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Macro Express 3

Manual of Instruction

Copyright © Insight Software Solutions, Inc.

Table of Contents

Introduction

About Macro Express

8

Program Overview

9

Program

Navigation

10

Installing Macro Express

Installing Macro Express

 

11

Advanced Installation

12

 

15

Uninstalling Macro Express

16

Tutorial

Tutorial - Introduction

17

Creating a HotKey Macro

18

Creating

a

20

Creating

a

23

27

 

Capture a Macro - HotKey Last

30

Create a Popup Menu

32

Quick Wizard Capture

35

Macro

41

Sample Macros

44

46

50

52

Playing Back Macros

Macro Activation

54

57

59

Scheduled Macros

Schedule Activation -

Scheduling

At Startup

60

62

Scheduling - Once

63

64

Scheduling - Daily

65

Scheduling

-

Weekly

66

Scheduling

-

Monthly

67

Scheduling

-

68

Scheduling - Other

70

71

Window Title

 

72

No Activation

73

Popup Menu

74

Mouse Activation

75

Floating Menu

76

 

77

79

Using the Macro Explorer

System Macros

....................................................................................................................

82

Menu Commands File

File Menu

84

Import/Export Macros

 

Importing Macros

86

Import

Text Files

87

Import

88

 

Exporting Macros

89

 

90

91

Macros

Add Macros

92

Copy Macro

97

 

Run Macro Now

98

Recapture Macro

99

 

100

Search

Explorer

101

Delete Macro

102

Place on

103

 

Macro Properties

104

Category

Categories

106

Options

Sort Macros

108

View

110

 

Preferences

Appearance

111

 

113

Caching

115

Capture

116

Delays

118

Dialogs

119

 

Email Settings

121

 

122

 

File Paths

123

Miscellaneous

124

Miscellaneous - Advanced

127

Network

128

 

Passwords

129

Playback

130

Scheduler

132

 

133

Startup

136

Tools

 

Mouse Locator

137

Remap

Keyboard

138

 

140

Restore Program Defaults

142

Import Program Configuration

143

Export Program Configuration

144

Restore

Restore

File Associations

145

Keyboard Hooks

146

Restore Mouse Hooks

147

Building Macros with the Editors

Scripting vs Direct Editor

 

148

Scripting Editor

149

Direct Editor

152

 

154

Editor Menu Items

 

Editor

Menu

Items

155

Editor

Menu

-

File

158

Editor Menu - Edit

159

 

161

162

164

168

170

Macro Command Categories CD-ROM

 

CD-ROM

 

171

Clipboard

 

Clipboard

 

173

Debug

Log Messages

 

176

Desktop

Desktop

 

177

Dialogs

Multiple Choice

 

178

 

181

Explorer

Open Explorer To

 

184

 

185

186

Files/Folders

 

Convert File Name

 

187

File Manipulation

188

Get File

Version

190

Process an ASCII Delimited Text File

191

Process a Text File

 

195

Set File Attributes

197

Internet

Dial-Up Commands

 

198

Get IP Address

200

FTP ChMod Command

201

FTP Directories

................................................................................................................

203

 

FTP Directory

204

FTP

File Commands

205

FTP

Keep Alive

206

FTP Send File

207

FTP

Site

208

FTP

Site

Command

209

Ping Site

210

Send Email

211

Web Site

215

Keyboard

Keys Up or Down

216

Toggle Keys

217

Logic

 

AND/OR/XOR Logic

218

If Commands

220

If

Control

224

If

Message

225

If OS Version

227

If Ping Successful

228

If Registry

229

If

Variable

230

Switch / Case Commands

231

 

Macro Control

Load Macro Text File

234

Load New Macro File

235

 

Macro

236

Macro

238

Password Protection

239

Remarks

241

 

Macro Express

Macro Express Commands

242

Restart Macro Express

243

Mouse

Mouse Click on Control

244

 

Mouse

Commands

245

 

249

 

Multimedia

Audio Controls

250

Set Sound

251

Video Clip

252

Network

Map a Drive

254

Registry

Create Registry Key

256

Read/Write Registry

257

Write to Registry

229

Repeat

Repeat Options

...............................................................................................................

260

System

Control Panel

 

263

Default Printer

 

264

Empty Recycle

Bin

265

Get Pixel Color

266

Hibernate

268

 

269

270

272

Screen Display Settings

 

273

Set System Date/Time

274

System Controls

 

275

System Dialogs

277

 

278

Text

Date

 

279

Date and Time

280

 

282

283

284

286

Timing

Delay

288

Pause

289

Speed

 

291

Wait For Commands

292

Variables

Variables Overview

 

296

Clear Variables

298

 

299

300

302

304

308

310

Set Decimal Variables

 

311

Set String

 

313

Set Variable Integer

 

315

 

321

Variable Set from Miscellaneous

 

323

Variable

Set

to

ASCII

Character

324

Variable

Set

to

ASCII

Value

325

Window Controls

 

Controls

326

Using Controls

 

46

 

331

332

270

336

337

Variable

Get Control Text

338

Variable Modify Control

339

 

341

 

Windows/Programs

Activate or Launch

342

Set Window Order

344

 

345

 

Terminate Process

347

Window

Commands

348

Window

350

Capture (Record) a Macro

Capture Macro - Introduction

352

Capture Settings

 

116

Capture a Macro

355

 

27

Capture a Macro - Hot Key Last

30

 

Quick Wizard Capture

35

Create a Macro with Quick Wizards

Quick Wizards

368

Text Wizards

370

Internet and Networking Wizards

371

Macro Wizards

372

373

374

Using Popup and Floating Menus

Building Popup and Floating Menus

376

Properties

378

Scope

381

Notes

385

Icons

386

Macro Recycle Bin

 

Macro Recycle Bin

389

Networking and Other Issues

390

 

Networking Questions

391

 

392

License and Support Issues

Support

394

Frequently Asked Questions

395

Backup and Restore Macros

390

End-User License Agreement

399

Licensing

the Evaluation Copy

401

Upgrade Policy

402

About Macro Express

Macro Express is the premier macro utility on the market. With Macro Express, you can record, edit and play back mouse and keyboard macros. Its powerful tools and robust features will noticeably boost your productivity.

What is a Macro?

A macro is a set of commands that can be played back at will to perform a given task. These tasks may be something simple such as inserting your name and address into a word processor to something more complex such as launching a program, copying data from it, activating another program, pasting the data into it and repeating the steps several times. Tasks performed by macros are typically repetitive in nature allowing significant savings in time by executing the macro instead of manually repeating the commands.

Creating a Macro

There are several ways to create macros with Macro Express. One method is to capture (record) your keystrokes and mouse movements. Another method is to use the Quick Wizards. The Quick Wizards guide you through a series of questions and build the macro for you. Or you can build your own macros with the easy to use Scripting Editor or Direct Editor. The tutorial provides examples of creating macros through each of these methods.

Playing Back a Macro

Macro Express offers several methods for executing macros. These include the use of HotKeys, Shortkeys, Scheduled Macros, Window Activation, Mouse Clicks, Popup/Floating Menus and several others.

  • 1. A HotKey is a combination of keys on the keyboard that are pressed to initiate a macro. This could include pressing CTRL+ALT+R or CTRL+F12 or any number of combinations.

  • 2. A Shortkey is a small string of characters. When a matching combination is keyed in from the keyboard, it is erased and the assigned macro executes. You could use the small string of #add to type out your address.

  • 3. A Scheduled Macro executes on a given time schedule.

  • 4. For Window Activation, a macro runs when a specific window gains focus (appears) on the screen.

  • 5. A macro may be triggered by clicking on a specific area of the screen with the left, right or middle Mouse button.

  • 6. A Popup Menu or Floating Menu is basically a list of defined macros. Once the list is displayed, click on the desired macro or press an associated number or letter to execute the macro.

  • 7. A macro can be activated through a Batch File or Command Line.

  • 8. Macros may also be activated through Windows API calls or Windows Explorer.

  • 9. Run a macro from the Macro Explorer by using the Run Macro Now option.

Macro Scopes

Macro scopes allow you to place restrictions on your macros. You can assign macros to play back in all Windows programs, in one specific window or program, or in every program except the one you define. The tutorial steps through a few examples of how to do this.

Program Overview

Macro Express is a utility designed to help you automate repetitive computer tasks. This guide will explain a few basic concepts of Macro Express that may help you better understand the program.

Starting Macro Express

After installing the program, click on Start | Programs and open the folder that you chose for the shortcut (normally Macro Express). Click on the Macro Express 3 shortcut to start the program. If you elected to put Macro Express in your StartUp folder during the installation process, Macro Express will load each time you start your computer.

You can chose to have the program run in hidden mode or place an icon in the System Tray. Click on Options | Preferences | Appearance to make your selection. If running in hidden mode, the default hotkey is CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+W to activate the program window.

Player and Editor

Macro Express is split into two parts known as the Macro Express Player and the Macro Express Editor. The Macro Express Player is what executes the macros and it must be running in order for macros to play back. The Macro Express Editor is the tool used to create the macros.

When you run Macro Express, you are really running the Macro Player. By default, the Macro Editor will also run when you start Macro Express, but this can be changed so that it does not run automatically. The Macro Editor cannot be run by itself.

By default, the Macro Express Player shows up as an icon in the system tray. From this icon you can invoke the Macro Express Editor or shut down the Macro Express Player. You can optionally set the Macro Express Player to be completely hidden so that no icon shows in the system tray. With this option set, you would need to use the System Macros to invoke the editor or terminate the program.

Macros

A macro is a script containing commands that automate computer tasks. Each command performs one step, such as moving the mouse, launching a program or entering keystrokes.

There are several ways within the Macro Express Editor to create a macro. Using the Quick Wizards or Capture are the simplest. The Quick Wizards ask a series of questions and build a macro for you. To Capture a macro, you start the Capture, enter your keystrokes and mouse movements, and then stop the Capture process. You can use the Scripting Editor or Direct Editor for more control in writing your macro.

Macro Activation

Once written, a macro needs an action to cause it to play back. The macro activation might be a combination of keystrokes, a mouse click in a certain area of the screen or a macro may launch when a program starts up.

Files

Macro Express allows you to create multiple files of macros. When installing the program, two macro files are also loaded. They are samples.mex and macex.mex. The samples.mex file contains a number of sample macros that you can look at or use for reference. It is recommended that you not use this as your default file to create and store macros. The other file, macex.mex, is where you can save macros that you create. Or you can create a new macro file for this purpose by clicking on File | New Macro File from the Macro Explorer. The Macro Explorer displays the macro file name and path of the file you currently have opened.

Program Navigation

Macro Express consists of several components. The major components of the program may be accessed by clicking on the icons in the Actions column. You may also access these components through the menu commands. Each of these components will be discussed briefly here. Links are provided for more detailed information about each component.

Macro Explorer

By default, the program opens to the Macro Explorer. This displays the list of macros in the file that you have open. When saving macros in the editors or other options, the program will return to the Macro Explorer.

Scripting Editor

The Scripting Editor is one of two editors available for writing or editing macros. If you have highlighted a macro in the Macro Explorer list and click on the Scripting Editor icon, the contents of the highlighted macro will be displayed in the Scripting Editor. If you do not have a macro highlighted and click on the Scripting Editor icon, a message will appear saying that you have not selected a macro to edit. Then it asks if you would like to create a new macro using the Scripting Editor. If you click yes, the Add Macro window will appear and you can begin writing the macro. Double clicking on a macro listed in the Macro Explorer will load the Scripting Editor if you have it set as your default editor. Once in the Scripting Editor you can then click on the Direct Editor and work on the macro in this editor.

Direct Editor

The Direct Editor is the other editor available for writing or editing macros. If you have highlighted a macro in the Macro Explorer list and click on the Direct Editor icon, the contents of the highlighted macro will be displayed in the Direct Editor. If you do not have a macro highlighted and click on the Direct Editor icon, a message will appear saying that you have not selected a macro to edit. Then it asks if you would like to create a new macro using the Direct Editor. If you click yes, the Add Macro window will appear and you can begin writing the macro. Double clicking on a macro listed in the Macro Explorer will load the Direct Editor if you have it set as your default editor. Once in the Direct Editor you can then click on the Scripting Editor and work on the macro in this editor.

Capture

This will start the process for recording or capturing a macro. Your keystrokes and mouse clicks/movements will be recorded and saved.

Quick Wizards

This option will start the Quick Wizards. There are 25+ different wizards to guide you step by step through the creation of different macro types.

Recycle Bin

Macro Express has its own recycle bin. Any macros deleted from the Macro Explorer will be sent to the Recycle Bin. If you deleted one by mistake you can restore the macro to its proper file. Or if you are sure you don't need the deleted macros, you can remove them permanently.

Installing Macro Express

The steps for installing Macro Express are fairly standard.

  • 1. First download the program from www.macros.com.

  • 2. Save the downloaded file to a folder on your hard drive.

  • 3. Locate the downloaded file and double click the .exe file to start the installation process.

  • 4. Follow the on screen instructions to complete the install.

To get started with the program, read the Introduction and the Tutorial sections of the Macro Express Help.

Licensing Macro Express

If you have purchased the license for Macro Express you will also receive a license code. From the Macro Explorer click on Help | License Macro Express to activate the License Information window. Enter your name and code exactly as they appear on the license instructions you received when you purchased Macro Express. Press OK to save the license information. Your license status will now display in the lower left corner of the Macro Explorer.

See the Advanced License Information topic for consideration of Administrator and non-Administrator login rights and Macro Express licensing.

Advanced Installation

Silent Install

A silent install means Macro Express will be installed without the user having to answer any questions during the installation process. This is useful if you want to install Macro Express from within another setup program or when installing from a server on a network.

 

Note: Because it requires command line parameters, a Silent Install cannot be run by clicking on the installation filename in Explorer. You may execute it from the Start | Run command or from a batch file that contains the proper command.

 

The /S command line parameter tells the Macro Express installer to do a Silent Install. For example: macex3.exe /S

 

Note: The Macro Express installation file can be named setup.exe or macex3.exe depending on where you obtained the file. In the examples shown, substitute the actual name of your Macro Express installation file. If you downloaded an

 

installation file in zip format, you must unzip setup.exe or macex3.exe from the zip file before running a Silent Install.

 

Installation options

The Macro Express Install program allows you to use a text file to automatically respond to the install questions during the installation process. By putting entries in the text file, you can choose things such as where to install the program, whether Macro Express should be put in the Startup folder so it is automatically launched when Windows starts, or whether the Quick Start Guide should be displayed after Macro Express is installed.

To do this you need to create a text file with a name of your choosing and use the /M= command line parameter. For this example, we will name the file ME3Setup.txt.

macex3.exe /M=c:\ME3Setup.txt

These are the options you can put in the setup file:

INSTALLPATH is used to override the default installation folder. If included, Macro Express will be installed in the folder specified by INSTALLPATH. INSTALLPATH=c:\myprograms\Macro Express

STARTMENUFOLDR is used to override the default start menu used to load Macro Express. If included, the menus to start Macro Express will be placed in the folder specified by STARTMENUFOLDR. STARTMENUFOLDR=Utilities

STARTUP=Y puts Macro Express in Windows StartUp folder. STARTUP=N does not put Macro Express in Windows StartUp folder.

LAUNCHNOW=Y Launches Macro Express after installation is completed. LAUNCHNOW=N does not Launch Macro Express after installation is completed.

NOQUICKSTART = Y the Quick Start Guide will not be installed. NOQUICKSTART = N the Quick Start Guide will be installed (default).

QUICKSTARTNOW=Y displays Quick Start Guide after installation is completed or when Macro Express starts (default). QUICKSTARTNOW=N does not display Quick Start Guide at the end of the installation. QUICKSTARTNOW=P Prevents the Quick Start Guide from being displayed when Macro Express starts. QUICKSTARTNOW=NP does not display Quick Start Guide at the end of the installation and also prevents the Quick Start Guide from being displayed when Macro Express starts.

Note: NOQUICKSTART prevents the Quick Start Guide from even being installed. QUICKSTARTNOW just prevents

 
 

the Quick Start Guide from being displayed. When using QUICKSTARTNOW the Quick Start Guide can be installed but not automatically displayed.

 

WHATSNEWNOW = Y Displays What's New in this version after install WHATSNEWNOW = N does not display What's New in this version after install

REBOOT=N suppresses the dialog suggesting a reboot after installation is completed, even if the installer has determined that one is needed.

LICENSENAME and LICENSECODE are used to license the software during install:

LICENSENAME=Name used when Macro Express was licensed LICENSECODE=Code received when Macro Express was licensed

CONFIGFILEPATH= path to optional configuration file. This allows you to set a specific configuration for Macro Express at the time you install Macro Express.

To do this, install Macro Express on a computer and set all the preferences the way you want them. Then, click Tools | Export Program Configuration to create a file containing the preferences you desire. Then add CONFIGFILEPATH=c:\macexp.mcf to the MESetup.txt file.

This example assumes the preference information has been saved in the file c:\macexp.mcf.

NOEDITOR=Y the Macro Express Editor will not be installed NOEDITOR=N the Macro Express Editor will be installed (default)

NOHELP = Y the Help file will not be installed. NOHELP = N the Help file will be installed (default).

NOICONS = Y the sample icons will not be installed. NOICONS = N the sample icons will be installed (default).

INSTALLOLDER = Y all files will be installed even if they are older than files already in the destination folder. INSTALLOLDER = N newer files in the destination folder will not be overwritten (default).

MACROFILEDEST = Path and filename of where to install the macro file macexinstall.mex, if it exists

Listed below are the rules for installing a macro (.mex) file.

  • 1. The macro file macexinstall.mex must exist in the same directory as the install file.

  • 2. If the MACROFILEDEST silent install option does not exist, then a) the macro file will be installed in the same folder as

the program and b) the name of the macro file is the default name for that program (macex.mex).

  • 3. If the MACROFILEDEST silent install option is used, then the macro file will be installed in the folder and filename

specified.

Sample Text File Using Notepad, or some other text editor, create the file ME3Setup.txt containing the
Sample Text File
Using Notepad, or some other text editor, create the file ME3Setup.txt containing the
following:
INSTALLPATH=c:\Program Files\Mac Exp 3
STARTMENUFOLDR=Mac Exp 3
STARTUP=N
LAUNCHNOW=N
QUICKSTARTNOW=N
REBOOT=N
LICENSENAME=Jason Junior
LICENSECODE=AB3EX-45F9T-1200P-34CC3-6TY54
Note: The License Information is for demonstration purposes only. You should use the
License Information you received when you purchased Macro Express 3.
This example will cause Macro Express to be installed in the c:\Program Files\Mac Exp 3
folder. The start menu will be Mac Exp 3. Macro Express will not be launched when
Windows is started. Macro Express will not run at the end of the install. The Quick Start
Guide will not be displayed at the end of the install. The setup will not reboot the
computer. After the installation is complete, the program will be licensed to Jason Junior.
Note: Only insert valid options into the ME3Setup.txt file. Do not include comments, blank
lines or remarked out options.

Silent Install with Options

You may combine the Silent Install with the Installation Options listed above. After creating ME3Setup.txt you would install Macro Express 3 with the following command:

macex3.exe /S /M=c:\ME3Setup.txt

Related Topics

Advanced Licensing Information

Advanced License Information

Windows can be configured to allow different users to log into a single computer. Some versions of Windows require a user to log in. Normally only one user is logged in at a time. One or more login names have access to the entire computer and are said to have administrative access rights. Other login names do not have administrative access rights. These login names have restrictions about what they can change on the computer.

If the Name and Code are entered into the License Information dialog when you are logged in as an administrator, Macro Express 3 will be licensed for all users. If, however, the License Information is entered when you are logged in as a non-administrator, Macro Express 3 will only be licensed for that user login.

Uninstalling Macro Express 3

To remove Macro Express from your computer follow the steps below:

1)

Click on File | Terminate Macro Express Player and Editor to close Macro Express.

2)

From the taskbar, click the Start menu button to open the Start menu.

3)

Open the Windows Control Panel.

4)

Based on the version of Windows you are running, select the option from the control panel used to uninstall

5)

applications. Highlight Macro Express 3 in the list of installed programs.

6)

Again, depending on your version of Windows click on the option to remove the program.

7)

Follow the on-screen prompts to remove Macro Express from your computer.

Tutorial - Introduction

A macro is a set of commands that can be played back at will to perform a given task. These tasks can be something simple such as inserting your name and address into a word processor to something more complex such as launching a program, copying data from it, activating another program, pasting the data into it and repeating this several times. Tasks performed by macros are typically repetitive in nature allowing significant savings in time by executing the macro instead of manually repeating the commands.

Macro Creation

There are several ways to create macros with Macro Express. One method is to capture (record) your keystrokes and mouse movements. Another method is to use the Quick Wizards. The Quick Wizards guide you through a series of questions and build the macro for you. Or you can build your own macros with the easy to use Scripting Editor or Direct Editor. This tutorial will give examples of creating macros through each of these methods.

Macro Playback Options

Macro Express offers several ways to execute macros. These include the use of HotKeys, Shortkeys, Scheduled Macros, Window Activation, Mouse Clicks, Window Controls and Popup/Floating Menus.

  • 1. A HotKey is a set of keys on the keyboard that are pressed to initiate the macro. This could include pressing CTRL+ALT+R or CTRL+F12 or any number of combinations.

  • 2. A Shortkey is a small string of characters. When a matching combination is keyed in from the keyboard, it is erased and the assigned macro executes. You could use the small string of #add to type out your address.

  • 3. A Scheduled macro is one that executes on a given time schedule.

  • 4. For Window Activation, a macro runs when a specific window gains focus (appears) on your computer.

  • 5. A macro may be triggered by clicking on a specific area of the screen with the left, right or middle Mouse button.

  • 6. A Popup Menu or Floating Menu is basically a list of defined macros. Once the list is displayed, click on the desired macro or press an associated number or letter to execute the macro.

  • 7. A Control Activated macro allows you to start a macro when a specific Window Control, such as a button, edit box, etc., is active.

Macro Scopes

This guide will also discuss the scope of a macro - or the restrictions you have placed on the macro. You can assign macros to play back in all Windows programs, in one specific window or program, or in every program except the one you define. We'll also go through a few examples of how to do this.

Tutorial - HotKey

In this exercise we'll create a macro assigned to a hotkey.

Assigning the Macro Activation

From the Macro Express Explorer menu click on Macros | Add Macro to open Add Macro window. HotKey should already be selected and the blinking cursor should be in the edit box. If the cursor is not in the edit box, click on the edit box to place the text cursor there.

Tutorial - HotKey In this exercise we'll create a macro assigned to a hotkey . Assigning

Next, hold down the CTRL key, the SHIFT key and the T key all at the same time and then release them. CTRL+SHIFT+T should appear in the edit box. This is the hotkey we will use to run the macro. We can choose to create the macro by entering the macro command directly or by using a scripting editor. Other methods to create macros are to use one of the Quick Wizards or capture (record) a macro. These options will be reviewed in other sections.

Creating the Macro

For this exercise click on the Direct Editor button to open the Direct Editor window.

1. Type your address into the Macro Text field. 2. Click on the Properties tab and
  • 1. Type your address into the Macro Text field.

  • 2. Click on the Properties tab and type "My Address" in the Nickname field.

  • 3. Click on the Scope Tab and make sure Global is selected. It is the default option.

When finished, click on File | Save to save your macro. Then click on the Macro Explorer button to see your newly defined macro, My Address, added to the list of available macros.

Running the Macro

To test the macro, open the notepad program. To start notepad, click on the Windows Start button and enter notepad in the search box. When found, click on the file to open the notepad program. On older systems, click on Start and then Run. Enter "notepad" and click the ok button.

Once notepad is running, hold down the CTRL key, the SHIFT key and the letter T. Then release all the keys. Your address will type out into the notepad program.

Tutorial - Shortkey

This page demonstrates how to create a macro assigned to a shortkey.

Shortkey Settings

First, let's create some default settings that will apply to the playback of all shortkey macros. From the Macro Express Explorer menu click on Options | Preferences to load the Preferences window. Click on Shortkeys from the list in the left panel of the window to display the shortkeys options.

Tutorial - Shortkey This page demonstrates how to create a macro assigned to a shortkey .

Select the Use Prefix Keys option and enter ## in the Prefix Keys entry space. This will require that ## be pressed before typing the shortkey or the macro will not play back. Click the OK button to return to the Macro Explorer.

Assign the Activation

Tutorial - Shortkey This page demonstrates how to create a macro assigned to a shortkey .

From the Macro Express Explorer menu click on Macros | Add Macro to open the Add Macro window. Select the Shortkeys option and enter "email" into the Shortkey edit field.

Creating the Macro

We can choose to create the macro using the Direct Editor or the Scripting Editor. For this exercise click on the Scripting Editor button to open the Scripting Editor window.

First, click on the Properties tab . In the Nickname box, enter "My Email Address". Then

First, click on the Properties tab. In the Nickname box, enter "My Email Address". Then click on the Scope tab and make sure Global is selected. Now click on the Script tab to return to the screen displayed above. Scroll down the list of commands and click on the Text category of commands to expand this listing. Double click on the Text Type command found in this group.

From the Text Type window, enter your email address in the Keystrokes field. If you want

From the Text Type window, enter your email address in the Keystrokes field. If you want to have the macro paste the text into your application via the Windows clipboard, select the Use Clipboard to Paste Text option. By default the text will type into the application unless another selection is made. Press the OK button to save the entry and return to the Scripting Editor.

A new entry is listed in the Macro Script. This entry will read Text Type: followed by the email address that you entered. If you made a mistake entering your email address, you can double click on this entry and edit the address in the Text Type window.

From the Scripting Editor, click on File | Save to save your macro. Click on the Macro Explorer button to see your newly defined macro, "My Email Address", added to the list of available macros.

Run the Macro

To test out the macro, run the notepad program. To start notepad, click on the Windows Start button and enter notepad in the search box. When found, click on the file to open the notepad program. On older systems, click on Start and then Run. Enter "notepad" and click the ok button.

Once notepad is running, type the following: ##email. Your email address will type into the notepad program.

Tutorial - Scheduled Macro

This page will demonstrate creating a scheduled macro, one that will play back on the schedule that you choose.

Setting the Schedule

From the Macro Express Explorer menu click on Macros | Add Macro to open the Add Macro window.

Tutorial - Scheduled Macro This page will demonstrate creating a scheduled macro, one that will play

Select Schedule to display the scheduling options. For this example select the Other option in the Run Macro section. To simplify the example, select the Play Macro Indefinitely option. Next set the schedule to run every 1 minutes and 0 seconds. With these settings, the macro will play back once every minute.

Creating the Macro

We can choose to create the macro by using the Direct Editor or the Scripting Editor. For this exercise, click on the Scripting Editor button to open the Scripting Editor pane.

First, click on the Properties tab. In the Nickname box, enter "Date and Time". Then click on the Scope tab and make sure that Global is checked. Now click on the Scripting tab.

We will create this macro to only play back in the Notepad window and only if it is already running. To begin, click on the Logic command to expand this category. Then double click on the If Window running command to open the If Commands window. Make sure the If Window Running option is selected.

Enter Notepad for the Window Title and select the Partial Match option. Click on the OK

Enter Notepad for the Window Title and select the Partial Match option. Click on the OK button to save and see the command inserted into the macro script.

Next expand the Windows/Programs category of commands and double click on the Window Activate command to open the Activate/Launch Program window. Make sure the Activate Window Only option is selected.

Enter Notepad for the Window Title and select the Partial Match option. Click on the OK

Enter notepad for the Window Title and click on the OK button to insert this command into the macro script.

Next click on the Text category of commands to expand this category. Double click on Date/Time to open the Date/Time window.

Enter dddd, MMMM dd, yyyy - h:mm:ss AMPM in the Format edit field. Select both the

Enter dddd, MMMM dd, yyyy - h:mm:ss AMPM in the Format edit field. Select both the Type Out and Use Current Date/Time options. Click on the OK button to save and return to the Scripting Editor.

Then expand the Text category again and double click on the Text Type option to load the Text Type window.

Enter dddd, MMMM dd, yyyy - h:mm:ss AMPM in the Format edit field. Select both the

Locate Enter in the yellowed area and click on it to insert <ENTER> into the Keystrokes field. This instructs the macro to insert a carriage return after typing the current date and time. The last step is to close the If statement. Expand the Logic category and double click on End If to insert the End If command directly into the Scripting Editor.

You should have five entries listed in the "Macro Script" area as shown in the Scripting Editor image above. You can double click on any of these entries to make changes to what was previously input.

From the Scripting Editor, click on File | Save to save your macro. Click on the Macro Explorer button to see your newly defined macro, Date and Time, added to the list of available macros.

Testing the Macro

As long as Macro Express is running, a scheduled macro should be ready to execute. However, in our example the scheduled macro will only perform if Notepad is running. To start notepad, click on the Windows Start button and enter notepad in the search box. When found, click on the file to open the notepad program. On older systems, click on Start and then Run. Enter "notepad" and click the ok button.

Once Notepad is running, just wait and watch the date/time entered into Notepad each minute.

Close notepad and nothing will happen, because the macro cannot find a running copy of notepad.

Delete or Disable the Macro

After viewing the playback you can either delete or disable this macro since you won't want this Scheduled Macro to continue executing every minute indefinitely! To delete the macro, highlight it in the Macro Explorer list and choose "Macros | Remove Macro" from the menu.

If you prefer to keep this example but do not want it running every minute, then right mouse click on the macro. From the menu that appears, left click on the Disable Macro menu option. You will notice that the entry for this macro is now italicized and in a lighter color. This means it is disabled and will not play back until the macro has been enabled.

Tutorial - Capture a Macro - Assigning HotKey First

In this tutorial we will capture the macro in the Windows Paint program. To start we first need to run the Windows Paint program. To do so, click on the Windows Start button and enter mspaint.exe in the search box. When found, click on the file to open the Paint program. On older systems, click on Start and then Run. Enter "mspaint" and click the ok button.

Once Paint is running, we want to switch directly to Macro Express. If you are running Macro Express in the system tray, left click on the Macro Express icon in the system tray; otherwise, click on Macro Express in the taskbar.

Assign a Macro Activation

From the Macro Express Explorer window click on Macros | Add Macro or click on the Capture icon. The Add Macro opens as shown below.

Tutorial - Capture a Macro - Assigning HotKey First In this tutorial we will capture the

The HotKey option should already be selected and the blinking cursor should be in the edit box. If the cursor is not in the edit box, click on the edit box to place the text cursor there. Next, hold down the SHIFT key, the CTRL key and the Z key all at the same time and release them. CTRL+SHIFT+Z should appear in the edit box. This is the hotkey we will be assigned to the macro we record.

Capture Settings

Next click on the Capture Macro to open the capture settings window.

A number of capture options are available depending on what you are needing to capture. Default

A number of capture options are available depending on what you are needing to capture. Default settings for each of these options may be set in the Capture preferences panel. Those defaults would display in this window each time you started a capture. They may be temporarily overwritten as needed for each individual capture, which we will do now for this capture.

1.

Enter My Paint Drawing in the Nickname field.

2.

Select the scope setting of Program. This indicates that the recorded macro will only play back in the program we

record it in.

3.

Select the Capture Keystrokes and Capture Double <ALT> for Menus options.

4.

Make sure the Capture Mouse Relative to Window options are selected. Also make sure the Capture Window Size

option is checked.

5.

Since we will be recording mouse movements as well as mouse clicks, the Only Capture Mouse Clicks option should

be unchecked.

6.

Select the Capture At Actual Speed options.

7.

We want to start capturing the macro inside of the Paint program. Under Choose the program to start capturing in,

we want to select the Paint program. It should display in the dropdown list as "untitled - Paint".

Capturing the Macro

With all settings in place, click on the Start Capture button which will minimize the Macro Express window. The last program running prior to Macro Express should appear, which is the Paint program.

The macro is now recording. You can do something fairly simple in the Paint program such as drawing a face. Click on a color, and then draw a circle and place two eyes, a nose and mouth on it.

When the masterpiece is complete press the hotkey we assigned to the macro - CTRL+SHIFT+Z. A dialog appears that the capture is complete.

Running the Macro

Now it is time to run the macro we just recorded. Open the Paint program window. We need to start with a clean Paint window, so click on File | New from the Paint menu and don't save the changes to the previous drawing. With the clean Paint window, press CTRL+SHIFT+Z. The face that you just drew is redrawn complete with any hesitations that you may have made while doing so!

Tutorial - Capture a Macro - Assigning HotKey Last

When running Macro Express, you will note that there are five hotkeys automatically assigned and displayed in the Macro Explorer. These five hotkeys are System Macros (Scope indicates System). One of these System Macros is called Start / Stop Capture and by default is defined as CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+X. Pressing CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+X will start the recording of a macro and pressing it a second time will stop the recording. This hotkey combination may be changed to another available in Macro Express.

Capture Settings

Before we record any macros using this System hotkey, we want to make sure we have our default settings in place. From the Macro Explorer click on Options | Preferences and select Capture to display the Capture default settings as shown below.

Tutorial - Capture a Macro - Assigning HotKey Last When running Macro Express, you will note

These are the settings that are used when the System Start / Stop Capture hotkey function is invoked. These are also the default settings that appear when doing a macro recording by Assigning HotKey First (see prior example) or when using the Capture Quick Wizard.

1.

Select the Scope setting of Program. This indicates that the recorded macro will only play back in the program we

record it in.

2.

Select the Capture Keystrokes and Capture Double <ALT> for Menus options.

3.

Make sure the Capture Mouse Relative to Window options are selected. Also make sure the Capture Window Size

option is checked.

4.

Since we will be recording mouse movements as well as mouse clicks, the Only Capture Mouse Clicks option should

be unchecked.

5.

Select the Capture At Actual Speed options.

6.

Select the Prompt on Capture option which will display a message indicating that the capture is starting.

Click on the OK button to save the defaults. We are now ready to record.

An important thing to remember when recording a macro is to make sure that the program you plan to start recording in

is active and on top.

 

Our example recording will be in the Windows Paint program. To start the Windows Paint program, click on the Windows Start button and enter mspaint.exe in the search box. When found, click on the file to open the Paint program. On older systems, click on Start and then Run. Enter mspaint and click the ok button.

Capturing the Macro

With the Paint program open and on top, press CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+X. A notice may appear warning about the use of the ALT key. Click OK. Then a notice appears stating that the macro is about to start recording. Click the OK button to start the capture.

The macro is now recording. You can do something fairly simple in the Paint program such as drawing a face. Click on a color, and then draw a circle and place two eyes, a nose and mouth on it.

When the masterpiece is complete, terminate the macro capture by pressing the same SYSTEM hotkey we started with, CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+X. This action open the Capture Complete window as shown below.

Capturing the Macro With the Paint program open and on top, press CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+X. A notice may

Assigning Macro Activation

At this point we assign a hotkey or another type of macro activation to the macro we just recorded. We also give the macro a nickname and we can also override the Scope default setting at this point.

  • 1. Enter My Paint Drawing #2 in the Nickname field.

  • 2. Make sure Program is still selected as the Scope.

  • 3. Select HotKey as the Default Activation. Now move the cursor to the hotkey edit window, press CTRL+SHIFT+S and

release. CTRL+SHIFT+S should appear in the edit box. Click on the Save button and the capture process is complete.

Running the Macro

Now it is time to run the macro we just recorded. Open the Paint program window. We need to start with a clean Paint window, so click on File | New from the Paint menu and don't save the changes to the previous drawing. With the clean Paint window, press CTRL+SHIFT+Z. The face that you just drew is redrawn complete with any hesitations that you may have made while doing so!

Tutorial - Popup Menu

This example will show how to create a popup menu. Before starting, you need to already have some macros available to place in the menu . If you have not done so, then first create both a hotkey macro and a shortkey macro as described in the hotkey and shortkey sections. This example is based on the assumption that you have created these macros.

Setting the Activation

From the Macro Explorer menu click on Macros | Add Macro. A new window should appear titled Add Macro.

Tutorial - Popup Menu This example will show how to create a popup menu. Before starting,

Select the Popup Menu option. Click on the edit box to place the cursor inside. Next, hold down the ALT key, the SHIFT key and the Z key all at the same time and then release them. ALT+SHIFT+Z should appear in the edit box. This is the hotkey we will use for the popup macro. Next, click on the Build Menu button to activate the menu builder.

Setting the Menu Properties The Available Macros section displays all macros created. The Macros in Menu

Setting the Menu Properties

The Available Macros section displays all macros created. The Macros in Menu is the list of macros assigned to the popup menu. But first click on the Properties tab and enter My Menu in the Nickname field. Select Nickname and Scope as the How to Display option.

In the Icons area click on the Change button to open the Select an Icon window. Click on the Browse button to display several icon folders and a number of icons. Select the black 4 icon (black 4.ico) and click on the Open button. This displays the 4 icon as the current icon. Press OK to return to the Properties Tab. Select the Place Menu in System Tray option. We'll use the icon later on.

Building the Menu

Now click on the Editor tab. Under the section titled Available Macros, highlight the macro CTRL+SHIFT+T (the one we created earlier) and then click on the Add button. Next highlight the email macro (created earlier) and click on the Add button. These two macros should now reside in the Macros In Menu section. We are finished defining the menu so click on the Save button or File | Save Menu to save the menu.

Click on the Macro Explorer button to see your newly defined popup macro, ALT+SHIFT+Z, added to the list of available macros.

Testing the Menu

Nickname and Scope

Setting the Menu Properties The Available Macros section displays all macros created. The Macros in Menu

Let's test out the popup menu macro using notepad. To start notepad, click on the Windows Start button and enter notepad in the search box. When found, click on the file to open the notepad program. On older systems, click on Start and then Run. Enter "notepad" and click the ok button.

Once notepad is running, hold down the ALT+SHIFT+Z keys. A menu similar to the one above should appear, listing the two macros we have previously defined. We can either press the corresponding letter or number next to the macro or double click on the macro in the menu and it will play the selected macro back in notepad.

Another way to invoke the popup menu is to right click on the "black 4" icon in the system tray. The "black 4" icon should now be showing in your system tray, because of the Properties settings we made previously. The popup menu may be displayed in four different forms. One of these, Nickname and Scope, is displayed above.

First part of Macro

Let's test out the popup menu macro using notepad. To start notepad, click on the Windows

Let's take a quick look at the other options. Highlight the Popup Menu macro listed in the Macro Explorer and click on the menu item Macros | Menu Builder to reopen the Menu Builder. Click on the Properties tab and select the First Part of Macro option from the How to Display Menu section. Click the Save icon. Click on the "black 4" icon in the system tray to open the menu. This time it lists the first part of the contents of each macro, as shown above.

Icons Only

Let's test out the popup menu macro using notepad. To start notepad, click on the Windows

Cancel out of the popup menu and return to Macro Express. Right mouse click on the My Menu macro and select the Edit with Menu Builder option. Then click on the Properties tab and select the Icons Only option from the How to Display Menu section. Next, select the Horizontal option and enter 10 for Maximum Icons per Row. Click the Save icon. Now click on the "black 4" icon in the system tray. The menu should display, but this time, it will show a list of icons. Click on one of the icons in the menu to run the macro.

Windows Default

Let's test out the popup menu macro using notepad. To start notepad, click on the Windows

Return to the Macro Explorer and double click on the My Menu macro to activate the Menu Builder. Click on the Properties tab and select the Windows Default option from the How to Display Menu section. Click the Save icon. Now click on the "black 4" icon in the system tray. The menu will display as shown above. Click on the macro you want in order to execute the macro. Windows will also assign underscores to each of the macros, where possible. So in the example above, pressing the M key will also activate the My Email Address macro.

Tutorial - Quick Wizard Capture

Using the Quick Wizards may simplify the process of creating a macro. The wizard prompts you step by step through the

creation of a macro. In this tutorial we‘ll create a message to pop up at a specific time to remind us of a task that needs

to be done. We‘ll start by clicking on the Quick Wizards icon to open the wizard welcome page.

Tutorial - Quick Wizard Capture Using the Quick Wizards may simplify the process of creating a

1. This page displays types of macros that can be created using Quick Wizards. To create a reminder, select Text and click on the Next button.

2. Choose the Create a Reminder option and click on Next to proceed.

2. Choose the Create a Reminder option and click on Next to proceed.

3. This panel shows a few things that can be done with the Reminders. Click next

3. This panel shows a few things that can be done with the Reminders. Click next to continue.

4. Enter a reminder message into the edit field. We can also choose to have a

4. Enter a reminder message into the edit field. We can also choose to have a sound play back to alert us of the

message. For this example we‘ll just use the beep sound.

Also select the ―Delete this macro after displaying the reminder‖ option to delete the macro after it runs. In this example the message is to only be displayed once, rather than on a recurring schedule. So we want the macro deleted. It‘s simpler than remembering later to manually delete the macro.

Click next and now we‘ll set the schedule for the macro.

5. We only want it to play back one time, so select the Once schedule option.

5. We only want it to play back one time, so select the Once schedule option. Set it to run a couple of minutes from now so that you can see it run. Click next to continue.

6. Now we need to assign a Nickname to the macro. Enter a nickname to help
  • 6. Now we need to assign a Nickname to the macro. Enter a nickname to help remember what the macro does. Then

click the Finish button to return to the Macro Explorer window. Our quick wizard macro is now listed as a Scheduled macro.

  • 7. The last step is to wait for the reminder message macro to run at the time you scheduled.

Tutorial - Macro Scope

Macro Scope

Scope indicates under what conditions a macro should play back. Four Scope categories are available - Global, Global Except, Window Specific and Program Specific. A global macro will play back in any Windows program. The Global Except option allows a macro to run in any Windows program except the application you specify. A Window Specific macro will only start in a window that matches the window title specified in the macro. A Program Specific macro will only play back in a given program. We'll look at some real examples of how this works.

To illustrate the process, we need to run two different programs that we can potentially have the macros play back in. For this example we'll run Windows Notepad and WordPad.

To start notepad, click on the Windows Start button and enter notepad in the search box. When found, click on the file to open the notepad program. On older systems, click on Start and then Run. Enter "notepad" and click the ok button. Follow the same steps for WordPad, just substitute WordPad for notepad.

Tutorial - Macro Scope Macro Scope Scope indicates under what conditions a macro should play back.

Global Macro

We already created a couple of Global macros in other tutorials. If you have not created these macros, please refer to the hotkey tutorial for instructions on creating the CTRL+SHIFT+T macro. A global macro plays back in all Windows programs. To illustrate, bring Notepad to the foreground and press CTRL+SHIFT+T. Your address is typed into the notepad. Now bring WordPad to the foreground and press CTRL+SHIFT+T. Your address types out into WordPad.

Program Specific Macro

We will now change the CTRL+SHIFT+T macro to become a Program Specific macro. First minimize Notepad and WordPad. With Macro Express the active window, highlight the CTRL+SHIFT+T macro (nickname of "My Address") from

the Macro Explorer and click on the Scripting Editor button. Click on the Scope tab and select the Program Specific option. Next click on the Select button to open the Select Programs window as shown below.

the Macro Explorer and click on the Scripting Editor button. Click on the Scope tab and

On the left is a list of all current programs that are running on your computer. Scroll through the list of programs running and find notepad.exe. Highlight it in the list and click on either Add button. This will place notepad.exe in the Program Name edit box.

(You may also note that there is a button called "Select from list of installed programs". You could click on this button for

a list of all programs installed on your computer and select from this list.)

 

Make sure the Run If On Top option is selected and then click on the OK button. Click on File | Save to save your macro changes. Click on the Macro Explorer button and note that the scope for the CTRL+SHIFT+T macro (nickname of "my address") has changed from Global to Program Specific:notepad.exe.

To see what effect the changes have on the macro, bring Notepad to the foreground and press CTRL+SHIFT+T. Your address types into the program. Now bring WordPad to the foreground and press CTRL+SHIFT+T. Nothing happens. You have defined CTRL+SHIFT+T to only work in the Notepad program.

Global Except

We will now change the CTRL+SHIFT+T macro to become a Global Except macro. First minimize Notepad and WordPad. With Macro Express the active window, highlight the CTRL+SHIFT+T (nickname of "my address") macro from the Macro Explorer and click on the Scripting Editor button. In the Scripting Editor, click on the Scope tab and choose the Global Except option. Click on the Select button to open the Select Programs window.

This time you will select the program that the macro will not work with. On the

This time you will select the program that the macro will not work with. On the left is a list of all current programs that are running on the computer. Notepad.exe should already be selected. If not, scroll through the list of running programs and click on notepad.exe. Click on the Add button to place notepad.exe in the Program Name edit box.

(You may also note that there is a button called "Select from list of installed programs". You could click on this button for

a list of all programs installed on your computer and select from the list.)

 

Click OK to save the program choice and return to the Scripting Editor. Then click on File | Save to save the macro changes. Click on the Macro Explorer button and note that the "scope" for the CTRL+SHIFT+T macro has changed from Program Specific to Global Except.

To see what effect the changes have on the macro, bring Notepad to the foreground and press CTRL+SHIFT+T. Nothing happens. The macro is defined to not work with Notepad. Now bring Wordpad to the foreground and press CTRL+SHIFT+T. Your address types into the program.

You have defined CTRL+SHIFT+T to work in all programs except the Notepad program. Activate another program that accepts text input such as your email program and press CTRL+SHIFT+T. Your address should type out into that program as well.

Window Specific Macro

Lastly, we will change our CTRL+SHIFT+T macro to become a Window Specific macro. First minimize WordPad and Notepad. From Macro Express, highlight the CTRL+SHIFT+T macro from the Macro Explorer and click on the Scripting Editor button. With the Scripting Editor open, click on the Scope tab and choose the Window Specific option. Click on the Select button to open the Select Window dialog.

We will use this option to select a specific window that the macro will run in.

We will use this option to select a specific window that the macro will run in. (A Window Title is the text that appears in the top caption bar of most windows). Notepad.exe is most likely listed in the Selected Window field. Highlight this .exe and click on the Remove button to clear out the selected windows.

On the left is a list of all current windows that are running on your computer. You could browse through this list, but for this example just enter notepad in the Selected Window edit box and click on the Add button to the immediate right of the edit box. Select the Run If On Top Option and then click on the OK button to return to the Scripting Editor. Click on File | Save to save the macro changes. Click on the Macro Explorer button and note that the scope for the My Address macro has changed from Global Except to Window Specific:notepad.

To see what effect these changes have on the macro, activate the Notepad window and press CTRL+SHIFT+T. Your address will type out into the program. Now activate the WordPad window and press CTRL+SHIFT+T. Nothing happens. You have defined CTRL+SHIFT+T to only work in a Notepad window.

Sample Macros

The Macro Express help file contains comprehensive information on how to use each part of the program. It contains screen shots of almost every element in the program with explanations of how to use each element. There are also many written examples of how to use the commands in macros.

We have also included a number of sample macros with the program. This section will briefly review each of these macros. First, to have access to the sample macros, open the Macro Explorer. Then click on "File | Open Macro File" and select the "samples.mex" macro file. With this macro file loaded in, you can see and review any of the sample macros.

Floating Menu Using Icons

This sample macro demonstrates how to setup and use a Floating Menu macro. A floating menu macro is simply a toolbar or window that floats on top of all other programs. The toolbar or window contains a list of other macros which you can activate at will by clicking on a macro in the toolbar or window.

If you edit this macro, you will be shown a list of all macros available for inclusion in the floating menu and a list of all macros currently in the floating menu. You can add or remove macros from the menu at will. There are options available to choose the menu style, whether it will be a toolbar with icons or a window with text selections.

Hide a Program

This sample demonstrates how to hide (make it invisible) a window and how to display it again. It uses the notepad program for its example. It also demonstrates the use of launching a program, using a variable and displaying messages in a text window.

Launch Program

This sample demonstrates how to launch a program. It launches the Microsoft Paint program. It also demonstrates the use of If / then / else conditioning by testing to see if the Paint program exists. Displaying messages in a text window is also demonstrated.

Maximize and Minimize

This sample demonstrates how to minimize, maximize and restore a window. It uses the notepad program for its example. It also demonstrates the use of launching a program, using variables, activating a window and displaying messages in a text window.

Menu and Question

This sample demonstrates how to use a question and a menu of choices in a macro. It asks the user a question and then asks the user to choose from a list of choices. It also demonstrates the use of if / then / else conditioning, using variables and displaying messages in a text window.

Open Explorer Folder

This sample demonstrates how to open up an Explorer folder. It opens up the Windows Explorer to the Recycle Bin. It also demonstrates displaying messages in a text window.

Paste Text

This sample demonstrates how to paste text into an application. It pastes our company address into the notepad program. It also demonstrates the use of launching a program, displaying messages in a text window and various clipboard commands.

Popup Menu Using Nicknames

This sample macro demonstrates how to setup and use a Popup Menu macro. A popup menu is very similar to a floating menu except it only appears on the screen when you need to use it. It doesn't hang around. A popup menu macro is simply a toolbar or window that pops up on top of all other programs when you press a hotkey or click on an icon in the system tray. The toolbar or window contains a list of other macros which you can activate at will by clicking on a macro in the toolbar or window.

If you edit this macro, you will be given a list of all the macros available to be put in the popup menu and a list of all the macros that are currently in the popup menu. You can add or remove macros from the menu at will. There are options

available to choose the menu style, whether it will be a toolbar with icons or a window with text selections.

Process a Text File

This sample demonstrates how to process a basic text file. This macro first creates a small file named mesample.txt. The text file simply contains a short list of names where each name is on a line by itself. The macro reads in each name out of the text file and types it out in the notepad program. This macro also demonstrates setting and manipulating variables, launching a program, displaying messages in a text window and typing text.

Process Folder File Names

This sample demonstrates how to process all the file names in a folder. The root folder of your C: drive (i.e. C:\) is processed. Each file name is typed out in the notepad program. It relies on the Repeat With Folder command to do so. This macro also demonstrates the use of variables, launching a program, displaying messages in a text window and typing text.

Repeat Until

This sample demonstrates repeating a process until a condition is met. In this example, the user is prompted to enter the name of the program. It repeats this process over and over until the correct program name is entered. This macro also demonstrates the use of setting a variable from a prompt, an if / then statement and displaying messages in a text window.

Repeat With Prompt

This sample demonstrates repeating a process using a value entered by the user to determine the number of times to repeat. In this example, the user is prompted to enter a repeat count and a number will be typed into the notepad program the number of times indicated by the repeat. The number shown each time will be a different random number between 1 and 100. This macro also demonstrates the use of a variable, using a random number, typing text, using a repeat counter, launching a program and displaying messages in a text window.

Run Control Panel

This sample demonstrates run a control panel applet. It runs the Display Properties control panel applet and sets it to the "Screen Saver" tab. It also demonstrates displaying messages in a text window.

Type Dates and Time

This sample demonstrates using dates and times. It types today's date, yesterday's date, the date in a week and the current time into the notepad program. This macro also demonstrates the use of typing text, launching a program and displaying messages in a text window.

Variables and Mouse

This sample demonstrates using variables and the mouse. It first saves the coordinates of the mouse into variables. It then moves the mouse in a small circle on the screen. It then returns the mouse to the same location it was at before moving it. This macro also demonstrates the use of delays, macro playback speed, using variables, moving the mouse and displaying messages in a text window.

Window Resize and Position

This sample demonstrates how to resize and reposition windows. It uses the notepad program for its example. It first sets the exact size of the window, then increases it by a percentage and then changes it by a pixel amount. It then moves it to the top right corner of the screen, then to the bottom middle of the screen and then to specific location. The notepad program is then restored to its original size and location. It also demonstrates the use of launching a program, using variables and displaying messages in a text window.

With the Macro Explorer open, press the hotkeys associated with the sample macros to watch the macros play back. Afterwards, double click on one of the sample macros listed in the Macro Explorer to load the macro into the Scripting Editor or Direct Editor. Here you can examine the commands used to make the macro work.

Using Controls

Let's run through an example of how to use the Window Controls. To begin, we first need to start the Windows calculator program. To start Calculator, click on the Windows Start button and enter calculator in the search box. When found, click on the file to open the calculator program. On older systems, click on Start and then Run. Enter calculator and click the ok button. Leave the program running and return to Macro Express.

Selecting the Activation

We'll create a macro using a hotkey. From the Macro Express Explorer menu click on Macros | Add Macro to open the Add Macro window. HotKey should already be selected and the blinking cursor should be in the edit box. If the cursor is not in the edit box, click on the edit box to place the text cursor in this field.

Using Controls Let's run through an example of how to use the Window Controls. To begin,

Next, press the F3 key and release it. F3 should appear in the edit box and will be the hotkey used to run the macro.

Creating the Macro

We can choose to create the macro by entering the macro command directly, by using the scripting editor or capturing the macro. For this exercise click on the Scripting Editor button to activate the Scripting Editor.

In the Scripting Editor first click on the Properties tab. In the Nickname box, enter "Clear

In the Scripting Editor first click on the Properties tab. In the Nickname box, enter "Clear Calculator". Then click on the Scope tab and make sure Global is selected. Now click on the Script tab to return to the screen displayed above. Scroll down the list of commands and click on the Window Controls command category to expand this listing. Double click on the Get Control command found in this group to activate the Get Control window as shown below.

In the Scripting Editor first click on the Properties tab. In the Nickname box, enter "Clear

Select the Hide Macro Express option. Make sure that the Save Control In option is set to variable C1 and select Exact Match. Now click on the Launch Get Control Utility button.

This activates the Capture Window Control screen and hides Macro Express. Now click on the target

This activates the Capture Window Control screen and hides Macro Express. Now click on the target (crosshairs) at the bottom of this window. Hold down the left mouse button and drag it over top of the "C" button on the calculator. Release the mouse button. This should insert some information into the Capture Window Control. Class Name should read "Button". Click the save button to save the information and return to the Get Control Window.

This activates the Capture Window Control screen and hides Macro Express. Now click on the target

This window should have the information stored to the variable C1 as shown above. Click OK to save this command and return to the Scripting Editor. Scroll down the list of commands and click on the Window Controls command to expand this listing (if not already open). Double click on the Mouse Click on Control command to open the Mouse Click on Control window.

This activates the Capture Window Control screen and hides Macro Express. Now click on the target

In the General Tab, select Single Click, C1 as the variable and Left Button. This instructs the macro to perform a single left mouse click on the variable C1, which we have defined as the "C" button on the Calculator. We can ignore the Advanced Tab, so click OK to save your changes. This returns us to the Scripting Editor. The script should look like the following:

Get Control %C1% Mouse Single Left Click on Control %C1%

Click on File | Save to save the macro and return to the Macro Explorer. Our F3 macro with a nickname of Clear Calculator should now be listed in this window.

Running the Macro

To test the macro, open the calculator window and enter some numbers into the calculator. With numbers displayed in the Calculator edit box, press the F3 button. This simulates clicking on the C button of the calculator and clears the display.

Copy and Paste Between Two Applications

Below is a simple example of how to set up a copy and paste routine between two applications. You can use this as a guideline for creating routines between your specific applications.

 

You might be tempted to try and use the ALT+TAB key to switch between programs. This is actually not always reliable and in fact, will not even work via Macro Express on some computers due to the low level nature of this key command.

The solution is to use the ACTIVATE command.

 

Setting up the Macro

From the Macro Express Explorer menu click on Macros | Add Macro. A new window should appear titled Add Macro. HotKey should already be selected and the blinking cursor should be in the edit box. If the cursor is not in the edit box, click on the edit box to place it there. Next, hold down the CTRL key, the SHIFT key and the P key all at the same time and then release them. CTRL+SHIFT+P should appear in the edit box. This is the hotkey we will define for the macro.

Next click on the Scripting Editor button start building the macro in the Scripting Editor. First click on the Properties Tab and enter Copy and Paste in the Nickname field. Next click on the Scope tab and make sure that the macro scope is set to global. Then click on the Script tab to start building the macro.

Building the Macro in the Scripting Editor

1) Scroll through the list of command categories and click on Windows/Programs to expand the list. Double click on the Window Activate command. In the Activate Window field, enter "notepad" (without the quotes) as the Window title. Click on the OK button to save the entry. This first command instructs the macro to bring notepad to the front and be ready to receive keystrokes.

2) We now want to enter our commands to be processed in notepad. Let's assume we want to repetitively copy one line at a time over to WordPad. Our next command would be to highlight a single line of text. This can be done by using Shift+End. To do this scroll through the list of command categories and click on Text to expand the category. Then double click on Text Type to open the Text Type window. Click on Shift and then End in the list of options in the yellow area of this window. This should insert <SHIFT><END> into the Keystrokes edit field. Click OK to save your changes.

3) The next step is to copy this to the Windows Clipboard. Scroll through the list of command categories and click on Clipboard to expand the category. Double click on the Clipboard Copy command to insert this to your script.

4) Now that the line has been copied to the clipboard, we are ready to go paste it into WordPad. But first, lets move the cursor to the next line in notepad so we will be ready to copy the next line. To do this, scroll through the list of command categories and click on Text to expand the category. Then double click on Text Type to open the Text Type window. Click on Home and then Arrow Down in the list of options in the yellow area of this window. This should insert <HOME><ARROW DOWN> into the Keystrokes edit field. Click OK to save your changes.

5) Now to activate WordPad, we follow the same process as before by scrolling through the list of command categories and clicking on Windows/Programs to expand the list. Double click on the Window Activate command. In the Activate Window field, enter "wordpad" (without the quotes) as the Window title. Click on the OK button to save the entry. This command will activate WordPad and allow text entry into this window.

6) The next step of the macro is to paste the text from the clipboard into WordPad. To do this scroll through the list of command categories and click on Clipboard to expand the category. Double click on the Clipboard Paste command to insert into the script.

7) Now let's place an <ENTER> into the macro so that it moves the cursor to a new line in WordPad. To do this, scroll through the list of command categories and click on Text to expand the category. Then double click on Text Type to open the Text Type window. Click on Enter in the list of options in the yellow area of this window. This should insert <ENTER> into the Keystrokes edit field. Click OK to save your changes.

8) We are almost done now. There are two final issues that we need to address. First we need to place the macro in a loop so that it copies multiple lines. Let's set the macro up so that it copies the first 5 lines in notepad over to WordPad. Highlight the first line of your macro script - Activate Window: "notepad". Then scroll through the list of command categories and click on Repeat to expand the category. Single click on the Repeat Start option and then click on the Insert Before arrow - the top blue arrow of the three insert arrows. This will open the Repeat Options window. Make sure the Start Repeat option is selected and enter 5 in the Repeat Count entry field. Click OK to save the change. This should

insert the Repeat command as the first line of your macro.

9) Single click on the Repeat End command and then click on the Add to End insert button - the bottom of the three Insert buttons. This should insert a Repeat End command as the last command of your macro script.

10) The last thing we need to do is address a possible timing issue. It's possible for Macro Express to send the Clipboard Paste command before WordPad has fully activated. So what we need to do is insert a short delay right after activating either window. To do this, scroll through the list of command categories and click on Timing to expand the list. Then double click on Delay to open the Set Delay window. Select the Delay in Seconds option and enter .5 (a half second). Click OK to save the change.

Find the delay command in the script and highlight it. Then click on the Duplicate button to make a copy of this command. The Duplicate button is the bottom of the three buttons to the right of the Macro Script. You should now have two Delay commands listed in the script. Highlight one of the Delay commands and click on the Up or Down arrow on the right side of the Macro Script. Move the delay command so that it is positioned below the Activate Window: "notepad" command and above the Text Type:<SHIFT><END> command. Go back and highlight the other Delay command and move it so that it is positioned below Activate Window: "wordpad" command and above the Clipboard Paste command.

Macro Script

Your macro script should look like what is displayed below. If your macro doesn't look like this, arrange the commands so that they are in this order.

Repeat Start (Repeat 5 times) Activate Window: "notepad" Delay 0.5 Seconds Text Type: <SHIFT><END> Clipboard Copy Text Type: <HOME><ARROW DOWN> Activate Window: "wordpad" Delay 0.5 Seconds Clipboard Paste Text Type: <ENTER> Repeat End

Click on File | Save to save the macro.

Testing the Macro

To run the macro, start the notepad and WordPad applications. To start notepad, click on the Windows Start button and enter notepad in the search box. When found, click on the file to open the notepad program. On older systems, click on Start and then Run. Enter "notepad" and click the ok button. Follow the same steps for WordPad, just substitute WordPad for notepad.

Enter five lines of text into notepad or copy the first five lines of the macro script displayed above and paste them into notepad. Make sure you don't have any blank lines between the lines of text. Next, place the mouse cursor at the beginning of the first line of text in notepad. Then press CTRL + Shift + P to start the macro. It should switch between both programs copying each line from notepad and pasting them into WordPad.

Using Text String Variables

Let's work through an example of using Text String Variables. There are hundreds, even thousands of uses for Text String Variables. This example will provide an idea of how they can be used and manipulated.

This macro, when completed, will help fix typing errors when we transpose letters, such as when we type "adn" or "teh" instead of "and" or "the". Just place the cursor between the two transposed letters and press the assigned hotkey to correct the typing error.

Setting up the Macro

To get started, open the Macro Express Explorer and click on Macros | Add Macro. A new window should appear titled Add Macro. HotKey should already be selected and the blinking cursor should be in the edit box. If the cursor is not in the edit box, click on the edit box to place it there.

Next, hold down the F4 key and release it to insert F4 in the edit box. This is the hotkey we will define for the macro. Click on the Scripting Editor button to open the Scripting Editor to begin creating the macro.

Building the Macro in the Scripting Editor

1) Scroll through the list of command categories and click on Macro Control to expand the list. Double click on the Remark command. In the Comments field of the Remarks window, enter "Place cursor between the transposed letters" (without the quotes). Click on the OK button to save the entry. This will place the text in bold blue font in the Scripting Editor. This line will not do anything in the script. It is just a reminder for later of how to use the macro. Before running the macro, we need to place the text cursor between the two transposed letters.

2) The macro will first highlight the two letters that are reversed. To do this we will need to move the cursor back one character and highlight the two characters using the Text Type command. Scroll through the list of command categories and click on Text to expand the category. Then double click on Text Type to open the Text Type window.

Click on Arrow Left from the list of options in the yellow area of this window to move the cursor back one character. Then click on Shift Down, Arrow Right, Arrow Right and Shift Up to highlight the two transposed characters. The entry should look like this - <ARROW LEFT><SHIFTD><ARROW RIGHT><ARROW RIGHT><SHIFTU>

Click OK to save and return to the Script Editor.

3) Next we'll cut the text and copy to the clipboard. Scroll through the list of command categories and click on Clipboard to expand the category. Then double click on Clipboard Cut to insert the clipboard cut (Ctrl X) command as the next item in the script.

4) Now the clipboard contents will be saved to a text string variable. Scroll through the list of command categories and click on Variables to expand the category. Then double click on Variable Set String to open the Set Text String Variables window. Select the Set Value from Clipboard option. Assign the contents of the clipboard to Variable T1 in the Choose Variable Name field. T1 should be the default selection. Click OK to save.

5) The next couple of steps will reverse the order of the text that we copied to the clipboard - the two transposed letters. Scroll through the list of command categories and click on Variables to expand the category. Then double click on Variable Modify String to open the Modify String Variables window. Select the Copy Part of Text option. We are going to copy the first letter of the variable T1 and save it to variable T2.

Select Variable T2 as the Variable to copy to. Select Variable T1 as the variable to copy from. Select Value for the Starting Position and enter the number "1" (without the quotations) in the edit field. Select Value for the Characters to Copy and enter the number "1" (without the quotations) in the edit field. Click OK to save.

6) This next step will copy the second letter of variable T1 and save it to variable T3. Scroll through the list of command categories and click on Variables to expand the category. Then double click on Variable Modify String to open the Modify String Variables window. Select the Copy Part of Text option.

Select Variable T3 as the Variable to copy to. Choose Variable T1 as the variable to copy from. Select Value for the Starting Position and enter the number "2" (without the quotations) in the edit field. Select Value for the Characters to Copy and enter the number "1" (without the quotations) in the edit field. Click OK to save.

7) The last step plays back the corrected text. Scroll through the list of command categories and click on Text to expand the category. Then double click on Text Type to open the Text Type window.

In the Keystrokes edit field, type the following - %T3%%T2%. This will type out the second letter of the transposed text first, reversing the order and correcting the typing error. Click OK to save.

In the Scripting Editor, click on the Properties Tab. In the Nickname field enter "Fix Transposed Letters" (without the quotes). Then save the entire macro by clicking on File | Save.

Macro Script

Your macro script should look like what is displayed below. If your macro doesn't look like this, arrange the commands so that they are in this order.

// Place mouse cursor between transposed letters

Text Type: <ARROW LEFT><SHIFTD><ARROW RIGHT><ARROW RIGHT><SHIFTU> Clipboard Cut Variable Set String %T1% from Clipboard Variable Modify String: Copy Part of %T1% to %T2% Variable Modify String: Copy Part of %T1% to %T3% Text Type: %T3%%T2%

Testing the macro

To test out the macro, run the notepad program. (To run notepad, click on "Start | Run" from the bottom left of the computer screen, enter "notepad" and click the OK button.) Type the following text into notepad - Tihs is a tset. (Include the typing errors.)

Insert the cursor between the "i" and "h" in the word "Tihs". Press the F4 key to play back the macro. Do the same for the "s" and "e" in the mispelled word "tset". The macro corrects the mistyped letters.

Macro Activation

There are many different mechanisms that you can use to activate a macro (i.e. trigger a macro to run).

HotKey

A hotkey is a key combination such as CTRL+ALT+A, CTRL+Right Mouse Click, etc. When the keys are pressed and released, the macro runs.

Shortkey

A shortkey is a set of characters such as abc, myname, etc. When the keys are typed into an application the macro runs.

Schedule

The macro runs as a scheduled event. These events can be scheduled to play at startup of Macro Express, hourly, daily (choose any or all days of the week), weekly, monthly, one given time, every "x" minutes or after "x" minutes of inactivity.

Window Title Appears

When a specified window gains focus, then the macro runs. The window is specified by its window title (text in the top blue caption bar).

None

None specifies that no activation is to be associated with the macro. This is done because the macro will be used as part of another macro (i.e. a macro can run other macros) and/or this macro will be used in a popup menu of macros and no other macro activation is desired for the macro.

Popup Menu of Macros

A popup menu of macros is a list of macros that are displayed in a window. Clicking on one of the macros or typing a corresponding number or letter activates that macro from the popup menu. The popup menu itself can be activated by either a hotkey or by right clicking on a system tray icon. The popup menu can either show icons (representing the macros) or the first part of the text of the macro or the macro nickname and scope.

Mouse Click

Use either the left, middle or right mouse buttons to activate the macro. Select an area of the screen to click on or designate a window part to click on, such as scroll bar, title bar, buttons, etc. to activate the macro.

Floating Menu

This creates a menu of macros that are displayed as a floating toolbar that sits on top of your other applications. The floating menu can either display icons (representing the macros) or the first part of the text of the macro or the macro nickname and scope. Clicking on one of the macros or typing a corresponding number or letter activates that macro from the floating menu.

Control

The Control option will activate a macro when a specific control is active. The control may be a window button, edit box or another identifiable portion of a window.

Command Line Parameters

Invoke a macro using a command line parameter. The specific command line parameters to invoke a macro are the /A and /MXE commands. Both the macexp.exe and the meproc.exe programs may be used. See the command line parameters help section for more detail.

Via Windows Explorer

Double clicking on a playable macro file (.MXE) from within Windows Explorer will execute the macro.

Run Macro Now

Run a macro from the Macro Explorer by using the Run Macro Now option. Right click on the macro in the Macro Explorer and then left click on the Run Macro Now menu item.

Windows API Calls

This option is only intended for the programmer who wants to add macro functionality directly from their own programs. While the command line parameter options can be used via another program, the following method may be much quicker and remove the overhead of having to run an external program such as macexp.exe or meproc.exe.

You can instruct the Macro Express Player to directly execute a macro in the currently loaded macro file by specifying its nickname or you can instruct it to run a playable macro. The macro nickname is case sensitive. If your macro is named QZStart you must specify QZStart, not qzstart, QZSTART, Qzstart, QZstart, or QzStart. If you have more than one macro with the same nickname, only the first one found in the macro file will be activated.

The following examples demonstrate the basic steps of how to activate a macro using Windows API messages and are presented in several different programming languages. These examples assume that you are familiar with basic Windows API commands and terminology. The process involves posting a series of messages directly to the Macro Express Player. These examples use the message WM_USER+20 to run a macro within the currently loaded macro file. To run a playable macro, change the messages in the examples from WM_USER+20 to WM_USER+21.

Example: Delphi

var

i

: integer;

S

: string;

Hwnd : THandle; begin Hwnd := FindWindow('TMainWin', 'Macro Express Player'); if(IsWindow(Hwnd)) then begin

S := MacroName;

for i := 1 to length(S) do PostMessage(Hwnd, WM_USER+20, ord(S[i]), 0); PostMessage(Hwnd, WM_USER+20, 0, 0); end else ShowMessage('Macro Express is not running'); end;

Example: C/C++/Visual C

HWND hwnd = FindWindow(―TMainWin‖, ―Macro Express Player‖);

if( IsWindow(hwnd) ) { for(int x = 0; x < strlen(s); x ++) PostMessage(hwnd, WM_USER+20, s[i], 0); PostMessage(hwnd, WM_USER+20, 0, 0);

}

else

MessageBox(GetForegroundWindow(), ―Macro Express is not running‖, ―Error‖, 0);

Example: VBA

Private Declare Function FindWindow _ Lib "User32" Alias "FindWindowA" ( _ ByVal lpClassName As String, _ ByVal lpWindowName As String) As Long

Private Declare Function PostMessage _ Lib "User32" Alias "PostMessageA" ( _ ByVal hwnd As Long, _ ByVal wMsg As Long, _ ByVal wParam As Long, _ ByVal lParam As Long) As Long

Private Sub RunMacro() 'Runs a macro express macro

Const WM_USER = &H400 Const Command = WM_USER+20 Const Macroname = "Macroname"

Dim hwnd, I, Result As Long

hwnd = FindWindow("TMainWin", "Macro Express Player") For I = 1 To Len(Macroname) Result = PostMessage(hwnd, Command, Asc(Mid(Macroname, I, 1)), 0) Next I Result = PostMessage(hwnd, Command, 0, 0) End Sub

HotKeys

A hotkey is a combination of keys that, when pressed together, will play back a macro. Macro Express allows hotkey combinations of a single key up to four keys pressed simultaneously.

HotKeys A hotkey is a combination of keys that, when pressed together, will play back a

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro

If you want to activate a new macro with a hotkey, make sure the HotKey choice is selected in the Add Macro window. Place the cursor in the edit box and hold down the hotkey combination that you want to use. That combination will be placed in the edit box. This is the hotkey combination you will press to activate the macro. If you are not sure which combination to use, scroll through the list of keys and highlight the one you want. This will also place the hotkey combination in the edit box.

After selecting the hotkey combination, click on the method you want to use to create the macro. You can create the macro using the Scripting Editor, Direct Editor or by Capturing the macro.

List of HotKeys Available

Macro Express supports over 725 different key combinations. Playback of a series of keystrokes and mouse clicks and movements can be assigned to each of the hotkeys. The following is a comprehensive list of available hotkeys:

<CTRL> <Alpha Character> <CTRL> <Numeric> <CTRL> <FKey> <CTRL> <Mouse Click> <ALT> <Alpha Character> <ALT> <Numeric> <ALT> <FKey> <ALT> <Mouse Click> <WIN> <Alpha Character> <WIN> <Numeric> <WIN> <FKey> <WIN> <Mouse Click> <CTRL> <SHIFT> <Alpha Character> <CTRL> <SHIFT> <Numeric> <CTRL> <SHIFT> <FKey>

<CTRL> <SHIFT> <Mouse Click> <CTRL> <ALT> <Alpha Character> <CTRL> <ALT> <Numeric> <CTRL> <ALT> <FKey> <CTRL> <ALT> <Mouse Click> <ALT> <SHIFT> <Alpha Character> <ALT> <SHIFT> <Numeric> <ALT> <SHIFT> <FKey> <ALT> <SHIFT> <Mouse Click> <CTRL> <WIN> <Alpha Character> <CTRL> <WIN> <Numeric> <CTRL> <WIN> <FKey> <CTRL> <WIN> <Mouse Click> <ALT> <WIN> <Alpha Character> <ALT> <WIN> <Numeric> <ALT> <WIN> <FKey> <ALT> <WIN> <Mouse Click> <CTRL> <ALT> <SHIFT> <Alpha Character> <CTRL> <ALT> <SHIFT> <Numeric> <CTRL> <ALT><SHIFT> <FKey> <FKEY> <SHIFT><FKEY> <SHIFT> <Mouse Click>

The following keys can be used by themselves as single key presses:

Insert Key

Delete Key

Home Key

End Key

The following characters can be used with <CTRL>, <ALT>, <SHIFT><ALT>, <CTRL><ALT>, <CTRL><SHIFT> and <CTRL><ALT><SHIFT>:

\

,

. /

;

'

[ ]

- = `

The following characters can be used with <SHIFT>, <CTRL>, <ALT>, <SHIFT><ALT>, <CTRL><ALT>, <CTRL><SHIFT> and <CTRL><ALT><SHIFT> along with the character by itself:

/ on the Numeric Keypad * on the Numeric Keypad - on the Numeric Keypad + on the Numeric Keypad Page Up Key Page Down Key Left Arrow Key Right Arrow Key Up Arrow Key Down Arrow Key

The following special keys can be used with <SHIFT>, <CTRL>, <ALT>, <SHIFT><ALT>, <CTRL><ALT>, <CTRL><SHIFT> and <CTRL><ALT><SHIFT>:

Enter Key Space Key*** Tab Key* Backspace Key Insert Key Delete Key** Home Key End Key * <ALT> and <ALT><SHIFT> are not available ** <CTRL><ALT> and <CTRL><ALT><SHIFT> are not available

*** <WIN> key can also be used by itself with the space key

Shortkeys

Shortkeys Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro A shortkey is a set of characters

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro

A shortkey is a set of characters such as abc, myname, etc. When the characters are typed into an application, the macro runs. If you want to create a new macro with a shortkey, click on the shortkey option to display the shortkey edit box. In this field enter a series of characters from two to 10 characters in length.

After entering the shortkey name, click on the option you want for creating the macro. You can create the macro using the Scripting Editor, Direct Editor or by Capturing the macro.

Note:

Before using the Shortkey option you may want to first define the Shortkey default settings. Click on Options |

Preferences | Shortkeys to make your settings.

 

Shortkey Specifications

Up to 10 characters may be entered as an original short key. In addition, up to 3 Prefix Keys may optionally be used and are applied to all Original Shortkeys created. The following Prefix characters may be entered and used:

The letters A through Z (both upper and lower case) The numbers 0 through 9

The following characters: !

@

#

$

%

^

&

_

=

<

>

?

.

;

,

*

-

/

+

`

'

"

)

] and space bar

If you choose not to use a prefix key, you can use the suffix key option and press the space bar, the enter key or a suffix character of . , : ; ? ! or - after typing the shortkey to activate the macro.

Schedule Activation

Schedule Activation Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro Scheduled Macros are macros that can

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro

Scheduled Macros are macros that can be scheduled to play back at a specific time. Just set the schedule for the macro and it will play back unattended at the designated time. No need to press a hotkey or click on an icon. The macro will play back at the time you specified. In order for your macro to execute, Macro Express must be running in the background.

There are a number of scheduling options available. These are described briefly below.

At Startup -Running a macro At Startup instructs Macro Express to immediately execute the scheduled macro

when Macro Express first starts up. If you have Macro Express in your Start Up group, then this type of macro would play back when you first start Windows. Once - Running a macro Once lets you select one specific date and one specific time when you want the macro

to run. Hourly - An Hourly macro lets you run the macro over and over at a specific time each hour.

Daily - A Daily macro allows you to run the macro once each day. You can also specify which days of the week

that you want the macro to run. Weekly - A Weekly macro allows you to pick one day of the week and the time during that day to run the macro.

Monthly - A Monthly macro allows you to run the macro at a specified time on the same day of the month each

month. Time Out - Setting the schedule with the Time Out option will play back the macro after the computer has been

idle (no keyboard or mouse activity) for the number of minutes you specify. This option allows you up to 720 minutes after the computer has been idled. Other -The Other option lets you repetitively run a macro every XX number of minutes or seconds. The intervals

can be between 1second and 99999 minutes and 59 seconds. If you schedule a macro to run every 1 second and the macro takes 5 seconds to execute, then this function will not operate properly. If you plan to use macros that will run more frequently than every 10 seconds, you will need to change the Scheduler Frequency default setting. The default instructs Macro Express to check every 10 seconds to see if a scheduled macro is ready to play back. You will need to reduce this number in order for scheduled macros to play back more frequently. Load File - This option instructs the macro to play back when the macro file containing the macro is first loaded.

Select Schedule to activate the Scheduler. Then select the time frame that you want.

After selecting the desired schedule, click on the method you want to use to create the macro. You can create the macro using the Scripting Editor, Direct Editor or by Capturing the macro.

Note: Macro not Playing Back

 

Screen Savers will prevent a scheduled macro from operating correctly. Focus cannot be given to a program if a screen

saver is running. Also, the security measures built into the "Lock Workstation" function of Windows will prevent Macro

 

Express from executing a macro.

 

A scheduled macro will not play back if you are capturing a macro.

Note: Playback Accuracy

 

The accuracy of a scheduled macro is not guaranteed. There are a variety of things that may cause the scheduled macro

to not play at the exact time specified. For example, if another macro is running when a scheduled macro should run, the scheduled macro will be delayed. Sometimes several macros can be queued up waiting to run. The scheduled macro may

not run until all other queued macros run.

 

By default, the Macro Express Scheduler‘s Timer Interval is set to 10 seconds. This means that Macro Express will only

 

check every 10 seconds to see if a scheduled macro should run. If your macro should run at 11:01 AM, it may not run

until 10 seconds later. To increase the accuracy of a scheduled macro, click Options | Preferences | Scheduler and

 
 

change the Timer Interval to ―Check every 1 seconds‖. This causes Macro Express to use more CPU cycles but this should not be noticeable on faster computers.

 

Also, the load of other programs running on your computer can affect when a scheduled macro will run.

Scheduling - At Startup

Scheduling - At Startup Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule Running a

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule

Running a macro At Startup instructs Macro Express to immediately execute the scheduled macro when Macro Express first starts up. If you have Macro Express in your Start Up folder, then the macro will play back as soon as Windows starts.

Options

Time Frame

You may specify certain times of the day when you want the macro to play back. In the example above, the macro will only play back from 7:00 AM to 9:00 AM. If you were to restart Macro Express at 10:00AM the macro would not play back because it is outside of the specified time period.

Date Period

You may specify a range of dates that the macro will work. In the example above, the macro will work between January 11, 2012 and January 10, 2013. After this date the macro will no longer function, unless you modify the dates. You could set this up so that the macro would begin working a week or a month from the date you created the macro.

Play Macro Indefinitely

If you are not concerned with a Time Frame or Date Period, just place a check next to Play Macro Indefinitely. This will play the macro back every time you want start Macro Express, on the days of the week selected. This will continue indefinitely.

Days of Week

You may select which days of the week you want the macro to run. You may not want the macro to play back on weekends, so you would just remove the checks from Saturday and Sunday as in the image above.

Scheduling - Once

Scheduling - Once Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule Running a macro

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule

Running a macro Once lets you select one specific date and one specific time when you want the macro to run. In this example, the macro is set to run at 10:00AM on January 11, 2012. Once it runs on this date, it will not run again.

Scheduling Hourly

Scheduling Hourly Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule Running a macro Hourly

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule

Running a macro Hourly lets you run the macro over and over at a specific time each hour or every xx number of hours.

Setting an Hourly Schedule

With the Play Macro Indefinitely option checked select the (Start at) hour of the day that you want the macro to play back. Next select how many minutes after the hour you want the macro to begin. You may also select to have the macro play every hour or every several hours.

If you don't want to have the macro play back indefinitely, then remove the check next to this option. You will need to set a start and stop time for the macro. You will also need to set a start date and an end date for the macro. The From and Between options will be highlighted so that you can set your start and finish dates and times. You can have the macro set to run for several weeks, months or years and limit it to run during business hours or some other time frame. As with the other option enter the time and frequency. The Start At time field will not be accessible for this option. In the example above, the macro is scheduled to play back 15 minutes after the hour every four hours. So the first time the macro will play back is at 12:15 PM and then again at 4:15PM and so on.

Scheduling - Daily

Scheduling - Daily Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule Running a macro

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule

Running a macro Daily allows you to run the macro once each day. You can also specify which days of the week that you want the macro to run or have the macro run every xx number of days.

Setting a Daily Schedule

With the Play Macro Indefinitely option checked, select a date that you want the macro to begin working. You can set this to today's date, three weeks from now or any other date. Set the time that you would like the macro to play back. You can select to have the macro play back every day, every other day, every ten days, etc. Or use the Selected Days option to select the days of the week for the macro to execute.

If you don't want to have the macro play back indefinitely, then remove the check next to this option. You will need to set a start date and an end date for the macro. The Between option will be highlighted so that you can set your start and finish dates. You can have the macro set to run for several days, weeks, months or years. As with the other option enter the time, frequency or days of the week. The From time and Start On date fields will not be accessible for this option.

Scheduling - Weekly

Scheduling - Weekly Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule Running a macro

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule

Running a macro Weekly allows you to pick a day of the week and the time during that day to run the macro.

Setting a Weekly Schedule

With the Play Macro Indefinitely option checked, select a date that you want the macro to begin working. You can set this to today's date, three weeks from now or any other date. Set the time that you would like the macro to play back. You can select to have the macro play back every week, every two weeks, every three weeks, etc. Lastly, select the day of the week for the macro to execute.

If you don't want to have the macro play back indefinitely, then remove the check next to this option. You will need to set a start date and an end date for the macro. The Between option will be highlighted so that you can set your start and finish dates. You can have the macro set to run for several weeks, months or years. As with the other option enter the time, frequency and day of week. The From time and Start On date fields will not be accessible for this option.

Scheduling - Monthly

Scheduling - Monthly Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule Running a macro

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule

Running a macro Monthly allows you to run the macro at a specified time on the same day of the month each month.

Setting a Monthly Schedule

With the Play Macro Indefinitely option checked, select a date that you want the macro to begin working. You can set this to today's date, three weeks from now or any other date. Set the time that you would like the macro to play back each month. You then have the option to select the day of the month, such as the first, 15th, 20th or any. Or you can select an option such as the one displayed above - the second Wednesday of each month. You can select the first, second, third, fourth, fifth or last day of any day of the week. The third date option is to simply select the last day of the month. Lastly, select the frequency that the macro will execute. You can set this to monthly, bimonthly, quarterly or any other combination. You can set up annual events by setting the frequency to every 12 months.

If you don't want to have the macro play back indefinitely, then remove the check next to this option. You will need to set a start date and an end date for the macro. The Between option will be highlighted so that you can set your start and finish dates. You can have the macro set to run for several months or years. As with the other option enter the time, day of the month and monthly frequency. The From time and Start On date fields will not be accessible for this option.

Scheduling - Time Out

Scheduling - Time Out Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule Setting the

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule

Setting the schedule with the Time Out option will play back the macro after the computer has been idle (no keyboard or mouse activity) for the number of minutes you specify. This option allows you up to 720 minutes after the computer has been idled.

There are two fields in the Time Out section where you can enter a number of minutes. The second value is the amount of computer idle time required. The first value is the amount of time Macro Express will wait before initially starting the macro.

Example

Example In the image above, the scheduler will wait for the system to be idle for

In the image above, the scheduler will wait for the system to be idle for 15 minutes. It will then wait 2 minutes before running the macro.

If the macro does not require use of the keyboard or mouse, it will play back again in 2 minutes.

If the macro does change the idle status of the computer, then the macro will not play back again until the system has been idle for 15 minutes and then the 2 minute wait period.

 

Scheduling - Other

Scheduling - Other Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule The Other option

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule

The Other option lets you repetitively run a macro every XX number of minutes and/or seconds. The intervals can be between 1second and 99999 minutes and 59 seconds. If you schedule a macro to run every 1 second and the macro

takes 5 seconds to execute, then this function will not operate properly.

If you plan to use macros that will run more

 

frequently than every 10 seconds, you will need to change the Scheduler Frequency default setting. This setting instructs

Macro Express to check every 10 seconds to see if a scheduled macro is ready to play back. You will need to reduce this

number in order for scheduled macros to play back more frequently.

 

Options

Time Frame

You may specify certain times of the day when you want the macro to play back. In the example above, the macro will only play back every 30 minutes from 7:00 AM to 5:00 PM. At 5:30 PM the macro would not play back because it is outside of the specified time period. In the example above, if you close Macro Express 20 minutes after the macro ran, the macro will not run again 10 minutes after you restart Macro Express. The "clock" resets and the macro will play back after the full 30 minutes has elapsed, since Macro Express was restarted. The same situation applies if you disable a macro.

Date Period

You may specify a range of dates that the macro will work. In the example above, the macro will work between January 11, 2012 and January 10, 2013. After this date the macro will no longer function, unless you modify the dates. You could set this up so that the macro would begin working a week or a month from the date you created the macro.

Play Macro Indefinitely

If you are not concerned with a Time Frame or Date Period, just place a check next to Play Macro Indefinitely. The macro will play back every 30 minutes. This will continue indefinitely.

Scheduling - At File Load

Scheduling - At File Load Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule This

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro > Schedule

This is similar to the At Startup schedule with one difference. Any time that the macro file containing your scheduled macro is loaded, the macro will run. So if you are starting up Macro Express in the morning, the file loads and the macro will play back. If you open another macro file and then open your original file that contains your scheduled macro, then the macro will also execute.

Options

Time Frame

You may specify certain times of the day when you want the macro to play back. In the example above, the macro will only play back from 7:00 AM to 5:00 PM. If you were to start Macro Express with the specified file loaded, at 6:00 PM, the macro would not play back because it is outside of the specified time period.

Date Period

You may specify a range of dates that the macro will work. In the example above, the macro will work between January 11, 2012 and January 10, 2014. After this date the macro will no longer function, unless you modify the dates. You could set this up so that the macro would begin working a week or a month from the date you created the macro.

Play Macro Indefinitely

If you are not concerned with a Time Frame or Date Period, just place a check next to Play Macro Indefinitely. This will play the macro back every time you want start Macro Express, on the days of the week selected. This will continue indefinitely.

Days of Week

You may select which days of the week you want the macro to run. You may not want the macro to play back on weekends, so you would just remove the checks from Saturday and Sunday as in the image above.

Window Title

Using this option will instruct the macro to execute any time the Window Title you specify has focus. In other words, once the window is activated the macro will play back.

Window Title Using this option will instruct the macro to execute any time the Window Title

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro

Selecting the Window Title option will display the above window. In the edit box, enter the title of the Window that you want the macro to play back in. The title of the window is that which appears in the caption bar of a window. Macro Express examines all Window Titles running on the computer in an attempt to find a match.

The Window Title does not need to be an exact match. A partial match will work. For example, if you wanted to switch to the Windows Notepad program, you could use "notepad" or "notep". This is particularly useful as some Window Titles change based on whether a given file is open. Case sensitivity is not required. For example, "NOTepad" will work as well as "notepad".

After typing in the Window Title name,click on the option you want for creating the macro. You can create the macro using the Scripting Editor, Direct Editor or by Capturing the macro.

No Activation

No Activation Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro It is possible to create a

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro

It is possible to create a macro and not assign any activation key to the macro. There are two primary uses for the No Activation option. First, you can create generic macro templates that can be incorporated into other macros - a set of instructions that you might find useful for insertion into several other macros. The Macro Run command will allow you to insert a No Activation macro into other macros.

A second use for this option is to just place the macro in a popup or floating menu. You may not want to assign the macro to a hotkey or shortkey for fear of accidentally invoking the macro. The only way to invoke the macro would be through the popup or floating menu.

After selecting No Activation, click on the option you want to use to create the macro. You can create the macro using the Scripting Editor, Direct Editor or by Capturing the macro.

Popup Menu

Popup Menu Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro A popup menu is a menu

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro

A popup menu is a menu of macros you have previously created. The menu window can be activated by pressing a hotkey of your choice or designating a system tray icon. Then either double click on the macro in the menu to run that macro or press the number or letter in the menu associated with the macro you want.

Selecting a Popup Menu will activate the above Window, requesting a hotkey to assign to activate the menu. After selecting the hotkey that you want to use to activate the popup menu, click on the Build Menu button to open the Build Macro Menu window. In this window you can select which macros to include in the menu and the menu style.

Mouse Activation

Mouse Activation Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro You can create macros to run

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro

You can create macros to run when the mouse button is clicked. To do this, first select the Mouse Click option to display the mouse options shown above. Macro activation may be assigned to the Left, Middle or Right mouse buttons.

There are two different types of mouse activation available, Area on Screen or Window Part.

Area on Screen

You can define regions on the screen that can be activated with a mouse click. Clicking on the defined area will trigger the macro. This option requires that you input four pixel coordinates - Left, Top, Right, and Bottom. The area within these four pixel coordinates is the area you can click on to run the macro.

Locator

Click on the Locator button to launch this small utility to help you quickly define the pixel coordinates. After the locator is running, move your mouse to the upper left corner of the region you want to define. Press Ctrl+Space to insert the pixel coordinates in the Left and Top fields. Then move your mouse to the lower right corner of the region you want to define. Press Alt+Space to insert the pixel coordinates into the Right and Bottom fields. this is a test.Press OK to save the coordinates.

What you have done is define a square or rectangular area on the screen. The macro runs when you click inside this area.

Window Part

You can define a macro to run by clicking on a part of a window. Parts include the window border, window title bar, window menu, horizontal scroll bar, vertical scroll bar, system menu, minimize button and maximize button.

Note: A few options have been excluded where they will interfere with Windows. These include such things as Left

Mouse with the Maximize or Minimize buttons.

 

After selecting the mouse option, click on the Scripting Editor, Direct Editor or Capture button to create the macro.

Floating Menu

Floating Menu Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro A floating menu has the same

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro

A floating menu has the same form and options as a Popup Menu except that it always remains on top and is always accessible as long as the Macro Player is running. A floating menu can be minimized to just the caption bar to free up space if needed. Multiple floating menus can be created. The last location of the floating menu is retained and used with subsequent runs of Macro Express.

Select the Floating Menu option and then click on the Build Menu button to open the Build Macro Menu window. In this window you can select which macros you want to include in your floating menu, and other details.

Control Activation

For our purposes, Control refers to the identifiable parts of a specific application window. Controls may include such things as a button, an edit box, a toolbar, a window title bar or others. The control may be part of the main application window or be part of a child window (a window within a window).

Control Activation For our purposes, Control refers to the identifiable parts of a specific application window.

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Add Macro

With Control Activation selected, the macro will play back when the control is active or the window with the control is active. In the example above the control name is listed. The program .exe is named and then the window component that must be active in order for the macro to play back.

Control on Top

This option only requires that the control part of the window is currently active or on top.

Control Focused

This option requires that the control be part of the active window and the control must have focus. For example the mouse cursor could be in an edit box, giving focus to this control. Or a button may be highlighted and have control.

Get Control

Below is an image of the Capture Window Control window that appears when you launch the control utility. Essentially you just place the mouse cursor on the crosshair image, hold down the left mouse button and drag the mouse over the control you want. You can drag this over title bars, buttons, edit boxes, forms, toolbars, etc. As you drag the mouse over these different controls, you'll see the Class Name and Window Text fields populated with the corresponding information. Once you have selected the control you want, release the left mouse button. Click on the Save button to return to the Add Macro window. The control name will be saved in this window.

Control Activation For our purposes, Control refers to the identifiable parts of a specific application window.

Note: Not every button, menu item or component on a program is actually a Control. Sometimes the only control in a

 
   

given program is the window or dialog that pops up when the program starts. We have also noticed that many of Microsoft's programs seem to have fewer controls than programs from other manufacturers. How the controls work will

depend upon the way the program you are working with is designed.

 

Related Topics

Control Overview

Controls Tutorial

Stopping a Macro

Once you have started a macro, you may find times when you need to stop the macro before it is complete. There are several ways to do this.

Aborting a Macro

If you have selected to display the Running icon when a macro is running, right mouse click on the icon in the System tray to stop the macro. Or you may press the Scroll Lock and Pause keys to stop the macro. This is the default hotkey. You can change the default to Win + ` or the Pause key by going to Options | Preferences | Playback.

Any of these options will cancel a macro that is playing. However, please note that macros that consist of a lot of keystrokes can send the keystrokes rather quickly and Windows will buffer up the keystrokes. Once such commands have been buffered up in Windows, aborting a macro will not cancel them. In these cases, it may appear that the abort command did not work when in reality the macro has already finished issuing its commands and Windows is now processing them.

Note: The Timed Delay in Seconds command and the Wait for Time to Elapse command suspend Macro Express for the

amount of time specified. During this delay time the macro cannot be terminated.

 

Macro Stop

The Macro Stop command allows you to stop the execution of a macro before the macro steps have completed. You would insert the Macro Stop command into your macro script. Whenever this line in the macro is reached, the macro will terminate. In most cases you would use this command in conjunction with a conditional statement. For example, if a desired condition is not met, terminate the macro.

Macro Explorer

Macro Explorer Actions The icons in the Actions column are the primary methods for navigating through

Actions

The icons in the Actions column are the primary methods for navigating through the program. Click on any of these icons to load a different program function.

Categories

If you have created quite a few macros, you may find it convenient to use the optional category function. This "category" section allows you to assign each macro to a category you define. For example you can create a Password category to hold any macros containing important passwords or assign any MS Word specific macros to a MS Word category. This makes it easy to find the macros you want - for a quick edit or change. A macro may only be assigned to one category. The same macro cannot be placed in multiple categories.

The category option may be turned on or off via the Appearance window. From this window, place a check in the box next to Show Categories to display the category listings. The category column appears on the left side of the Macro Explorer. In the Macro Explorer you can add, delete and rename categories.

When the program is first installed, there are two default categories - All Categories and Unassigned.

Macros

By default, the program opens to the Macro Explorer pane. This pane displays the list of macros in the file that you currently have open. The program comes with five System Macros that cannot be removed as they are essential parts of the program. When saving macros in the editors, quick wizards or with a macro capture, the program will return to the Macro Explorer. The list of macro information is displayed in four columns.

Activation - This displays the method you selected to execute the macro. This column displays the hotkey combinations, any scheduled macros, the letter combinations used for any shortkeys or any other type of activation method you selected. Popup menus or floating menus can be created for easier execution of macros.

Nickname - You can assign a nickname to any macro so that you can more readily identify the purpose of the macro. You do not have to assign nicknames to macros. This is an optional function. Any not assigned will show as a blank field.

Scope - This column lists whether the macro is global, global except, window specific, program specific, a system macro, a popup menu or a floating menu. A global macro will play back in any Windows application. A global except macro will play back in any Windows application except the one(s) you specify. A window specific macro will only execute in the window that you designate. If the window is not active the macro will not play back A program specific macro will only execute in the program that you designate. If the program is not active the macro will not play back.

Modified - This displays the date that the macro was last modified.

Sorting Macros

To quickly sort the list of macros displayed, click on one of the column headers, Nickname, Activation, Scope or Modified. The macros will be sorted in order based on the column header you selected. Click on the header again and it will reverse the sort order. For additional sorting options click on Options | Sort Macros | Custom.

Right Click Context Menu

There are a number of options available if you right mouse click on a macro in the macro list. A menu will appear. The options include Run Macro Now, Copy Macro, Edit with Scripting Editor, Edit with Direct Editor, Enable/Disable Macro, Rename, Delete Macro and Properties.

Listing of Keyboard Shortcuts

Below is a listing of the Keyboard Shortcuts available in the Macro Explorer.

Keystroke

Action

Ctrl+F

Find (text in Nickname field)

 

F3

Find Again

 

Delete

Delete macro

 

Below is a list of the keystroke equivalents for navigating through the program. These keystrokes would be the same as clicking on the Actions Icons in the left hand column of the program.

Keystroke

Action

Alt+V E

Macro Explorer

 

Alt+V S

Scripting Editor

 

Alt+V D

Direct Editor

 

Alt+M A

Capture (the same as Add Macro)

 

Alt+V Q

Quick Wizards

 

Alt+V R

Recycle Bin

 

System Macros

System Macros Macro Express Explorer > Right Click on System Macro > Left Click on Properties

Macro Express Explorer > Right Click on System Macro > Left Click on Properties

Macro Express defines several system macros for a variety of program functions. These macros can be renamed at any time to something that may be easier for you to remember.

Renaming a System Macro

To rename a system macro, right mouse click on the macro displayed in the Macro Explorer. From the menu that appears, left click on Properties to open the System Macro Properties window. Click on the Set HotKey button next to the System Macro you want to edit. Select a hotkey from the list that may be simpler to remember and click OK. The new hotkey will display in the Activation column of the Macro Explorer.

Menu of Macros for Top Most Window

Pressing the Ctrl+Alt+Shift+Z hotkey opens a window listing all macros that are specifically defined for the current window you are working in.

You can define what information you want displayed in this popup menu. The popup menu will display the icons you have associated with the macros, show the name and activation method defined for each macro in the menu, display the first part of a macro - the first line of two of a macro or display a Windows default menu. Click on the option you want to have it displayed in the popup menu.

Resume Pause

If you have inserted a pause into your macro, instead of using the mouse to click the "Resume" button, you can press down the Ctrl+Alt+Shift+Y hotkey to resume the macro.

Run Macro Express Editor

Pressing the Ctrl+Alt+Shift+W hotkey activates the Macro Express editor. It will bring the editor program to the forefront from its hidden or minimized state. This is a simple way to activate the program without using the mouse.

Start/Stop Capture

When you are ready to begin capturing keystrokes or mouse movements for a macro, press Ctrl+Alt+Shift+X to start capturing. When you are finished capturing, press Ctrl+Alt+Shift+X again to stop recording. You can also press the hotkey combination that you are defining to stop the capture process.

Terminate Macro Express

Pressing the Ctrl+Alt+Shift+V system hotkey will terminate Macro Express. If you have the program set to run completely hidden, you will need to use this command to close Macro Express.

Suspend / Resume Macro Express

Pressing the Ctrl+Alt+Shift+U system hotkey will toggle between suspending Macro Express and resuming its active status. No macros will play back while Macro Express is suspended.

Another way to suspend the program is to right mouse click on the Macro Express icon in the system tray. Left click on Suspend from the menu that opens. The menu item will display Resume when the program is suspended. The icon in the system tray is changed to a red circle with a line through it when Macro Express is suspended.

File Menu

New Macro File

Macro Express allows you to create multiple files with different macros in each file. Click on the File | New File option create a new file. A dialog box appears prompting you to name the file and place it into the desired folder.

to

Open Macro File

Click on this option to open a macro file you have previously created. A dialog box appears prompting you to select the file and choose from which folder.

Save Macro File As

Select this option to make a copy of the macro file currently open. Save the file with a new name and select a location for saving the file.

Backup

This option will immediately make a backup of the macro file that is currently open. If you have opted to set up a back up schedule, this option will not disturb the schedule you have created. It will follow the settings that are selected in the option, such as where the backup will be saved and how many backup copies will be created.

Restore

Use this option to restore from a backup file. A Windows dialog will open prompting to select the backup file. The dialog opens to the folder designated in the Backup preferences panel for file backups. If the backup options were recently changed, then it may be necessary to browse to the location where previous backups were stored.

Reopen

This is a convenient way to open a macro file previously used. This option displays the last five macro files that you have used. Click on the file you want to load into Macro Express.

Import

There are three different import options available in Macro Express. Click on the topic of interest below to obtain more information.

Import Macros Import Text File Import a Playable Macro

Export

There are three different export options available in Macro Express. Click on the topic of interest below to obtain more information.

Export Macros Output Macro Information Export as Playable Macro

Print Macro List

Click on File | Print Macro List or click on the speed button to print a list of all macros currently assigned. The list will contain the activation method, such as the hotkey combination used, the nickname assigned, if any, and macro scope (global, system, window specific or program specific). The list will include the information as shown in the Macro Explorer pane.

Printer Font

Use this option to select font settings for printing the macro list. Select font size, color, type, etc.

Printer Setup

Select this option to ensure printer settings are accurate before printing the macro list.

Terminate Macro Express Editor

Selecting this option closes the Editor but will leave the player running. Your macros will still run with the Editor closed.

Terminate Macro Express Editor and Player

Selecting this option closes the Editor and Player, shutting down the entire program, preventing any macros from running.

Importing Macros

The import and export functions are a convenient way to transfer macros between Macro Express users. Use the Export command to save your macros to a USB drive or some other media. On another computer, import the macros from the USB drive or other device.

Importing Macros The import and export functions are a convenient way to transfer macros between Macro

Macro Express Explorer > File > Import > Import Macros

To import macros, click on File | Import | Import Macros. An empty Import Macros window will appear. Click on the Open File button to open an existing Macro Express macro file. A standard dialog box will appear so that you can browse through your folders to find the correct file.

All Macro Express macro files have a file extension of .MEX. Highlight the file you want to import and click on Open. A list of all macros found in that file will be shown. Highlight the macros you want to import by clicking on each macro. Then click the Import button. An Import Complete message will appear. Click OK and then click Exit to return to the Macro Explorer. This finishes the process and the macros have been imported into your current file.

If you want to import all of the macros, click on the Select All button which will highlight all macros. Then click the OK button. Pressing the Clear button will remove the highlight from any macros already selected.

Note: It is also possible to import or export popup menu macros along with the macros that were in them and have

 
   

them correlate correctly after the import or export. This can be done as long as the macros in the popup menu are imported or exported at the same time as the popup menu. Any macro that is not imported or exported along with the

popup menu will be removed from the popup menu as an entry.

 

Import Text File

Selecting File | Import | Import Text File from the Macro Explorer menu allows you to import a group of shortkey or hotkey macros. A standard Windows dialog box opens prompting you to navigate and select the text file to import.

The text file must be in a specific format. An improper format will cause unpredictable results. The format requires an <ITEM NAME> tag followed by the shortkey or hotkey name on the first line. The hotkey names to use are the names used in the Macro Express editor when selecting to add a new hotkey macro. If a match is not made on one of these, then it is assumed that the name given is a shortkey. The next line contains the nickname of the macro. The following line or set of lines contains the macro text. The macro text can span multiple lines. The next macro to be imported will again start with the <ITEM NAME> tag starting on a new line.

Example:

This example shows the format for two shortkey macros followed by a hotkey macro to be imported.

<ITEM NAME>issadd Our Address Insight Software Solutions, Inc. P.O. Box 106 Kaysville, UT 84037 <ITEM NAME>Lic1 License Info Licensor grants to Licensee a non-exclusive and non-transferable license to use Macro Express upon the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement. <ITEM NAME>Ctrl+Shift+T Text File Import The text file must be in a specific format. An improper format will cause unpredictable results. The format requires an "<ITEM NAME> tag followed by the shortkey or hotkey name on one line. The hotkey names to use are the names used in the Macro Express editor when selecting to add a new hotkey macro. If a match is not made on one of these, then it is assumed that the name given is a shortkey. The next line contains the nickname of the macro. The following line or set of lines contains the macro text. The macro text can span multiple lines. The next macro to be imported will again start with the "<ITEM NAME> tag starting on a new line.

 

Macro Express Explorer > File > Import > Import Text File

Import a Playable Macro

A "Playable Macro" file format is available. Files with an .MXE file extension are similar to .EXE files. Double clicking on the .MXE file from within Windows Explorer will play back the macro. Macro Express is not required to be running to execute the .MXE macro, though installation of the Macro Express player is necessary. The .MXE file may also be executed from a command line parameter to run a batch file.

This option is used for importing a playable macro from another machine on a network or from a disk that contains a playable macro and converting it to a .MEX macro. Click on File | Import | Import a Playable Macro. A box will appear allowing you to search your disc or drive to import the .MXE file. Once located, highlight the file you want to import and click OK to import the file. The Copy HotKey window opens prompting you to assign a hotkey activation or another method for executing the macro. This will place the imported macro into your regular list of macros in the Macro Explorer.

Macro Express Explorer > File > Import > Import a Playable Macro

Exporting Macros

The import and export functions are a convenient way to transfer macros between Macro Express users. Use the Export command to save your macros to a USB drive or some other medium. On another computer, Import the macros from the USB drive or other device.

Exporting Macros The import and export functions are a convenient way to transfer macros between Macro

Macro Express Explorer > File > Export > Export Macros

To export macros, click on File | Export | Export Macros. A window will be presented showing all macros from the macro file you are currently working with. Highlight the macros you want exported and click the Save File button. A standard windows box will appear asking you to name the file and select a destination folder. The new file created will be a Macro Express macro (.mex) file which can be opened directly by Macro Express using the File | Open Macro File menu or the macros may be imported.

If you want to export all of the macros in the file, click on the Select All button which will highlight all macros. Then click the Save File button. Pressing the Clear button will "de-select" any macros already highlighted.

   

Note: It is possible to import or export popup menu macros along with the macros that were in them and have them correlate correctly after the import or export. This can be done as long as the macros in the popup menu are imported or

exported at the same time as the popup menu. Any macro that is not imported or exported along with the popup menu

 

will be removed from the popup menu as an entry.

 

Output Macro Information

With this option you can select what information you want to save out to a text file. As shown in the window below, place a check in the boxes of the items you want to output by clicking on those items. After selecting those items, click OK. A standard dialog box will prompt you to select a file name and folder destination for storing this information. The Icon option will list the names of the icons used. The information can then be printed in any text editor.

Output Macro Information With this option you can select what information you want to save out

Macro Express Explorer > File > Export > Output Macro Information

Export as Playable Macro

A "Playable Macro" file format is available. Files with an .MXE file extension are similar to .EXE files.

Double clicking on

the .MXE file from within Windows Explorer or My Computer will play back the macro. Macro Express is not required to be running to execute the .MXE macro, though installation of the Macro Express player is necessary. The .MXE file may also be executed from a command line parameter to run a batch file or similar.

The "Export As Playable Macro" option allows you to export (or create) any defined macro as a playable macro. From the Macro Explorer highlight the macro that you want to export. Next, click on File | Export | Export as Playable Macro. A box will appear asking you to name the file and specify the location where to save the .MXE file. Clicking on the .MXE file using Windows Explorer or My Computer will execute the macro.

Macro Express Explorer > File > Export > Export as Playable Macro

Add Macros

Click on Macros | Add Macros from the main window of the program to open the Add Macro window. Select the macro activation method you want. Choose from HotKey, Shortkey, Scheduled Macro, Window Activated, Window Control, Mouse Click, Popup or Floating Menus or No Activation. The program defaults to the HotKey activation.

HotKey

Add Macros Click on Macros | Add Macros from the main window of the program to

If you want to activate your new macro with a hotkey, make sure the hotkey choice is selected. The window will look like the one above. Place the cursor in the edit box and hold down the hotkey combination that you want to use. That combination will be placed in the edit box. This is the hotkey combination you will press to activate the macro, when completed. If you are not sure which combination you want to use, scroll through the list of keys and highlight the one you want. This will also place the hotkey combination in the edit box.

After selecting the hotkey combination, click on the option you want for creating the macro. You can create the macro using the Scripting Editor, the Direct Editor or by Capturing the macro.

ShortKey

Add Macros Click on Macros | Add Macros from the main window of the program to

Selecting the Shortkey option activates the above window. In the edit box type in the shortkey (up to 10 characters) that you want to use to activate the macro. A shortkey is a set of characters such as abc, myname, etc. When the characters are typed into an application that accepts text input, the macro runs. This option will not trigger a macro from the

Windows desktop or other applications that do not accept text input. For a complete list of characters that can be used with a shortkey, see the program specifications.

After typing in the shortkey name, click on the option you want for creating the macro. You can create the macro using the Scripting Editor, Entering the Macro information directly or by Capturing the macro.

Note:

Before using the Shortkey option you may want to first set the shortkey default settings. Click on Options |

Preferences | Shortkeys to define your settings.

 

Scheduled Macro

Windows desktop or other applications that do not accept text input. For a complete list of

Select Schedule to activate the Scheduler options. Choose the schedule that you want and click on the Scripting Editor, Direct Editor or Capture buttons to begin building the macro. The macro will play back at the time you have designated.

Window Title

Windows desktop or other applications that do not accept text input. For a complete list of

This activation instructs the macro to execute any time the Window Title you specify has focus. In other words, once the window is activated the macro will run.

In the edit box, enter the title of the Window that you want the macro to play back in. The title of the window is that

which appears in the caption bar of a window. Macro Express examines all Window Titles running on the computer in an attempt to find a match.

The Window Title does not need to be an exact match. A partial match will work. For example, if you wanted to switch to the Windows Notepad program, you could use "notepad" or "notep". This is particularly useful as some Window Titles change based on whether a given file is open. Case sensitivity is not required. For example, "NOTepad" will work as well as "notepad".

After inserting the Window Title, click on the option you want for creating the macro. You can create the macro using the Scripting Editor, Entering the Macro information directly or by Capturing the macro.

Popup Menu

which appears in the caption bar of a window. Macro Express examines all Window Titles running

Selecting a Popup Menu activates the above Window. After selecting the hotkey that you want to use to activate the popup menu, click on the Build Menu button to open the Build Macro Menu window. In this window you can select which macros you want to include in the popup menu. Also choose from several type menus to display.

Floating Menu

which appears in the caption bar of a window. Macro Express examines all Window Titles running

A floating menu has the same form and options as a Popup Menu except that it always remains on top and always accessible as long as the Macro Player is running. A floating menu may be minimized to just the caption bar to free up desktop space if needed. Multiple floating menus can be created. The last location of the floating menu is retained and used with subsequent runs of Macro Express. Click on the Build Menu button to open the Build Macro Menu window. In this window you can select which macros you want to include in the floating menu. Also choose from several type menus to display.

Mouse Click

Mouse Click This option allows you to define macros activated by mouse clicks . Two different

This option allows you to define macros activated by mouse clicks. Two different mouse options are available.

  • 1. Define regions on the screen that can be assigned to the left, middle or right mouse button. Clicking on this area will trigger the macro. Macros can be global, window or program specific.

  • 2. Or click on part of a window to execute a macro. Window parts include the window border, window menu, window caption bar, horizontal scroll bar, vertical scroll bar, system button, minimize button and maximize button. Macros can be assigned to left, middle or right button and can be global, window or program specific. A few options have been excluded where they will interfere with Windows. These include such things as Left Mouse with the Maximize or Minimize buttons.

No Activation

Mouse Click This option allows you to define macros activated by mouse clicks . Two different

There are at least two possible uses for the No Activation option. First, you can create generic macro templates that can be incorporated into other macros - a set of instructions that you might find useful for insertion into several other macros. The Run A Macro command will allow you to insert this macro into other macros.

The second possible use for this option is to just place the macro in a popup menu. You may not want to assign the macro to a hotkey or short key for fear of accidentally invoking the macro. The only way to invoke the macro would be through the popup menu.

Control

The Control option will activate a macro when a specific window control is active. The control

The Control option will activate a macro when a specific window control is active. The control may be a window button, edit box or another identifiable portion of a window.

Copy Macro

Macro Express provides a simple method for copying of an existing macro. From the Macro Express - Explorer window highlight the macro to copy. Then click on Macros | Copy Macro from the menu or the Copy Macro button on the toolbar to open the Copy Macro window. Select the macro activation to use and click OK.

The new copied macro is listed in the Macro Explorer window. The macro nickname is designated as "Copy of

...

" the

original macro name. Double click on the macro to edit in the Scripting Editor. Open the Properties tab and assign a new nickname if desired.

Highlight macro in Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Copy Macro

Run Macro Now

This option does what its title implies. Highlight the macro that you want to run from the Macro Explorer. Click on Macros | Run Macro Now and the macro will play back. Of course you'll need to make sure that the macro you want to run now is appropriate for the windows you have open, etc.

Another way to run the macro is to right mouse click on the macro in the Macro Explorer. From the menu that appears, left mouse click on the Run Macro Now menu item.

Highlight macro in Macro Express - Explorer > Macros > Run Macro Now

Recapture Macro

To overwrite the results of a previous captured macro, highlight the macro from the Macro Express Pro - Explorer list and click on Macro | Recapture Macro. This opens the Capture a Macro window which allows you to check the capture settings before recording. Then click the Capture button to start the macro capture.

Press the system hotkey Ctrl + Alt + Shift + X, right click on the camera icon in the system tray or press the hotkey combination of the macro being recaptured to stop the capture.

Recapturing removes the contents of the existing macro and replaces it with the newly captured script.

Highlight macro in Macro Express - Explorer > Macros > Recapture Macro

Enable or Disable Macro

To temporarily disable a macro, highlight the macro from the list in the Macro Explorer. Then click on Macros | Disable Macro. The disabled macro will appear italicized and grayed out in the Macro Explorer. The disabled macro will not function again until it has been Enabled. To enable the macro, highlight the disabled macro with the mouse and click on Macros | Enable Macro. The macro is now ready for use again.

If you close a floating menu by clicking on the "X" in the upper right corner of the menu window, the floating menu is disabled. To enable the menu you will need to highlight the floating menu from the list of macros in the Macro Explorer. Then click on Macros | Enable Macro.

You can also use the Macro Disable and Macro Enable commands in macros themselves to enable and disable other macros in your macro file, such as Floating Menus.

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Disable Macro or Enable Macro

Search Explorer

If you have a large number of macros listed in the Macro Explorer, you may find this option to be a real time saver. This will perform a search through the list of macro nicknames. It will perform the search beginning with the macro you have highlighted and continue through the rest of the list.

Search Explorer If you have a large number of macros listed in the Macro Explorer, you

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Search

Pressing CTRL + F or clicking on Macros | Search will open the Find window. Enter the word(s) you are looking for in the Nickname field and press the Find Next button. If a match is found, the macro that matches will now be the highlighted macro. If no match is found, a message will be displayed saying that you have "Reached the end of the list".

If your first match is not the macro you were looking for, press F3 or click on Macros | Search Again to go to the next match.

Match Case

This option will make your search case sensitive. Capital and lower case letters will need to match exactly in order to find the right match.

Delete Macro

To remove a macro that is no longer needed, first highlight that macro with your mouse from the list in the Macro Explorer. Click on Macros | Delete Macro(s) or the Delete button on the toolbar. A window prompts you to verify that you want to delete the macro. Select Yes to delete or No to cancel. You may also highlight a group of macros and delete them all at the same time.

You can also use commands in macros themselves to delete other macros or to delete itself upon termination of the macro. You may want to create a one-time reminder message and then have the message (macro) be removed after playback. The Macro Commands function allows you to do this.

Deleted macros are sent to the Macro Express Recycle Bin. If you decide later that you need the deleted macro, you can restore it from the Recycle Bin. Or you can periodically remove all macros from the Recycle Bin.

Highlight macro in Macro Express - Explorer > Macros > Delete Macro

Place on Desktop

You can place an icon on your desktop for any of the macros you have created. In order to do this, highlight the macro you want to place on the desktop from the list of macros in the Macro Explorer. Then click on Macros | Place on Desktop. The icon that you assigned to your macro will now be displayed on your desktop.

You can change a macro's icon by double clicking on the macro from the list of macros in the Macro Explorer. This action opens the Scripting Editor or Direct Editor, depending on which is defined as your default editor. Click on the Properties Tab and then click on the Change button in the icon section to select an icon. If an icon was not selected at the time the macro was created, the default Macro Express icon is displayed.

Note 1: When you create an icon on the desktop, the macro nickname also becomes the file name. Windows will not

 

accept several characters in a file name, one of them being the /. Other characters not allowed are \ : * ? < > and |.

 

Note 2: To remove an icon from the desktop, right mouse click on the icon and select delete from the menu that opens.

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Place on Desktop

Macro Properties

Macro Properties This view of the Properties window may be accessed from the Macro Explorer. Highlight

This view of the Properties window may be accessed from the Macro Explorer. Highlight the macro of interest and click on Macros | Properties from the Macro Explorer menu. Or right mouse click on the macro of interest and left click on Properties from the context menu. The following information is available about the macro you have selected.

General

This Tab provides some basic information about the macro. You can change the status of the macro from active to inactive or vice versa from this tab. You can also select a new icon to be associated with your macro from this tab.

You may also change the Macro Nickname. Just type over the existing nickname to rename the macro. Click Apply to save the change.

Activation

This tab displays what macro activation(s) you have selected. The activation(s) may be modified from this screen.

Scope

The Scope tab displays what programs or windows you have selected the macro to work with. These selections may be modified from this screen.

Script

The Script tab displays the macro script, similar to the format you would see in the Direct Editor. The macro script cannot be altered in this tab. This must be done in the Scripting Editor or Direct Editor.

Security

The Security Tab allows you to make changes to the macro passwords defined or create new passwords.

Notes

This tab displays any notes you may have made about the macro. You may edit the notes in this field.

Log

The Log Tab displays any error logging that you may be tracking in the macro. Click on the Clear Log button to remove all log entries. Place a check in the box next to Enable Error Log to start logging any error messages. Or if you have the logging default set in the Preferences | Miscellaneous, the errors will be logged. This field is not editable.

Macro Categories

Macro Categories If you have created quite a few macros, you may find it handy to

If you have created quite a few macros, you may find it handy to use the optional category function. This optional "category" section allows you to assign each macro to a category you define. For example you can create a Password category to hold any macros containing important passwords or assign any MS Word specific macros to a MS Word category. This makes it easy to find the macros you want - for a quick edit or change. A macro may only be assigned to one category. The same macro cannot be placed in multiple categories.

The category option may be turned on or off via the Appearance window. From this window, place a check in the box next to Show Categories to display the category listings. The category column appears on the left side of the Macro Explorer. In the Macro Explorer you can add, delete and rename categories.

When the program is first installed, there are two default categories - All Categories and Unassigned.

Add Category

Select this menu option to add a new category. A new category folder and edit box will appear in the category list. Type in the name that you want to call the category. You may also create sub-categories within your list of categories. To do this, right mouse click on the main folder and then left mouse click on New Category. A new category sub-folder will be added to the list.

Rename Category

To change the name of a category you have already created, highlight the category and click on the Category | Rename Category menu option. The category name will be highlighted and you can type in a new name. This is similar to Windows Explorer.

Enable / Disable Macros

All macros in the highlighted category are disabled or enabled when this option is selected.

Delete Category

Highlight the name of the category that you want to remove. Then click on Category | Delete Category. A warning message will appear verifying that you want to delete the category. Click yes to delete the category and any sub-categories of that category.

Macro Express Explorer > Category

Placing Macros in Categories

Once you have created a category, drag the macro from the Macro Explorer list to the category you want. To drag the macro, highlight the macro you want to assign to a new category. Hold down the left mouse button and move the pointer to the category listed in the Category column. When the mouse is pointing to the category you want, release the left mouse button. This will assign the macro to your category. Next, click on the category and your macro will be displayed in that category. Only those macros assigned to that category will be displayed. The macro you just moved will also remain in "All Categories".

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Move to Category You can also use the menu commands

Macro Express Explorer > Macros > Move to Category

You can also use the menu commands to assign macros to categories you have already created. Highlight the macro you want to assign, then click on Macros | Move to Category. A list of categories will appear as in the example above. Highlight the category you want and then press the OK button. Your macro will now be assigned to the category you selected.

With either of the above options, you can highlight a block of macros and move them all at once to the category of your choice.

Note: The categories you have selected are specific to the macro file that you currently have open. If you open a new

macro file, the categories will change to what you have assigned for that file.

 

Sort Macros

There are several options for sorting macros in the Macro Explorer. These options are accessible through the Options | Sort Macros menu.

By Nickname

All macros in the Macro Explorer list are sorted by macro nickname. You can also click on the column header to sort. Another click on the column header will reverse the sort order.

By Activation

This option alphabetically sorts all of the macros in the Macro Explorer list by macro activation. You can also click on the column header to sort. Another click on the column header will reverse the sort order.

By Scope

All macros in the Macro Explorer list are sorted by macro scope. You can also click on the column header to sort. Another click on the column header will reverse the sort order.

By Date

Sort all of the macros in the Macro Explorer list by the date the macro was last modified (edited). You can also click on the column header to perform the sort. Another click on the column header will reverse the sort order.

Custom

Use this option to customize how you want the macros sorted. Below is a display of the sort window used to define the sort order of macros displayed in the Macro Explorer.

Sort Macros There are several options for sorting macros in the Macro Explorer . These options

Macro Express Explorer > Options > Sort Macros > Custom

Primary Sort

You can select which item will be your primary sort. Highlight the item you want as your primary sort and click the up arrow to move it to the number one (top) position. You can change the positions of any of the items by highlighting it and then clicking on the up or down arrow. You can sort by Activation, Nickname, Scope or Modified Date/Time. Make your selection and then use the Secondary Sort to further sort the Activation or Scope options.

Using the Nickname as primary sort would sort the names you assigned to each macro in alphabetical order. Any macros not assigned a nickname will appear first in the list. The Modified Date/Time selection will sort the macros by the date and time that the macro was last modified.

Secondary Sort

In this example, the primary sort is Activation so that the macros listed in the Macro Explorer are sorted by Activation code. Based on the Secondary Sort example above (Activation column), all hotkeys are placed in alphabetical order first. Next, all shortkeys are placed in alphabetical order, then the scheduled macros followed by the no activation

macros and those activated by a window title. Lastly, the mouse click activated macros, floating menus and control activated macros are listed.

The Scope column actually adds another sort level. So in the example above, the macros are sorted by macro activation with all hotkey macros being listed first. Then if you have the same hotkey assigned to more than one macro, then that hotkey would be further sorted by the scope of the macro. Highlight the scope option and click on the Up or Down arrows to move it to the sort position you want.

Use Drag and Drop to set the order of macros

With this option checked you can drag the macros in the Macro Explorer list and drop them to a new position in the list. Just click on the macro (or highlight a group of macros) and hold down the left mouse button. Move the mouse cursor to the new location in the list and release the button. The macro(s) should now be positioned as you instructed.

View

This option affects the amount of macro detail displayed in the Macro Explorer window.

Large Icons

Display only the icons associated with each macro. The icons are in a large size format and have the macro nickname listed below each icon.

Small Icons

Display the icons associated with each macro in a smaller size format. The macro nickname is listed to the right of each icon. Scroll up or down to view the entire list, if you have sufficient macros to require scrolling.

List

This is similar to the small icon option. Scroll horizontally to view the entire list of macros, if you have sufficient macros to require scrolling.

Details

Display details about each macro. View four columns displaying the Macro Nickname, primary Activation, Scope and macro Modified date.

Macro Express - Explorer > Options > View

Appearance

You can change the look of Macro Express by clicking on Options | Preferences | Appearance. This function also includes options for displaying various program functions.

Appearance You can change the look of Macro Express by clicking on Options | Preferences |

Macro Express Explorer > Options > Preferences > Appearance

Explorer

Grid Font Open a font dialog to select a different font type, style, size and color and alter the appearance of the text in the Macro Explorer columns.

Category Font

Open a font dialog to select a different font type, style, size and color for the Categories displayed in the Macro Explorer.

Show Category Icons Display folder icons next to each category in the Category field of the Macro Explorer.

Show Macro Icons Display icons next to each macro defined in the Macro Explorer.

Show Date and Time

Show the current date and time at the bottom of the program window. This information is taken from the Windows system clock.

Show Categories Select to display the column listing macro categories in the Macro Explorer.

Show Gridlines

Choose to show the grid lines between each macro displayed in the Macro Explorer.

Show Actions Bar

Display the Actions bar on the left side of the Macro Explorer window. If you choose not to display the bar, you will need to click on the menu commands to navigate through the program.

Menu Style

Select different styles for the menu bars and drop down menus in the program. Select from Standard, Enhanced, Flat, Office 11 or XP styles. The XP menu look is set as the default.

Menu Animation

This option allows you to select different ways to display the drop down menus in the program. Select from Slide, Unfold, Random, Fade or None (which simply displays the menu without animation). The default option is set to None.

Scripting Editor

Show Script Command Categories

Display the list of commands sorted into categories. Not selected, the commands will display individually and not be segregated into categories.

Show Icons

Choose to have icons displayed for each category and again on each line of the macro script. An icon is associated with each command in the script.

System Tray

Show in System Tray

Place a Macro Express icon in the Windows system tray or notification area when the Macro Express Player is active. The icon primarily serves two purposes. First, it alerts you to the fact that Macro Express is running in the background. Second, clicking on the icon with the left mouse button will activate the Macro Express Editor and bring it to the foreground. Right clicking on the icon opens a small menu that allows you to open the editor, access the help file, access tools, suspend the program, shut down the program, etc.

Completely Hide

This mode completely hides the macro player. In the absence of a system tray icon, you will need to use the system macros that are defined for activating the editor and terminating the player. Ctrl + Alt + Shift + W is the default hotkey to open the editor.

Show Running Icon

Display the running man icon in the system tray during the execution of a macro.

Show Recording Icon

Display the movie camera icon the system tray during the recording (capturing) of a macro.

Backup Preferences

This option allows you to set up automatic backups of your macro data file. The data is backed up when you close the Macro Express Player. The file that you currently have loaded when closing the program will be the macro file that is backed up. This option allows you to select the frequency of the backups, the number of backups to store and where to save the backup files.

Backup Preferences This option allows you to set up automatic backups of your macro data file.

Macro Express Explorer > Options > Preferences > Backup

Schedule

Determine the frequency of backups.

Backup when program starts

A backup of the data is created when the Macro Express Player is started.

Backup when program closes

This creates a backup of the data every time that the Macro Express Player is closed.

Backup when editor closes

A data backup file is created each time one of the Macro Express editor windows closes. This includes the Script Editor, the Menu Builder, the Quick Wizard and the Macro Express - Explorer window.

Every

___

Days

This options provides flexibility for creating a backup schedule. Select the number of days between backups. If the number 2 is entered, then a backup will run every two days. Choose to have the backups run when the program starts, closes or select a specific time of the day.

No Backup

To not schedule any backups, leave the four options unchecked. Manually back up the macro file by opening the

Macro Express - Explorer window and clicking on File | Backup. See the information.

Backing Up Macros topic for more

Options

Display Message While Backing Up

With this option selected a message will appear when you shut down asking if you would like to continue with the backup of your file. This will only appear when you select to have a backup created.

Keep

____

Backups

You can specify the number of backup copies that you want to store. If you were to keep three backup copies of the macex.mex file, the backups would be named macex.000, macex.001 and macex.002. The macex.000 would be always be the most current backup.

Backup Location

Specify the location of the backup files from the drop down list. Select the number of backup copies to keep.

Backup to the Same Folder as the Macro File

The backup file is created and saved into the same folder where the original macro file is currently located.

Backup to a Specific Path

Use this option to store the backups in a folder other than the one where the original file is located.

Backup Path

If using the Backup to a Specific Path option, click on the Browse button to determine the location where the

backup file will be stored. Or type in the full file path in the edit field.

Note: To manually back up the macro file at any time, open the Macro Express Explorer window and click on File |

Backup.

 

Caching

Caching Macro Express Explorer > Options > Preferences > Caching Macro Caching The Caching option allows

Macro Express Explorer > Options > Preferences > Caching

Macro Caching

The Caching option allows you to decide how much memory you want to allocate for storing macros in memory. The default setting is 1024 KB or about one megabyte of memory allocation. In most cases this should be sufficient. This option is to allow for a quicker response time. The caching will help speed the response time of the macros.

When disabled, there will not be an allocation to memory for macros. This requires the program to first access the hard drive to locate the macro and then run it.

Window Activation Caching

(Also applies to Window Control Activation)

This option pertains only to Window Activated and Window Control Activated macros. Below is the scenario when this option would be relevant. It's possible that you may have one or several macros activated by a Window title.

Let's say a macro runs and it opens a window that should trigger a Window Activated macro. But the first macro still has other commands to process. Since the first macro is still running, the second Window Activated macro will not trigger and run because two macros won't run simultaneously. With this option checked, the Window Activated macro will be queued. Once the first macro has finished playing, then the queued macro will start. This same scenario would apply to Window Control Activated macros as well.

If you do not want to have the macros queued, do not select this option.