Flexible Offense by Gerry Watkins "Flexibility Above All

"

My Offensive Philosophy
Flexibility above all things, while some offenses are based on speedy receivers, some on big backs, this system is predicated on flexibility. If you have speedy receivers you should throw. If you have a big back you should run. A good system allows the offensive coordinator room to customize the fit for his players. To this end I've tried to keep the design as amorphous as possible and not devote the system too much to any one tactic or style. "Be like the nature of water" is something martial artists are often told. Be flexible; maintain the ability to fit into any container. To marry any one style is to be denied the advantages of all other styles. Unfortunately, there are always trade offs. The trade-off we make in our effort to maintain flexibility is complexity. The ability to do a lot of things requires a lot of terminology. The trick is to maintain system flexibility without crushing players' minds. To this end, the terminology I use is all designed around an "interchangeable parts" approach. That is to say that the entire play is assembled piece by piece during the call with no specific piece dependent on the inclusion of another. To avoid confusion as to whose assignment belongs to whom the system incorporates word association (words beginning with Z for the Z receiver, Y for the Y, R for the R, etc); so while there

can be a lot of calls on a single play, each player knows (by word association) what sounds/letters to listen for and he can ignore anything that doesn't apply to him. This offense is also very concerned with maintaining surprise. Any offense's most basic advantage is the fact that it knows the plan of attack and the defense does not. A good system will endeavor to preserve this advantage as long as possible. No play is dependent on any particular formation and a single play can have one of a multitude of very minor changes (motions, alignments, etc.) attached to it. The idea is for all plays to look as similar as possible until the critical moment when you spring your attack. By maintaining flexibility and keeping your true intentions masked until the moment of execution, the defense is forced to defend a large number of possibilities rather than a fewer number of tendencies. Finally, along with flexibility and surprise a good system should be efficient. That is to say, a well designed offense is large in theory and trim in practice. While this system is intended to be comprehensive on paper, it is up to the individual coaches to tailor it to the realities of their situation. If you don't have a fullback who can lead block, don't bother installing the 10 series. If you don't have 2 viable tight ends, don't bother installing the J personnel package. Without the proper personnel you lack the capability to effectively run those packages, so you do nothing to increase your operational flexibility. You also lack the credibility to threaten the defense using those packages, so you gain no advantage in tactical deception either. Remember the goal is REAL flexibility not FALSE flexibility. Maximize the offense you can use not the offense you can draw. Install what is useful and put the rest back on the shelf until you can use it. Formations and Personnel

 “A Group” (2 RB, 3 WR, 0 TE) --> Alice
        “B Group” (1 RB, 4 WR, 0 TE) --> Bob, Benton “C Group” (0 RB, 5 WR, 0 TE) --> Charlie “D Group” (2 RB, 2 WR, 1 TE) --> Daniel “G Group” (1 RB, 3 WR, 1 TE) --> Grant, Gary, Gavin “H Group” (0 RB, 4 WR, 1 TE) --> Harold “I Group” (2 RB, 1 WR, 2 TE) --> Ian “J Group” (1 RB, 2 WR, 2 TE) --> Jenny, Jerome “K Group" (0 RB, 3 WR, 2 TE) --> Kevin

NOTE: Names for packages and formations are largely arbitrary. Pick any names you believe can be easily remembered by the players, with a few exceptions. The letters E and F were omitted because they are associated with other things (several words beginning with E are shifts for the backfield and words beginning with F are used to direct the fullback). In order to minimize friction, package and formation words beginning with X, Y, Z, T, F, R or E should be avoided, as should names of animals. These associations are used for other variations.

Alignment and Spacing Rules

NOTE: The outermost receivers set the formation. The spacing rule for slot receivers is to "split the distance between the man outside you and the tackle".

Pre-Snap Adjustments
By using specialized calls to adjust the alignments of individual players we can greatly increase the number of looks the defense may see on any one play. This contributes to our ability to deceive and disguise. Furthermore, judicious use of alignments can maximize the effects of certain schemes. For example, by moving the Z in with a "zebra" call, we make it easier for him to put pressure on the interior of the defense with a shallow route. Adjustments are broken down into two subcategories: alignments and motions. Alignments go into effect as soon as the team breaks the huddle, whereas motions must be signaled by the QB. Both are associated by sound (words beginning with Z for the Z-receiver, T for T, etc), and all alignments are animal names. NOTE: Adjustments are often explained in terms relative to the actor, for example, when "Zero" motion tells the Z to motion to the far sideline, the word "far" refers to the sideline furthest from the Z.

Zebra
Z closes his split to 1x1 from the next man to his inside. NOTE: This can be useful when the Z is running inside routes (slant, shallow, dig, square, etc), in order to facilitate a shorter, easier throw for the QB (bench, out, etc), or to create a "bunch".

Tiger
T opens his split to 1x1 from the next man to his outside. NOTE: This can be a used as an addition to the Z-slash screen, to bring a LB out of the box, or to create a "bunch".

Turtle T closes his split to 1x1 from the next man to his inside. NOTE: This can be used to bring T in as an extra blocker on running plays, an extra protector on pass plays, to isolate an outside receiver, or to facilitate more leverage against inside coverage.

RB Alignments
"Rabbit Strong" - RB lines up 1x1 off the last man on the strong side of the line. "Rabbit Weak" - RB lines up 1x1 off the last man on the weak side of the line. "Raccoon Strong" - RB lines up behind the strong side tackle, 5-yards deep. "Raccoon Weak" - RB lines up behind the weak side tackle, 5 yards deep. NOTE: Rabbit is useful to facilitate an easier pass release for the RB. Raccoon can be used to change the look of certain running plays (without changing any assignments) or to allow for easier pass blocking.

FB Alignments
"Falcon Strong" - FB lines up 1x1 off the last man on the strong side of the line. "Falcon Weak" - FB lines up 1x1 off the last man on the weak side of the line. "Frog Strong" - FB lines up behind the strong side guard, 5-yards deep. "Frog Weak" - FB lines up behind the weak side guard, 5 yards deep. NOTE: Frog is one of the most useful adjustments for the 10-series,

both to facilitate lead blocking and release on play-action passes. Falcon is useful anytime the FB has to block the end or release.

Z Motions
"Zip" - To the hip of the next man to his inside. "Zap" - To the hip of the first man on the near side of the line. "Zig" - To the hip of the last man on the far side of the line. "Zag" - To the QBs hip and then back to the hip of the first man on the

near side of the line. "Zoom" - To the hip of the last receiver on the far side of the line. "Zero" - To the far sideline. NOTE: There are quite a few motions listed here. Of course, an efficient coordinator will install only those he intends to use. Zip is useful in the same ways as Zebra. Zap, Zig, Zag can be used to convert Z to a slot receiver or to bring him into a position to pass block or crack. Zoom and Zero are used primarily for misdirection or to ascertain coverages.

T Motions
"Tip" - To the hip of the first man on the near side of the line. "Top" - To the hip of the last man on the far side of the line. "Tag" - To the QBs hip and then back to the hip of the first man on the near side of the line. "Tax" - To the inside hip of the X. "Toy" - To the inside hip of the Y. "Taz" - To the inside hip of the Z. "Trick" - To the far sideline. NOTE: There are quite a few motions listed here. Of course, an efficient coordinator will install only those he intends to use. Tip, Top, and Tag are useful in the same manner as Turtle. Tax, Toy, and Taz are used in the same manner as Tiger, mostly to create bunches. Trick is used mostly for misdirection and to ascertain coverages.

RB Motions
"Rip Strong/Weak" - To the hip of the first man on the strong/weak side of the line. "Rat" - To the inside hip of the T. "Relax" - To the inside hip of the X. "Roy" - To the inside hip of the Y. "Razor" - To the inside hip of the Z. "Roll Strong/Weak" - To the strong/weak sideline. NOTE: Rip is useful in the same ways as Rabbit. Rat, Relax, Roy, and Razor are used to create bunches. Roll is used primarily for misdirection. NOTE: Motioning the RB out of the backfield can be used to free up more running room for the FB.

FB Motions
"Flow Strong/Weak" - Lateral motion to the guard-tackle gap on the strong/weak side of line. "Front Strong/Weak" - To the hip of the first man on the strong/weak side of the line. "Fax" - To the inside hip of the X. "Fly" - To the inside hip of the Y. "Faze" - To the inside hip of the Z. "Freak Strong/Weak" - To the strong/weak sideline. NOTE: Flow is useful in the same ways as Frog. Front is useful in the same ways as Falcon. Fax, Fly, and Faze are used to create bunches. Freak is used primarily for misdirection. NOTE: Motioning the FB out of the backfield can be used to free up more running room for the RB.

The Running Game
Hole Identification

Read Point - RB
The read point is the first step for the RB, the place from which he

receives the ball. The read point remains the same no matter what alignment the RB starts from.

Read Point - FB

QB Footwork

QB Footwork - Option Package

Running From Two-Back Formations

Running From One-Back Formations

Option Package (Two-Back)

The 3-Step Passing Game
There is no distinction between outside and slot routes (with the exception of the Arrow route, which can only be run from the slot, and the Out, which can only be run from the outside). 30 series routes can be combined in any order with the play call proceeding from the outside in using the first letter of each route.

30

Series Route Chart
NOTE: While the system allows for any combination to be made, the OC must use common sense and not run two players to the same sport (i.e. 32 OA, LF, FA, etc)

EX. 30-1
NOTE: The first letter is for the outside

receiver, the second for the slot. (Figure 30-1 “Bob Right- 32 SG”)

EX. 30-2
NOTE: If there is a third receiver to one side the third letter designates his route. (Figure 30-2 “Charlie Right- 32 SGA”)

5-Step Passing Game
The outside route is the route explicitly called which implies a complimentary route for the next man inside, and for the backside receivers. The following chart shows the packaging of routes.

Call - Play side Slot - Backside Slot - Backside Outside Shallow - Over - Go - Square Fin - Over - Go - Square Curl - SAO - Replace - Brake Bench - Choice - Replace - Brake Dig - Go - Replace - Brake Hook - SAO - Replace - Brake Square -SAI - Go - Brake Go - Choice - Replace - Brake Post - Choice - Replace - Brake

PC - SAI - Replace - Brake

Outside Routes Inside Routes

Backfield Routes

Brake Route
NOTE: The "brake route" is a simple read. If, when the receiver reaches 10 yards, the DB is closer than 5 yards, then the receiver will run the "go". If the DB is giving the receiver 5 or more yards of space, then the receiver will curl up at 12 yards.

Choice Route
NOTE: The choice route is a key component to this passing game, but it requires an intelligent route runner capable of reading the defense without half-stepping his route. The goal is to attack the middle of the field. The "choice" is at what depth. If the receiver sees a deep safety in the middle of the field (i.e. versus cover 3 or man-free) then he will run the dig underneath that safety. If he sees no deep safety in the middle (i.e. versus cover 2 or straight man) then he will run the post.

Replace Route
NOTE: The "replace" route is the basic dump off route designed as a last resort and to hold the LBs from doubling the deeper routes. The receiver is running to the spot where the middle linebacker began the play.

EX. 50-1

NOTE: You can adjust any

receiver’s route individually by calling it specifically. (“Bob Right 52 AllGo, T-SAI”)

EX. 50-2
NOTE: If more than 2

receivers to one side, the Inner Receiver must be called explicitly.

(“Benton Right 52 Z-Dig T-SAO”)

EX. 50-3

NOTE: Any receivers (inside or outside the call) with out a designated or implied route run a Go. (In “Benton Right 52 Y-Dig” the Z runs a Go)

EX. 50-4
NOTE: The routes can also be

changed by adjusting the subject of the call (as seen in this and the next two examples). Three subject modifiers (Double, All, and Mirror) can be used for this purpose. For example, if the call is Bob Right 52 Z-Go, the routes front side-tobackside read Go-Choice-Replace-Brake. However, if the call is Bob Right 52 Double Go, then both front side receivers will run the called route, in this case a "go".

EX. 50-5
NOTE:

Similarly, if the call is Bob Right 52 All Go, then all receivers will run the go.

EX. 50-6

NOTE: Lastly, a call of 52 Mirror Go will

direct both outside receivers to run the "go" and both slots to run the complimentary "choice" route (thus creating the "mirror effect where both sides are running the same packages).

Out of Pocket Passing Game
Play side Outside - Play side Slot - Innermost - Backside Slot Backside Outside "PASS" Go - Over - SAO/Shallow - Drag - Post "COMEBACK" Comeback - Corner - SAO/Shallow - Drag - Post

Comeback Route
NOTE: The "comeback" is a hard push outside to turn the defender and then a hard break back and to the outside, coming back towards the throw.

Drag

Route
NOTE: The Drag replaces the replace as the default backside slot route in out of pocket packages. 8 yards with a slight lean to the inside and then across the field aiming for 18-20 yards on the opposite sideline.

Corner Route
NOTE: The "corner" route is similar to the over route, but instead of breaking towards the sideline, under the outside route, the receiver will break over the outside route and aim for the back corner of the end zone.

"Pass"
NOTE: The "pass" call is a route package for up to all five receivers. The QB will read from the play side, in (Z to Y to T to R to X) and hit the first open man.

(“Charlie Right 82 Pass”)

"Pass" (with 3 backsides)
NOTE: If there are 3 receivers on the backside the innermost will run a shallow to fill the zone where the SAO route would have been. The read is still play side-in. (“Charlie Right 81 Pass”)

Comeback
NOTE: The "comeback" call is a route package for up to all five receivers. The QB will read from the play side, in (Z to Y to T to R to X) and hit the first open man.

(“Charlie Right 82 Comeback”)

Comeback (with 3 backsides)
NOTE: If there are 3 receivers on the backside the innermost will run a shallow to fill the zone where the SAO route would have been. The read is still play side-in ("Charlie Right 81 Comeback")

Bad Call
NOTE: Of course, you can still call any regular 50s route package, but bare in mind some will work better than others because the QB's throwing position has changed. The example to the right shows a bad idea because the QB would have to throw back opposite his run to the middle of the field. ("Alice Right 214 Z-

Square")

Good Call
NOTE: The OC should always be aware of what his calls mean in terms of throwing lanes. Unlike the play above, this is a good example of using play-action to set up an easy throw. ("Alice Right Falcon Streak 314 Pass X-Bench")

Counter Boots
NOTE: There are not 100s or 200s off of counter action. Bootlegging off the counter requires a "counter" call to differentiate it from a normal 300 bootleg. Lastly, don't forget to incorporate the other adjustment and passing options. (Bob Right Toy 313 Counter All-Go T-SAO).

Screen Packages
NOTE- Screens are associated with the letter "S". Patterns beginning with "s" are usually screens (the exceptions being "square" and "shallow"). NOTE- Basically the system runs several variations on 2 types of

screens: an outside-in screen (shown with the Z) and an inside-out screen (shown with the T). NOTE- These screens are not position specific. You could run an X-slash (provided there was another receiver to his in side) or a Y-Slip (provided there was another receiver to his outside). Nevertheless, in most offense, the T and Z will probably be the screen recipients. NOTE- T-Slice is not so much a screen as a hybrid of a counter and a shovel pass. It’s included here because it doesn't really go anywhere else.

Pass Protection Schemes
3Step

Protection (30s)
.

5Step

Protection (50s)
.

Sprint-Out Protection (80s)
.

Play-

Action Protection (100s)
.

Roll Out

Protection (200s)
.

Bootleg Protection (300s)
.

Counter Boot Protection (300 Counters)
.

Tango
NOTE: A "Tango" call will tell the T to pass protect. However, an adjustment call (either a motion or alignment) will be needed to put him in position. ("Bob Right Turtle Tango 52 Z-Shallow")

X-ray
NOTE: An XRay call will tell the X to remain in as an extra pass

protector. This can only be used when X is in tight. (“Gavin Right X-ray 52 All-Go R-Flare”)

Yankee
NOTE: A Yankee call will tell the Y to remain in as an extra pass protector. This can only be used when Y is in tight. (“Grant Right Yankee 31 GS”)

Zulu
NOTE: A "Zulu" call will tell the Z to pass protect.

However, an adjustment call (either a motion or alignment) will be needed to put him in position. (“Benton Right Zig Zulu 52 X-Hook”)

Max
NOTE: A "Max" call will keep both the Y

and X in to pass protect. "Max" is only available in the I, J, and K personnel groups. (“Jerome Right Max 52 Mirror-Curl R-Flat”)

Overload Blocking
The OC may find it desirable to further concentrate blockers at the point of attack by using receivers as other than stalk-blockers. To this effect there are two WR block calls: Hard and Crack. Hard directs the receiver to block the defensive end closest to him. The Solid call tells both slot receivers to block their respective DEs (in essence a double hard call). Crack sends the WR into the center of the defense to block the closest LB. While this package uses the Solid, Hard, and Crack calls against unblocked defenders, they can also be used to double team particularly tough defenders (as I will eventually demonstrate in another sample package).

Grant Right Zebra Tip 44

Counter Solid Z-Crack
NOTE: The Hard on the backside DE allows you to run the play against a 50, which you could not do without it. The Hard on the front side

means that the play side guard will most likely be going against a DB instead of the DE. The Crack call inhibits the LB pursuit.

Gavin Right Zap 42

Sweep Z-Hard T-Crack
NOTE: Same principles as above, except we don't Hard the X because that would be a waste. Most backside ends are not going to make the play on a toss sweep, so we feel it is better to leave the X with his original assignment of cutting off backside pursuit from the CB (just in case the RB breaks a long one or cuts back).

Daniel Right Freak Weak 43 G-Lead X-Hard
NOTE: We motion the F out to draw away the CB. Then use the X-Hard to free the pulling guard to take on the LB pursuit.

Daniel Right Zip 44 G-Kick Z-Crack
NOTE: Using the crack call here effectively switches the blocking assignments of the Z and FB. Which is better for both, since the Z now has a blindside shot at a LB and the F will be matched against a smaller DB.

Jerome Right Solid 48 Draw Blast
NOTE: Using the Solid call guards against the risk that the ends will not be fooled by the draw.

No Huddle Package
I like the no-huddle because it really puts the pressure on the defense. In this section I put together a small no-huddle package. All plays are

run from Bob Right to avoid any confusion. The shotgun can be automatic for the no-huddle or called with the adjustment "Gun". Please note that this is NOT a 2 minute drill package (I'll put one of those up later). This is intended to pressure the D, not to protect the clock. Note also, 1) no adjustments (other than the shotgun) are made, no motions, no alignments changes, 2) I don't use any pulling linemen in order to preserve their energy, 3)each of the pocket pass plays are paired with a run, and all are off of play-action, which plays to our goal of maximizing deception.

Bob Right 142 Y-Fin RFlare
NOTE: I like this as part of a huddle because it’s got plenty of variety. The Y-Fin is an easy throw and can result in big yards after the catch. At the same time, the Y-Fin keeps the LBs off the X-Square (good for third and long) and the RFlare. Plus there's always the Z on the go route for a deep threat.

Bob Right 145 THook X-

Bench

NOTE: The T-Hook is good for the no-huddle package because it’s a fairly easy throw for the QB and it gets a good chunk of yardage. I add the X-Bench incase the CB starts to cheat towards the inside to help with the hook. Of course, you've always got the standard backside combo of the replace and the brake.

Bob Right 148 AllCurl
NOTE: This is

included for 4 basic reasons 1) its the simple read, 2) its an easy throw, 3) its good for 3rd-and-longs, 4) its a good opportunity for WRs to get yards after the catch (if they create proper separation).

Bob Right 45 Base
NOTE: The shotgun adds a kind of "draw effect to the most basic (and most easily executed) running play from the one-back.

Bob Right 42 Toss
NOTE: This play will become more and more effective as the no huddle wears down the LBs. WR blocking is a must though.

Bob Right 48 Draw
NOTE: The draw is easily

executed and a good way to keep the LBs honest.

Bob Right 80

Mirror Pass R-Flat
NOTE: Which side this play goes to is the QBs pre-snap choice which he will call at the line (for the benefit of the line and the RB).

Bob Right 80 Mirror

Comeback R-Flat
NOTE: Which side this play goes to is the QBs pre-snap choice which he will call at the line (for the benefit of the line and the RB).

Wing-T Adaptation
Off-setting the RB (like in a Wing-T) can add a new dimension to an offense by changing the timing and angles in the running game and facilitating a more aggressive out-of-pocket passing game for the QB.

Daniel Right Raccoon Wk 28 Trap
The quick trap is employed in this package because it sets up the option back towards the RB.

Daniel Right Raccoon Wk 41 Trap Opt
By optioning towards the realigned RB the play will develop faster and could lead to a big play. The X's release block on the CB is key.

Daniel Right Raccoon Wk Freak Wk 41 Toss
Similar to the option, I like the toss here because it develops extra quick and can catch the weak side of the defense off-guard.

Daniel Right Raccoon Wk 15 Lead
The lead is the bread-and-butter of the two-back running game. The alignment change adds almost a sort of draw effect since the RB is actually taking a step back to hit his read point.

Daniel Right Raccoon Wk 14 Counter Y-Crack
By running away from the realignment we slow down the development and create a sort of sweep action. This would be a good call for a cutback running specialist.

Daniel Right Raccoon Wk Zip 14 G-Lead ZCrack
Again, by running away from the realignment we slow down the development and create a sort of sweep. The runner should be looking to bounce outside since the Z is coming down on the LBs with a crack.

Daniel Right Raccoon Wk Zip 81 Pass X-Bench R-Flat
Sprinting out towards the realignment allows the RB to get into the pattern immediately and allows for a fast developing play. QB is reading the CB. Secondary read is the FS, who is being "high-lowed" by the Z and Y. If the QB has a strong arm, this can be a big play back to the Z in the deep middle.

Daniel Right Raccoon Weak Freak Wk 31 HJ
Since every package should have a quick pass, we motion the fullback out for a quick hitch. The Jump route to the X can be big if you have an athletic TE.

Daniel Right Raccoon Weak Freak Weak 141 Double Go R-Flare
Working off the Toss, we freeze the defense with play-action and then throw away from the FS (F or X on deep routes), or dump to the RBFlare.

Daniel Right Raccoon Weak 116 Z-Square FFlat
Again, suck up the defense with the play-action and then read the SS for the Square-SAI decision. Look for the defense to possibly forget about the FB after the fake.

Daniel Right Raccoon Weak Counter 314 XCorner
Lots of misdirection in the backfield here, counter, and then boot back to the weak side, reading outside-in (X to Y). The Z-Post can be hit for a big play, but the QB must have an exceptional arm. Ideally, the read should be quick (Look X-Look Y-Run it!).

Daniel Right

Raccoon Wk Zip 214 Comeback F-Flat
The QB is rolling right behind the RB fake and pressuring the outside of the defense. The Z is motioned in to make the defense worry about the crack, and to allow for more separation on the comeback route. Again, the read is outside-in.

Motion to Trips

Motioning to trips is a good move for 3 reasons. 1) it changes the strength of the formation which forces the defense to adjust on the fly 2)it allows you to flood the trips side of the field 3) it distracts the defense from the weak side.

Grant Right Zig Z-Hard 46 Base
Here the motion is used to draw the SS away from the point of attack.

Grant Right Zig Solid 43 Counter
Here the motion gives us an extra blocker on the play side.

Grant Right Zig Solid 41 Speed Opt
The motion combined with the Solid call turn the speed option into a load option.

Grant Right Zig 42 Toss
Similar to the 46 base, we use the motion to draw attention to the strong side and then use the quick toss back to the weak side.

Grant Right Zig 51 All-Curl T-SAO
As you might notice in the other sample packages, I like curls because they're easy throws and easy reads. This is simple, flood the zone and throw wear the SS isn't.

Grant Right Zig Counter 343 Pass Y-Corner
More misdirection, bootlegging back away from the motion, if the big play to the Y isn't there, you've got a 3-tiered cross (post-drag-shallow) coming from the backside.

Grant Right Zig 81 Pass
The sprint-out pass is a good play to have in any package. I like to run it off the motion because it gives the Z a running start into his route and lets him get to the outside that much faster.

Grant Right Zig Zulu 142 X-Shallow Y Post
Motion draws attention to the Z, and then passing to the others, in-out on the SS (shallow and over), and a high-low on the LBs (post and shallow).

Grant Right Zig Yankee 31 GSF
Good quick pass. The read is the man over the T (check the X in presnap). This works well in concert with the screen (Z-Slip) because the two look so similar.

Grant Right Zig 31 Z-Slip
Quick screen to the motion man, who gets a running start on the defense, (note: play side tackle must delay the end just a little, before moving to the backer)

Bunch Passing
When multiple receivers start their routes very close to each other it’s called "bunching". In this system the "animal" shifts (Tiger, Zebra, etc) and motions are used to create bunches. Bunch passing can be useful to confuse the defense (especially in the case of man coverage) and to free up

receivers on deep routes.

Alice Right Zebra Fly 144 Z-Dig F-Up
Zebra and Fly create the bunch. The Y clears; the Z pressures the inside, which should leave the F open down the sideline. If the safety overflows to the sideline to pick up the up, the Dig will be open.

Daniel Right Falcon Streak Zebra Roy X-ray 52 Z-Hook R-Up
Similar to the previous example, but this time the read is a high-low in the flat between the SAO and the Up, once again, if the defense overflows to the outside, comeback to the hook in the middle. X-ray keeps the tight end in for extra blocking.

Alice Right Frog Wk

Zebra Razor 52 Z-Square Y-Up
Another variation on the same theme, however, this time the motion makes the Y the innermost receiver so he will run the Up.

Jenny Right Zebra Trick X-ray 52 Z-Fin R-Flat
This time the bunch created in close with the idea of a shorter completion. The T clears the CB, making it a in-out read between the Z and the RB. If all the defense sucks up on the short passes, then the Y should be open deeper on the over route.

Benton Right Zebra Toy 32 NGA
Three step passing can be especially effective out of a bunch. The Y clears, leaving an in-out read between the T and Z.

Bob Right

Zebra Toy 32 SJF
Very similar to the previous example, this should also be effective against zone as it creates a high-low in the flat in addition to an in-out.

Grant Right Zebra Razor 32 HAG
As with the Z-Fin this is an excellent play for short yardage. If the Z is not open immediately upon his break, then look for the T (who also had a benefit of a running start into his route).

Charlie Right Gun Zebra Tiger Rip Streak 82 ZBench T-Slip
The bunch doesn't have much affect here (except perhaps to give the Z more room to the sideline), but rather serves as a pre-snap distraction for the defense.

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