and viewing)
-Experiential Learning (role playing)
-Independent Study (assigned
question)
-Interactive Instruction (discussion)

Objectives:
1. Describe some characteristic properties of matter.
1. Determine which properties of objects can be used to identify them.
4. Examine some of the properties of solids, liquids, and gases.
Cross Curricular Competencies:
-Developing Thinking
-Developing Literacies
Prerequisite Learning:
-Matter is everything around us and all matter takes up space.
-There are three states of matter: Solids, liquids and gases.
-We use our senses to determine properties of objects that can be used to
identify them.
-Properties of matter describe how a material is similar and different from
another material.
Preparation: (Equipment/materials/set-up)
-White Chart paper from previous class
-Molecules video:
http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity/states_of_matter/index.html
-Computer/projector cart
-Matter Fact Book Page 3 and 4 (Molecules)
Set:
1. Review what we learned yesterday about Matter.
Chart Paper and Matter Fact Book:
--What is matter?
--What are the three states of matter?
--What are examples of matter?
--What do we use to find out about matter?
--What are characteristics of matter called?
--What properties can we determine from using our senses?
Development:

Student
Engagement/
Classroom
Management
Strategies
-Voices Grade 3
-Have weaker
and stronger
students repeat

1. Introduce new term: Molecules


instructions
Add information to Chart Paper
--One way to find out what state of matter something is is
by what its made out of. Has anyone heard the term
molecules before?
--All matter is made up of molecules. A molecule is a tiny,
tiny particle that are too small to see, even with a very
strong microscope. These tiny particles join together to
make solids, liquids and gases. The molecules are always
moving.
--The molecules in a solid are very close together. The
molecules have very little room to move around. (Draw
picture on the board).
--The molecules in a liquid are close together, but not as
close as solids. They have room to move around. The
molecules in liquids flow. (Draw picture on the board).
--The molecules in a gas are spread far apart. The
molecules float around and spread out in all directions.
These molecules keep moving and gently bump into each
other. (Draw picture on the board).
--Watch video on molecules:
http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity/states_of_matter/index.
html
--Review how molecules act in a solid, liquid and gas.
2. Group Representation of Molecules
--Split class into 3 groups of 10 students.
--Have students pretend there are molecules.
--Students will:
a) Act like molecules in a solid;
(Students are standing very close together, barely able to
move)
b) Act like molecules in a liquid;
(Students are holding hands and moving apart while slowing
moving arms up and down)
c) Act like molecules in a gas.
(Students are spread out around the classroom, constantly
moving and gently bumping into each other)
OR:
Solid: hold hands and stand as close together as you can
really squeeze together and stay very still.
Liquid: still holding hands, spread out so you can move.
Sway and walk so the group forms different shapes.
Gas: Let go hands and spread out. Run around. Bump
gently into one another.

--After groups have a chance to act out all three, have one
group perform molecules in a solid for the class, one group
perform molecules in a liquid for the class, and one group
perform
molecules in a gas for the class.
Closure:
1. Matter Fact Book
--Hand out pages 3 and 4 (Molecules) and have students
work on answering the questions.
--Students should be finished page 2 prior to working on
todays page.
2. Extensions
--Those that are finished both pages can continue
decorating their cover page, work on other outstanding
work, silent read, or make use of the other time fillers.
Assessment:
At the end of each lesson, I will collect the Matter Fact Books. This
assessment for learning will show where the students are in the class:
-are all the students caught up or do they need more time to spend on
their Matter books?
-what concepts are the students grasping well?
-should I spend more time on a previous concept by including another
lesson on it (as a whole class or individual students)?

LESSON 3
Content: (Topic)
Discovering Solids

Instructional Strategies:
-Direct Instruction (questioning)
-Independent Study (assigned
question)
-Interactive Instruction (brainstorming,
cooperative learning groups)

Objectives:
1. Describe some characteristic properties of matter.
3. Recognize solids, liquids, and gases as states of matter.
4. Examine some of the properties of solids, liquids, and gases.
Cross Curricular Competencies:
-Developing Thinking
-Developing Literacies
Prerequisite Learning:
-Matter is everything around us and all matter takes up space.
-There are three states of matter: Solids, liquids and gases.
-We use our senses to determine properties of objects that can be used to
identify them.
-Properties of matter describe how a material is similar and different from
another material.
-Molecules are tiny particles that make up matter. Molecules are situated and
move differently in solids, liquids and gases.
Preparation: (Equipment/materials/set-up)
**Book multipurpose room
-Chart Paper from previous lessons
-Matter Fact Book Pages 5 and 6 Solids
-Candle, Banana, Rice, Rock, Salt, Sugar, Book, Ziploc bag, Toothpicks, Glass
-Discovery Card for each item
Set:
1. Review from Chart Paper and Matter Fact Book
--What are the three states of matter?
--What are properties of matter?
--What are molecules?
--How do molecules act in a solid, liquid and gas?

Student
Engagement/
Classroom
Management
Strategies
-Voices Grade 3

2. Introduce Solids
Brainstorm what we know about solids and write them on

-Have weaker
and stronger

the chart paper.


students repeat
--A solid is one kind of matter.
instructions
--A solid takes up space.
--Solids have a shape of their own.
--Solids keep their shape and size. Solids have a definite
shape that you can see and feel.
--The molecules in a solid are very close together and have
little space to move around.
What do we know about properties of solids?
--Many of a solids physical properties are easy to see and
describe. We use these properties to help identify the solid.
Properties show how one solid is the same and yet different
from other solids. What are these properties? Brainstorm
words that describe how a solid looks, feels, is made of, etc
(write on board).
a) size
b) shape
c) colour
d) hardness
e) texture, etc.
--Talk about pouring a solid.
Development:
1. Discovering Solids
--Split students into 10 groups of 3.
--Hand out page 5 of the Matter Fact Book (solids chart).
--Students will start at one of the solids placed around the
room and follow the directions on the discovery card at each
item.
(Go through an example of a solid. Draw chart on the
board and walk through the steps of the activity with
the class. Demonstrate how to complete the chart.)
**Move to multipurpose room
--I will give students the cue to move to the next object
when I feel they have had adequate time in working with
the solid.
--When students finish, hand out page 6 of the Matter Fact
Book for question the students can work on.
Closure:
1. Review of Chart
--Review the different properties we discovered about the
solids the students worked with (chart).
2. Extensions

--Those that are finished can continue working on their other


pages can continue decorating their cover page, work on
other outstanding work, silent read, or make use of the
other time fillers.
Assessment:
At the end of each lesson, I will collect the Matter Fact Books. This
assessment for learning will show where the students are in the class:
-are all the students caught up or do they need more time to spend on
their Matter books?
-what concepts are the students grasping well?
-should I spend more time on a previous concept by including another
lesson on it (as a whole class or individual students)?

Discovery Card Solids


Directions:
1. Look at the solid and answer the following questions
out loud:
a) What does it look like?
b) What shape is it? Is it square, round, big, little, fat,
thin?
c) What colour is it?
Think of other words that describe what the solid looks
like. Write three words in the chart under What Solid
Looks Like.
2. Pick up the solid and answer the following questions
out loud:
a) What does it feel like?
b) Is it hard, soft, heavy, light, smooth, slippery, or
rough?
Think of other words to describe how the solid feels.
Choose three words that describe how the solid feels and
write them in the chart under What Solid Feels Like.
3. Answer the following questions out loud:
a) What is the solid made of? Is it made of wood, metal,
plastic, stone, glass, rubber, cloth, or some other
material?
Choose one or two words that tell what the solid is made
of and write the words in the charter under What Solid
Is Made Of.

LESSON 4
Content: (Topic)
Discovering Liquids

Instructional Strategies:
-Direct Instruction (questioning)
-Independent Study (assigned
questions)
-Interactive Instruction (brainstorming,
cooperative learning groups)

Objectives:
1. Describe some characteristic properties of matter.
3. Recognize solids, liquids, and gases as states of matter.
4. Examine some of the properties of solids, liquids, and gases.
Cross Curricular Competencies:
-Developing Thinking
-Developing Literacies
Prerequisite Learning:
-Matter is everything around us and all matter takes up space.
-There are three states of matter: Solids, liquids and gases.
-We use our senses to determine properties of objects that can be used to
identify them.
-Properties of matter describe how a material is similar and different from
another material.
-Molecules are tiny particles that make up matter. Molecules are situated and
move differently in solids, liquids and gases.
Preparation: (Equipment/materials/set-up)
**Book multipurpose room
-Chart Paper from previous lessons
-Matter Fact Book Pages 7, 8 and 9 Liquids
-Water, Cooking Oil, Dish Detergent, Honey, Conditioner, Milk, Molasses, Juice,
Shampoo, Pancake Syrup
-Two containers per liquid
-Discovery Card for each item
Set:
1. Review from Chart Paper and Matter Fact Book
--What are the three states of matter?
--What are properties of matter?
--What are molecules?
--How do molecules act in a solid, liquid and gas?

Student
Engagement/
Classroom
Management
Strategies
-Voices Grade 3

2. Introduce Liquids
Brainstorm what we know about liquids and write them on
the chart paper.
--A liquid is one kind of matter.
--A liquid takes up space.
--A liquid does not have its own shape, but takes the shape
of whatever container it is in.
-Liquids keep their size, but change their shape.
--The molecules in a liquid have room to move around.
-The molecules in a liquid flow.
What do we know about properties of liquids?
-How the liquid looks?
-How the liquid feels?
-How the liquid pours?
Development:
1. Discovering Liquids
--Split students into same groups of three.
--Hand out page 7 of the Matter Fact Book (liquids chart).
--Students will start at one of the liquids placed around the
room and follow the directions on the discovery card at each
item.
(Go through an example of a liquid. Draw chart on
the board and walk through the steps of the activity
with the class. Demonstrate how to complete the
chart.)
--I will give students the cue to move to the next object
when I feel they have had adequate time in working with
the liquid.
--When students finish, hand out pages 8 and 9 of the
Matter Fact Book for question the students can work on.
Closure:
1. Review Chart.
--Review the different properties we discovered about the
liquids the students worked with (chart)
a) How did the liquids pour?
b) Describe findings thick, thin, colour, transparent?
c) How did it feel?
2. Extensions
--Those that are finished can continue working on their other
pages can continue decorating their cover page, work on
other outstanding work, silent read, or make use of the
other time fillers.

-Have weaker
and stronger
students repeat
instructions

Assessment:
At the end of each lesson, I will collect the Matter Fact Books. This
assessment for learning will show where the students are in the class:
-are all the students caught up or do they need more time to spend on
their Matter books?
-what concepts are the students grasping well?
-should I spend more time on a previous concept by including another
lesson on it (as a whole class or individual students)?

Discovery Card Liquids


Directions:
1. Look at the solid and answer the following questions
out loud:
a) What does it look like?
b) Is it clear or cloudy?
c) What colour is it?
Think of other words that describe what the liquid looks
like. Write three words in the chart under What Liquid
Looks Like.
2. Feel the liquid and answer the following questions out
loud:
a) What does it feel like?
b) Is it greasy, smooth, wet, slippery, gooey, sticky, hot
or cold?
Think of other words to describe how the liquid feels.
Choose three words that describe how the liquid feels and
write them in the chart under What Liquid Feels
Like.
3. Pour some of the liquid into another container. Answer
the following questions out loud:
a) How did the liquid pour?
b) Did it pour quickly or slowly?
c) Did it drip, splash, flow, or ripple out of the container?
Choose one or two words that tell what the solid is made
of and write the words in the charter under How Liquid
Pours.

LESSON 5
Content: (Topic)
Solids, Liquids, Matter Fact Book

Instructional Strategies:
-Independent Study (assigned
questions)
-Interactive Instructions (cooperative
learning groups)

Objectives:
1. Describe some characteristic properties of matter.
3. Recognize solids, liquids, and gases as states of matter.
4. Examine some of the properties of solids, liquids, and gases.
Cross Curricular Competencies:
-Developing Thinking
-Developing Literacies
-Developing Social Responsibility
Prerequisite Learning:
N/A
Preparation: (Equipment/materials/set-up)
-Chart paper from previous lessons
Set:
1. Review from Chart Paper and Matter Fact Book
--What are the three states of matter?
--What are properties of matter?
--What are molecules?
--How do molecules act in a solid, liquid and gas?
--Properties of Solids
--Properties of Liquids

Student
Engagement/
Classroom
Management
Strategies

Development:
1. Matter Fact Book
--split students into groups (stronger students with strong,
weaker students with weak)
--start at page 1 of Matter Fact Book and make sure
everyone in group is caught up discuss each of the
questions as needed. Continue until the Matter Fact Book
has been completed to date.

-Have weaker
and stronger
students repeat
instructions

Closure:
1. Review Pages in Matter Fact Book
--to ensure everyone is caught up as needed.

-Voices Grade 3

2. Extensions
--Those that are finished can continue decorating their cover
page, work on other outstanding work, silent read, or make
use of the other time fillers.
Assessment:
At the end of each lesson, I will collect the Matter Fact Books. This
assessment for learning will show where the students are in the class:
-are all the students caught up or do they need more time to spend on
their Matter books?
-what concepts are the students grasping well?
-should I spend more time on a previous concept by including another
lesson on it (as a whole class or individual students)?

LESSON 6
Content: (Topic)
Growing Crystals

Instructional Strategies:
-Direct Instruction (questioning)
-Interactive Instruction (discussion)
-Independent Study (assigned
questions, independent activity)
-Experiential Learning (conducted
experiments)

Objectives:
1. Describe some characteristic properties of matter.
3. Recognize solids, liquids, and gases as states of matter.
4. Examine some of the properties of solids, liquids, and gases.
Cross Curricular Competencies:
-Developing Thinking
-Developing Literacies
Prerequisite Learning:
--What are the three states of matter?
--What are properties of matter?
--What are molecules?
--How do molecules act in a solid, liquid and gas?
--Properties of Solids
--Properties of Liquids
Preparation: (Equipment/materials/set-up)
-Matter Fact Book page 10 (Growing Crystals)
-Directions for growing crystals
-tea kettle
-water
-sugar
-measuring spoon
-string (cotton or wool)
-glasses/beakers (30)
-pencils (30)
-scissors
-spoons
-food colouring
Set:
1. Review.
-Properties of solids, liquids

Student
Engagement/
Classroom

-Molecules in a solid and liquid


2. Ask students if they know what crystals are.
-What they look like
-Solid, liquid or gas?

Management
Strategies
-Voices Grade 3

-Have weaker
Development:
and stronger
1. Grow crystals
students repeat
-Explain to students that we are going to be growing
instructions
crystals today.
-They take a few days to grow, so after we set up what is
needed for them to grow, each day we will observe them to
see if there are any changes until about 4 or 5 days later
they will be ready for us to eat.
Over the course of the week, at the beginning of each class
we will take about 5 minutes to observe our crystals to see
if there have been any changes. Students will document
their observations in their Matter Fact Book.
Closure:
1. Explanation
-When the crystals have grown to a good size (around 4-5
days), prior to eating them ask the students how they think
they got there.
Didnt the sugar disappear into the water?
Whats happening?
The sugar didnt really disappear. Each tiny piece of sugar
broke into smaller and smaller bits and spread out in the
water. This is called dissolving. Because the water was
warm, its molecules spread far apart. There was room for
the little bits of sugar to fit between the molecules. When
the water cooled, its molecules moved close together again
and squeezed the sugar out. The little bits of sugar stuck to
the sugar already on the string and formed large chunks.

Assessment:
At the end of each lesson, I will collect the Matter Fact Books. This
assessment for learning will show where the students are in the class:

-are all the students caught up or do they need more time to spend on
their Matter books?
-what concepts are the students grasping well?
-should I spend more time on a previous concept by including another
lesson on it (as a whole class or individual students)?
Sugar Crystals on a String
http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/family/science-projects-for-kids-states-ofmatter2.htm
Materials:
-tea kettle
-water
-sugar
-measuring spoon
-string (cotton or wool)
-glass
-pencil
-scissors
-button
-spoon
-food colouring
Step 1: Bring water to boil.
2: Add one tablespoon of sugar, and stir until it dissolves
3: Continue adding sugar, one tablespoon at a time, letting each
tablespoonful dissolve completely before adding the next. When no more
sugar will dissolve in the water, allow the saturated solution to cool.
4: Tie a string to the middle of a pencil and set the pencil across the rim of a
glass. Cut the string so that it just touches the bottom of the glass. Tie a
button to the bottom of the string.
5: Pour the cooled sugar water into the glass. Rest the pencil across the rim
of the glass so that the string and button are in the solution.
6: Allow the glass to sit in a warm place without being disturbed for several
days so that the water evaporates. As the water evaporates, it will leave
sugar crystals on the string. Youve just made rock candy.
Rock Candy Solids, Liquids and Gases by The Ontario Science Centre
Materials:
-tea kettle
-250 ml water (1 cup)
-375 ml sugar, or more (1 cups)
-spoon
-glass

-pencil
-cotton or wool string
-food colouring
1. Bring water to a boil
2. Add the sugar to the water and stir.
3. When all the sugar disappears, stir in more. Keep adding a little at a time
until you can see sugar floating in the water.
4. Let the sugar water cool a little. Then pour it into the glass.
5. Tie the cotton string around the pencil. Rub some sugar into the string,
so that a few grains stick to it.
6. Drop the free end of the string into the sugar water. Rest the pencil on
the rim of the glass.
7. Put the glass in a cool place, then dont touch the glass.
8. Wait a few days, the gently pull the string from the water. Taste the solid
that clings to the string.
Whats happening?
The sugar didnt really disappear. Each tiny piece of sugar broke into smaller
and smaller bits and spread out in the water. This is called dissolving.
Because the water was warm, its molecules spread far apart. There was
room for the little bits of sugar to fit between the molecules. When the water
cooled, its molecules moved close together again and squeezed the sugar
out. The little bits of sugar stuck to the sugar already on the string and
formed large chunks. Eventually the water evaporated, leaving only the
sugar crystals.

LESSON 7
Content: (Topic)
Discovering Gases
Balloon in a Bottle
Empty Glass

Instructional Strategies:
-Direct Instruction (structured
overview, questioning)
-Experiential Learning (conducted
experiments)
-Independent Study (assigned
questions, independent activity)
-Interactive Instruction (discussion,
cooperative learning groups)

Objectives:
1. Describe some characteristic properties of matter.
3. Recognize solids, liquids, and gases as states of matter.
4. Examine some of the properties of solids, liquids, and gases.
Cross Curricular Competencies:
-Developing Thinking
-Developing Literacies
Prerequisite Learning:
-Matter is everything around us and all matter takes up space.
-There are three states of matter: Solids, liquids and gases.
-We use our senses to determine properties of objects that can be used to
identify them.
-Properties of matter describe how a material is similar and different from
another material.
-Molecules are tiny particles that make up matter. Molecules are situated and
move differently in solids, liquids and gases.
Preparation: (Equipment/materials/set-up)
**Book multipurpose room??
-Matter Fact Book, pages 11 14
-chart paper from previous lessons
-30 balloons
-30 water bottles
-10 plastic cups
-paper towel
-10 pails of water
Set:
1. Review from Chart Paper and Matter Fact Book
--What are the three states of matter?

Student
Engagement/
Classroom

--What are properties of matter?


--What are molecules?
--How do molecules act in a solid, liquid and gas?
--Properties of Solids
--Properties of Liquids

Management
Strategies
-Voices Grade 3

2. Introduce Gases
-Have weaker
Brainstorm what we know about gases and write them on
and stronger
the chart paper.
students repeat
--Gases are one kind of matter.
instructions
--Gases have no constant shape or size
--Gases completely fill any closed container
--The molecules in gases are spread far apart.
--The molecules float around and spread out in all directions.
Development:
1. Ask students, Do you think gas takes up space?
Write answers on the board.
--Ask students, if gas takes up space, how come if another
teacher came into the room they would fit? If gas is
everywhere and spread out in all directions, why would
there be any room left for the teacher?
2. Explain that we are going to find out whether
gases take up space by doing an experiment
involving blowing up a balloon in a bottle.
-Explain the general idea of the balloon:
a) We will put a balloon into a plastic bottle and try and
blow it up.
3. Whenever scientists do an experiment, they are
doing it to test something out.
--First step: Scientists make a hypothesis. What is a
hypothesis?
--an educated guess of what they think is going to happen.
--Second step: Testing and observation. Scientists
perform the experiment and take notes about what
happened.
--Third Step: Interpreting Data and making
conclusions.
--scientists use their data to come up with a conclusion.
--Fourth Step: Communicate to others. Teach other
what we have learned.
3. Experiment Balloon in a Bottle
A) Hand out Matter Book Pages 10 and 11

Laboratory Notes
B) Read through the directions.
C) Have students write their hypothesis.
D) Hand out materials balloon and bottle.
E) Have students complete the experiment and
complete their lab notes.
4. Review what students came up with. Were they
able to blow up the balloon? Why or why not?
(Conclusion of experiment)
5. Looking back at our big question, Does gas take
up space? ask students yes or no.
6. Explain to students that when scientists are
testing something, they often use more than one
kind of test to make sure they have the right answer.
So we are going to do a second experiment to see if
we get the same results as to whether gas takes up
space.
7. Experiment Empty Glass?
A) Hand out Matter Book Pages 12 and 13
Laboratory Notes.
B) Read through directions.
C) Have students write their hypothesis.
D) Split students into groups of 3.
E) Hand out materials cups, paper towel and pail of
water.
F) Have students complete the experiment and
complete their lab notes.
8. Review what students came up with. Did their
paper towel stay dry? Why or why not? (Conclusion
of experiment).
9. Looking back at our big question, Does gas take
up space? Ask students yes or no.
Closure:
1. Why do we know that gas takes up space?
2. Extensions
--Those that are finished can continue decorating their cover
page, work on other outstanding work, silent read, or make
use of the other time fillers.

Assessment:
At the end of each lesson, I will collect the Matter Fact Books. This
assessment for learning will show where the students are in the class:
-are all the students caught up or do they need more time to spend on
their Matter books?
-what concepts are the students grasping well?
-should I spend more time on a previous concept by including another
lesson on it (as a whole class or individual students)?

LESSON 8
Content: (Topic)
Gases

Instructional Strategies:
-Direct Instruction (questioning,
listening and viewing)
-Experiential Learning (conducted
experiments)
-Independent Study (assigned
questions)
-Interactive Instruction (discussion,
cooperative learning groups)

Objectives:
1. Describe some characteristic properties of matter.
3. Recognize solids, liquids, and gases as states of matter.
4. Examine some of the properties of solids, liquids, and gases.
Cross Curricular Competencies:
-Developing Thinking
-Developing Literacies
Prerequisite Learning:
-Properties of gases
-A gas takes up space
Preparation: (Equipment/materials/set-up)
**Book multipurpose room
-The Magic School Bus Gets Baked in a Cake
-Powerpoint slides of pages of story
-chart paper from previous lessons
-Computer/ Projector cart
-15 bottles
-15 balloons
-funnels
-spoons
-baking soda
-vinegar
-Matter Fact Book pages 15 and 16 (The Magic School Bus)
-goggles
Set:
1. Review from Chart Paper and Matter Fact Book
--What are the three states of matter?
--What are properties of matter?
--What are molecules?

Student
Engagement/
Classroom
Management
Strategies

--How do molecules act in a solid, liquid and gas?


--Properties of Solids
--Properties of Liquids
--Properties of Gases
--Does a gas take up space?
2. The Magic School Bus Gets Baked In a Cake
--Read the Magic School Bus up to marked spot.
Development:
1. Experiment
-Review steps of an experiment
a) Hypothesis
b) Testing and observing
c) Interpreting data and making conclusions
d) Communicating with others what we know.
A) Hand out Matter Book Pages 15 and 16 The
Magic School Bus Gets Baked in a Cake
B) Read through directions.
C) Have students write their hypothesis.
D) Split students into pairs
E) Hand out materials balloon, bottle, baking soda,
vinegar.
F) Have students complete the experiment and
complete their lab notes.
Closure:
1. Review the experiment. What happened when we
mixed the solid (baking soda) with the liquid
(vinegar)?
--They produced a gas called carbon dioxide. The gas takes
up more room than there is in the bottle so it blows up the
balloon.
2. Finish reading The Magic School Bus Gets Baked
in a Cake
--stop at the part where they use baking soda and
vinegar to get out of the cake. Why do they do this?
--the gas has no where to go so it pushes against the bus
and shoots them out of the cake.
3. Self Assessment
4. Extensions
--Those that are finished can continue decorating their cover

-Voices Grade 3
-Have weaker
and stronger
students repeat
instructions

page, work on other outstanding work, silent read, or make


use of the other time fillers.
Assessment:
At the end of each lesson, I will collect the Matter Fact Books. This
assessment for learning will show where the students are in the class:
-are all the students caught up or do they need more time to spend on
their Matter books?
-what concepts are the students grasping well?
-should I spend more time on a previous concept by including another
lesson on it (as a whole class or individual students)?
Self Assessment Rubric (Assessment as Learning)
At the end of this lesson the students will assess themselves in their
confidence levels with respect to the content thus far in the unit. I will use
this to determine what areas I still need to focus on and what areas my
students feel confident in. This will place some responsibility upon the
students in indicate if, in fact, there are areas that they do not understand.
Coupled with the Matter Fact Books and my own observations, I will be able
to see what directions I need to take with the class as individuals and as a
collective group.

Student Name: _________________ Date: _______________________

I still dont get


it!

I am fairly
certain, but
would like to
spend some more
time on it.

I feel very
confident.

I understand
there are three
types of
matter:
Solids, Liquids
and Gases
I know what
molecules are
and how they
look in solids,
liquids and
gases.
I know some
properties of
solids.
I know some
properties of
liquids.
I know some
properties of
gases.
I would like to learn more about
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

LESSON 9
Content: (Topic)
Solids, Liquids, and Gases
-Promotion Poster

Instructional Strategies:
-Direct Instruction (structured
overview)
-Independent Study (independent
activity)

Objectives:
1. Describe some characteristic properties of matter.
3. Recognize solids, liquids, and gases as states of matter.
4. Examine some of the properties of solids, liquids, and gases.
Cross Curricular Competencies:
-Developing Thinking
-Developing Literacies
Prerequisite Learning:
-Matter is everything around us and all matter takes up space.
-There are three states of matter: Solids, liquids and gases.
-We use our senses to determine properties of objects that can be used to
identify them.
-Properties of matter describe how a material is similar and different from
another material.
-Molecules are tiny particles that make up matter. Molecules are situated and
move differently in solids, liquids and gases.
-Properties of solids, liquids and gases
Preparation: (Equipment/materials/set-up)
-chart paper from previous lessons
-large white paper (11 x 14)
-construction paper
-markers, crayons, pencils
Set:
Student
1. Review Solids, Liquids and Gases
Engagement/
--What do we know about solids liquids and gases from our Classroom
information chart and Matter Fact Books?
Management
Strategies
Development:
1. Promotional Poster/Wanted Poster
-Voices Grade 3
-Brainstorm on the board a list of solids, liquids and gases
and what we know about them.
--The students will create a poster with respect to their solid,
liquid or gas of choice. Students should include the

following information:
-Have weaker
a) Name of solid, liquid or gas;
and stronger
b) Type of matter;
students repeat
c) Image;
instructions
d) What it looks like;
e) What it feels like;
f) What it is made of;
g) Other information as provided.
--If students dont know information about their solid, liquid
or gas, they can look back in their Matter Fact Books or use
the matter books for silent reading to obtain information.
--Students will be assessed on this piece. As a large group
we will discuss what we feel is important for their posters,
such as having necessary content, aesthetic appeal,
pictures, title, etc. When we have completed this list
together (and we have discussed any additional items I
deem necessary) I will explain to the students that I will be
using our list to create a rubric that will be used to mark
their posters. As this is a two-day lesson, on the second day
students will have the opportunity to look at the rubric and
compare it with their posters before handing in their final
piece of work.
Closure:
Students will have the opportunity to present their posters if
they choose.
Extensions:
--Those that are finished can work on any outstanding
Matter Fact Book pages, work on other outstanding work,
silent read, or make use of the other time fillers.
Assessment:
Rubric (Assessment of Learning)
After introducing the task at the beginning of lesson 9, as a large group
we will discuss what we feel is important for their posters, such as having
necessary content, aesthetic appeal, pictures, title, etc. When we have
completed this list together (and we have discussed any additional items I
deem necessary) I will explain to the students that I will be using our list to
create a rubric that will be used to mark their posters. As this is a two-day
lesson, on the second day students will have the opportunity to look at the
rubric and compare it with their posters before handing in their final piece of
work.

Matter Poster
Name: _____________________________________
Not Yet
Beginning
Visual Appeal -work is of poor
-some white on sheet,
quality or incomplete rushed or incomplete
-multiple spelling
appearance
errors and information -some spelling errors
is illegible
-some information
illegible
Required
-student included
-student included 3 or 4
Information
between 0 and 2 of
of the following:
the following:
a) name of matter
a) name of matter
b) type of matter
b) type of matter
c) picture of matter
c) picture of matter d) what matter is made
d) what matter is
of
made of
e) how the molecules
e) how the molecules look in matter
look in matter
f) where matter is found
f) where matter is
found
-student included the
above, but it did not
relate to type of
matter correctly
Properties

-student included
between 0 and 2
properties of their
chosen matter
-student included
properties of their
chosen matter but
needed significant
assistance

Meeting
-good effort, visually
appealing
-few spelling errors, if
any

Exceeding
-excellent effort, visually
appealing
-no spelling errors

-student included at
-student included the
least 5/6 the following, following, using words
using words and/or
and/or images:
images:
a) name of matter
a) name of matter
b) type of matter
b) type of matter
c) picture of matter
c) picture of matter
d) what matter is made of
d) what matter is made e) how the molecules look
of
in matter
e) how the molecules f) where matter is found
look in matter
in addition to other
f) where matter is
information, and in a
found
manner that was easy to
comprehend by viewer

-student included 3 or 4 -student included 5


-student included more than
properties of their chosen properties of their
5 properties of their chosen
matter
chosen matter
matter, without prompting
-student included 5
-student included more by teacher
properties of their chosen than 5 properties of
matter but needed
their chosen matter, but
prompting by the teacher only due to prompting
for at least 2
by teacher

LESSON 10
Content: (Topic)
Oobleck Bartholomew and the
Oobleck by Dr. Seuss

Instructional Strategies:
-Direct Instruction (questioning,
listening and viewing)
-Experiential Learning (conducted
experiments)
-Independent Study (independent
activity)

Objectives:
1. Describe some characteristic properties of matter.
1. Determine which properties of matter can be used to identify them.
2. Recognize solids, liquids and gases as states of matter.
Cross Curricular Competencies:
-Developing Thinking
-Developing Literacies
Prerequisite Learning:
-Properties of a solid
-Properties of a liquid
Preparation: (Equipment/materials/set-up)
**Book multipurpose room
-Bartholomew and the Oobleck by Dr. Seuss
-Powerpoint slides of pages of book
-Computer/ Projector cart
-Oobleck instructions for each pair of students
-newspapers
-cornstarch
-tin pans
-water
-spoons
-***dont use food colouring as it will dye everything!
Set:
1. Read Bartholomew and the Oobleck by Dr. Seuss
--Ask students why we are reading this book today?
--Ask students whether Oobleck is a solid or a liquid?

Student
Engagement/
Classroom
Management
Strategies

2. Hypothesize as a class whether Oobleck is a solid


or a liquid and why we think so?
-Voices Grade 3

Development:
**In the Multipurpose Room:
1. Make Oobleck
--Go through instructions with students on how to make
Oobleck prior to starting.
--Students will follow the instructions on making oobleck
and what to do once they have it made.
Closure:
1. Clean Up and head back to the classroom.
--Make sure to put oobleck into the garbage can, not down
the sink!
2. Discuss what happened to the Oobleck:
-when we poured it off the spoon?
-when we hit it with our hands?
-when we scooped it up in our hands and made a bal?
-when we let go of the ball?
3. Whats happening?
-Corn starch is made of millions of tiny particles. When you
add water to the starch, the particles float freely, keeping
themselves spaced evenly apart (like the molecules of a
liquid).
-Imagine the floating starch particles are like our class going
through a doorway. If everyone walks in an evenly spaced
line, the group of us will get through easily. But if everyone
tries to push through at one, we will get jammed in the
doorway.
-The same thing happens to oobleck. When you move the
oobleck mixture slowly or gently, as when you were stirring
it or pouring it, the particles can slide easily past one
another. The mixture acts like a liquid.
-When you try to move the mixture quickly or push on it too
hard, the starch particles get pushed together and the
mixture acts like a solid.
4. Thereforeis oobleck a liquid or a solidBoth!

-Have weaker
and stronger
students repeat
instructions

Oobleck Instructions
1. Make sure the newspaper is spread out on the table.
2. Put some corn starch into the pan and add some of the
water. Stir.
3. Keep adding water and stirring until the mixture is as
thick as mayonnaise. Youve made oobleck! Make more
oobleck until you have a layer 1 cm deep.
4. Lift up a spoonful of oobleck and pour it back into the
pan. Does it pour? What type of matter pours?
5. Slap the pan of oobleck with the palm of your hand.
Does any splash out?
6. Wait a minuteif its a liquid, shouldnt it splash
everywhere?
7. Scoop up a handful of oobleck. Roll it around between
your hands to make a ball. What type of matter is this?
8. When you think youve made a ball, lift your top hand
up. What happens?

LESSON 11
Content: (Topic)
Changes of State

Instructional Strategies:
-Directed Instruction (structured
overview, questioning, listening and
viewing)
-Independent Study (assigned
questions)

Objectives:
2. Identify some changes in matter.
1. Recognize that the state of matter is a physical property.
2. Identify changes of state.
3. Associate changes of state with temperature changes.
5. Investigate some physical changes.
Cross Curricular Competencies:
-Developing Thinking
-Developing Literacies
Prerequisite Learning:
-Matter is everything around us and all matter takes up space.
-There are three states of matter: Solids, liquids and gases.
-We use our senses to determine properties of objects that can be used to
identify them.
-Properties of matter describe how a material is similar and different from
another material.
-Molecules are tiny particles that make up matter. Molecules are situated and
move differently in solids, liquids and gases.
-Properties of solids, liquids and gases
Preparation: (Equipment/materials/set-up)
-computer/ projector cart
-White chart paper from previous lessons
-Changes of State video/song:
http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/studyjams/matter_states/
-Matter Fact Book pages
Set:
1. Review from previous lessons.
-White chart paper
2. Introduce new topic: Changes of State.
-Ask student what I mean when I say state
-Review with students what we know about molecules.

Student
Engagement/
Classroom
Management
Strategies
-Voices Grade 3

-Depending on whether its a solid, liquid or gas, the


molecules move at different speeds.
-Solids: the molecules are very close together and dont
have much room to move around. They move very slowly.
-Liquids: the molecules are spread out and can flow. They
move around more than solids.
-Gases: the molecules are spread very far apart and move
around quickly and easily.
-As a large group, move around like the molecules in a solid,
liquid and gas (as in lesson 2).
One thing that influences how fast the molecules can move
around is heat. Think of your own body. When its really
cold outside, you move slow and dont want to do much.
But when its a beautiful day, you are moving around and
playing outside and having fun! Thats like molecules.
Development:
1. Watch video.
--Explain that we are going to watch a video. There will be
lots of terms that we wont understand, but well go through
it together so it will make more sense.
http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/studyjams/matter_st
ates/
(a) States of matter
(b) State depends on how fast molecules move
(c) Gas molecules move fastest because of heat
(d) Liquid reduce heat and molecules slow down and form
a liquid (condensation)
(e) Solid reduce heat and molecules slow way down to
form a solid (0 degrees freezing point) (freezing)
(f) Solid to Liquid when temperature rises about 0
degrees, ice melts into a liquid again (melting point)
(melting)
(g) Liquid to Gas raise heat even more and molecules will
move faster and turn into a gas (boiling point)
(evaporation)
--What were the terms that we didnt recognize? Write on
the board.
2. Explanation
--What is changes of state?

-Have weaker
and stronger
students repeat
instructions

--Using ice as an example (solid):


(a) How do we get it to a liquid? Add heat, called melting
0 degrees is melting point
(b) How do we get water to a gas? Add heat, called
evaporation - what temperature? 100 degrees, boiling
point
(c) Now we want to get the gas back to a liquid, what do we
do? Remove heat (cooling slows down molecules),
called condensation
(d) How do we get the liquid (water) back to a solid (ice)?
Remove heat, called freezing what temperature? 0
degrees, freezing point
-Use triangle to explain above.
Closure:
1. We are going to go through the different stages in
more detail, so this is just an introduction to them.
-States of matter song
http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/studyjams/matter_st
ates/
-Matter Fact Book explain to students that its okay if they
dont know all the answers, just fill in the ones they do. We
can keep coming back to the answers and we do more
exploring.
2. Extensions
--Those that are finished can work on any outstanding
Matter Fact Book pages, work on other outstanding work,
silent read, or make use of the other time fillers.
Assessment:
At the end of each lesson, I will collect the Matter Fact Books. This
assessment for learning will show where the students are in the class:
-are all the students caught up or do they need more time to spend on
their Matter books?
-what concepts are the students grasping well?
-should I spend more time on a previous concept by including another
lesson on it (as a whole class or individual students)?

LESSON 12
Content: (Topic)
Freezing Making Ice Cream
**CHECK FOR ALLERGIES**

Instructional Strategies:
-Directed Instruction (questioning)
-Independent Study (independent
activity)
-Experiential Learning (conducted
experiments)

Objectives:
2. Identify some changes in matter.
2. Identify changes of state.
3. Associate changes of state with temperature changes.
5. Investigate some physical changes.
Cross Curricular Competencies:
-Developing Thinking
-Developing Literacies
Prerequisite Learning:
-Changes of State
Preparation: (Equipment/materials/set-up)
-white chart paper from previous lessons
-instructions for making ice cream
-heavy cream
-sugar
-vanilla
-table salt
-ice
-large Ziploc bags (10 or 15)
-small Ziploc bags (30)
-spoons
-measuring cups
Set:
Student
1. Review Changes of State
Engagement/
--What is changes of state?
Classroom
--Using ice as an example (solid):
Management
(a) How do we get it to a liquid? Add heat, called melting Strategies
0 degrees is melting point
(b) How do we get water to a gas? Add heat, called
-Voices Grade 3
evaporation - what temperature? 100 degrees, boiling
point
-Have weaker
(c) Now we want to get the gas back to a liquid, what do we and stronger

do? Remove heat (cooling slows down molecules),


called condensation
(d) How do we get the liquid (water) back to a solid (ice)?
Remove heat, called freezing what temperature? 0
degrees, freezing point
Development:
1. Freezing
Today we are going to focus on freezing. What happens
when a liquid freezes?
--molecules
--turns to solid
--melting point
--called freezing
What do we need in order for something to freeze?
--heat above 0 degrees, in the case of water
--different solids have different points at which they
freeze
2. Making Ice-Cream
Today we are going to take a look at freezing a liquid, but
unlike yesterday it wont be water. Today we are going to
freeze cream to make.ice cream!
--Follow directions in making ice cream
--split into groups of two or three per large Ziploc bag
--take turns shaking bag
Closure:
1. Explain
--liquid turning to solid
--freezing point
--how is this similar to water freezing and different?
--Ice has to absorb energy in order to melt, changing the
phase of water from a solid to a liquid. When you use ice to
cool the ingredients for ice cream, the energy is absorbed
from the ingredients and from the outside environment (like
your hands, if you are holding the baggie of ice!). When you
add salt to the ice, it lowers the freezing point of the ice, so
even more energy has to be absorbed from the environment
in order for the ice to melt. This makes the ice colder than it
was before, which is how your ice cream freezes. Ideally,
you would make your ice cream using 'ice cream salt', which
is just salt sold as large crystals instead of the small crystals

students repeat
instructions

you see in table salt. The larger crystals take more time to
dissolve in the water around the ice, which allows for even
cooling of the ice cream.

MATTER
FACT BOOK

Name: _______________
Matter

Draw an example of matter here!

What is matter? _______________________________________


____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
Three states of matter are:
a) _________________________________________________
b) _________________________________________________
c) _________________________________________________
Two examples of matter are:
a) _________________________________________________
b) _________________________________________________

Molecules (2 pages)
**idea taken from Matter unit and therefore
not posted.

Discovering Solids (2
pages)
**idea taken from Matter unit and therefore
not posted.

Discovering Liquids (2
pages)
**idea taken from Matter unit and therefore
not posted.

Growing Crystals

What type of matter is a crystal? ________________________


How do you think the molecules look in a crystal?

Draw your observations of your crystals in your glass:


Day 1:

Day 2:

Day 3:

Day 4:

Day 5:

Laboratory Notes

Does Gas Take Up


Space?
Balloon in a Bottle

Question: What will happen when I try to blow up the


balloon in the bottle?

Hypothesis:
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________

Directions:
1. Push the balloon into the bottle.
2. Stretch the end of the balloon back over the mouth of
the bottle. Have a friend help you if you need.
3. Blow up the balloon and record your findings by
drawing a picture of what happened to your balloon inside
the box. When scientists perform experiments they
complete the same task more than once. This is to make
sure they get the same results each time.

Observations:
Yes, the balloon
inflated.
Trial #1

Trial #2

No, the balloon did


not inflate.

Trial #3

Interpreting Data:
Circle One:
I was able to blow up my balloon inside the bottle.
I was not able to blow up my balloon inside the bottle.

Conclusion:
Think back to our big question: Does gas take up space?
After completing this experiment, how has do you know
that gas does or does not take up space?
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________

Laboratory Notes

Does Gas Take Up


Space?
Empty Glass?

Question: What will happen to the paper towel?


Hypothesis:
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________

Directions:
1. Stuff the paper towel tightly into the bottom of the
glass. It should stay there even when you hold the glass
upside-down.
2. Make sure you have water in the pail in front of you
enough so that the cup can be covered in water.
3. Turn the glass upside-down. Hold the glass very
straight and plunge it into the water. Make sure you have
it all the way sunk under the water.
4. Slowly count to ten. Lift the glass out of the water
without tipping it.
5. Pull the paper towel out of the glass.
6. Is the paper towel still dry? Circle your findings for all
three trials.

Observations:

Trial #1: The paper towel stayed dry.


The paper towel got completely wet.
Trial #2: The paper towel stayed dry.
The paper towel got completely wet.
Trial #3: The paper towel stayed dry.
The paper towel got completely wet.

Interpreting Data:
Circle One:
The paper towel stayed dry.
The paper towel got completely wet.

Conclusion:
Why do you think you got the results that you did? Think
back to our big question, Does gas take up space?
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________

The Magic School Bus


Gets Baked in a Cake!
Question: What will happen when we put baking soda
into a bottle with vinegar?

Hypothesis:
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________

Directions:
1. With a partner, gather the following materials:
a) Balloon filled with baking soda;
d) Vinegar;
e) Bottle.
2. Fill the bottle about 1/3 with vinegar.
3. Stretch the neck of the balloon over the neck of the
bottle. Dont let any baking soda fall into the bottle.
4. Ready? Hold the balloon up so that all the baking soda
falls into the vinegar in the bottle.
5. Record your observations below:

Observations:
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
Draw what happened to your balloon:

Interpreting Data:
What do you think is happening?
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________

Conclusion:
What was produced when we mixed vinegar and baking
soda together? (Hint: What filled up the balloon?)
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________

Changing States of
Matter

**idea taken from Matter unit and therefore


not posted.