DECEMBER 2008

DULUTH TOWNSHI P COMMUNI TY CENTER AND
NORTH SHORE COMMUNI TY SCHOOL: MASTER PLAN
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
This project was produced and completed by The Center for Changing
Landscapes, College of Design, College of Food, Agricultural, and Natural
Resource Sciences at the University of Minnesota.
The project team included:
Mary Vogel, Co-Director
Roger Martin, Senior Research Fellow, Professor Emeritus
Laura Detzler, Research Fellow
Nichole Schlepp, Design Coordinator
Special thank you to:
Sue Lawson, Planning Director, Duluth Township
Dave Mount
Paul Voge, LHB
Funding for this project was received in part by the Coastal Zone
Management Act, by NOAA’s Office of the Ocean and Coastal Resource
Management, in cooperation with Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal
Program.
This publication is available at http://ccl.design.umn.edu/.
For alternative formats, direct requests to:
Center for Changing Landscapes
151 Rapson Hall
89 Church Street
Minneapolis, MN 55455
612.624.7557
©2008 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and
employer.
Printed on recycled and recyclable paper with at least 10 percent post
consumer material.
INTRODUCTION
Project Description
THE SITE
Existing Conditions
Photo Analysis
Identified Needs
MASTER PLAN
The Plan
Phasing
Phase One: Fix Site Drainage
Phase Two: Core Site Grading
Phase Three & Master Plan Components
Grading For Stormwater Run Off
Swale and Rainwater Garden Design
Native Plants
APPENDIX
Work Plan
Meeting Notes May 2008
Site/Topographic Survey
Proposed Building Comprehensive Plan
Preliminary Design Concepts
Alternate Final Plan
Plant Lists
RESOURCES
5-7
6-7
9-15
10-11
12-13
14-15
17-31
18-19
20-21
22-23
24-25
26-27
28-29
30-31
33-52
34
35-36
37
38-39
40-51
52-53
54-56
57
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I NTRODUCTI ON
PROJECT DESCRI PTI ON


PROJECT DESCRI PTI ON
The project goals were to work with the community and the school to
create a master plan that:
Uses a participatory process that engages and creates consensus
among community members, officials, and the school on the site’s
future directions,
Looks holistically at current and future needs,
Locates future site developments, and
Empowers future fund raising efforts to implement the plan over
time.
SCOPE OF WORK
The design/planning team completed an initial investigation and analysis
that identified existing conditions and outlined a site program; created
three design concepts driven by site opportunities and constraints and
programmatic considerations; created a preliminary design for feedback;
and completed a final design. For a detailed description of the process see
Work Plan in the Appendix.
COMMUNITY PROCESS
The design team worked with community members, community officials,
school staff and students to identify community and school needs and the
challenges and opportunities associated with those needs. Feedback was
received in a series of public meetings. Meetings were also held with the
fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students in addition to a meeting with the
school staff. The program was developed, the design concept to pursue
was chosen, and the preliminary design was critiqued at these meetings.
For a listing of needs identified at the initial meetings see Community
Meeting Notes May 2008 in the Appendix. The Design Concepts are also
in the Appendix.
PROJECT GOALS
777 PROJECT DESCRI PTI ON
Meeting October 28th, 2008
THE SI TE
I DENTI FI ED NEEDS
PHOTO ANALYSI S
EXI STI NG CONDI TI ONS




THE SI TE
EXISTING CONDITIONS
The Duluth Township Community Center and Community School site is
located at the intersection of Lismore Road and Ryan Road, the location
of the former North Shore Elementary Public School. The site is owned
by Duluth Township; it is leased to the North Shore Community School,
a kindergarten through six-grade charter school with about a 260 student
enrollment. Besides accommodating the North Shore Community School,
the site is a gathering place for community events and community athletic
games.
The 38 acre site consists of a school/community building; woodlands with a
creek and footpaths; outdoor recreational areas that include a skating rink,
a small garden, fields for playing soccer, softball, basketball, tetherball,
and parking areas. The site survey is in the appendix.
Currently the Duluth Township Community Center and North Shore School
Campus is characterized by:
A number of individual separate elements that are used by the
community and the school,
Poor stormwater runoff management generated by the current grading
and the site’s clay soils,
A desire to expand the building over time, and
A desire to use the site more effectively as a community and school
asset.
11 11 11 EXI STI NG CONDI TI ONS
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THE SI TE
PHOTO ANALYSIS
A temporary classroom building is set on a concrete slab east of the
main building.
Clay soils and ineffective grading characterize much of the developed
site.
The rainwater garden and a drainage trench are located east of the
school building.
The main building entry is set back off Ryan Road.
A greenhouse and garden are resources for the environmental
curriculum.
Playing fields for a variety of sports occupy a large part of the site’s
developed areas.
The site’s large wooded area provides opportunities for environmental
education and demonstrations of forest management practices.
Currently a series of trails pass through the woods.
A creek runs long the site’s western edge.
Temporary Classroom Building
Possible Pond Area Rainwater Garden
13 13 13
PHOTO ANALYSI S
School Entrance
Greenhouse
Forest Trails
Farm fields
Uneven Play Fields Creek
THE SI TE
IDENTIFIED NEEDS
The following needs were among the many identified in meetings with the
community members and officials and school students, staff, and parents.
The needs include:
A coherent campus wide pathway system,
Upgrading and/or maintenance of structured play areas,
The relocation of the playing field for the youngest soccer players,
An outdoor bathroom facility,
A picnic pavilion,
An outdoor classroom,
More storage space for outdoor recreational equipment,
A strategy to use the site’s wooded area more effectively,
More, safe parking spaces, and
Designs/plans that reinforce and extend the school’s environmental
learning emphasis.
For a more detailed list of the needs/desires identified at the meetings see
the Meeting Notes in the Appendix.
15 15 15 I DENTI FI ED NEEDS
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Lismore Road
MASTER PLAN
PHASI NG
THE PLAN
GRADI NG FOR STORMWATER RUN-OFF
I NSTALLATI ON ESTI MATES
SWALE AND RAI NWATER GARDEN DESI GN
SWALE AND RAI NWATER GARDEN PLANTS
THE PLAN
The Site Master Plan structures the site to function as a campus for both
a community center and a charter school. It responds to the existing soil
conditions and stormwater run off issues while creating a circulation system
that serves both the community at large and the school community. It
enhances the unique qualities of the site and adds more facilities. Features
of the plan include:
Circulation Systems
The main entry on Ryan Road provides access to both the current
building and its planned expansion spaces,
Expanded parking lots accommodate up to 136 cars,
A paved fire truck/emergency vehicle access lane and a pedestrian/
emergency vehicle route encircles the building to accommodate
pedestrian movement and emergency access to all parts of the
building,
The service road is off Ryan Road North of the main entry, and
A handicap accessible pathway system knits the site together and
provides a framework for the addition of elements over time,
Play Areas and Athletic Facilities
An enlarged and improved ice hockey rink with an expanded warming
house is located on the northern edge of the site,
Renovated softball/soccer field with bleachers and dugouts serves
both the school and the community,
Two separate play areas, one for primary grades and one for 4-6
grades, are located east of the building,
An existing tetherball court is moved and upgraded, and
Two soccer fields are relocated and regraded to enhance their playing
surfaces.
Gathering Places
The event patio is expanded,
A new picnic/outdoor classroom pavilion with storage and adjacent
toilet facilities is located for access by the community and the
school,
An existing log shack gathering place in the woods remains, and
Environmental learning area that over looks the creek is improved.
Environmental Features
A grading plan moves stormwater towards rainwater gardens and the
green environmental corridor,
A heavily planted green corridor is dominant element on the non-
wooded portion of the site. It receives stormwater runoff from the
regraded site and cleans it before it reaches a creek,
The existing rainwater garden is improved, and a new one is created,
The northern pond/wetland is expanded,
The cistern system for storing stormwater is expanded in the are
north of the school,
A community and school garden is located by the green,
The septic garden is retained and upgraded with plantings, and
The pathway system along the edge of the woods is expanded to
connect existing trails.
MASTER PLAN
19 19 19 THE PLAN
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PHASI NG
Stormwater is a very important site issue because the clay soils and the
current grading cause ponding and run off problems. Stormwater on
playing fields and in other areas creates mud spots and makes playing field
games difficult. The run off brings pollution to the stream compromising
its water quality. The Master Plan solves the stormwater challenge by
regrading the site to make an amenity: The Green Corridor.
Stormwater from a portion of the parking lot and the temporary classroom
building’s roof is channeled into an enhanced rainwater garden. Stormwater
from the playing fields runs off into a swale that feeds a second rainwater
garden. Both rainwater gardens help form a heavily planted Green Corridor
that functions ecologically to clean the stormwater before it infiltrates
or leaves the site to reach a stream. The Green Corridor is not only an
environmental asset, it is an aesthetic and educational asset as well. Is size
and its position between the main built portion of the site and the ball fields
makes it the dominant environmental feature of the non-wooded portion
of the site. Planted with many native plants, its beauty not only enhances
the landscape, it is also a very visible demonstration of an ecologically
sound strategy to treat stormwater. Because of its proximity both to the
school and the playing fields used by the community, the site can be used
for casual interpretation and can be an outdoor learning environment for
the school’s environmental curriculum.
Phase One: Fix Drainage Issues
Phase I work upgrades the existing rainwater garden, adds a rainwater
garden, and begins to create the Green Corridor.
Phase I:
Relocates the storage shed,
Realigns a portion of the fire/emergency vehicle access road/
pathway,
Upgrades the existing rainwater garden,
Creates a second rainwater garden,
Recommends removing and amending the soil in the base of the
rainwater gardens and swales to improve infiltration, and
Adds stormwater plant material in the existing swale.
SOLVING THE STORMWATER CHALLENGE: THE GREEN CORRIDOR
21 21 21 PHASE ONE: FI X DRAI NAGE I SSUES
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PHASI NG
The Phase II work addresses the drainage issues that compromise the
quality of the existing play areas close to the building and the soccer field
and adds to and upgrades existing play and gardening areas.
Phase II:
Regrades the entire area to the east and southeast of the building
to create a long swale that channels stormwater run off into the
stormwater pond and Green Corridor;
Completes the grading and the planting of the Green Corridor and
places the picnic/ outdoor classroom pavilion on a site overlooking the
Green Corridor;
Integrates the outdoor toilet facilities and the expanded storage into
the pavilion area;
Creates a series of discrete areas for gathering, play, and gardening
next to the building that include an expanded patio, a play area for K-3
students, a play area for 4-6 students, and an improved garden by the
greenhouse;
Upgrades the athletic playing areas by reseeding and regrading the
sod soccer field, moving the basketball court, installing fencing around
it, and installing a large cistern under the tetherball court/basketball
court;
Creates a circulation system that structures access to the gathering,
play, and garden areas; and
Installs a main circulation/emergency access path between the
outdoor areas and the soccer field.
PHASE TWO: CORE SITE GRADING
23 23 23 PHASE TWO: CORE SI TE GRADI NG
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Phase III completes the Master Plan by:
Expanding the parking lot to accommodate up to 135 more cars,
Moving the small children’s soccer field by Ryan Road to northeast of
the building,
Regrading to upgrade the pond/skating rink,
Adding a rainwater garden on the site of the old soccer field by Ryan,
Adding a seasonal retention pond southeast of the Green Corridor,
Planting a windbreak along the parking lots by Ryan Road, and
Completing the woodland trail system.
MASTER PLAN COMPONENTS
The following are estimates for the components of the Master Plan to be
used to obtain cost estimates for the surfaces and the vegetation.
Surfaces
Trail Extensions
Bituminous
750 linear feet of 5 foot wide bituminous trail: 3,750 square feet of
bituminous surface
Bituminous or Crushed Rock
875 linear feet of 10 foot wide bituminous or crushed rock trail: 8,750
square feet of crushed rock or bituminous surface
Mulched
2,900 linear feet of 4 foot wide mulch trail: 11,600 square feet of
mulched surface
Basketball Court
4,000 square feet of concrete or bituminous surface
Patios
Gathering Patio by School: 2,200 square feet of paving

Pavilion Patio: 640 square feet by pavilion
PHASE THREE
Surface Parking (bituminous or crushed rock)
First 25-28 stalls (18-21 added to existing stalls) plus entry from Ryan:
6000 square feet
From proposed Ryan entry to proposed southern entry (75-84 stalls):
19,200 square feet
Future expanded lot (26-30 stalls): 9,000 square feet
Site Vegetation
Trees
Swale and Rainwater Gardens: 40 trees
Parking Lot Screens: 70 trees
Additional site trees: 100 trees
Shrubs
Swale and Rainwater Gardens: 100
Other: ~100
Ground Cover
Swale and Rainwater Gardens: ~11,200 square feet
Other: ~20,250 square feet
Pedestrian Bridges
Woodland Bridges - one new and replace three existing
25 25 25 PHASE THREE
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Major grading on the site is needed to move the stormwater generated by
the temporary classroom building, other impermeable surfaces, and the
site’s clay soils away from the play areas and the playing fields to create
surfaces for play, gardening, and gathering. The grading plan manages run
off by creating a series of swales and two rainwater gardens. These areas
infiltrate the water where it is possible to infiltrate it and channel it into
the drainage channel after it is cleaned by plant materials where it is not
possible to infiltrate it.
The drainage plan is not just utilitarian. By transforming the drainage
system into the Green Corridor, it is aesthetic and an educational addition
to the site. The rainwater gardens are heavily planted in order to function
as water cleaning basins. The sides of the ditch are planted to stabilize
them and prevent erosion. By using native plants and installing interpretive
elements, the system can inform community members and students.
GRADING FOR STORMWATER RUN OFF
MASTER PLAN
27 27 27 GRADI NG FOR STORMWATER RUN OFF
SWALE AND RAINWATER GARDEN DESIGN
In order for the swales and the rainwater gardens to function properly the
clay soil needs to be amended or replaced. The section drawing shows
two to three feet of amended soil. In the first two sections the clay soils
are removed and replaced with sandy loam to facilitate infiltration. The
third section shows the insertion of a drain pipe, an alternate strategy for
soils with very poor infiltration rates. Soil tests should help determine
which is needed.
MASTER PLAN
29 29 29 SWALE AND RAI NWATER GARDEN DESI GN
Swale with Amended Soils
New Rainwater Garden with Amended Soils
Rainwater Garden with Drainage Pipe
NATIVE PLANTS
MASTER PLAN
Building Entry With Native Plants Mixed With a Few Ornamental Plants
Native grasses, forbs, shrubs, and trees are to be used in the rainwater
gardens, along the drainage channel, in the windbreaks, and other
areas that call for plantings. Many of these plants can be started in the
greenhouse and the garden.
The current and following pages contain photographs of native plants
that show how they are used in the landscape to provide year round
interest. Plant lists for the rainwater gardens and swales are located in the
Appendix. These lists were modified for the Northern Superior Uplands
Eco-region, a regional ecological classification system developed by the
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Plant information and lists
were gathered from Plants for Stormwater Design: Species for the Upper
Midwest.
31 31 31 NATI VE PLANTS
April Wetland Native Plant Blooms August Native Plant Blooms
September Native Plant Blooms May Wetland Native Plant Blooms
APPENDI CES
APPENDI X G: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPT
APPENDI X C: SI TE/TOPOGRAPHY SURVEY
APPENDI X I : PLANT LI STS
APPENDI X B: MEETI NG NOTES MAY 2008
APPENDI X A: WORK PLAN
APPENDI X D: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPTS 08.27.08
APPENDI X E: PROPOSED BUI LDI NG COMPREHENSI VE PLAN
APPENDI X F: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPTS 10.28.08
APPENDI X H: ALTERNATE FI NAL PLAN










34
WORK PLAN
This work plan outlines a process for creating a plan/design concepts for
the Duluth Township Community Center/North Shore Community School
site. The work plan is organized by tasks allowing for flexibility in meetings,
community input, and resource gathering.
Step I: Initial Investigation and Analysis
Designation of a local steering committee whose role is to represent
community and the school’s points of view and facilitate communication
between the design team and community stakeholders. At the
completion of the project the committee will develop recommendations
for a preferred site plan/design of the Duluth Township Community
Center/North Shore Community School site.
Information gathering which will include reviewing previous reports,
maps, historic documents and working with the committee and the
school’s students.
Photographic analysis and inventory.
Inventory existing and proposed amenities, sensitive areas, natural
and cultural features, utilities, personal safety issues etc.
Base model and base drawing development.
Initial meeting and site visit: meeting with students during the school
day and holding a community-wide kick off meeting.
Step II Design Concepts Driven by Opportunities &
Constraints
Identify issues and opportunities.
Identify proposed site plan/design options.
Present plan/design options for review and feedback to the local
steering committee at a public meeting.
Step III Preliminary Design
Develop a clear and concise design program based on the feedback
from the steering committee that clarifies the design issues to be
addressed in the preliminary design.
The Design team will produce a preliminary design concept for
review by the steering committee. The program will be addressed
by environmentally sensitive plan/design strategies that protect and
celebrate the site’s ecology and other natural features.
The steering committee and local stakeholders will review the
preliminary designs at a public meeting concluding Step III.
Step IV: Final Design
Final designs: input from the Step III review will inform the final
designs.
The designs will be illustrated in a number of graphic formats including
but not limited to sections, perspectives, plans, and axonometric
drawings to communicate design intent.
The design team will produce a final package of presentation quality
boards. All of the graphic and written material will be made available
in an electronic format.
The final designs will be presented to the steering committee at a
public meeting.
Following the final meeting, a project document will be created and
delivered in hard copy and electronic form. The final deliverables will
consist of:
1 Full size set of final design boards.
3 Reduced versions of the final design boards
3 Bound copies of the final project document
5 Digital versions with all of the above mentioned
Final document will specify the species, number, and quality of landscape
plantings to implement the final design. In addition, description of
landscape elements such as walkways, pavilion structures, etc. will
specify the preferred materials for such structures.
APPENDI X A: WORK PLAN
35 35 35
COMMUNITY MEETING NOTES
MAY 2008
Needs, wishes, and problem areas in need of improvement were identified
in a series of meetings with community members and school staff and
students. These are listed below.
COMMUNITY INPUT
Needs/Suggested Improvements: safe event parking, a pavilion with
seating, enlarged gardens (rainwater garden, butterfly), an outdoor
restroom, a safe 3-6 playground, handicap accessible trails, dual-purpose
space for parking and other uses, stream access with erosion control, a
warming shack by the ice rink, a horseshoe court, three soccer fields,
a stormwater management/reuse strategy, a rainwater garden/collection/
reuse demonstration, a community auditorium, landscaping (trails, gardens,
shrubs, berries to separate areas), a second well, public use/picnic pavilion
with restroom facilities, a large space for outdoor learning, access/egress
for vehicles for seniors parking, trees, hockey facilities, more classroom
space, enhanced basketball court with a better location, a fence, and an
improved surface.
Modernize, fix up warming shack, expand building for more classroom
space, limestone and level out ice rinks and use them for parking in spring
& fall, community vegetable garden space, school vegetable garden to
use for food/education, underwater rainwater collection system cistern,
prairie/native plants in place of lawns, trees planted to provide shelter from
NW wind, points for looking at change in ecosystems, exercise stations
on trail, bridges/trails over stream for monitoring viewing, wetlands
sewage treatment system, geothermal heating incorporated in pond-
fields, volleyball court, community storage, school storage, expanded and
improved nature trail community picnic site with pavilion, eco-tourism
outdoor class space, windbreak on west to catch snow for watering
fields, reclaim forest ecosystem, butterfly gardens, stormwater run off
managed to get it out of flowing directly into the stream, picnic pavilion
and bathrooms near backstop of softball field, seating near red pines so
folks can watch the game in the shade, parking close by, too many trees
seemingly planted at random, and an expanded, improved nature trail.
Likes: K-2 playground, that the school is open, the woods, the trails,
the stream, the natural areas, the hockey/recreation rink, and the public
recreation fields
Comments: Its seems that this is a school only and not a community
center
Should township hire recreation facilities manager? Someone to take care
of soccer filed, warming shack, etc.
SCHOOL
Sixth Grade
Likes: Soccer field, nature trail, all the land (ball court, swings, woods,
soccer field), hacky sack, jump ropes, soccer field, baseball field lots of
space, ice rink, jump ropes, soccer field, baseball field, big woods, swings,
and greenhouse
Needs/Suggested Improvements: Add 4th side to shacks on the nature
trail, basketball court, (expand and improve paving and new fencing), new
volleyball court, soccer field (mark lines and boundaries), fix tetherball
court (expand, paint lines, add new fencing, and new blacktop), tennis
court (enlarge, new fencing, repair surface), football field, new hockey rink
(new goalie area and boards on sides), bigger gym, six wheelers to take
places, indoor play land (rock wall, trampoline, foosball), more swings,
archery range, hockey sacks, big swishy swings, play ground slide, tennis
and badminton courts, more sports equipment (soft balls, basketballs,
etc.), new playground equipment, rock wall, better grass, more play in
woods and creek, ropes course in the woods, and sliding hill.
Would like: Swimming pool with water slide, trampoline, rock wall, ropes
course, obstacle course, pool, football field, archery range for 6th graders,
recess on the nature trail, more places to rest on nature trail, and water
slide.
Fifth Grade
Likes: Open space, greenhouse, river, year-round access, open spaces,
nature trail, ability to ski/snow shoe, tetherball, baseball field, jungle gym,
soccer field, patio, greenhouse, shed, and tennis court.
Needs/Suggested Improvements: Basketball court (have hoops on the
long way, get new basketball ball nets and black top court), better laptop
in the court, fix tetherball, plant grass on dirt, baseball field (correct the
baseball measurement of the bases, and fix up field with sand) soccer filed
(level and remove rocks) basketball court, (repave).
Would Like: Football field, add obstacle course, more tire swings, winter
sliding hill, swimming pool, playground, volleyball court, climbing platform/
rock wall, level all playing fields and improve their surfaces, football field
with goal posts/yard lines, new soccer goals & nets, baseball gravel and
sand for the field, new basketball court, volleyball court, playground
obstacle course, big swings, handicap accessible swings, rope swing,
tower slide, climbing wall, resting benches with backs, outdoor drinking
fountain and bathroom, a playground for the big kids, and a bigger gym.
APPENDI X B: MEETI NG NOTES MAY 2008
36
Fourth Grade
Likes: All the space, soccer field, basketball court, soccer field, greenhouse,
playing field, kick ball, ski trail, three sisters garden, nature trail, playground,
greenhouse, ice rink, tetherball, basketball court, chickadee landing, ski
trail, water trail, playground, tetherball, greenhouse, ice rink, three sisters
garden, greenhouse, nature trail, and playgrounds.
Needs/Suggested Improvements: Tetherball court, slides, shooter ball
games, tennis court, basketball court, soccer fields (surface, goals and field
striping), baseball fields, hockey rink and pleasure rink, stream bridges,
benches for stream visits, and patio.
Would Like: Tables, umbrellas, chairs, and benches on an enlarged patio,
outdoor swimming pool, hot tub, water slide, big kid playground, swings
for older kids, handicap swing with straps or buckles, tire swing, really
high slide, new basketball court, badminton court, jungle gym, monkey
bars, rock wall, improved zip line, fitness station, sand box, better soccer
field and basket ball court, playground for bigger kids 3-6, a flower/food
garden, outdoor bathrooms, larger, more benches, baseball field benches
with backs, outdoor classroom, outdoor water fountain, bathroom for ice
rink, more stream bridges, sledding hill, golf course, outdoors pavilion, an
eating area with picnic tables, candy mountain, fire pit, stove, ant farm,
animal farm, petting zoo, dirt bike track, bikes for nature trail, long hiking
trail, theme park, derby cars & track, merry go round, rollercoaster, and
sports equipment (boxing gloves, more balls, volley ball net, soccer net,
etc.).
Staff
Likes: Woods, nature, skating rink, tree nursery, rainwater gardens,
chickadee landing, trails, out door shelters, playground for primary, rinks,
soccer field, special education lower grade classrooms, greenhouse,
storage shed, skating rink, nature trail including sheds
Needs/Suggested Improvements: Re-do forest management plan to
recognize/emphasize ecosystems, make sure there is continuity with
projects (rainwater gardens not maintained any more), soccer right next
to Ryan Road is a worry (this part of the site would be good for planting a
wind break), upgrade rinks, resurface soccer fields and basketball court,
add a playground for 4-6, make more parking, improve landscaping to
minimize mud in yard, use greenhouse more, upgrade rainwater garden,
add outdoor storage space, and delineate playing fields (lack of distinct
playing fields meshing soccer & football is scary).
Would like: Landscaping, green space, shrubs/tree on the north, wild life
bird corridor, mini parks with open spaces, community picnic site with
pavilion, defined walkways, defined areas (learning play etc, definition of
outdoor areas with signs, borders), expanded trail system (new handicapped
accessible trails, improved nature trail by stream, and more stuff on trail
for teaching), more parking, pick up area near portable classrooms, water
(for land, rink, fire, garden plots, wash station to clean kids), tree nursery,
outdoor restroom, more outdoor classrooms, additional playgrounds (one
for younger children and one for older children), more activity areas for
upper grades, a third soccer field north of school for small kids, finished
soccer & baseball fields, a finished ice skating rink, sledding hill, tree
houses, larger shelter, gazebo classroom, more storage, bench seating by
playing fields and along the trail, color-changing plants on chain link fence
by the boiler room), more playground, sport equipment, and equipment for
those with handicaps.
Building Space Needs: Although the focus of the sessions was the
campus, several building needs were identified. They included: special
education space, faculty room space it is very crowded, bathrooms needed
now stand in line, soundproof room, windows with screens, large special
ed room with bathrooms, several small rooms for testing and quiet study
APPENDI X B: MEETI NG NOTES MAY 2008
37 37 37 APPENDI X C: SI TE/TOPOGRAPHI C SURVEY
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38
Building Plan
The North Shore commissioned a comprehensive plan for the building.
The plans for the building’s future expansion are shown on the opposite
page. These plans were accommodated in the Site Master Plan.
APPENDI X D: PROPOSED BUI LDI NG COMPREHENSI VE PLAN

39 39 39 APPENDI X D: PROPOSED BUI LDI NG COMPREHENSI VE PLAN
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NORTH SHORE COMMUNI TY CENTER
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

40
Design Concepts
Three design concepts were developed for the August 27th community
meeting. All of the Preliminary Designs:
Responded equally to the needs and wishes identified in the May
meetings by enhancing existing and creating more outdoor recreation
facilities and amenities for the community and the school,
Created a pedestrian network that defined the site’s separate use
areas,
Provide for pedestrian connections throughout the non-wooded area
of the site,
Created more parking lots,
Developed the Green Corridor as the signature environmental feature
of the site,
Expanded community and environmental education facilities,
Addressed stormwater run off issues, and
Enhanced the existing trail system in the woodlands.
Each concept represented one of three ways of looking at the site as both
a community facility and a charter school.
Preliminary Plan I:
Community Integration
The first concept creates community space as part of the core facility for
use by both the community and the school. It has:
Additional community multi-use space on the northern wing of the
building,
Additional new classrooms to the east and to the south at the
temporary classrooms’ current location, and
Shared enhanced outdoor facilities.
APPENDI X E: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPTS 08.27.08
41 41 41 APPENDI X E: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPTS 08.27.08
Relocated Sid i
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42
Preliminary Plan II:
The Separate but Connected Plan
The second concept creates a separate identity for the School and the
Community Center on a site that is shared. When viewed from Ryan
Road, the school and the community building are seen as separate yet
parts of the overall integrated center/school campus. Its distinctive
features include:
A separate entrance off Ryan Road,
A separate parking lot, and
A separate community building that overlooks the Green Corridor.
APPENDI X E: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPTS 08.27.08
43 43 43 APPENDI X E: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPTS 08.27.08
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Scale: 1· .50.0'

44
Preliminary Plan III:
Community Identity
In the third scheme, the Community Center and the School are very
separate to emphasize their separate identities. In this scheme the
community building and playing fields occupy the southeast corner of the
site. The scheme’s features include:
The community building and playing fields have an entry off Lismore
while the school’s entry is off Ryan,
The separate building relates to the woodland, it does not share the
Green Corridor with the school, and
Although Community Center’s parking lots are connected to those
that serve the School, it has separate main access off Lismore and a
minor access off Ryan Road.
Comments from Meeting
Aug. 27, 2008
Five people came to make initial comments on the analysis and 3
preliminary designs.
Preliminary design comments:
Fire lane needed so trucks can access greenhouse behind building in
case of fire
Must reach toilets with truck to pump
Should toilets be separate from the pavilion structure? Smell issues?
Is there capital to ever build a separate community structure?
Would it make sense for a separate structure if the school may
someday need to expand into it?
The southern section of the site was just regraded/resodded
Can more of the site’s run-off be collected and stored for use?
Can the building’s north drains be captured and stored for possible
fire truck use?
School wants a stage/auditorium
Community doesn’t want to feel like they are treading on somebody
else’s land when they try to use amenities at the school – since it is
also a community center and should feel more like it
How can the community become more incorporated into the school?
The septic mound is expanding 125’ to the east
The community does not need an additional space to meet
In order to get money to do any of the work, it probably needs
community functions
Would like but doesn’t need a Folk Art School
An addition would be more feasible
Possibility of senior housing eventually moving into the area to the
south of the site
Safety of having ponds?
Utilize a geothermal energy source
Concern of trees creating hiding places for vandals
Add community restrooms in school addition
Move ski shack/storage closer so kids don’t have to trek through deep
snow with ski boots on
Have a trail to ski storage that is plowable
Outer parking lot would be great for the elderly who come to view
games in southern soccer field
More wind breaks!
Is there room for the ditch between the parking and roadway?
Propose less paved parking
APPENDI X E: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPTS 08.27.08
45 45 45 APPENDI X E: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPTS 08.27.08
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46
Master Plan: Building Expansion Phase 1
At the community’s direction the design team developed the first design
scheme into a preliminary design that showed the additions on the north
and west of the building. Along with a grading plan and section drawings
it was presented at a community meeting on October 28. The design is on
the opposite page.
APPENDI X F: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPTS 10.28.08

47 47 47 APPENDI X F: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPTS 10.28.08
hpanded PondlWetl.nd
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Se",ice Court lor
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48
Master Plan: Building Expansion Phase II
APPENDI X F: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPTS 10.28.08
The site plan with the additional classrooms on the eastern side of the
building are shown on the opposite page.

49 49 49 APPENDI X F: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPTS 10.28.08
Exponded PondlWetland
Domomuoti<>n with
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50
Preliminary Plan:
Increased Open Space
The design team changed the plan based on the comments received at the
October 28th meeting. The pavilion with sports storage and outdoor toilet
were moved, garden space was reduced, open turf area was increased,
the sidewalk was widened to allow for emergency vehicle traffic around
the school, reenforced turf was added for emergency parking, and
parking was rearranged. Slight changes were made to this plan based
on comments from a November meeting where other options for final
building additions were discussed. These changes appear in the final Site
Master Plan on page 19.
APPENDI X G: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPT
51 51 51 APPENDI X G: PRELI MI NARY DESI GN CONCEPT
bpanded Por>ellWat llnd
Demonstration with
C i > t ~ m lor Gorden I
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School Gard"".
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Alternate Final Plan
Following additions to the building, the temporary classroom building may
unnecessary. In this case, the basketball court could be placed on the
existing slab. The tetherball would stay in its current location and a larger
open turf space would be available for the Grade 4-6 play area.
APPENDI X H: ALTERNATE FI NAL PLAN
APPENDI X H: ALTERNATE FI NAL PLAN

A'Non l
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54
The following lists are from Plants for Stormwater Design: Species for the
Upper Midwest. Lists were adjusted to only include plants suitable for
Ecological Section 212L - Northern Superior Uplands.
A- Aromatic, BF- Butterfly/Nectar Source, CF- Cut/Dried Flowers, FC- Fall
Color, S- Shade, WL- Wildlife, L- Limited Availability
APPENDI X I : PLANT LI STS
Rainwater Garden Side Slopes
Design
Possibilities
Trees and Shrubs
Aronia melanocarpa Black chokeberry FC
Cornus racemosa Gray dogwood
Viburnum trilobum High bush cranberry FC, WL
Forbs and Ferns
Allium stellatum Prairie wild onion A
Anemone canadensis Canada anemone
Arisaema triphyllum Jack-in-the-pulpit S,L
Artemisia ludoviciana Prairie sage A
Aster laevis Smooth aster BF, CF
Aster macrophyllus Bigleaf aster L
Epilobium angustifolium Fireweed WL
Galium boreale Northern bedstraw CF, L
Heuchera richardsonii Prairie alumroot
Liatris pychnostachya Prairie blazingstar BF, CF
Lilium superbum Turk's-cap lily BF, L
Matteuccia struthiopteris
var. pennsylvanica Ostrich fern S
Monarda fistulosa Wild bergamot A, CF, WL
Osmunda regalis Royal fern S
Pycnanthemum virginianum Mountain mint A, CF
Ratibida pinnata Yellow coneflower CF
Smilacina racemosa False Solomon's seal CF, S
Solidago flexicaulis Zig-zag goldenrod S
Solidago rigida Stiff goldenrod BF, CF
Tradescantia ohiensis Ohio spiderwort BF, CF
Zizia aurea Golden alexanders BF, CF
Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
Andropogon gerardii Big bluestem FC
Bromus ciliatus Fringed brome CF, S
Panicum virgatum Switchgrass CF, WL
Sorghanstrum nutans Indian grass BF
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources
Stormwater Plant Lists
55 55 55
Rainwater Garden Base
Trees and Shrubs
Aronia melanocarpa Black chokeberry FC
Cornus sericea Red-osier dogwood WL
Ilex verticillata Winterberry
Viburnum trilobum High bush cranberry FC, WL
Forbs and Ferns
Agastache foeniculum Giant hyssop A, CF
Anemone canadensis Canada anemone
Angelica atropurpurea Angelica A, L
Asclepias incarnata Marsh milkweed A, BF
Aster puniceus Red-stemmed aster BF
Chelone glabra Turtlehead BF
Equisetum fluviatile Horsetail WL
Eupatorium maculatum Joe-pye weed BF, CF
Eupatorium perfoliatum Boneset
Gentiana andrewsii Bottle gentian CF
Iris versicolor Blueflag CF
Liatris pychnostachya Prairie blazingstar BF, CF
Lilium superbum Turk's-cap lily BF, L
Lobelia sphilitica Blue lobelia CF, WL
Lysimachia thrysiflora Tufted loosestrife L
Onoclea sensibilis Sensitive fern CF, S
Osmunda regalis Royal fern S
Physostegia virginiana Obedient plant CF
Pycnanthemum virginianum Mountain mint A, CF
Scutterlaria lateriflora Mad-dog skullcap L
Solidago rigida Stiff goldenrod CF, BF
Thalictrum dasycarpum Tall meadowrue S
Veronicastrum virginicum Culver's root BF, CF
Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
Bromus ciliatus Fringed brome CF, S
Carex comosa Bottlebrush sedge
Carex crinita Caterpillar sedge S, L
Carex hystericina Porcupine sedge L
Carex vulpinoidea Fox sedge
Glyceria striata Fowl manna grass WL
Juncus effusus Soft rush
Panicum virgatum Switchgrass CF, WL
Scirpus cyperinus Woolgrass
Spartina pectinata Prairie cord grass
APPENDI X I : PLANT LI STS
56
Dry Pond
Design
Possibilities
Trees and Shrubs
Aronia melanocarpa Black chokeberry FC
Cornus racemosa Gray dogwood
Cornus sericea Red-osier dogwood WL
Salix discolor Pussy willow CF
Salix exigua Sandbar willow
Spiraea alba Meadowsweet BF
Forbs and Ferns
Aster lanceolatum (simplex) Panicle aster BF, CF
Aster lucidulus Swamp aster BF, CF
Aster puniceus Red-stemmed aster BF
Equisetum fluviatile Horsetail WL
Euthanmia graminifolia Grass-leaved goldenrod
Liatris pychnostachya Prairie blazingstar BF, CF
Lobelia siphilitica Blue lobelia CF, WL
Monarda fistulosa Wild bergamot A, CF, WL
Pycnanthemum virginianum Mountain mint A, CF
Veronicastrum virginicum Culver's root CF, BF
Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
Andropogon gerardii Big bluestem FC
Bromus ciliatus Fringed brome CF, S
Carex bebbii Bebb's sedge
Carex vulpinoidea Fox sedge
Elymus virginicus Virginia wild rye WL
Panicum virgatum Switchgrass CF, WL
Spartina pectinata Prairie cord grass
Dry Swale
Design
Possibilities
Forbs and Ferns
Anemone canadensis Canada anemone
Artemisia ludoviciana Prairie sage A
Asclepias incarnata Marsh milkweed A, BF
Aster puniceus Red-stemmed aster BF
Euthanmia graminifolia Grass-leaved goldenrod
Lobelia siphilitica Blue lobelia CF, WL
Pycnanthemum virginianum Mountain mint CF
Verbena hastata Blue vervain BF, CF
Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
Andropogon gerardii Big bluestem
Bromus ciliatus Fringed brome CF, S
Calamagrostis canadensis Canada blue-joint grass WL
Carex bebbii Bebb's sedge
Carex vulpinoidea Fox sedge
Elymus virginicus Virginia wild rye WL
Glyceria striata Fowl manna grass WL
Juncus effusus Soft rush
Panicum virgatum Switchgrass CF, WL
Scirpus altrovirens Green bulrush CF
Spartina pectinata Prairie cord grass
Useful sod-forming grasses
Afrostis palustris Creeping bentgrass
Elymus sp. Wheat-grass
Poa palustris Fowl bluegrass
APPENDI X I : PLANT LI STS
57 57 57 RESOURCES
Books:
Field Guide to the Native Plant Communities of Minnesota. The Eastern
Broadleaf Forest Province. Minnesota Department of Natural Resources,
St. Paul, MN. 2006.
Field Guide to the Native Plant Communities of Minnesota. The Laurentian
Mixed Forest Province. Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, St.
Paul, MN. 2003.
Field Guide to the Native Plant Communities of Minnesota. The Prairie
Parkland and Tallgrass Aspen Parklands Provinces. Minnesota Department
of Natural Resources, St. Paul, MN. 2005.
Shaw, Daniel, & Rusty Schmidt. Plants for Stormwater Design: Species
Selection for the Upper Midwest. Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, St.
Paul, MN. 2003.
Data:
Special thanks to Paul Voge and LHB for providing the site survey, and
BDP Architects for the proposed building additions.
RESOURCES
Photo Credits:
Images from various internet sources:
Page 30, Building Entrance Stormwater Plants, Designscapes, Inc, www.
dscapes.com/stormwaterdes.htm
Page 31, April Wetland Native Plant Blooms, JFNew, http://www.jfnew.
com/images/featured-photos/large-April.jpg
Page 31, August Native Plant Blooms, JFNew, http://www.jfnew.com/
images/featured-photos/large-August.jpg
Page 31, September Native Plant Blooms, JFNew, http://www.jfnew.com/
featured-photo-month.asp
Page 31, May Wetland Native Plant Blooms, JFNew, http://www.jfnew.
com/featured-photo-month.asp

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