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introduction 11 tools and ingredients 15 ramen and other wheat noodle bowls 39 pho, bibimbap, and other rice-noodle and rice bowls 81 grain bowls 121 dumpling bowls 165 basics and components 213 sources 249 index 251

vegetarian curry laksa

COCONUT,

GREEN

BEANS,

TOMATOES,

PEANUTS

This fragrant, vibrantly colored, rich bowl called laksa can be thought of as the Malaysian street-food counterpart to Japanese ramen. Authentic, non-vegetarian versions call for seafood in most of the primary components. My vegetarian laksa is a little lighter, but still has a good deal of body from the coconut milk and a heady, fragrant spiciness from curry paste. I encourage you to make your own curry paste—the recipe that follows is modeled after a fragrant Malaysian curry paste, and the most complicated part about it is sourcing the galangal, fresh turmeric, and lemongrass. But you can certainly substitute store-bought curry paste—just check to make sure all the ingredients are vegetarian. Brown rice ver- micelli noodles make a great substitute for the wheat noodles used here. Used primarily as an aromatic in many cuisines of the world, curry leaves add an unmistakable, somewhat lemony flavor to soup-based bowls. They bear no relation to curry powder. Small branches of fresh curry leaves are increasingly available at western grocery stores, alongside the other fresh herbs in the produce department. Or more reliably, you can find them at Indian groceries and many Asian markets that cater to Malaysian and Indonesian clienteles where they’re sometimes sold from the freezer. If using frozen curry leaves, don’t bother thaw- ing them first; add them directly to what you’re cooking. SERVES 4

  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil

1/2 cup Red Curry Paste (page 63), or one 4-ounce can store-bought red curry paste

  • 3 cups vegetable stock, preferably homemade (see page 219) 13/4 cups coconut milk (one 14-ounce can)

  • 1 branch fresh curry leaves (optional)

  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt

  • 1 teaspoon sugar

  • 2 cups mung bean sprouts

  • 4 ounces green beans, stem ends trimmed

  • 8 ounces dried or 12 ounces fresh ramen noodles (page 232 or 235)

  • 1 cup shredded savoy or green cabbage

  • 4 boiled eggs, firm yolks (page 224), halved

1/2 cup quartered cherry tomatoes

1/2 cup coarsely chopped roasted peanuts, for

garnish

  • 1 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro leaves and

tender stems, for garnish

Lime wedges, for serving

bowl

60

roasted vegetable bibimbap

B R O C C O L I

R A B E ,

B U T T E R N U T

S Q U A S H ,

S H I I T A K E

This bowl has a terrific balance of autumnal flavors and a mix of foliage-inspired colors, with its sweet squash, earthy and juicy shiitakes, and slightly bitter broccoli rabe. All the vegetables are oven-roasted, and you can crisp the rice while they’re cooking, making this a relatively quick and efficient bowl to throw together. Roasted mushrooms are easy and addictive, adding bulk and chew. As for the squash, cutting it into domino-like slabs creates more surface area for carameliza- tion. You can use any winter squash here, such as kabocha (which doesn’t require peeling) or acorn—or even sweet potatoes—just cut them to about the same size, and watch closely during roasting. SERVES 4

  • 1 small or 1/2 a medium-to-large butternut squash (about 11/2 pounds)

  • 1 bunch broccoli rabe

  • 8 ounces shiitake mushrooms

  • 2 to 3 tablespoons neutral-tasting oil

  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce

  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar

  • 2 teaspoons gochujang (see page 36) or store-bought sambal oelek

  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil (optional)

  • 5 cups cooked white or brown rice or mixed grains (see pages 223), freshly cooked if

skipping the rice-crisping step

  • 4 soft- or crispy-fried eggs (page 225)

  • 1 cup sprouts or shoots, such as broccoli sprouts,

mung bean sprouts, or sunflower shoots, for garnish

1/2 cup Quick Cucumber Pickles (page 231),

for optional garnish

Lime wedges, for garnish

Gochujang Sauce (page 242) or sriracha, for serving

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Trim the ends off of the butternut squash, then cut in half crosswise where the bottom be- gins to swell. Stand each piece upright on a sturdy cutting board and, with a sharp chef ’s knife, carefully cut off the skin in strips, slicing down and working all the way around the squash.

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106

farro bowl

STEAMED

VEGETABLES,

TOASTED

WALNUTS,

PESTO-RICOTTA

CREAM

Farro—a grain similar to but not the same as barley, emmer, and spelt—has a good deal of substance. Rich and creamy things, such as the ricotta amped up with pesto in this recipe, are complementary. Use a good, fresh-made ricotta that’s light and fluffy, rather than grainy and dense. For the vegetables, asparagus and snap peas are terrific, as are chunks of ripe tomato, summer squash, roasted winter squash, or any type of leftover roasted vegetables. Farro shouldn’t be added straight to boiling water, or the insides will split the husks open. Cover it with cold water and place over the heat so that the grains heat up gradually, and the result will be much more attractive. S E R V E S 4

  • 2 cups farro

  • 2 teaspoons fine sea salt

  • 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar

Pinch of red pepper flakes

  • 8 ounces small to medium carrots of different colors

  • 6 ounces green beans

  • 8 ounces small waxy potatoes

  • 6 small-to-medium radishes

1/2 cup fresh ricotta

3 tablespoons Pesto (page 163)

Olive oil, as needed and for drizzling 1/2 cup chopped toasted walnuts

1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh basil or parsley, for garnish

Flaky salt, for garnish

Freshly ground black pepper, for garnish

Lemon wedges, for garnish

Place the farro in a medium or large saucepan and cover with at least 6 cups water. Bring to a boil, add the salt, then reduce the heat to a gentle boil and cook for 16 to 20 minutes, until the farro is tender but retains a pleasant chew. Drain, then return to the pot and toss with the vin- egar and red pepper flakes. Let stand, covered, until ready to serve.

Meanwhile, prepare the vegetables. Peel the carrots and slice into ½-inch-thick rounds. Trim the stem ends off the green beans. Slice the potatoes into ½-inch-thick rounds or quarter them if they’re small. Cut the radishes into paper-thin rounds.

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160

sesame beet dumplings

TAHINI,

CUMIN,

CHIVES

Beets and tahini are an unexpectedly terrific combination—sweet and earthy, succulent and creamy—with a buttery flavor and texture. You can steam or roast the beets yourself (see note, page 186), which does taste the best, but for this recipe it’s fine to use the vacuum pouches of cooked beets sold in in the produce section of many grocery stores are a fine second-best option. These dumplings are best steamed or fried and served over a salad. Or, if you use fresh beets with attractive greens still attached, serve the greens in place of or in addition to the Stir-Fried Bok Choy and Rice suggested, cooking them just until wilted and silky, 2 to 4 minutes. In both cases, shower the bowls with toasted sesame seeds just before serving.

MAKES

25

TO

30

DUMPLINGS

1/2 cup finely shredded cabbage 1/2 teaspoon salt

  • 8 ounces cooked beets, grated

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

  • 3 tablespoons well-stirred tahini

1/2 cup minced fresh chives

  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds

Lemon juice, to taste Pinch of sugar (optional)

25 to 30 thin round or square dumpling

wrappers

for the bowls

Stir-Fried Bok Choy and Rice (page 208),

Toasted Quinoa with Massaged Kale (page 210), or Green Salad with Honey-Soy

Vinaigrette (page 204)

Combine the cabbage and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a colander. Let stand for 20 minutes, until slightly wilted. Gently squeeze to extract excess moisture.

Stir together the cabbage, beets, olive oil, cumin, and pepper. Fold in the tahini, chives, ses- ame seeds, and a squeeze of lemon juice. Taste and add more salt or lemon juice or a pinch of sugar, as needed.

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184

FLAVORFUL VEGETARIAN VERSIONS OF FAVORITE ONE-DISH MEALS: RAMEN, PHO, BIBIMBAP, DUMPLINGS, AND BURRITO BOWLS

In BOWL, author Lukas Volger captures the full flavor of all the one-bowl meals that are the rage today—in vegetarian form. With the bowl as organizer, the possibilities for improvisational meals full of seasonal produce and herbs are nearly endless.

Volger turns simple miso ramen into a glorious Summer Ramen with corn broth, tomatoes, and basil. Vietnamese noodle soup pho is full of caramel- ized spring onions, peas, and baby bok choy. His Edamame Dumplings are served in soup or over salad, while Spicy Carrot Dumplings appear over toasted quinoa and kale for a rounded dinner. Grain bowls range from Ratatouille Polenta to Black Rice Burrito. And unlike their meatier counterparts, these dishes can be made quickly and without great expense.

BOWL also includes many tips, techniques, and indispensable base recipes, including broths, handmade noodles, sauces, and garnishes.

LUKAS VOLGER is the author of Veggie Burgers Every Which Way and Vegetarian Entrees that Won’t Leave You Hungry, and founder of Made by Lukas, a premium veggie-burger company. The editori- al director of the biannual magazine Jarry, he has been featured on The Splendid Table and in the New York Times. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

PUBLICITY AND MARKETING:

• National Media • Online Advertising

FLAVORFUL VEGETARIAN VERSIONS OF FAVORITE ONE-DISH MEALS: RAMEN, PHO, BIBIMBAP, DUMPLINGS, AND BURRITO BOWLS In BOWL

• Online Marketing and Social Media Promotion

Publicity contact:

Rebecca Liss

212-598-5729

rebecca.liss@hmhco.com

ISBN: 978-0-544-19069-6 240 pages • $25.00 • 7 1/2 x 9 1/8 • Paperback

Publication date: March 8, 2016

FLAVORFUL VEGETARIAN VERSIONS OF FAVORITE ONE-DISH MEALS: RAMEN, PHO, BIBIMBAP, DUMPLINGS, AND BURRITO BOWLS In BOWL

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