Abs Report Contents | Victoria (Australia) | Multiculturalism

contents

Acknowledgments Messages from the Premier and from the Minister Notes on the Data
4 5 7

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Victoria Overview
Tables 1 Key Facts: Australia and Victoria Compared, 1996, 2001 and 2006 Census 2 Key Facts: Australia, All States and Territories Compared, 2006 Census 3 Victoria: Overseas-Born Population, 2006, 2001 Census 4 Victoria: Top 30 Largest Birthplace Groups by Year of Arrival, 2006 Census 5 Victoria: Birthplaces with Largest Number of Overseas Arrivals between 2001 and 2006 6 Victoria: Language other than English Spoken at Home, 2006, 2001 Census 7 Victoria: Language other than English, Increase in Number of Speakers between 2001 and 2006 Census 8 Victoria: Language other than English Speakers with Low English Proficiency by Age, 2006 Census 9 Victoria: Religious Affiliation, 2006, 2001 Census 10 Victoria: Ancestry, Total Responses, 2006 Census Charts 1 Victoria: Top 30 Birthplaces, 2006 Census 3 Victoria: Local Government Areas with Largest Number of Overseas-born, 2006 Census 4 Victoria: Local Government Areas with Highest Proportion of Overseas-Born, 2006 Census 5 Victoria: Top 30 Languages other than English (LOTE) Spoken at Home, 2006 Census 6 Victoria: Local Government Areas with Largest Number of LOTE Speakers, 2006 Census 7 Victoria: Local Government Areas with Highest Proportion of LOTE Speakers, 2006 Census 8 Victoria: Local Government Areas with Largest Number of LOTE Speakers with Low English Proficiency, 2006 Census 9 Victoria: Religions with Largest Increase in Numbers between 2001 and 2006 Census 26 27 27 28 28 29 29 30 2 Victoria: Overseas Birthplace Groups with Largest Increase in Numbers between 2001 and 2006 Census 26 Page  2 3 6 6 7 9 20 22 24

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Metropolitan Local Government Areas – Four-Page Profiles
The four-page profile contains the following tables: 1 Summary of Population Diversity, 2006, 2001 Census 2 Top 30 Overseas-Born, Birthplace by Gender, 2006, 2001 Census 3 Top 15 Birthplace Groups excluding Australia by Year of Arrival, 2006 Census 4 Top 30 Languages other than English Spoken at Home by Gender, 2006, 2001 Census 5 Top 15 Birthplace Groups by Age, 2006 Census 6 Top 30 Religions by Gender, 2006, 2001 Census 7 Top 30 Ancestry Groups, First Response, 2006 Census 8 Top 15 Language other than English Speakers and English Proficiency, 2006 Census Tables 2.1.1 – 2.1.8 2.2.1 – 2.2.8 2.3.1 – 2.3.8 2.4.1 – 2.4.8 2.5.1 – 2.5.8 2.6.1 – 2.6.8 Metropolitan Melbourne Balance of Victoria Banyule (C) Bayside (C) Boroondara (C) Brimbank (C) 33 37 4 45 49 53

Population Diversity in Local Councils in Victoria: 2006 Census | 

Tables 2.7.1 – 2.7.8 2.8.1 – 2.8.8 2.9.1 – 2.9.8 2.11.1 – 2.11.8 2.13.1 – 2.13.8 Cardinia (C) Casey (C) Darebin (C) Glen Eira (C) Hobsons Bay (C)

Page 57 6 65 69 73 77 8 85 89 93 97 0 05 09 3 7 2 25 29 33 37 4 45 49 53 57 6

2.10.1 – 2.10.8 Frankston (C) 2.12.1 – 2.12.8 Greater Dandenong (C) 2.14.1 – 2.14.8 Hume (C) 2.15.1 – 2.15.8 Kingston (C) 2.16.1 – 2.16.8 Knox (C) 2.17.1 – 2.17.8 Manningham (C) 2.18.1 – 2.18.8 Maribyrnong (C) 2.19.1 – 2.19.8 Maroondah (C) 2.20.1 – 2.20.8 Melbourne (C) 2.21.1 – 2.21.8 Melton (C) 2.22.1 – 2.22.8 Monash (C) 2.23.1 – 2.23.8 Moonee Valley (C) 2.24.1 – 2.24.8 Moreland (C) 2.25.1 – 2.25.8 Mornington Peninsula (S) 2.26.1 – 2.26.8 Nillumbik (C) 2.27.1 – 2.27.8 Port Phillip (C) 2.28.1 – 2.28.8 Stonnington (C) 2.29.1 – 2.29.8 Whitehorse (C) 2.30.1 – 2.30.8 Whittlesea (C) 2.31.1 – 2.31.8 Wyndham (C) 2.32.1 – 2.32.8 Yarra (C) 2.33.1 – 2.33.8 Yarra Ranges (S)

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Major Regional Local Government Areas – Four-Page Profiles
Tables 3.1.1 – 3.1.8 3.2.1 – 3.2.8 3.3.1 – 3.4.8 3.4.1 – 3.5.8 3.5.1 – 3.5.8 3.6.1 – 3.6.8 Ballarat (C) Greater Geelong (C) Greater Bendigo (C) Greater Shepparton (C) Mildura (RC) Latrobe (C) 67 7 75 79 83 87

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Regional Local Government Areas – Two-Page Profiles
The two-page profile contains the following tables: 1 Summary of Population Diversity, 2006, 2001 Census 2 Top 20 Overseas-Born, Birthplace by Gender, 2006, 2001 Census 3 Top 10 Languages other than English Spoken at Home by Gender, 2006, 2001 Census 4 Top 10 Religions by Gender, 2006, 2001 Census 5 Top 10 Ancestry Groups, First Response, 2006 Census Tables 4.1.1 - 4.1.5 4.2.1 - 4.2.5 4.3.1 - 4.3.5 Alpine (S) Ararat (RC) Bass Coast (S) 93 95 97

2 | Population Diversity in Local Councils in Victoria: 2006 Census

Tables 4.4.1 - 4.4.5 4.5.1 - 4.5.5 4.6.1 - 4.6.5 4.7.1 - 4.7.5 4.8.1 - 4.8.5 4.9.1 - 4.9.5 4.10.1 - 4.10.5 4.11.1 - 4.11.5 4.12.1 - 4.12.5 4.13.1 - 4.13.5 4.14.1 - 4.14.5 4.15.1 - 4.15.5 4.16.1 - 4.16.5 4.17.1 - 4.17.5 4.18.1 - 4.18.5 4.19.1 - 4.19.5 Baw Baw (S) Benalla (RC) Buloke (S) Campaspe (S) Central Goldfields (S) Colac-Otway (S) Corangamite (S) East Gippsland (S) Gannawarra (S) Glenelg (S) Golden Plains (S) Hepburn (S) Hindmarsh (S) Horsham (RC) Indigo (S) Loddon (S)

Page 99 20 203 205 207 209 2 23 25 27 29 22 223 225 227 229 23 233 235 237 239 24 243 245 247 249 25 253 255 257 259 26 263 265 267 269 27 273 275

4.20.1 - 4.20.5 Macedon Ranges (S) 4.21.1 - 4.21.5 Mansfield (S) 4.22.1 - 4.22.5 Mitchell (S) 4.23.1 - 4.23.5 Moira (S) 4.24.1 - 4.24.5 Moorabool (S) 4.25.1 - 4.25.5 Mount Alexander (S) 4.26.1 - 4.26.5 Moyne (S) 4.27.1 - 4.27.5 Murrindindi (S) 4.28.1 - 4.28.5 Northern Grampians (S) 4.29.1 - 4.29.5 Pyrenees (S) 4.30.1 - 4.30.5 Queenscliffe (S) 4.31.1 - 4.31.5 South Gippsland (S) 4.32.1 - 4.32.5 Southern Grampians (S) 4.33.1 - 4.33.5 Strathbogie (S) 4.34.1 - 4.34.5 Surf Coast (S) 4.35.1 - 4.35.5 Swan Hill (RC) 4.36.1 - 4.36.5 Towong (S) 4.37.1 - 4.37.5 Wangaratta (RC) 4.38.1 - 4.38.5 Warnnambool (C) 4.39.1 - 4.39.5 Wellington (S) 4.40.1 - 4.40.5 West Wimmera (S) 4.41.1 - 4.41.5 Wodonga (RC) 4.42.1 - 4.42.5 Yarriambiack (S) Maps 1 Local Government Areas, Victoria 2006 2 Local Government Areas, Melbourne 2006

277 278

Population Diversity in Local Councils in Victoria: 2006 Census | 3

Acknowledgments
The Victorian Multicultural Commission would like to acknowledge the valuable contribution made by the Australian Bureau of Statistics to the preparation of this Report. The Report is based on data from the 2006 Census of Population and Housing. The Census provides the Australian community, including planners and policy makers, with a detailed source of information about the composition of Australian society and how it has changed over time.

4 | Population Diversity in Local Councils in Victoria: 2006 Census

Messages

From the Premier
Victoria is one of the most welcoming and diverse places in the world. Our State is home to Australia’s fastest growing capital city, Melbourne, and the country’s four fastest growing inland cities, Bendigo, Ballarat, Shepparton and Mildura. In 2005-06, Victoria’s population increased by 77,000 – 6,000 more people than the Gold Rush year of 1852 and the biggest increase in population in our State’s history. On top of that, one in four migrants to Australia are now choosing Victoria as their new home and one in five students attending a Victorian University in 2006 was an international student The 2006 Census tells us that 44% of Victorians were either born overseas or have at least one parent born overseas and that around 20% of Victorians speak a language other than English at home. This diversity is one of our greatest strengths. The challenge we face is to make sure that we continue to actively support and engage with the multicultural and multi-faith communities that have helped to make Victoria socially and economically stronger. This publication – Population Diversity in Local Councils in Victoria: 2006 Census – provides data on birthplace, language, ancestry, and religion at the Local Government level. It is an invaluable guide for local government planners, community organisations, researchers and those in the broader community concerned with designing and delivering services that are accessible and equitable. Our Government recognises the key role of Local Councils in this collective endeavour and we look forward to building even stronger partnerships and greater diversity in the years ahead..

From the Minister
Our multicultural, multilingual and multifaith diversity provides the foundation for a more prosperous Victoria. Nations, states, cities and communities that are at ease with and welcome other cultures attract new people, investment and skills. The Victorian Government is committed to strengthening multiculturalism in our State by providing increased support for culturally and linguistically diverse communities and ensuring that the social, economic and cultural benefits of this diversity are available to the whole community. We are all partners in making Victoria more prosperous, fair and vibrant. The Victorian Government is committed to delivering services that are accessible to all, with equitable outcomes for all. Engagement with culturally and linguistically diverse communities, community development and the economic, social and cultural dividends of population growth are enhanced by the availability of current and authoritative ethnicity data, as is program design and service delivery. Population Diversity in Local Councils in Victoria: 2006 Census offers a valuable resource for human service delivery planners and providers and for social policy practitioners seeking stronger engagement with culturally and linguistically diverse communities. I commend this publication as a resource for advancing our common objectives for a more cohesive, harmonious and prosperous Victoria.

James Merlino MP Minister Assisting the Premier on Multicultural Affairs

John Brumby MP Premier of Victoria Minister for Multicultural Affairs

Population Diversity in Local Councils in Victoria: 2006 Census | 5

6 | Population Diversity in Local Councils in Victoria: 2006 Census

Notes on the data
The figures in this publication are based on data from the 2006, 2001 and 1996 Censuses of Population and Housing, conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). Unless otherwise stated, the data is for Victoria or areas within Victoria. The Census provides characteristics of people based on two locations – their location on Census night (referred to as ‘place of enumeration’), and their usual residence as stated on the Census form. All data in this publication are based on place of usual residence, unless otherwise stated. The criteria for choosing whether an LGA had a four-page profile or a two-page profile was that it needed an overseas-born population of at least 3,000 persons, with at least 50 people for each of the main 20 birthplaces and 50 people for each of the 10 main non-English languages spoken at home. These criteria were chosen to ensure that the tables with large numbers of ranked categories were close to full, and there was a sufficient population in the major population groups to cross-tabulate without having significant problems due to introduced random error (see below). For example, in Table 5 Top 10 Ancestry Groups in the two-page profiles, the number of ancestries shown may be less than ten. All metropolitan Melbourne LGAs met these criteria, plus the regional LGAs of Greater Geelong, Ballarat, Bendigo, Greater Shepparton, Mildura and Latrobe.

Citations
As the data provided in this Report are customised data, the following citation is recommended for users of the data tables: Source: “Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2006 Census of Population and Housing, data available on request”. Citation for the entire Report is: Victorian Multicultural Commission (2007) Population Diversity in Local Councils in Victoria: 2006 Census, Melbourne, Victoria.

Confidentiality and Introduced Random Error
The Census collects information relating to each person and household in Australia. It is taken to provide a snapshot of information about the community as a whole and about groups within the community. However, it is not concerned with information about individuals as such. The public expects that the information they provide will be kept confidential, and this is ensured by provisions in the Census and Statistics Act 1905. Under this Act, all ABS officers are legally bound never to release identifiable personal information to any person or organisation outside the ABS. Tables containing cells with very small counts may potentially result in an individual being identified. Consequently, all tables are subjected to confidentiality processes before release. These steps are taken to avoid releasing information that may identify particular individuals, families, households or dwellings without impairing the usefulness of the tables.

Geography
In the two- and four-page profiles presented for Victoria, the geographic level used is Local Government Area (LGA). For 2006, these areas are mostly comparable to 2001 data. There have been some minor boundary changes to LGAs between 2001 and 2006; however these do not significantly impact on the comparability of data between the 2001 and 2006 Censuses. Between 2001 and 2006 the Shire of Delatite was split into two components, Mansfield Shire and Benalla Rural City. For the purposes of these profiles, data presented for Mansfield Shire in 2001 is for the former Statistical Local Area (SLA) of Delatite (S) – South, while 2001 data presented for Benalla (RC) is for the SLAs of Delatite (S) – Benalla and Delatite (S) – North. The boundaries of these SLAs closely approximate the new shire boundaries and are considered equivalent for statistical purposes. The other significant change to local government area boundaries between 2001 and 2006 was the excision of alpine resorts from the surrounding LGAs and inclusion into “Unincorporated Vic”. This affects data for Mansfield (S), Alpine (S) and Baw Baw (S). These areas contain large numbers of people enumerated on Census night but very few usual residents. As all the tables in this publication are based on usual residence, this change is expected to have minimal impact on the data.

Introduced Random Error
For the 2006 Census, a new technique has been developed to avoid identification of individuals. The confidentiality technique applied by the ABS is to slightly adjust all cells to prevent any identifiable data being exposed. These adjustments result in small introduced random errors. The technique allows very large tables, for which there is a strong client demand, to be produced even though they may contain many very small cells. Details of the exact nature of the methodology applied are available from the ABS on request. Modifications are made to totals and subtotals to preserve additivity within tables. Tables which have been randomly adjusted will be internally consistent. However comparisons with other tables containing similar data may show minor discrepancies. This is the case for both customised tables and standard products. These small variations can, for the most part, be ignored.

Four- and Two- Page Profiles
Four-page profiles are provided for those Local Government Areas with large and diverse overseasborn populations. All other LGAs have a two-page profile. The two-page profile has reduced numbers of Birthplace, Language, Religion and Ancestry rankings and does not have the Proficiency in English, Age and Year of Arrival breakdowns.

Population Diversity in Local Councils in Victoria: 2006 Census | 7

No reliance should be placed on small cells. Aside from the effects of introduced random error, possible respondent and processing errors have greatest relative impact on the accuracy of small cells. More information on random error in particular can be found in the 2006 Census Dictionary (cat. no. 2901.0), on page 200 in ‘Introduced random error’. More general information on data quality can be found in the same publication on page 14 in the chapter on ‘Managing Census Quality’. Due both to introduced random error, and the higher potential non-sampling error affecting small population groups, no data is shown in this publication for any birthplace, language, religion or ancestry group consisting of less than 50 persons in a Local Government Area. These groups will appear in the “Other” category for those tables.

Religion
In 2006, Religion was coded using the Australian Standard Classification of Religious Groups. There were 137 Religion categories, but only 36 broader level categories are presented in this publication. Religion has a high ‘not stated’ component as it is an optional question on the Census form. Assyrian Apostolic is a new category for 2006. The 2001 equivalent presented is formed from two groups, “Ancient Church of the East” and “Assyrian Church of the East”. The remainder of the “Oriental Christian” category in 2001 has been included as “Oriental Orthodox” for comparison with 2006. “Orthodox” has been renamed “Eastern Orthodox” in 2006. Data is presented for all religious groups which had at least 50 persons in an LGA. “No Religion” and “Not Stated” are included for all areas.

Birthplace
In 2006, the ABS coded the responses to the birthplace question into 284 categories, based on the Standard Australian Classification of Countries (ABS Cat No. 1269.0). There was only one significant change to this classification between 2001 and 2006. The 2006 categories of Serbia and Montenegro replace the category “Federal Republic of Yugoslavia” from the 2001 Census. Due to large number of people stating their birthplace as “Yugoslavia, these two categories are not equivalent to the 2001 category of “Federal Republic of Yugoslavia”, and where they appear in tables, there is no equivalent 2001 data. For the same reason “Other Birthplaces” is not comparable for 2001 and has been omitted from the tables. In 2006, birthplace responses such as “Yugoslavia” were coded to “South Eastern Europe, nfd”.

Ancestry
Ancestry was first included as a question in the 1986 Census. The aim of the question was to gauge the ethnic composition of the population as a whole. Ancestry was not included in the 1991 or 1996 Census, but reappeared in 2001, and again in 2006. Ancestry is coded using the Australian Standard Classification of Cultural and Ethnic Groups (ASCCEG), 2005-06 edition (cat. no. 1249.0). Respondents were asked to consider the ancestry they identify with back as far as three generations. Respondents had the option of nominating up to two ancestries. For data in this publication, only first response Ancestry has been used. This is subject to a bias based on the order in which the standard named categories are included on the Census form. This is shown below. For instance, if a respondent ticked the boxes “Italian” and “German”, Italian would be the first response because it appears earlier on the form. Order of tick-box responses on Census form: 1. English 2. Irish 3. Italian 4. German 5. Chinese 6. Scottish 7. Australian 8. Other – please specify.

Language
2006 Census data for language is presented using the Australian Standard Classification of Languages, 2005-06 edition. There have been extensive changes to this classification between 2001 and 2006, with the separate identification of a number of emerging language groups. As a result, some languages have no equivalent in 2001, so where they occur in a table, the 2001 component as been left blank. The major languages appearing in the tables with no direct comparison to 2001 are: Persian (excluding Dari) Dari Tagalog Filipino Serbo-Croation/Yugoslavian so described Karen Dinka.

Abbreviations
‘nec’ stands for ‘not elsewhere classified’, ‘nfd’ stands for ‘not further defined’.

8 | Population Diversity in Local Councils in Victoria: 2006 Census

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