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BATTALION CAREER COUNSELOR

SSG MCCLURE, JEFFERY


3380 S. WALNUT STREET
O r g a n iz a t i o n

BLOOMINGTON, IN 47401
812-332-4491 EXT 85069

MARCH 2010

2nd Battalion 150th Field Artillery Retention Newsletter

Soldiers in six month ETS window The Post - 9/11 GI Bill is a new education benefit program
for individuals who served on active duty on or after Septem-
ber 11, 2001.
PRN RANK NAME EXP ETS

DL6 SPCM ANGELILLIS PAUL EDWARD 3/11/2010


When Can I Receive Benefits under the
DL8 SPCM ZACHARY NATHAN EARL 3/17/2010
Post-9/11 GI Bill?
DLK PFC3 BRANNEMAN SAMUEL LEE 3/24/2010
Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits are payable for training pursued on
DL6 SPCM FRENCH CLIFTON YORK 3/29/2010
or after August 1, 2009. No payments can be made under this
DLK SGT5 EISELE REBEKKA ARLENE 3/29/2010
program for training pursued before that date.
DL4 SPCM HAYMAN JEFFERY DEAN 3/4/2010

DL4 SGT5 SOWERS JEREMIAH DANIEL 4/2/2010


Am I Eligible?
DL2 SPCM FRYE DUSTIN SCOTT 4/22/2010
You may be eligible if you served at least 90 aggregate days
DLK SPCM SORRELS JOSHUA LESTER 4/25/2010
on active duty after September 10, 2001, and you are still on
DL8 SGT5 JOHNSON KEITH ROBERT 4/28/2010
active duty or were honorably-
DL0 SGT5 SCHORLING KEVIN JOHN 5/15/2010 -discharged from the active duty; or -released from
DL2 SGT5 BEDRAVA STEVEN MAXEINER 5/3/2010 active duty and placed on the retired list or tempo-
DL2 SPCM JOHNSON RICKY LEE 5/9/2010 rary disability retired list; or -released from active
DL2 SGT5 KELLER RANDALL AUSTIN 6/16/2010 duty and transferred to the Fleet Reserve or Fleet
DL6 SSG6 SCHULTZ ERIC MICHAEL 6/19/2010 Marine Corps Reserve; or -released from the ac-
DLK SGT5 SPROWL NICHOLAUS JAMES FRAN 6/30/2010 tive duty for further service in a reserve component
DL2 SPCM SPARKS RICKIE LEE 7/14/2010
of the Armed Forces.
DLK SFC7 CREAMER ROBERT RAY JR 7/16/2010

DL6 SPCM MERRITT SCOTT ROBERT 7/2/2010


You may also be eligible if you were honorably discharged
DL0 SFC7 HALES ADRIAN REESE 7/24/2010 from active duty for a service-connected disability and you
DLK SGT5 COTE ANDREW JOSEPH 7/8/2010 served 30 continuous days after September 10, 2001.
DLK SPCM EVANS KYLE ANDREW 7/8/2010

DL6 SSG6 BERKSHIRE KENNETH HESS 7/9/2010 If I am eligible for the Montgomery GI Bill, Montgom-
DL0 CSM9 MCALLISTER MICHAEL SCOTT 8/18/2010
ery GI Bill-Selected Reserve, or the Reserve Educa-
DL2 SPCM TIDD JOSHUA PATRICK 8/24/2010
tional Assistance Program, am I eligible for Post-
DL2 SPCM HALTOM JERRY ALAN 8/9/2010
9/11 GI Bill?
DL0 SGT5 JORDAN DANNY JOSEPH 9/15/2010

DL6 SPCM SHOOK AARON THOMAS 9/21/2010

DL6 SPCM WARD DAVID ALLEN JR 9/22/2010


If, on August 1, 2009, you are eligible for one of these pro-
DL2 SPCM PRICE PATRICK LEE II 9/23/2010
grams and you qualify for the Post-9/11 GI Bill, you may
DL2 SPCM WEBB JAMES LEOLIN 9/9/2010
make an irrevocable election to receive benefits under the
Post-9/11 GI Bill.
Every soldier is valuable to our Battalion, If you
see any of these soldiers above walking around
your halls stop them and encourage them to Re- Note: Once you elect to receive benefits under the Post-9/11
enlist in to the 2nd Battalion 150th Field Artillery. GI Bill, you will no longer be eligible to receive benefits under
the program from which you elected the Post-9/11 GI Bill
Page 1 & 2 Post 911 GI Bill
Page 3 Career Center Info
Page4 Physical Fitness
2nd Battalion 150th Field Artillery March Retention Newsletter PAGE 2

How much will I receive? How many months of assistance can I re-
Based on your length of active duty service, you are ceive?
entitled to a percentage of the following: Generally, you may receive up to 36 months of enti-
tlement under the Post-9/11 GI Bill.
-Cost of tuition and fees, not to exceed the most
expensive in-state undergraduate tuition at a public
institution of higher education (paid to school); How long am I eligible?
-Monthly housing allowance* equal to the basic You will be eligible for benefits for 15 years from your
allowance for housing payable to a military E-5 with last period of active duty of at least 90 consecutive
dependents, in the same zip code as your school days. If you were released for a service-connected dis-
(paid to you); ability after at least 30 days of continuous service, you
-Yearly books and supplies stipend of up to will also be eligible for benefits for 15 years.
$1000 per year (paid to you); and -A one-
Example:
time payment of $500 paid to certain indi-
Tuition and fees for full time enrollment: $6700. High-
viduals relocating from highly rural areas.
est in-state tuition and fees: $7000.

*NOTE – The housing allowance and books and sup- Scenario 1: If you separated following three years on
plies stipend are not payable to individuals on active active duty and are going to school full-time, you would
duty. The housing allowance is not payable to those receive $6700 for tuition and fees, $1000 for books and
pursuing training at half time or less or to individuals supplies, and the monthly housing allowance.
enrolled in distance learning.
Scenario 2: If you have an aggregate of 12 months of
active duty in the guard or reserves and are going to
school full-time, you would receive $4020 (60% of
Individuals serving an aggre- Percentage of $6700) for tuition and fees, $600 (60% of $1000) for
gate period of active duty af- Maximum Bene- books and supplies, and 60% of the monthly housing
ter September 10, 2001, of: fit Payable allowance.

At least 36 months 100

At least 30 continuous days and


discharged due to service 100

connected disability

At least 30 months < 36 months 90

At least 24 months < 30 months 80

At least 18 months < 24 months 70

At least 12 months < 18 months 60

At least 6 months < 12 months 50

At least 90 days < 6 months 40


2nd Battalion 150th Field Artillery March Retention Newsletter PAGE 3

Indiana Army National Guard Career Center


345 West Division St.
Remington, IN 47977

Your one-stop career enhancement shop


Get answers to your questions by
attending the free courses offered
at the Career Center:

Retiree Benefits
Education Assistance
Enlisted Promotion System
Military Credit Evaluation
Survivor Benefits
Individual Counseling

Attend the Career Center in split-train status.


Contact your Unit Readiness NCO for more information..

TY 2010 Career Center Dates


Indiana Army National
Guard
24-25 Oct 09 Career Center
7-8 Nov 09 345 West Division St.
N/A Dec 09 Remington, IN 47977
30-31 Jan 10 (219) 261-2147 x 8152
27-28 Feb 10 or
(800) 237-2850 x 8152
27-28 Mar 10
24-25 Apr 10 SFC Tague x 17
22-23 May 10 SGM (R) Hancock x 18
26-27 Jun 10
17-18 Jul 10 SSG Lauderdale x 19
28-29 Aug 10
25-26 Sep 10
2nd Battalion 150th Field Artillery Retention Newsletter PAGE 4

PHYSICAL FITNESS

While you’re in the Army National Guard you are expected to maintain your own Physical Fitness readiness. Remember if you
are flagged for PT, you could loss any or all Bonuses, Education Benefits, Health Care Benefits and many other incentives.

Breaking out of a sedentary lifestyle and making exercise a regular part of your life can have impressive benefits. It can increase the
amount of blood your heart can pump, lower your heart rate when you are at rest, improve your cholesterol level, lower your blood
pressure and reduce body fat. Regular exercise also helps you mentally by making it easier to manage stress, leaving you more ener-
getic, making daily chores easier to accomplish, helping you sleep better and improving your self-image. The best part about these
benefits is that they are accessible, to some degree, to almost any individual who builds exercise into his or her daily routine.

Regular exercise does not have to entail expensive fitness club dues or high-priced equipment to fill your spare bedroom. It can be as
simple as walking, running, push-ups and sit-ups.

Regular exercise has four phases: (FM 21-20)

1. Warming up elevates your pulse slowly. Start at a fairly light pace and gradually increase it until you begin to perspire--about five
to 10 minutes. A good warm-up will help prevent muscle strains and raise the internal body temperature, which makes muscles more
flexible.

2. Stretching improves the flexibility of your joints, making movement easier and injuries less likely. Stretches should be done slowly
and without bouncing. Move until you can feel the muscle stretch but not to where you feel any pain. Hold the position for several sec-
onds (10-20) and repeat three to five times. Stretch before and after you exercise.

3. The Aerobic phase is the most important part of your daily exercise routine because this is when you temporarily elevate your rest-
ing heart rate. This phase involves three factors. The frequency of your exercise program is an important factor. In order to improve
your fitness level, you should try to exercise at least three times per week. The length of time you exercise is important. The body
needs approximately 20 minutes to reach its fat-burning stage. (Individuals who are extremely out of shape and those who have cardiac
or respiratory problems are exceptions to this rule and should start with shorter workouts. These people, especially those who are out of
shape, may be able to gradually increase the length of their workouts.) The intensity of your workout is crucial and should be deter-
mined by your level of fitness. Your workout should increase the number of times your heart beats to about 60 percent to 80 percent of
its maximum rate.

4. Cool down, you should reduce your pace slowly so that your heart rate and blood pressure decrease slowly. This is the final phase of
your workout.

Basic Army Physical Fitness Routine

Monday: Run 2 Miles

Tuesday: Push-ups(5 sets of 20) Sit-ups(5 sets of 20)

Wednesday: Run 2 Miles

Thursday: Push-ups(5 sets of 25) Sit-ups(5 sets of 25)

Friday: Sprints