You are on page 1of 8

ART 110 Introduction to Drawing CRN 5212

Fall Term I 2015 Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:00-4:30 PM


Memorial Hall 104 Drawing Studio
CONTACT:
Facilitator: John Shimon, Associate Professor of Art
Email: shimon-lindemann@lawrence.edu (best way to reach me outside of class)
Office: Wriston Art Center #109, 920.832.6534
Office Hours: Wednesdays 10-12.
Memorial Hall 104 Drawing Studio Hours: 8 AM - 5 PM Monday-Friday and 7-10 PM 7-days a
week
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
An introduction to drawing, emphasizing the development of the observational and critical thinking skills important
to art making. Class work is based on exercises that strengthen visual research experience, drawing abilities, and
mark-making techniques with a variety of tools. Assigned projects address fundamental technical and conceptual
problems suggested by historical and contemporary art practice. Lectures, readings, discussions, visiting artists, field
trips, and critiques explore elements of concept and craft pertinent to drawing as a medium.
LEARNING OUTCOMES (students should be able to):
1. Develop basic drawing skills including contour, gesture and shading while exploring the human
impulse to make marks.
2. Understand the principles of two-dimensional design pertinent to drawing (e.g. line, tone, shape,
texture, value, balance, emphasis, light and shadow, linear perspective, illusion of space, etc.).
3. Become familiar with the traditional materials available for drawing including pencils, pens,
charcoal, paint, brushes, erasers, ink, various papers, as well as everyday materials.
4. Consider how observation, reflection, exploration, and creation influence drawing while
developing your capacity for sustained and detailed study of the world around you.
5. Gain a basic knowledge and understanding of artists, art history, contemporary art and how
evolving technologies (from pencil to photography to computer) impact how artists use drawing.
6. Generate, research and propose project ideas while considering issues of approach, content, and
meaning.
7. Develop critical thinking skills required for making and analyzing art while strengthening verbal
skills through participating in class discussions and critiques.
8. Explore the importance of narrative and text in contemporary drawing.
CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION:
1. Attendance & Participation (10%): Attend and be on time for ALL class meetings. Only
ONE excused absence is allowed. Email instructor in advance of missing a class
indicating reason and how you will complete missed class projects. You must
work diligently on assigned projects until class ends at 4:30! Repeated absences, leaving early or
arriving late adversely affect your attendance grade (e.g. an A gets lowered to a B if two (2)
absences, to a C if three (3) absences, etc.). Arriving late three (3) times equals one (1) absence.
2. Projects (80%): Complete 10 projects with eight (8) being worth 5% each, the
research report being worth 10%, and the sketchbook being worth 30%. Projects must
demonstrate your developing observational skills, creative exploration, diligent practice, and
should be finished at the beginning of the class the day they are due with a 1-page typed
self-evaluation in provided portfolio. Related readings are mandatory and must be
referenced/quoted in self-evaluations. Projects will be given a letter grade and returned as quickly
as possible. Late projects receive a lowered grade and will not be accepted unless prior
arrangements made.
3. Reflection Papers (10%): Write two 1-page typed papers on assigned artist lectures
worth 5% each. Papers will be graded + (A), (B), - (C). Late papers receive a lowered
grade and will not be accepted unless prior arrangements made.
4. Honor Code: Please reaffirm the LU Honor Code in writing with all submitted items.

MATERIALS REQUIRED:
1. Book: Contemporary Drawing: Key Concepts and Techniques by Margaret Davidson
(ISBN 978-0823033157, Watson-Guptill Publications, NY, 2011) $35 (available at bookstore).
2. Drawing Supplies: You will be provided with a selection of paper, pencils, pens, erasers
needed to complete assigned projects. Our emphasis will be on resourcefulness and use of
found and everyday materials. High quality 8.5x11 drawing paper donated by Fox River Paper
Company (headquartered in Appleton since 1883 and producer of premium paper products) will
be provided free of charge. Students are encouraged to use and reuse materials at hand and
work on a manageable scale.
3. Optional Materials: Items listed below may be useful and can be obtained from online/local
sources. Feel free to experiment with any available materials. Some of our favorite drawing
materials include: Utrecht 9x12 - 70 lb. Sketch Pad 50 sheets, Strathmore 9x12 -140 lb. Watercolor
WB Pad 12 sheets, Strathmore 9x12 - 80 lb. Drawing Pad 24 sheets, Faber-Castell 9000 Art Set of 12
Graphite Pencils, Watercolors/Gouache, sable-type brushes, wax crayons (Crayola, etc.), Design Markers
(avoid cheap markers as the inks are fugitive and fade rapidly). NOTE: We wont use charcoals or
pastels in class as they require toxic aerosol treatment and create smeary messes.
INFO/RESOURCES:
1. Supplies online: DICK BLICK (800-828-4548 dickblick.com), UTRECHT (800-223-9132,
utrechtart.com), DANIEL SMITH (800-426-6740 danielsmith.com).
NOTE: Some suppliers provide student discounts!
2. Supplies locally: LU DEPARTMENT OF ART select materials available and can be
charged to your student account, BEN FRANKLIN (920-735-1702, 317 N Mall Dr.),
HOBBY LOBBY (920-739-3220, 346 N Casaloma Dr.), FOX VALLEY THRIFT
SHOPPE, FLEET FARM and HOME DEPOT are other options.
3. Figure Drawing Sessions: Are held by the student group WAC (Wriston Art Collective) on
a regular basis (usually Thursday evenings). Open to the entire campus community.
4. Art info online: pbs.org/art21, newsgrist.typepad.com, artsjournal.com, artnet.com,
theartnewspaper.com loro.ac.uk/departments/ac/tracey, drawingcenter.org, drawingroom.org.uk,
drawingrooms.blogspot.com
5. Art info @ Mudd Library/Periodicals (Level A): Get in the habit of reading: Art on
Paper, Art Calendar, Art in America, Art Forum, Art News, Burlington Magazine, and Flash Art.
6. Academic Accommodations for Students with Disabilities: Students who have a
disability covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act are entitled to academic
accommodations. Students must initiate all requests. Please contact the Office of Student
Academic Services (extension 6530) for information and advice.
7. Mobility: Some projects require walking in the campus area. Contact us in advance if you need
special consideration.
8. Health & Wellness: Balance results from two skills: avoiding imbalance through careful
planning, and managing and containing imbalance when it occurs. See full statement on
lawrence.edu healthy balance.
BIBLIOGRAPHY (Most on reserve or available at the Mudd library):
Contemporary Drawing: Key Concepts & Techniques by Margaret Davidson (2011) - REQUIRED
Writing on Drawing edited by Steve Garner (2008)
An Illustrated Life by Danny Gregory (2008)
Secret Knowledge: Rediscovering Lost Techniques of Old Masters by David Hockney (2001)
Drawing Now: Eight Propositions by Laura Hoptman (2002)
Day Job #95 curated by Nina Katchadourian for the Drawing Center (2011)
Experimental Drawing by Robert Kaupelis (1980)
The Drawing Book: A Survey of Drawing by Tania Kovats (2007)
Drawing from Life: The Journal As Art by Jennifer New (2005)
Vitamin D: New Perspectives in Drawing by Phaidon (2005)
Compass in Hand by Christian Rattenmeyer (2009)
How to Look at Outsider Art by Lyle Rexer (2005)
Themes of Contemporary Art by J. Robertson & C. McDaniel (2009) -- recommended, helpful guide
The Elements of Drawing by John Ruskin (1907)

DRAWING COURSE CALENDAR + PROJECTS


One time I was drawing all day for a couple of months in New York. This was a couple of
years back, it was 74, 75. I did it every day from eight till four with a break or
something, and it locked me into the present time more than anything else I ever did.
More than any experience Ive ever had, any enlightenment Ive ever had. Because I was
constantly being intermingled with myself and all the different selves that were in there,
until this one left, then that one left, and finally I got down to
the one that I was familiar with.
-- Bob Dylan in an interview with Karen Hughes for Rock Express, 1978
My advice: Draw from life as much as you can stand to. Thats where you really learn
things. And learn to express your real, personal feelings. And dont worry about creating
masterpieces or only drawing the pretty things. Look for the commonplace, the unnoticed
details of everyday reality. To draw from life is to learn about life. But, you know, you
need to be compelled by some inner need to fill the blank page.
Its gotta come from the inside.
-- Robert Crumb, An Illustrated Life (p. 49)

IMPORTANT: DRAWING IS A DEVICE FREE SPACE!


(1) We want you to focus on the physical world and relax your mind while in class!
You are required to put away your phone and personal listening devices
(no headphones) for the hours we meet twice a week!
(2) We will break at 2:30 so save restroom trips and phone checking until then!

WEEK 1 ORIENTATION
SEPT 15 (T)

INTRODUCTION: Complete and hand-in student surveys. Student/instructor


introductions. Review syllabus, attendance policy, structure (including projects with
self-evaluations, reflection papers, and critiques), books, and materials. We will explore
drawing as a means of expression in the context of ever-changing technologies from
lead pencils to computer projections and blogs. The exploration and use of everyday
drawing materials (e.g. ball point pens, brushes, felt tip marker, wax crayons,
embroidery thread, leaves, coffee, photographs, used magazines and books, product
packaging, newspaper pages, cosmetics, etc.) is encouraged.
DRAWING AS A MEDIUM SLIDE SHOW: A brief overview of drawing as a
medium for the 21st century with attention toward the continuum and evolution of
perceptions of realism. The first mark-making is thought to have been performed by
rubbing a burned stick (e.g. vine charcoal) across a cave wall to record human
observation. The invention of photography in 1839 enabled drawing to break from the
burdens of realism. Well view work by artists who sought to unlearn conventions and
(or never used them in the first place) such as Cy Twombly, Willem de Kooning, Jean
DuBuffet, James Castle, and Henry Darger. Contemporary artists such as Elizabeth
Peyton, Kate Bingaman-Burt, Ray Johnson, Jean-Michel Basquiat will also be covered.

PROJECT No. 1 8 BIT SHADING


Create a scale of 8 grays on graph paper using pencil shading. Grid out a magazine photo using a pencil
and ruler then identify representative gray tones based on your scale of 8 grays. Using pencil shading,
transpose your gridded magazine photo to graph paper. Does this abstraction retain representational
qualities? What do these gray tones convey?
DUE: SEPT 17 (R) (gridded magazine photo and your graph paper version).

SEPT 17 (R)

HAND OUT SKETCHBOOKS, SUPPLIES


HAND-IN PROJECT No. 1 8 BIT SHADING
WORK SESSION
FOR TUESDAY READ: Davidson: Introduction p. 8-11, Surface p. 12-37,
Materials p. 132-161

PROJECT No. 2 - THEMATIC SKETCHBOOK


Fill the provided sketchbook using any drawing media. Make 2-4 drawings per day with the goal
of filling your sketchbook with a series of related drawings by the end of the term. Explore one theme,
subject, concept or issue central to your studies and interests. Like any research endeavor, it is best to be
focused and specific rather than too broad or vague. Consider creating a signature theme an imaginary
character, an alien landscape or an anthropomorphized object. Such discipline provides the framework for
deeper understanding and insights beyond the ordinary. Your sketchbook is a process piece evolving and
changing as you go and should reflect your progress and understanding of how drawings express visual
concepts, while also helping you to develop your observational skills. Bring your sketchbook to all
Work Sessions!
SKETCHBOOK PROGRESS CHECK POINTS & DEADLINES:
SEPT 17 Make at least 3 preliminary drawings on single sheets of paper, testing your idea before
beginning work on your sketchbook.
SEPT 22 Hand in a 1 paragraph typed proposal along with 3 preliminary drawings
OCT 8 Meet with instructor(s), sketchbook must be 1/3 full
NOV 5 Meet with instructor(s), sketchbook must be 2/3 full
NOV 17 Meet with instructor(s), sketchbook must be nearly full
NOV 19 Make at least 10 scans from your sketchbook (bring USB flash drive to save your screenresolution .jpgs (e.g. 1024x1680)) to be used in your PowerPoint slide show. Use a plain white, black or
gray background to avoid distracting from your work. Include a title slide to include your name and the
year. Hand-in filled sketchbook. It will be returned at the Final Critique.
DUE: NOV 22 (SUNDAY) @ 3:30 AM - 5:00 PM in WRISTON AUDITORIUM
FINAL CRITIQUE: Each student will present a 5 min. PowerPoint highlighting at least 10
drawings scanned from their sketchbook.
Write a 1-page typed self-evaluation to be handed-in.
SEPT 18 (F)
6:00 PM

REFLECTION PAPER No. 1


ATTENDANCE REQUIRED: WRISTON GALLERIES Gallery talk on
the Social In/Justice print portfolio exhibition by our own Ben Rinehart and
Brandon Bauer, portfolio contributor and Associate Professor of Art at St.
Norbert College. Compose and print out a 250 word response to the
Social In/Justice show, responding to the form and the content of the work.
DUE: SEPT 22 (T)

WEEK 2 - SURFACE
SEPT 22 (T)

DISCUSS: Davidson: Introduction p. 8-11, Surface p. 12-37,


Materials p. 132-161
HAND-IN PROJECT No. 2 - SKETCHBOOK PROPOSAL with 3
DRAWINGS AND REFLECTION PAPER No. 1
ALTERING FOUND ART SLIDE SHOW: Examples of the readymade in art
including Marcel Duchamp, Andy Warhol, Richard Prince, John Baldessari, Bob Watt,
Bansky, Wayne White.
ERASED DE KOONING SCREENING: Screen short video of Robert
Rauschenberg talking about his Erased De Kooning Drawing.
WORK SESSION

PROJECT No. 3 ALTERED POSTCARDS


In the spirit of Marcel Duchamps alterations of a mass-produced Mona Lisa postcard to create his
L.H.O.O.Q. (1919), this project focuses on the readymade and found object. By drawing a moustache and
goatee on a postcard reproduction of the iconic Da Vinci painting, Duchamp questioned gender, identity,
nationality, meaning, replication, originality, and art itself. According to art historians, Duchamps added
title below the image, when pronounced in French, plays off the phrase "Elle a chaud au cul" translating to
"she has a hot bottom." Modify three (3) supplied postcards by adding, changing, erasing or renaming
using pencils, markers, erasers, and sand paper. Consider how you might subtly alter their meaning while

reflecting on: (1) the visual elements that make postcard imagery iconic, (2) how the banality of postcard
images can become interesting, and (3) ways your art agenda can be inserted into existing imagery.
DUE: SEPT 29 (T) (in portfolio with 1-page typed self-evaluation quoting the related readings)
SEPT 24 (R)

WORK SESSION
MEET WITH INSTRUCTOR ABOUT SKETCHBOOK IDEAS
FOR TUESDAY READ: Davidson: Mark p. 38-83

WEEK 3 - MARKS
SEPT 29 (T)

DISCUSS: Davidson: Mark p. 38-83


CRITIQUE/HAND-IN PROJECT No. 3 ALTERED POSTCARDS
MARK MAKING SLIDE SHOW: From Jackson Pollacks gestures to Eva Hesses
fiberglass sculptures projecting shadows on gallery walls, artists have expressed their
inner word through making marks.

PROJECT No. 4 ALL OVER MARKS DRAWINGS


Fill supplied 3-8.5x11 sheets of paper with an allover pattern of marks. Create a system of mark-making
using line, tone and texture reflecting your inner world and having no representational qualities.
DUE: OCT 6 (T) (in portfolio with 1-page typed self-evaluation quoting the related reading)
OCT 1 (R)

WORK SESSION
FOR TUESDAY READ: Davidson: Space p. 84-101

WEEK 4 - SPACE
OCT 6 (T)

DISCUSS: Davidson: Space p. 84-101


CRITIQUE/HAND-IN PROJECT No. 4 ALL OVER MARKS
PERSPECTIVE SLIDE SHOW: From Brunelleschi Filippos drawings of cathedrals
in Florence in the early 1400s to Ed Ruschas drawings of Standard Stations in the
1960s to Chris Wares Jimmy Corrigan comics of recent years, artists have
incorporated illusions of perspective to make artistic statements and convey visual
information.

PROJECT No. 5 THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT & LINEAR PERSPECTIVE


Walk to a location on or near campus and make a series of four (4) drawings of two subjects. Use
one and/or two-point linear perspective for 2 drawings to create an illusion of DEPTH and SCALE.
Make 2 drawings of same subjects to look FLAT. Meet back in the classroom for progress/evaluation.
DUE: OCT 13 (T) (in portfolio with 1-page typed self-evaluation quoting the related reading)
OCT 7 (W) REFLECTION PAPER No. 2 MIRIAM BEERMAN EXHIBITION AT
WRISTON ART CENTER GALLERIES

Film Screening Miriam Beerman: Expressing the Chaos and discussion with
Director Jonathan Gruber, October 7, 5 7 p.m., Warch Campus Center Cinema
Compose and print out a 250 word response to Miriam Beermans artwork. Address the
process/methods used along with your own analysis of the effectiveness of the artistic statement. Include
a pertinent quote from the Davidson book. Miriam Beerman is a prolific American painter, printmaker,
and mixed-media artist whose work reveals her deep emotional responsiveness to the tragedies of the
human experience, both historical and modern. The exhibition presents her diverse mixed-media collage
production within an aesthetic, art historical, and technical context. Ms. Beermans collage work highlights
her sympathetic preoccupation with injustice and tragedy through the visual expression of strong
emotions, as well as her quick intellect, her erudition, her sense of humor, and, importantly, her intuitive,
spontaneous artistic process. Comprised of fragments of her own paintings, new drawings, hand-written
quotes, photographs, and other found materials, the gestural energy of the collages mirrors Ms.
Beermans expressionistic painting technique, but with an even greater emphasis on texture, visual depth,
and narrative.
DUE: OCT 13 (T)

OCT 8 (R)

SKETCHBOOK PROGRESS MEETINGS (1/3 full)


WORK SESSION
FOR TUESDAY READ: Davidson: Composition p. 102-119

WEEK 5 COMPOSITION & OBSERVATION


OCT 13 (T)
3:00

DISCUSS: Davidson: Composition p. 102-119


WRISTON ART CENTER PRINT ROOM VISIT: Curator/Director Beth
Zinsli and Assistant Leslie Walfish will show us drawings from the Wriston Art
Galleries collection, which includes German Expressionist prints as well as early-19th
through late-20th century works by over 700 artists such as Modigliani, Alberto
Giacometti, Egon Schiele, and Paul Klee. Issues of storage and handling of works on
paper, the role of the curator/archivist and more will be addressed.
CRITIQUE/HAND-IN PROJECT No. 5 THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT
& LINEAR PERSPECTIVE
HAND-IN REFLECTION PAPER No. 2

PROJECT No. 6 COMPOSITION AND THE POWERS OF OBSERVATION


Make a representational, observational drawing of a provided object. Use a design concept from textbook
to compose your drawing mindfully.
DUE: OCT 20 (T) (in portfolio with 1-page typed self-evaluation quoting the related reading)
OCT 15 (R)

JAMES CASTLE, PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST SCREENING (Wriston


Auditorium): A documentary exploring the world of James Castle (1900-1977) who
created drawings, assemblage and books throughout his lifetime. Presumed deaf and
believed to have never learned to read and write, he resisted working on the family
ranch and instead worked on his drawings. He mastered perspective and tone and was
able to portray place with intensity. His works are generally small in scale and he
worked with found materials such as papers salvaged from common packaging and mail
and product containers like ice cream and butter boxes. (50 min., 2008, DVD).
WORK SESSION
FOR MONDAY READ: Davidson: Scale p. 120-131

WEEK 6 - SCALE
OCT 20 (T)

DISCUSS: Davidson: Scale p. 120-131


HAND-IN PROJECT No. 6 COMPOSITION AND THE POWERS OF
OBSERVATION
WORK SESSION
FOR TUESDAY READ: Davidson: Breaking Barriers p. 162-171

PROJECT No. 7 BIG vs. SMALL DRAWINGS & EXHIBITION


Using a cattle marker and supplied paper, make a gestural drawing larger than yourself considering line,
shape and balance as you work to fill the sheet. Collaboration with classmates is encouraged (e.g. 2
students make 2 big drawings). When the big drawing is finished, make a small (8.5x11) drawing of it. We
will be exhibiting both your large and small drawings. Members of the class will scan drawings, help install
the show, create a FaceBook event, make a poster, and generate a PPTX slide for the library Jumbotron
to promote the show. The Big vs. Small show will be mounted in the Mudd Gallery, 3rd Floor,
Mudd Library opening with a reception on Friday, Oct 30, 5:00-6:00 PM and running thru
Nov 12. Bring a snack or beverage to share to the opening! Invite your friends!
DUE: OCT 29 (R) (1-page typed self-evaluation quoting the reading and two drawings)
WEEK 7 BREAKING BARRIERS
OCT 27 (T)

DISCUSS: Davidson: Breaking Barriers p. 162-171


ASSISTED DRAWING SLIDE SHOW & DEMO: Review the ideas covered in
David Hockneys Secret Knowledge: Rediscovering the Lost Techniques of the Old Masters

book. Since the 1400s, artists used lenses, camera lucida and other aids to render
scenes in a more dimensional, lifelike way. Hockneys thesis considers drawing an
imaging technology that grew directly into photography. When photography was
invented, drawing became an old technology and artists were freed of the
responsibility to depict reality faithfully. New ways of seeing emerged. Discuss selftaught artists like Henry Darger and trained artists like Andy Warhol who used
tracing as a way to sample cultural debris in their works. Demonstrate drawing aids
such as tracing, transfers, projections, grids, camera obscura, camera lucida and collage.
PROJECT No. 8 COMMODITY CULTURE & YOU
Make a series of three (3) self-portrait drawings about your experience of the sell and the many
messages targeted at you, the individual consumer. Contemplate the rise of the selfie and the narcissism
epidemic in the 21st century. Your depiction of self may be literal or implied. Use a method of mechanical
assistance to aid freehand drawing and the age-old self-portrait genre.
DUE: NOV 3 (T) (in portfolio with 1-page typed self-evaluation reflecting on the reading/ppt)
SIGN-UP FOR MUDD GALLERY EXHIBITION TASK
Review Project No. 9 and pick a first and second choice artist to report on
OCT 29 (R)
1:00-2:00 PM

VISUAL RESOURCES/MUDD LIBRARY RESEARCH WORKSHOP


(ITC Mudd Library 214): Well review listed artist research options. All are
recognized artists, featured in art museums, galleries, and publications. Each student
will pick one artist to research (have alternates in mind). Librarians Colette Lunday
Brautigam and Gretchen Revie will workshop you through finding materials for your
presentation using library resources.
HAND-IN PROJECT No. 7 BIG vs. SMALL SELF-EVALUATION
BRING BIG vs. SMALL DRAWINGS AND THEN EITHER HELP
INSTALL or PROMOTE THE MUDD GALLERY EXHIBITION
FOR TUESDAY READ: Davidson: Intentionality p. 172-187

PROJECT No. 9 - ARTISTS & EMULATIONS RESEARCH REPORT


Google the following artists that appear from the Davidson book before class today: Carl Andre,
John Cage, Chuck Close, Agnes Denes, Paul Fabozzi, Ellen Gallagher, Arshile Gorky,
Louise Hopkins, Etsuko Ichikawa, Louise Kikuchi, Franz Kline, Sol LeWitt, Brice
Marsden, Agnes Martin, Walter Tandy Murch, Barbara Robertson, Georges Seurat,
Kiki Smith, Saul Steinberg, Xu Bing, Zhi Lin. Research and then produce a slide show
presentation while making a series of drawings influenced by the artist assigned to you. Consider the
technique, subject matter, and content of their drawings. Your own drawings may be an exact copy,
emulation or subtle reference.
REQUIREMENTS:
1. DEVELOP A THESIS & CONDUCT RESEARCH: Using techniques covered in class,
research your artists background including when and where they worked concentrating
specifically on how they used drawing. Find and reference at least one (1) critical review
commenting on your artists drawings in your report.
2. SELECT IMAGES: Select 10 key digital images using ARTstor, CONTENTdm or other
credible online source such as the artists own web site, galleries, museums, etc.
3. DESIGN PPTX SLIDE SHOW: Use PowerPoint to design your slide show. The
background should be neutral (black, white, gray) and fonts simple so they do not distract from
the art. Label each artwork slide with the title, year, size, medium. Start with your report title
and thesis. End with your bibliographic sources. Video clips less than 1-minute may be included.
Put your .mov video files in same file folder as PPTX. Do not hyperlink to online videos as there
are usually loading delays.
4. MAKE DRAWINGS: Make a series of 3 drawings on 8.5x11 paper emulating your artists
work, then scan to include in your PPTX slide show. Provide your analysis of the work then
explain your response to your artists ideas and approach.
5. PRESENT a concise five (5) minute oral report/PPTX slide show in class on due date
supported by a 1-page outline, 1-page bibliography listing all your sources, and 1-page
self-evaluation. Practice what you plan to say. Bring your PPTX to class on a USB flashdrive
and email it to yourself as a backup!
DUE: NOV 12 (R) (3 drawings in portfolio with outline, bibliography, self-evaluation)

OCT 30 (FRI)
@ 5-6 PM

BIG vs. SMALL EXHIBITION OPENING @ MUDD GALLERY


Bring a snack or beverage to share and your friends!

WEEK 8 - INTENTIONALITY
NOV 3 (T)

DISCUSS: Davidson: Intentionality p. 172-187


CRITIQUE/HAND-IN PROJECT No. 8 - COMMODITY CULTURE
DE-INSTALL MUDD GALLERY SHOW

PROJECT No. 10 WORDS


Make a series of three (3) drawings using text to expand the meaning and intensity of your ideas.
Consider the power of words to trigger emotions and imply associations that enhance visuals.
DUE: NOV 10 (T) (in portfolio with 1-page typed self-evaluation quoting the related reading)
NOV 5 (R)

WORDS SLIDE SHOW: Examples of artists using text to expand meaning including
Bob Dylan, Chris Johanson, Glenn Lignon, Raymond Pettibon, Ed Ruscha.
BEAUTY IS EMBARRASSING: THE WAYNE WHITE STORY SCREENING:
The irreverent and inspiring story of a visual artist and raconteur. The film traces
Whites career from his stint as an underground cartoonist in New Yorks East Village
to his big break as a designer, puppeteer and voice-over actor on Pee-Wees Playhouse
(for which he won three Emmys), as well as his work animating music videos for The
Smashing Pumpkins (Tonight, Tonight). (88 min., 2012, DVD)
SKETCHBOOK PROGRESS MEETINGS (2/3 full) & WORK SESSION

WEEK 9 ARTIST REPORTS


NOV 10 (T)

CRITIQUE/HAND-IN PROJECT No. 10 WORDS


WORK SESSION

NOV 12 (R)

PRESENT PROJECT No. 9 - ARTISTS & EMULATIONS RESEARCH


REPORTS IN WRISTON AUDITORIUM (in portfolio, hand-in your
1-page typed self-evaluation, outline, bibliography, and 3 drawings at the end of class)

WEEK 10 SKETCHBOOK PRESENTATION


NOV 17 (T)

SKETCHBOOK PROGRESS MEETINGS (nearly full)


SKETCHBOOK WORK SESSION & SCANNING: Bring USB flash drive!

NOV 19 (R)

SKETCHBOOK WORK SESSION & SCANNING: Bring USB flash drive!


HAND-IN PROJECT No. 1 - THEMATIC SKETCHBOOKS

NOV 22
(SUNDAY)
3:00-5:30

FINAL CRITIQUE/SKETCHBOOK PRESENTATIONS in the


WRISTON AUDITORIUM: Present your 5 min. PowerPoint highlighting at
least 10 drawings scanned from your sketchbook. Hand in a 1-page typed selfevaluation.

js 9.8.2015