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UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY-COLLEGE OF EASTERN

451 E 400 NUtah
• PRICE,
UT OF
UTAHUTAH
STATE• UNIVERSITY
- COLLEGE
EASTERN UTAH
- 451 E 400 N - PRICE, UT 84501
State
University
Eastern

VOICE OF THE STUDENTS

Volume LXXVIII•Number 2

September 24, 2015

Legislative road trip
Over 100 people
welcomed to campus

• Nathaniel Woodward editor in chief / new.rmsd@gmail.com

bottom photos by Emilee Merrill, top left by Jorge Lascano/The Eagle

Utah State legislators visited the new Central Instructional Building as part of their tour of rural Utah, a first since 2008. John Siegel
presented a check to Chancellor Joe Peterson for clean coke technology and commercialization efforts.

The USU Eastern campus
served as a staging point for the
Utah State Legislature Rural
Utah tour Sept. 16. The main
speaker was Bowie Resource’s
CEO John Siegel, who presented
Chancellor Joe Peterson with a
check for $300,000 to advance
USU Eastern’s clean-coke technology and commercialization
efforts.
Carbon County Commissioner Jae Potter continued with
a call for citizens not to take what
the federal government reports as
truth. Potter asked that all should,
“do their homework” in relation
to climate change and what impact moving away from fossil
fuels would have on the region.
Utah Lieutenant Gov. Spencer Cox spoke about the recent
drowning tragedy which hit
Southern Utah involving the

death of nearly 20 people, including children in flash floods.
Cox pointed out the opportunity
the legislators had by being the
first in several years to tour rural
Utah as a governing body. What
was once commonplace, the
rural Utah tours were a staple of
Capital Hill up until 2008 when
they ceased. The lieutenant governor mentioned that rural Utah
makes up 90 percent of the states
geography, but accounts for 10
percent of its population.
Peterson spoke briefly detailing USU Eastern’s commitment
to advancing coal-coke technology as well as introducing speakers. He spoke on the attributes
of USU Eastern and thanked
the legislature for their partnership with the university, without
which, we would not have the new
Central Instructional Building.

Basketball team Umbrellas for Eastern’s R.A.I.N.N. program
Madison
re-instated
Woodward
staff writer
woodwardm18@gmail.com

The Utah State University Eastern men’s
basketball team was reinstated Wednesday,
Sept. 23.
While two players are still under an athletic
department suspension from basketball activities, pending the results of an investigation into
a reported Sept. 4 sexual assault, the rest of the
team has resumed activities.
“The purpose of the program suspension
was to ensure an investigation could go forward
unhindered,” said Greg Dart, vice chancellor
at USU Eastern. “We felt it was important to
reinstate the program as quickly as possible
because a lot of completely innocent students
had been feeling the impact.”
The police and internal Title IX investigations are still ongoing. The reinstatements were
based on preliminary information. In addition to
two players on the men’s team, one player from
the women’s basketball team has been suspended

As the events of the
first few weeks of school
at Utah State University
Eastern unfolded, student
leaders and students, took
action to help the campus
join as one in the cause
to help students become
aware of how to stay safe
on campus. Many uplifting movements occurred,
including chalk writings
on sidewalks to send a
message that sexual assault is not okay, and that
victims are not to blame.
The H.E.A.R.T. club
(Helping Everyone at
Risk Together) put on

see BB page 7

Statistics on sexual assaults
in Utah higher education
Nathaniel Woodward
editor in chief
new.rmsd@gmail.com

A report, released on Monday,
cited evidence from a survey of
over two-dozen university campuses involving nearly a million
students. In the end, the study
showed that a quarter of women
have or will have experienced
unwanted sexual contact while in
college. The number for men was
five percent. The Cleveland Rape
Crisis website which provided
the study, published several more
facts in regards to sexual violence
including:
Survivors of rape or sexual
assault are four times more likely
to be victimized by someone they
know.
Every 21 hours there is a rape
on an American college campus.
Freshman and sophomore
women during the first weeks of a
semester are most at risk.
One in 12 college-age men
admit having fulfilled the prevailing definition of rape or attempted
rape, yet virtually none of these
men identify themselves as rapists.
Seventy-five percent of men and
55 percent of women involved in ac-





quaintance rapes were drinking or
taking dugs just before the attack.
Men are more likely than
women to assume that a woman
who drinks alcohol on a date is a
willing sexual partner. Forty percent of men who think this way also
believe it is acceptable to force sex
on an intoxicated woman.
College-rape victims receive
external physical injuries in over
47 percent of all rapes.
Utah State University provided its own statistics on sexual
violence:
Almost 60 percent of completed
rapes occur in the victims residence, 31 percent occur in another
residence; 9.8 percent of victims in
Utah report to law enforcement.
Nationwide, one-third of college men reported they would rape
a woman if they knew they would
not get caught.
Statewide, according to the
national database at ope.ed.gov,
Utah’s largest schools reported the
numbers of sexual assaults from
the latest year data was collected
in 2013: USU (all campuses)- 5,
University of Utah - 21, Brigham
Young University - 16, Utah Valley
University - 0, Salt Lake Commusee assaults page 3

Calendar of Events
Legislator visit
Being offended
Safety or persecution
Whasssuppp?!?!

their first project on Sept.
17, with help from the
R.A.I.N.N. (Rape, Abuse
and Incest National Network).
According
to
R.A.I.N.N.‘s website,
it is a national network
geared towards, “prevention and education efforts
including working with
the entertainment industry, the media, colleges
and local communities
to help raise awareness
about issues related to
sexual assault.”
As part of its mission
statement they also have
a national R.A.I.N.N.
day which happens once
a year and is dedicated to
planned activities about
bringing awareness to
sexual assault on cam-

puses.
Many campuses participated this year including USU Eastern. Every
campus has different and
unique activities centered
on sexual assault, and
Eastern has a unique
perspective with the help
of umbrellas.
The H.E.A.R.T. presidency takes umbrellas
and turns them into a
force of positivity and
encouragement. Vice
President of H.E.A.R.T.,
Leslie Reyes, stated,
“With all that has happened on campus lately,
and how nearly everyone
has been affected, we
decided to focus more
on an uplifting activity
instead of focusing on the
negative feelings hanging

over campus since the
Blue Alert came out.”
The presidency believes that it is time to
move forward and take
action to help lift those
up that have been affected
by sexual assault.
O n S e p t . 17 ’s
R.A.I.N.N. activity, the
umbrellas were used as a
canvas for students to express their thoughts and
feelings on sexual assault,
and to leave inspirational
thoughts and quotes to
help anyone who has experienced sexual assault.
The H.E.A.R.T. presidency was shocked at the turn
out of 15 umbrellas being
filled with messages and
the outpouring of support from USU Eastern’s
student body.

USU Eastern students
witness U of U shooting
Daniel Pike

news editor
dpike84501@gmail.com
Two USU Eastern students
witnessed a shooting near the
University of Utah campus on
Sept. 12 that involved a Salt
Lake City local and two U of
U football players.
According to the two students (who wish to remain
anonymous), the shooting took
place at a house party a few
blocks away from the U of U
campus on the east side of the
Salt Lake Valley.
“We showed up around the
same time the guy who had the
gun tried to go inside the house.
It seemed like a couple football
players were telling him that he
couldn’t go inside. We weren’t
sure, but it could have been a
gang member.”
The first student explained
that neither they, nor the
shooter, were actually allowed
inside the house.
“Everything we saw happened outside. We saw one of
the guys that got shot throw a
bottle at the shooter because he
was causing problems and the





football guys didn’t like what
he was saying.”
From there things escalated
pretty quickly and shots were
fired.“We heard three gunshots; it seemed like two people
were hit, and one of the bullets
didn’t hit anyone. It was probably those two football players
from the U.”
O ne st udent sa id he
h it t he g round a nd t he
other dove into a bush.
It was determined that the two
U of U football players that
were shot were tight end, Lo
Falemaka and running back,
Marcel Brook-Brown. According to fox13now.com, BrookBrown has since been released
and it expected to return to the
team soon. Falemaka is still
hospitalized and expecting to
be released this week, though
his return to the team is unclear
at this time.
The two USUE students
came away shaken, but unharmed. “We left about 10
minutes after that. It was pretty
scary, man. That was the first
time I’ve ever heard gunshots
like that, so my adrenaline was
definitely pumping.”

Total eclipse of the moon
Christening of black box
Burge still teaching after 50 years
New librarian
Stuffed bell peppers

photo by Madison Woodward/The Eagle

Umbrellas hope to bring awareness against sexual
assault.

Sexual assault follow-ups
and HEART’s response
Christopher Palo
viewpoints editor
christopher.palo1@gmail.com

With the news of the recent
sexual assaults on USU Eastern’s
campus fresh in  everyone’s minds,
students are left wondering how
future events like this can be
prevented.   
Madison Woodward, president
of the H.E.A.R.T. club on campus,
asked that question and found out
the answers herself. H.E.A.R.T
stands for Helping Everyone At
Risk Together. This club is dedicated to keeping campus safe, free
and enjoyable for everyone who
attends.  
Woodward, with the help of
her two vice-presidents, drafted
a series of question that was presented to Chancellor Joe Peterson.
These questions were comprised
of what steps the university would
take to ensure the future safety of
its students. 
On Sept. 14 at noon, Woodward
and associates presented the
questions to the chancellor in the
Jennifer Leavitt Student Center
conference room. “The chancellor
is 100 percent on board with the





safety of the students,” Woodward
said, though some students felt that
the dissemination of information
was sluggish and that faster news
delivery would better prepare the
students. 
Some of the possibilities for
future prevention of assaults,
that were discussed were pepper
spray and buttons that make very
loud sounds to attract attention to
the situation and a video training
class. This class will be taken by
all freshmen and is about an hour
long. It has the hopes of informing students about the dangers of
certain situations and it gives tips
on how to protect themselves.  
T hese new potentia l
security measures may help and
they may be implemented in
the spring semester or the next
school year.
A security measure already
in place is a program called Title
IX. Title IX is an office that any
person, student, teacher or staff
can contact when they have been
harassed or assaulted.  
This program is managed in the
Reeves building room 178 by human resources specialist, Tammy
Auberger. She treats every situation
see follow up page 3

Alex Gunnell
Bond that cannot be broken
Men’s soccer 7-3-0
Tommy John “epidemic”
Coach Woodhouse

Viewpoints

Page 2

September 24, 2015

Legislator visit hijacked by coal special interest group
Nathaniel Woodward
editor in chief
new.rmsd@gmail.com

Normally I would continue the trend of my editorials
of writing on academic topics and how they apply to life,
however events on USU Eastern’s campus over the past
week necessitate a response. What was intended to be a tour
and promotion for the Central Instruction Building (CIB)
quickly turned into a biased conservative fracas spearheaded
by Bowie Resource Partners (BRP) CEO John Siegel and
promoted by local county commissioner Jae Potter. The
USU Eastern campus merely served as a staging point for
the heavily republican legislatures agenda. Continuing to
lobby BRP’s attributes in the interest of personal gain Siegel
sited anecdotal evidence and provided a free copy of the
critically panned “The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels” in his
arguments. Going on to state that the coal industry are the

only ones allowed to truly call themselves environmentalists, a statement which was immediately met by thunderous
applause by the largely Republican crowd.
The speech was thick with anti-environment sentiment calling all claims by those opposed to coal absurd
or unfounded. What should have been a display of USU
Eastern’s academic integrity and infrastructure was marred
by heavy political ideology and partisan politics. Carbon
County Commissioner Jae Potter continued that only a few
environmentalists view coal in a negative light, an obvious
absurdity, and that we need not listen to what the federal
government has to say and by association any scientist.
Potter later asked that all should “Do their homework” in
relation to climate change and what impact moving away
from fossil fuels would have. Notably and curiously absent
from the speech were many academic staff of USU Eastern,
who were not invited.
The highlight of the event was a visit from Utah Lieutenant
Gov. Spencer Cox who spoke briefly on the tragedy which

From the inside looking out
David Rawle

staff writer
davidrawle1@gmail.com
Every college student is
different: classes, majors,
friends, schools, teachers,
even how they view the
importance of college. Even
though everyone is different,
we all have a parallel factor.
That factor is something that
we all have experienced and
are guilty of doing more than
once. The older we get, the
more we do it and the more
we do it, the worst it gets.
This mysterious idea is
procrastination.
There are many different
re cog n i zable sig ns or
symptoms that one is a
procrastinator. The first is
the most obvious, sitting
doing nothing. It usually
sounds something like this,
“I’ll do it later,” or “I have
more important stuff to do
right now”, or even, “It’ll
get done, don’t worry.”
These are things we have
all said and let’s face it, will
continue to say. Why do we
do this? Laziness, or we just

find it unappealing. It’s not
that we are bad students or
bad people for that matter.
The work needs to be done
and we know that, but deep
down we’d rather be doing
anything else than doing
that homework assignment.
A p er fe ct exa mple
of this is being overly
productive. Now, I know
what you are thinking, isn’t
procrastination the exact
opposite of productivity?
Before you jump to that
conclusion, think about
what you do when you
procrastinate. You don’t just
ignore your assignment and
sit and do absolutely nothing.
You do everything else, but
the assignment. How many
of us sit, rearrange our desk
or redo our entire room.
Procrastination gives you
the feeling that you just can’t
work until it’s done. This is
a feeling that is familiar to
all of us.
Now, with all of this,
most of us still manage to
get our assignments in on
time. This is the favored
tool we procrastinators have

hit southern Utah this week involving the death of nearly 20
people, including many children in the recent flash floods.
Cox, a Sanpete County resident poked fun at the rivalry
between Sanpete and Carbon Counties and greatly lightened the mood. Chancellor Joe Peterson also spoke briefly
detailing USU Eastern’s commitment to advancing coal
coke technology as well as introducing the various speakers. Peterson continued to speak on the attributes of USU
Eastern and thanked the legislature for their partnership
with the University, without which we would
not have the new CIB.
The mood of the few students in attendance was dismal, many of whom were in
shock at the lack of discussion on education and the new addition to campus.
What should have been a wonderful
opportunity to show off USU Eastern’s glowing new addition turned
see legislator page 3

Is it safety or persecution?

in our arsenal: the night
before cramming session.
The biggest problem with
this is it’s a high-risk, highreward tool.
We
vet e r a n
procrastinators have learned
to retain and use these
cramming sessions in a
way that benefit us. Others,
however, have seen how
detrimental the down sides to
this tool can be. One of these
is completely blanking on
the answers when presented
with a quest. Others include
getting your information all
mixed up, cramming the
wrong material, realizing
you left a big mistake in plain
sight, or even just it having
no effect whatsoever.
Some tips to help you deal
with procrastination from
Kendra
C h e r r y,
w h o
has a
Masters
o
f
Science
in
see Out
page 3

Rodrigo A. Leon
staff writer
leon.rodrigo29@gmail.com

In today’s world we are
concerned about our safety
with good reason; there are
dangers in the world. Can
we take it too far? When
are we fighting an enemy
that isn’t there? Or when
we start preemptively attacking others? And how
do we define who the enemy
is? As a society we have
already named the enemy,
and once named we will
persecute and hunt in the
name of safety.
On Sep 16, 2015, Ahmed
Mohamed, a 14-year-oldMuslim boy, built a clock
out of a pencil box, so he
took it to school to show
off his creation. Instead of
getting congratulated, he
got arrested for attempting to bomb the school.
He was arrested for being
creative, for being brilliant.
Yet these are the things we
try to teach kids, we teach
them to be creative and take

their learning outside of the
classroom.
Take Conrad Farnsworth, who at the age of
18, built a nuclear reactor
in his garage something
100 times more dangerous
than a clock; yet instead of
getting arrested, he gained
a full-ride scholarship to
Harvard. Now what is the
difference between Farnsworth and Mohamed?
Because it isn’t where the
device was because they
both ended up in a school,
nor was it ambitions, both
where smart, curious kids.
It was their race and religion; Farnsworth is white
and Mohamed is a Muslim.
We have a problem in
the U.S., we are worried
about who will attack us
next, so we lash out at
groups just so we can blame
others for our actions.
When the U.S. misbehaves, we lash out at those
who react to our actions. For
example, we globalize and
impose our form of life on
others because we believe

our governmental system
is the only one that works.
The last time some other
nation told us how to run
our government, we went
to war, but now we hate it
when people do the same to
us. That isn’t the worst of it,
once a few people lash out,
we label what they have in
common as evil. Now all
people who share that trait
are also evil. After 9/11,
we labeled all Muslims as
radical terrorists and thus
we went to war. Because
of our tactics, we created
terrorists, which thus justified the war we were in,
again retrenching the idea
that Muslims are terrorists,
which justifies the kinds of
rights abuses like the Mohamed. We have
persecuted
people in
the name
of safety
and justice.
see
Safety
page 3

Being offended is just an excuse
Cristopher Palo

staff editor
christopher.palo@gmail.com

Eastern Utah Student Association
• Small class size
• New building/hang out spots
• Xbox and Wii U in the JLSC
• Smoothies at Golden Grille
• Water bottle fillers at drinking fountains
• Ruth Whiteside at the BDAC
• Smoothie bar at the BDAC
Monday

• Cafe food
• Grille Hours
• School Spirit
• People leaving early from activities
• Sexual assualt
• BDAC equipment
• Classes with online homework
Wednesday

Tuesday

Campus eVents

& other holidays & activities

September 24 - October 11
USU Eastern online calendar:
www.eastern.usu.edu/price

28

29

30

9 a.m. Red Rocks &
Blue Skies - museum

9 a.m. Red Rocks &
Blue Skies

11 a.m. Art @ Gallery
East

11 a.m. Art @
Gallery East

11:30 p.m. True Eagle

WValleyball @ USUE

9 a.m. Red Rocks &
Blue Skies
11 a.m. Art @
Gallery East
7 p.m. Flag Football

5

6

7

9 a.m. Red Rocks &
Blue Skies
11 a.m. Art @ Gallery
East

9 a.m. Red Rocks &
Blue Skies
11 a.m. Hispanic
Heritage
11 a.m. Art @
Gallery East

9 a.m. Red Rocks &
Blue Skies
11 a.m. Art @
Gallery East
6:30 p.m. Flag
Football

I recently got my book
allowance from the GI Bill
and figured I would splurge
a little and get something
nice. As I sit here, and scroll
through Facebook seeing
post after post containing links to controversial
articles.
Mixed in the stream
of “Doctor Who” and “Supernatural” posts, just after
the “Which Disney prince
should you marry” (I got
Flynn Ryder, though technically not a prince to
start out with, I’ll take it)
lay an articles titled, “Gay
face has been scientifically
proven,” source omgfacts.

Thursday

24

9 a.m. Red Rocks &
Blue Skies
11 a.m. Gallery East
Opening
11:30 a.m. Memory
Techniques
7 p.m. Sessions Pool
Tournament
7 p.m. Zumba

1
11 a.m. Art @ Gallery
East
11:30 a.m. Effective
Time Management
2 p.m. Men’s Soccer
@ USUE
7:30 p.m. Voices of
Heaven

8

9 a.m. Red Rocks &
Blue Skies
11 a.m. Art @ Gallery
East
11:30 a.m. Test Taking
Techniques
7:30 p.m. Little Shop
of Horrors
Eagle published

25

com, and another titled, “
What Obama just did to
our military will change
America forever...” This
source is from americanfreedomfighters.com.
One of the articles is
about how scientist have
studied people’s ability to
identify homosexuals, the
other is about how President Obama has outlawed
Christianity from the U.S.
Military. One is potentially
for fun, though some may
take offense to it. The
other is to stir hatred and
malice towards the current
commander-in-chief and
those who follow him.
The issue is that people
are believing that these are
legitimate articles proven
with facts, but you can tell
that they are fallacies made

Friday

up to ruffle feathers. Because
we are a nation of hurried
individuals, all we read is
the title. We are immediately
infuriated and now because
this “fringe work” may
slightly coincide with our
beliefs or our fears, we adopt
it as our daily or weekly mantra. We hop atop our soap
box and spout this rhetoric
as if it was from our own investigations. We gather our
troops and convince them to
spread the word. What was
a potential gag piece or the
ravings of a hateful person
has just spread
and caused
dissension
among us.
I
recently saw a
see Excuse
page 3

Saturday

26

9 a.m. Red Rocks &
Blue Skies
6 p.m. Care About
Children Workshop
7 p.m. Women’s
Volleyball @ USUE

9 p.m. CAC Workshop
10 a.m. Every Wildman
Golf
1 p.m. W Soccer @ USUE
1 p.m. W Volleyball @
USUE
3 p.m. M Soccer @ USUE
4 p.m. Student Family
Cookout

2

3

1:30 p.m. Tailgate
Party
2 p.m. W Soccer @
USUE
4 p.m. M Soccer @
USUE

12 p.m. Helper Saturday
at the Park
1 p.m. Women’s Soccer @
USUE

9

10

5 p.m. NBHA Barrel
Races
7:30 p.m. Foam
Dance
7:30 p.m. Little Shop
of Horrors

9 a.m. NBHA Barrel Races
1 p.m. WVB (away)
2 p.m. Little Shop of
Horrors Matinee
7:30 p.m. Little shop of
Horrors
7:30 p.m. Foam Dance

Sunday

27

The Eagle

USU Eastern
451 East 400 North
Price, UT 84501•CIB Room 201
Office: 435.613.5250
Fax: 435.613.5042
http://www.usueagle.com

• About The Eagle

The Eagle — The Voice of the
Students is an award-winning,
school-sponsored student
newspaper, published bi-weekly
fall and spring semesters
(excluding holidays) at USU
Eastern. A complete list of
publication dates can be found
online.
• Distribution - The Eagle is
distributed in all nonresidential
buildings on the Price campus,
as well as at the LDS Institute of
Religion.
• Content - Eagle editors and
staff are USU Eastern students
and are solely responsible for the
newspaper’s content. Opinions
expressed in The Eagle do not
necessarily represent those of
USU Eastern, its staff or students.
Columns & letters are the personal
opinions of the individual writer.
Funding comes from advertising
revenues and a dedicated
student fee administered by the
Eastern Utah Student Association
(EUSA). Information concerning
advertising rates is available by
e-mail at ads@eagle.ceu.edu
or in the advertising section of
The Eagle Online.
• Ordering The Eagle Subscriptions must be prepaid.
Forward all subscription
correspondence, including
change of address to the adviser,
Dr. Susan Polster via e-mail to
susan.polster@usu.edu or mail
care of The Eagle. The first issue is
free, others 50 cents.
• Submissions - We
welcome comments,
complaints, suggestions and
recommendations. Send letters
to the editor to webmaster@
usueagle.com. All submissions
must be received in The Eagle
office no later than 5 p.m. the
Friday prior to publication.
All submissions become property
of The Eagle and cannot be
returned. All letters must be signed
by the author(s). Also include
contact information (telephone or
address). No anonymous letters
will be printed.

Dr. Susan A. Polster
faculty adviser
susan.polster@usu.edu
Nathaniel Woodward
editor-in-chief
new.rsmd@gmail.com
April Miller
editing editor
am2pmletters@yahoo.com
Jorge Lascano
photography editor
e.lascano@aggiemail.usu.edu
Kayla A. Newman
sports editor
@gmail.com
Daniel Pike
news editor
dpike84501@gmail.com
Chris Palo
viewpoint editor
christopher.palo1@gmail.com
Nikkita Blain
cartoonist
nikkita.blain@gmail.com

4

11

9 a.m. NBHA
Barrel Races

layout staff
Kiara Horowitz
Rachel L. Prows
Mara Wimmer
Eric Love
photographers
Emilee M. Merrill
Jorge Lascano
Brett Allen
staff writers
Casey Warren
David J. Rawle
Eric D. Love
Kayla A. Newman
Mara Wimmer
Nathan Pena
Nikkita A. Blain
Rachel L. Prows
Rodrigo A. Leon
Samuel Czarnecki
Shania Hurst
Stacy L. Graven
Toby K. Foster
Kyndall Gardner
Vanessa Gomes
EJ Sanders Jr.

page 3

September 24, 2015
USU Eastern’s Day of Caring

“Headline News” - Weird Al

One of the foremost faces of the MTV era
Sam Czarnecki
staff writer
s.czarnicki@gmail.com

Singer, songwriter, record producer, author, parodist, etc. All of these titles refer to
the man with the accordion himself, Alfred
“Weird Al” Yankovic. One of the foremost
faces of the MTV era, Yankovic has been
composing, authoring, directing and making
parodies since 1976. Thirty-nine years later,
he’s still writing parodies (and directing
another movie) as one of the world’s greatest
comedy singers.
Yankovic was born in Downey, Calif.
and raised in Lynwood. Yankovic quotes
his father as often saying that “the key to
success” is “doing for a living whatever
makes you happy.” The day before his 6th
birthday, Yankovic began accordion lessons
at a local music school. His parents chose
the accordion because they were convinced
it would “revolutionize rock.” He continued
lessons for three more years before learning
on his own.
Early on, Yankovic’s role models included
accordionists Frankie Yankovic and Myron
Floren. As he grew older, he listened to music
written by Allan Sherman, Shel Silverstein
and other comedy songwriters, many of
whom found a steady venue through the

Special

photo by Emilee Merrill /The Eagle

Employees and staff help Price city clean up

Eric Curwen, residential life employee, and Greg Dart, vice chancellor of enrollment management and student
affairs, scooped up debris from 300 and 400 east on Sept. 15-16 as part of Day of Caring. In a campus-wide
e-mail, Dart said the college had decided to adopt two sections of the road for the college employees and
students to clean. Many faculty, staff and students helped with the project.

continued from page 1

unconscious because he was
debating the legitimacy of the
racial claims made against the
confederate flag. This is a hot
button topic for many, some are
for and a lot are against. But in
the comment section of the video
a black man posted, “I condone
the beating and killing of all white
people men, women and children,
until the senseless killings of black
people stopped.”
The man is talking about the
police shootings, whether just or
unjust, across the country. This has
been a huge issue for over a year,
an issue that has been exasperated
by social media. It has also been
a one-sided argument which is
polarizing this nation into different
races and religions.
These videos show white cops
shooting black men and often times
there is no back story like in the
case of Michael Brown. All that

Follow

Dr. Demento Radio Show. Other sources of
inspiration for Yankovic came from Mad
Magazine, Monty Python, and the Zucker,
Abrahams and Zucker parody movies.
Yankovic turned out to be extremely
bright, starting kindergarten a year earlier
than most children, as well as having the
capacity to skip second grade as well. He was
most active in Lynwood High’s debate team,
drama department and a Volcano Worshipers
club, “which did absolutely nothing. [They]
started the club just to get an extra picture
of ourselves in the yearbook.”
Yankovic went on to attend California
Polytechnic State University in San Luis
Obispo, where he would eventually earn a
bachelor’s degree in architecture.
During his sophomore year, 1976,
Yankovic sent a tape recording of his first
song, “Belvedere Cruisin,’” to Dr. Demento,
who then played it on his radio show. Skip
ahead 39 years. Yankovic has been part of a
band, written more songs, and starred in both
a satirical documentary of himself as well
as a stand-alone comedy written by himself.
Years after his initial appearance as,
“the guy with the tape-recorder and the accordion,” Yankovic has produced hundreds
of songs, appeared live over 1,000 times,
and, in my opinion, succeeded in keeping
the world’s ever-expanding library of music
from becoming too stale.

was shown was a black man was
shot. There was no mention of the
fact that Brown was intoxicated and
there was no mention of the fact
that he just robbed a store. It was all
race baiting propaganda against an
already overly scrutinized agency.
I would be remiss if I said all
cops are good. They are not, but
this pertains to all walks of life:
soldier and civilian, republican and
democrat and hippy and yuppy. All
of these have profoundly good and
horribly terrible people in them. No
sub-class of people, no matter how
true the intentions of that class are
completely without sin. To think
so is foolish.
These race baiters are creating
environments of distrust among
people. Using terms that offend me
and that stems from racism, often
times these people are seriously
grabbing at straws.
In “Newswee,” an article was

posted about the POW-MIA flag
and how it was a symbol of racism
and hate, though the article has been
rescinded and an apology has been
made by the author.
The fact that a public apology
was made by the author proves my
point, people are easily offended
by a symbol of remembrance
for prisoners of war and soldiers
missing in action that it has turned
into a topic of racial debate.
Many people hate and are
offended by many things that
a person can’t leave the house
without doing six offensive things.
Rangerup.com in response to all the
offense taken about everything and
by everyone posted this on their
Facebook page, “It is easier to be
offended than to construct a well
thought out rebuttal to something
you fundamentally disagree with.
If your first instinct is to be offend,
then chances are you’re not going

Assaults

continued from page 1

with the utmost seriousness and discretion. 
Upon request of services, the victim is
informed of their rights and asked if a formal
investigation is requested. Whether or not a
formal investigation is asked for, the victim
is advised to speak with Darrin Brandt, the
counseling center director in the JLSC. 
If a formal investigation is asked for, the
investigators from Utah State University
in Logan come and investigate and the Chancellor is the ultimate judge of what happens. 
“They are very level handed for both
sides of the investigation,” Brandt adds.
Because false reports are an unfortunate
but real possibility, the situation has to be
handled fair and evenly, not to accuse until
proven guilty. 
“[Title IX is] set apart from outside
influences,” Brandt added. This allows for
again neutral investigations of the incident
free from any predetermined conceptions
that might sway the findings unjustly one
way of the other. 
During the investigation, the two parties
in the investigation cannot communicate,
not even through a third party. To do so
would violate the terms of the investigation
and likely end in suspension from campus.  
Overall how the school responded was
widely accepted as being very good. Within

True Eagle
Monday, Sept. 28
at 11:30 in front of

Gibby

to change the thing you are offend
by...”
People throw around the word
“offended” like it’s a get-out-of-jailfree card. They spark up a debate
and once your argument starts
making sense, that magic word
comes out and you are supposed
to stop and automatically agree
with them.
To q u o t e a p o p u l a r
commercial,”that’s not how that
works, that’s not how any of this
works.” Just because you are
offended by something doesn’t
make you special. It means that you
are so wrapped up in yourself, in a
word, using it as a shield to protect
yourself from getting your feelings
hurt you have created a new way
of throwing around make believe
power.
Who cares that your offended?
People who rely on you, politicians,
actors, and anyone else in the

a very short amount of time of the incident,
a Code Blue alert was issued and an email
was sent out to all students and faculty.  
This Code Blue alert allowed students
to be on alert and for other victims to come
forward. Often times, if one victim has the
courage to come forward and report what
happened, other victims might do the same
and get the help both mentally and physically
that they need. 
These events are happening through the
country at colleges and universities. A wellinformed student body and well prepared
student body and staff could make the difference between it happening again and not. 
In the military there are two different
types of targets, a soft target and a hard target. A soft target is something that is easily
breached and overtaken, a hard target is a
fortified and well-defended target.  
Though in an ideal world none of these
instances would occur, but even with all the
classes and preparation in the world there
are sick individuals out there that will try.
So be a hard target. Make the assailant think
twice about trying to attack you. Take all
the training and tips seriously, and don’t put
yourself in situations that might compromise
your safety and above all else look out for
one another. 

Legislator

Westminster - 1 and Dixie - 2.
All statistics provided were pulled from
reputable websites including governmental

agencies. All universities are required to
file a report of their yearly crime statistics
which is where this data was obtained.

audience.
Next issue I will return to my academic
musings but the utter lack of integrity

shown by our political leaders was
too egregious to overlook. I have high
expectations for those with authority and
suggest that they themselves “do their
homework.”

we need to be conscience of the way
we evaluate people and their traits.
We can’t just pretend that without
thinking we can make unbiased deci-

sions. We have been taught these things
and can’t pretend we are perfect that
we can unconsciously override these
biases.

further. Break it down into more parts, and
do little segments at a time so. You’ll begin
to make progress and then you can do more
every time. It then becomes a habit, and
overall life becomes easier,” Cherry stated.
I hope this brought light to the subject
of procrastination. The risks of forgetting or
making the mistake that makes it obvious
that you did it last minute which can end in a

failing grade with a side of embarrassment.
Some ways to help you handle your
homework without procrastinating, then
the rewards of pulling it off and the feeling
you have afterwards, this is coupled with
the high risk of it actually working in the
long run. This reminds us all, that we do
procrastinate no matter how often we try
to deny it.

continued from page 2

into a politically driven debacle propagated by local leaders using biased and
unscientific views to persuade a willing

continued from page 2

We have to be critical of how we
evaluate threats, not just numbers, or
how likely is a scenario, but first look at
why these scenarios happen and second

Out

sees them. When he goes into work
tomorrow he might get killed or he
might get filmed taking out a man
trying to kill an innocent girl, but
because of the angle of the camera
it doesn’t show the girl it just shows
him taking out a man and he will go
to jail for something he didn’t do.
Think about that person and realize
that they put that uniform on and
heads out against insurmountable
odds just to protect you.
Think about all the things you
hate. Think about all the things that
offend you, and think about how
insignificance the word offended
is to the soldier that runs to the
sound of gun fire. Think about
how meaningless it is to the police
officer who just stopped a girl from
being raped, and think about how
pointless it is that you say it because
you are standing behind your hurt
feeling, while they are standing
up for you.

continued from page 1

University - 0, Salt Lake Community College - 2, Snow- 1, Southern Utah University
- 6, LDS Business College - 2, Weber - 3,

Safety

public eye. The only reason they
care is they want your vote for
their election, their Oscar or their
new funding, that’s it. If you were
to walk up to an average, sane,
hardworking citizen and tell them
you were offended they would
laugh in your face.
So why don’t you stop saying
you are offended and use your
words and say why you want
something changed take your
feelings out of it.
If you hate the war on terror,
hate the war on terror If you hate
the soldier, hate the soldier, but
acknowledge that they are willing
to run in to the mouth of hell for
what they believe in. Whether or
not you believe it, you have to admit
that, it shows bravery.
The police officer that you hate
so much, that has to go home and
look his family in the eye knowing
that they might be the last time he

continued from page 2

Education, with her primary interest in
educational psychology. “First thing that has
been recommended which I use personally,
is making a list. Start by writing down all
the things you need to do. Then list them in
order of the most urgent things you need to
get done. This helps you see it’s really not
that much work. If that still seems like a lot
or work, then you can break it down even

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Lifestyles

page 4

September 24, 2015

Don Burge’s portfolio
continues with 50 years
of teaching under his belt
From geology, dinosaurs to archery
Eric Love

staff writer
elove4797@gmail.com

photo by Emilee Merrill/The Eagle

Don Burge still teaching after 50 years; teaches archery at USU Eastern.

How many know the dinosaur named the Gastonia Burgei?
How many know USU Eastern’s archery instructor named Don
Burge? Do you know what these two have in common? One
simple thing: the name; the Gastonia Burgei was named after
Don Burge. If anyone could be the real life most interesting
man in the world it would be him.
They call him Dr. Burge; not because Burge went to college to get that title, but because of the vast knowledge that
he has garnered throughout his life. Burge is now entering
his 50th year of teaching archery here at USUE (also College
of Eastern Utah), but he actually gained his start in higher
education as a medical student.
Burge said, “I graduated as a pre-medical student from the
University of Southern California.” Once he had graduated,
he decided it was time to make a career change. “I just happened to be lucky, I was at the right place at the right time.”
From there Burge decided to pursue a more interesting career
path: a path full of dinosaurs.
“As a medical student, I learned the anatomy of animals
… it turns out that the anatomy of a dinosaur and the anatomy

Utah State University Eastern receives
scholarship funds for engineering students
The Intermountain Power
Agency this month contributed
$30,000 to Utah State University Eastern. Over the past
several years, USU Eastern has
received more than $240,000
from IPA to support an ongoing scholarship endowment
for engineering students.
“Encouraging talented
young people to enter the
engineering field is of vital
importance to our industry
and our nation,” said James
A. Hewlett, general manager
of the Intermountain Power
Agency. “A generation of en-

gineers throughout the United
States is nearing retirement
and we need more qualified
young people to feel those
ranks.”
USU Eastern is one of the
Utah institutions of higher
learning that receive scholarship contributions from
IPA. Engineering students
interested in coal utilization
and emissions control technologies receive preference
in the awards or scholarships
from IPA funded endowments.
The Intermountain Power
Agency is an organization

of 23 Utah municipalities
formed to finance, construct,
operate and maintain the
intermountain power project.
The project’s generating station, located near Delta, Utah,
generates enough electricity to
supply the needs of more than
1.5 million homes.
Historically, Intermountain Power Project has been
one of America’s cleanest
and most efficiently operated coal-fueled generating
stations. More recently, the
Project has evolved into a hub
for a development of other

energy resources – including
wind and solar electricity
generation, energy storage in
underground salt domes, and
the potential development of
new natural gas fueled electricity generation.
The Intermountain Power
Project includes a two-unit
coal-fueled generating station
located near Delta, Utah, two
transmission systems, a microwave communication system
and a railcar service center,
all built as a joint undertaking by 36 utilities in Utah and
California.

AICPA survey finds disconnect between college students’
perception of financial literacy skills and reality
Students say financial management skills important

Virtually all students say financial
management skills are important, but
only two-in-five follow a monthly budget
NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)- While a majority of college students
give themselves good grades for their
financial literacy skills, many of them
need to study up on the basics. A newly
released survey from the  American
Institute of CPAs  (AICPA) found that
college students who rated themselves
as having excellent or good personal
financial management skills (57 percent)
outweighed those who rated their skills
as poor or terrible (12 percent) by a more
than a five-to-one margin.
However, almost half of college
students (48 percent) reported having
less than $100 in their bank account at
some point in the last year. In addition,
thirty-eight percent said that they had
borrowed money from friends or family
in the last year and more than one-inten (11 percent) missed a bill payment.
The survey, conducted online among
751 college students who will be enrolled
in fall of 2015, on behalf of the American
Institute of CPAs by Harris Poll in August, highlights the differences between
students’ perception of their financial
literacy skills and the reality.
The survey found that, despite the
nearly universal feeling among college
students about the importance of personal financial management skills – 99
percent said they were either extremely
or very important –they are not actively
taking steps to develop their knowledge
in this area. In fact, only one-in-four
college students (23 percent) say they
seek out personal financial management information and incorporate it
into their spending and saving habits
frequently or often, compared with
two-in-five (41 percent) who say they
rarely or never do so.
“For many students, college is their
first time making independent financial
decisions. With this opportunity comes
serious responsibility, and if they aren’t

making informed, intelligent decisions
it can have a negative impact on the
rest of their financial lives,” said Ernie
Almonte, CPA, CGMA, chairman of
the AICPA’s National CPA Financial
Literacy Commission. “This fall, we
encourage students to take ‘financial
literacy 101’ by establishing a budget,
tracking their spending and expenses,
and reviewing it on a monthly basis.
By incorporating these positive behaviors, students will be better equipped
to make intelligent financial decisions
later in life.”
Members of the AICPA’s Financial
Literacy Commission say that establishing and following a budget is one of the
most important things a person can do to
take control of their financial situation
and build for the future. However, the
survey found that only two-in-five (39
percent) students reported following a
monthly budget. Of those who follow
a monthly budget, 42 percent said they
learn how to budget from their parents
or relatives with 37 percent saying they
learned on their own.
“Parents of college students should
definitely encourage their children to
establish a monthly budget as a means
of keeping their spending in check while
they are in school,” added Almonte.
“Establishing a monthly budget is the
foundation upon which other positive
financial behaviors are built. There are
resources on the AICPA’s 360 Degrees
of Financial Literacy and Feed the Pig
websites that teach students how to create
a budget and provide them tips and tools
for staying on track.”
While many college students need
to develop better financial habits, the
survey found that more than 8-in-10 (84
percent) say they are extremely or very
interested in learning how to make better
personal financial decisions.
This fall there will be  17 million
students enrolled in 2 and 4-year undergraduate programs across the U.S. The
AICPA’s National Financial Literacy

Commission suggests the following
tips to help them improve their financial
literacy and make better decisions while
they are in school and beyond:
Get started.  Visit the AICPA’s 360
Degrees of Financial Literacy website
to  use the free budget calculator specifically designed for college students.
The calculator allows you to input your
expenses and income for an eight-month
school year running from September
through April.
Review your plan. Look at your budget on a monthly basis and see if there
are differences between your budget
and your actual spending on a monthly
basis. If there is a gap, determine if your
budget or spending needs to be modified.
Build a credit score. It’s a good idea to
start to establish a positive credit history
by having a credit card in college. But
it’s critical that you don’t use it unless
you can pay it off, or it is an absolute
emergency. Late night pizza or fancy
lattes are not emergencies.
Set a goal for summer earnings.
Figure out how much money you’ll need
to get through the semester to get you
fixed things like utilities, cell phone bill,
transportation costs (i.e. car payment,
insurance, bus fare, etc.), and rent if
you’re living off campus. Use that as a
goal for how much money you’ll need
to save from working over the summer
and start the semester from a position
of financial strength.
Methodology
This survey was conducted online
within the United States from August 3
to 12, 2015 among 751 college students
who will be enrolled full-time in a 2
or 4 year college in the fall of 2015, by
Harris Poll on behalf of AICPA. Figures
for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education,
region and household income were
weighted where necessary to bring them
into line with their actual proportions in
the population. Propensity score weighting was used to adjust for respondents’
propensity to be online.

of a man are very similar.” Burge’s first job was working at
the Los Angeles County museum, where he gained valuable
knowledge and skill that he brought back to Price, Utah.
But before he came to Price, he earned his master’s degree
in geology at Brigham Young University. After graduation
he accepted a position to teach at CEU and spent the next 50
years working at this institution.
Burge, who helped envision and build the CEU Museum,
was its director for 40 years, where he made numerous contributions to the field of paleontology.
He said, “We discovered eight new dinosaurs nobody else
in the world had, if you go to London, Paris, Berlin you are
going to see our dinosaurs.” Burge, while working with BYU,
was able to extract dinosaur DNA from a coal mine; that work
brought him into contact with the likes of Stephen Spielberg
and Stephen Hawking. Spielberg approached Burge while
undergoing work for the first Jurassic Park movie, and Hawking interviewed him about the process of extracting DNA.
With all of this important work Burge still finds time to
teach here; it is great to know that we have teachers like him
here on campus, someone who has immense career experience
that is willing to share with students. Burge showed much
gratitude towards his students saying, “It was never just me,
I always had students working with me.”

Caretaker of books

classes is truly one of the best ways to
pick a major.
staff writer
As students, I hope that we can find
casey.warren06@gmail.com
ways to relate to Armitstead and welcome
her into our USU Eastern family. To get
This semester on campus, many changes to know our new librarian better, she was
have been implemented. These changes asked a couple of questions. The first quesinclude a new building, a revamped library tion posed was what are you most proud of
and new members of the faculty. One of in your life? Her response was, “Earning
the newest faculty members is Kathie my Bachelor’s Degree. I worked hard to get
Armitstead. When asked to give a brief that diploma and it has opened many doors
description about her position on campus for me.” Most of us here at USU Eastern
Armitstead replied, “I am the library’s Ac- are here for a degree, whether it be a two
quisitions and Technical Services Manager. or four year. Like Armitstead, if we work
hard we can have that
I purchase the collection
proud moment of earnitems, such as books and
ing a degree that will
DVDs.” Her job helps
give us more direction
our campus stay stocked
in our lives.
on needed items, which
A fitting question
is great news for stugiven to Armitstead
dents. Armitstead chose
was have you ever read
this career because she
a book that changed
“[wants] to be a part of
your life? She replied
education, and [loves] liby saying, “This is
braries.” She also noted
the hardest question. I
“it stems from a love of
think that every book
reading and learning.
you read changes you
During junior high and
in one-way or another.
high school I always
The one that comes
seemed to end up in
to mind is ‘Night’ by
the library. I even made
Elie Wiesel. He is a
weekly trips to the city
Holocaust survivor
library during the sumand this book tells his
mers. The atmosphere
Kathie Armistead
story of the concentrain a library is special,
tion camps. His brutal
with all of the books
and other resources. I always feel a sense honesty about what things went on in the
camps changed how I looked back on the
of endless possibilities.”
Many of us spend time at the campus Holocaust.”
Each of us has something we look forlibrary studying for exams and doing
homework. The time we spend studying ward to doing daily or weekly. Armitstead
will help us earn better grades so that we is no different. When asked what the most
can get into the major program we desire. satisfying part of her day is, she replied,
For those of us who don’t have a declared “I love to sit down with dinner and a book
major, Armitstead advises us to, “Take a after a day at work.” As important as it is
wide variety of introduction classes, even to head to the library to study and work
if you are simply curious about a certain hard for our grades, it is also important to
subject. Just one class can influence you take time for ourselves doing something
towards or against a field of study.” When we enjoy.
Take time while you are here at USU
reflecting on her own college experience
Armitstead said, “I had thought about be- Eastern getting to know most, if not all, of
coming a paralegal for a little while, until the faculty on campus and truly engage in
I took an Introduction to Criminal Justice their lives as they do in yours. Go check
class. It was interesting, but also made me out our amazing library that is filled with
realize my calling was elsewhere.” I think opportunities for success and meditation
we can all agree that taking introduction and be sure to visit our new librarian.

Casey Warren

Cancer fund raiser
Need a pedicure, manicure, facial,
hair cut?

Thursday, September 24
USU Eastern Cosmetology Dept
All proceeds from services go to purchase wigs
for people who have lost their hair because of
cancer or health problem.

page 5

September 24, 2015

Little shop of what?

JASon Huntzinger photography exhibit

“Little Shop of Horrors” christens
opening of Peterson Black Box theater
With “Little Shop of Horrors” opening
in a few weeks, Eastern Utah Theatre’s
2015-16 season includes Shakespeare’s
“Hamlet,” David Lindsey-Abaire’s, Pulitzer
Prize winning play “Rabbit Hole,” and Neil
Simon’s, “Rumors.” All four productions
will christen the opening of the Central
Instructional Building and the Petersen Black
Box Theater.
Renovations and the addition of the scene
shop to the Geary Theater allows the historic
theater to rest for the first time in nearly 56
years. All Eastern productions will be in the
state-of-the-art Black Box theater. For those
unfamiliar with the term, a black box space
is a theatre with an almost infinite number of
seating arrangements. It is a more intimate
setting allowing the audience to experience
theatre up close and more personal, said Corey
Ewan, theatre department chair.
Opening Oct. 8 and playing through the
17th is Howard Ashman and Alan Menken’s,
“Little Shop of Horrors,” a play that many
may be familiar with. It is a musical based
on the low-budget 1960 black-comedy film
of the same name and the 1986 film starring
Rick Moranis and directed by Frank Oz

Ja rom Ch r istopher Brown com i ng
back to Easter n to direct William
Shakespeare’s “Hamlet.” Brown earned
a master’s of fine arts from William and
Mary in Shakespeare studies. He directed
last year’s production of  “The Merchant
of Vegas.”
“He brings an energy and a love for
Shakespeare and his language. He was very
patient in teaching our students the how’s
and why’s of Shakespeare in production. He
even taught this old dog some new tricks,”
Ewan said.
“Hamlet”  is arguably Shakespeare’s
greatest work. It has it all: great characters, a
strong plot, beautiful language, meaning and
spectacle. Playing the lead character will be
a challenge, as it has been for any actor who
has taken the role; John Barrymore, Lawrence
Olivier, John Gielgud, Richard Burton, Keanu
Reeves, and David Tennant, Ewan continued.
This production will be a full participant
in The American College Theatre Festival.
What this means is that Eastern’s show will
be watched by two-official respondents
representing the organization who will
evaluate the strengths and challenges of the

photo courtesy Cathy Lilly

Debut of new Gallery East

The first exhibit to showcase USU Eastern’s new, beautifully designed Gallery East in the Central Instruction
Building, is by Helper artist, Jason Huntzinger. His work showcases a collection of photographs and photo
composites titled “Within the Teeth of Geologic Time” and runs from Sept. 7 through Oct. 2.

Suicide prevention: what to do as a friend
Audrey II, a man-eating plant, is the play’s main character.

(Fozzie Bear, Yoda). 
The story centers on Seymour, who works
at a flower shop. One day during an eclipse,
he discovers a “strange and exotic plant,” he
names Audrey II (after the love of his life,
Audrey). However, his plant is no normal
plant. It came from outer space and requires
a diet of fresh blood.
Seymour gives the plant his own blood.
The plant promises Seymour to grant him
anything his “secret heart desires,” as long
as he keeps feeding it but, when people start
dying, the plant wants more than a few drops
of blood.
In the musical’s initial run, it was
critically acclaimed and won several awards
including the 1982–1983 New York Drama
Critics Circle Award for Best Musical,
the  Drama Desk Award for Outstanding
Musical, and the Outer Critics Circle Award.
The production ran five years, with 2,209
performances. This made it the third-longest
running musical and the highest-grossing
production in Off-Broadway history.
Finishing fall semester sees

photo by Emilee Merrill/The Eagle

production and may recommend its inclusion
in this next year’s festival. Although not
a competition, Eastern will vie with other
schools hoping that their shows may be
chosen. This gives Eastern the opportunity
to bring this production to the festival in
February where it will be seen by colleges/
universities from  Arizona, Central and
Southern California, Hawaii, Southern
Nevada and Utah. This year the festival will be
held at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa and
Chaminade University of Honolulu.
According to the KCACTF home page,
it states, “Through state, regional, and
national festivals, KCACTF student and
faculty participants celebrate the creative
process and share experiences and insights
within the community of theater artists.
The KCACTF honors excellence of overall
production and offers student artists
individual recognition through awards and
scholarships in playwriting, acting, dramatic
criticism, directing and design.”
This will be a fun and memorable opening
semester for USU Eastern theatre, Ewan said.

Stacy Graven

staff writer
stcgraven06@gmail.com
What if a friend approached you with
an upsetting admission? This is how
you can help. Darin Brandt, director
of student counseling, said, “The first
thing someone should realize is that
they are not the expert and they don’t
have to be.” It may be hard to know the
appropriate way to handle such a crisis.
What does someone do as a friend?
Concern for the individual arises
in the friend and panic or uncertainty
may prevent or cloud proper thought.
This is where QPR (question, persuade,
and refer) comes in. Qprinstitute.com
was recommended by Brandt who said,
“QPR’s mission is to save lives and
reduce suicidal behaviors by providing
innovative, practical and proven
suicide prevention training.” A similar
approach to aiding survival is Cardiac
Pulmonary Resuscitation. CPR is for
emergency medical intervention where
as QPR is for emergency mental health
intervention. “Both CPR and QPR are

part of systems designed to increase
the chance of survival in the event of a
crisis,” Qprinstitute.com says.
First things first is question wording is important in this and you
want to make sure to not ask in a
negative way. The appropriate way of
questioning is, “are you thinking of
hurting yourself or are you thinking of
killing yourself?” Brandt said. If you
ask with a negative connotation, they are
less likely to answer in accordance with
their feelings. They might even outright
deny it. Wording is key. Recognition of
warning signs comes in questioning,
as well.
Next is persuade - calming and
reassurance are necessary in times
of crisis. Signs of hope and positive
support toward the individual can help.
Harsh words and negative reactions to
their admissions can hinder instead
of help.
Lastly is refer - get them help. This
is where people ask the question of how.
There are multiple resources for this.
You can call 911 if it is very crucial to
survival and Brandt at 435-613-5670

during office hours for that help that you
are searching for. Taking them to the
emergency room is another possibility.
When a person is injured physically, this
is where the injury is helped. Mentally,
it is no different. You can know how to
save a life.
A word of caution is advised to those
approached. Some, when approached
with the QPR process, might deny it
outright. People close to them might
even say, “I should have known,” There
is no sure way to know 100 percent so
it isn’t your fault.
“If we were to be brave and ask
that [first] question more often, we’d
lower the rate of suicide.” Brandt said.
Unfortunately, last year we had two
devastating occurrences. If all of us
are more aware of the resources and
possibilities for help, there would
be less suicide and more surviving.
“Reach out to me or my interns. They
are there to help and are more than
willing to. Utilize these resources
and do not be afraid to. Help and hope
exist. The time for a better tomorrow
is now,” he said.

Cooking with Toby: stuffed bell peppers, the choices and the cook
Toby Foster

staff writer
metastablechaos@hotmail.com
To be honest, when I decided to
use this for the recipe of the issue, I
had never made stuffed bell peppers
before. Not to worry I did try them
before I got this out to you guys.
Now, I love stuffed peppers,
especially the spicy kind, I am from
Texas after all. They are pretty easy
to do, but they do take time to prepare. When you make these, give
yourself about an hour of free time
before you plan to eat. Also this
recipe is for eight peppers. Unless
you have company, I recommend
you make one or two peppers and
then refrigerate the left over stuffing and then cook up some more
peppers later for a quick dinner or
lunch later on.
As far as my research has been

able to find, Spain was the first
nation that prepared stuffed bell
peppers and from there it spread
across Europe and the Mediterranean. India was stuffing peppers
before Spain, but they were a different kind of pepper all together
and the filling is entirely unknown
to me. So in this article, I will focus
on those variations that stem from
the Spanish variety.
This time around, I will be putting a lot of choices into your hands
on this one. There are several different colors of bell peppers and they
all have a slightly different flavor. I
do not know how to describe it so I
will just say that I used yellow bell
peppers for this, but you can pick
your favorite.
Your typical filling is made
from rice and meat. The meats can
be anything really but for the sake
of cost, we will just use ground beef.

If you have a bigger budget you
can use Italian sausage or if you
are looking for lower fat, ground
turkey would work just fine.
As for t he
rice, there are a
ton of varieties
that will work
for this recipe.
Minute rice is a
cheap option but
has almost no
nutrients whatsoever. I used white
basmati rice. It is
a little pricey, but
it is rich in iron
and vitamin B.
The only nutritional variation left to discuss is that
all forms of brown rice are higher
in fiber than white rice.
If you are interested in making
this healthier, you can replace the

rice with couscous or quinoa. I
have seen some people using oats
mixed in with the rice for higher
fiber and more vitamin. However,
I know very little
about how to use
the oats.
My re cip e
does call for a
vegetable of your
choice. I recommend one that
gets softer as it
is cooked but not
mushy. Mushrooms, potatoes,
carrots, or even
beans are all examples. I used
a sweet potato for mine simply
because I had one lying around (and
I’m obsessed with sweet potatoes).
Choosing these will keep a smooth
texture in the filling and bring out

Total eclipse of the moon on September 27
A total eclipse of the moon
will take place on this Sunday,
Sept. 27. The eclipse begins about
7:07 p.m. Mountain Daylight
Time and will be underway
when the moon rises in the east
so you will want to have as low
an eastern horizon as possible,
Rich Erwin, introduction to
astronomy instructor said.
The total phase begins at
about 8:11 p.m. and it will last
about an hour and 12 minutes so
the moon will be up a bit higher
when it begins to emerge from
the Earth’s shadow at about 9:23
pm MDT.  It will be almost 10:30
p.m. before the last bit of the
umbra slides off the moon’s edge. 
Erwin said,  “This eclipse is

a bit unusual in that the moon
is closer to its orbital perigee
than it will be ever again in our
lifetime. Therefore, the size of
the moon in the sky will be just
a tiny bit larger than it has been
during an eclipse for a very long
time and will be again for a very
long time. 
“And we do not know just
how dark the moon will appear
during the total phase because
this varies substantially from
one eclipse to another, due to
the characteristics of the Earth’s
atmosphere during totality. Let’s
a l l hop e t hat t he weat her
cooperates and allows us to view
photo courtesy Tom Ruen
this great natural phenomenon,”
April 2014 lunar eclipse, California, 12:44 a.m. PDT
Erwin stated.

the light crunch of the peppers
themselves, while still bringing
variety to the flavor.
Many of the recipes I found
call for tomato or pasta sauce, but
I didn’t really like the idea of that
so I left it out. If you want to use
tomato sauce, use less water to cook
the rice and add the sauce.
• 8 bell peppers
• 1 1/2 cups of rice
• 1/2 cup chopped vegetable
of your choice
• 2 tsp garlic powder
• 1 tsp parsley flakes
• ½ tsp oregano
• ¼ tsp rosemary
• ½ tsp ground coriander
• 1 tsp black pepper
• 2 tsp salt
• 1 lb ground beef
• ½ tsp cayenne pepper
• ½ tsp basil
• Your choice of cheese

Now on to the recipe.
Bring a large pot of water to a
boil. Cut the tops of the peppers off
and remove the seeds and center
vein. Place the peppers in the pot
of boiling water for 10 minutes or
until a fork can puncture them with
ease. Remove the peppers and allow
to drain upside down
Follow basic cooking instructions for your rice with the vegetable, 1 tsp of garlic, the parsley,
the oregano, the rosemary, the coriander, ½ tsp pepper and 1 tsp salt.
Next cook the meat in a frying
pan with 1 tsp garlic, ½ tsp pepper,
1 tsp salt, cayenne pepper and basil.
After the meat and rice are
fully cooked, combine and start
spooning the mixture into the
peppers. Stuff until the rice and
meat mixture rises about an inch
and a half above the pepper. Top
with cheese and allow it to melt

R e c e p t i o n

for History Students
Wednesday, Sept. 30 • 3:30 – 4:30 pm
Lee Conference Room • USUE Library

The USU Department of History is hosting a reception for students
interested in the history major. Information will be available on
programs now available to USU Eastern students, including the
secondary ed teaching major and the new religious studies minor.
Stop by for free refreshments and pick up information
on scholarships and upcoming campus events sponsored by
Phi Alpha Theta, the history honorary society.
Open to all USUE students • Refreshments will be served

Sports

Page 6

September 24, 2015

Buckeye
dominance at
the heart of
the offense
Edmond James Sanders Jr.
sports writer
edmond_james@outlook.com

Michael Briano dribbles the ball while a player from Salt Lake Community College tries to steal it from him.

photo by Jorge Lascano/The Eagle

Men’s soccer finds consistency,
improving to a 7-3 record
Vanessa Gomes

sports writer
vanessa.gomes@aggiemail.usu.edu
With half of the season over, the
men’s soccer team is 7-3-0, with latest
victories against Trinidad and Otero
Community College. Leading the Eagles
are forward Youssef Mourchid with six
goals and left wing Andres Garza with
three goals 2 assists, followed by Jake
CLements with two goals and two assists
and Luis Rico with two goals and one
assist. “We have lost a couple games
that we shouldn’t have, by making big
mistakes, giving the ball away to the
other team just 20 yards in front of the
goal, pretty much saying here, shoot it,
we don’t want it, but other than that we
are playing the best soccer, so that is a
good thing,” Coach Bennett said.
Players stepping up and making
a difference include Mourchid, goal
keeper Dylan Mclllece, Rico, midfielder
Alexis Beiza, Clements, right wing Taige

Smith, midfielder Peter Funaro, Garza
and defender Michael Brady.
The team is on to a good path, and a
little bit more focused and unified rather
than last year. “There is always things
that come up with guys; they are always
trying to act like they are the bull on
the field, like
they are the big
guy, and want
everyone to
see them ind iv id u a l ly.
Last year we
had some
im matur ity
problems,
this year not
as many. They all get along pretty
well and recognize our strengths,”
Bennett said.
“Every team has its strengths, weaknesses and challenges. They might be
controlling the ball really well, really
good in the counter attack, very athletic, very fast and doing really well

offensively, but giving up easy goals
is definitely what we need to fix, and
with a team of 31 players is even more
challenging,” Bennett said
“We have a few guys that are probably good enough to play, but there are
just a couple of guys that are just a little
bit ahead
of them, so
we have
s o m e
g o o d
players
that don’t
get a lot
of playing time.
We are a
new team, we were here last year but
we have a lot of new players and that
affected us early, but once we figured
out the rotation and the style, we have
been a lot better,” Bennett continued
Consistency and good decision making seem like the biggest improvements
this team needs, they tend to play a

“We are good enough
to win it . . .”
Coach Ammon Bennett

really good first half and then not so
good second half. “It is a distribution
mistake, where we give the other team
the ball right in front on top of us and
they score on you, so we have to fix that.
The last two games, out of 90 minutes,
we played about 70 minutes of really
good soccer; consistency in that will
make some decisions that just lead
directly to goals,” Bennett said
This team seems like they have it all,
and they all want the same thing, to win
the region title, and take it all the way
to nationals.
“I think we are good enough to do
that, but the region that we would have
to play in is better. We beat the top
teams in the league, but we also lost to
one of the bottom teams in the league,
and that bottom team has turned around
and beat some of the better teams, so
there is a lot of back and forth. I think
we are good enough to win it, we are
good enough to go to Arizona, play those
teams and advance to nationals, and
that is certainly the goal.” Bennett said.

Tommy John “epidemic:” baseball injury becoming more
and more common as players begin playing earlier
Shania Hurst

sports writer
shaniahurst17@gmail.com
Tommy John surgery, also known
as ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction, is a surgical graft surgery,
where the ulnar collateral ligament in
the medial elbow is replaced with a tendon from somewhere else in the body,
and a very common surgery in baseball
players, according to Wikipedia.
Named after the first baseball
player to receive this surgery, MLB
pitcher Tommy John, who was a lefthanded pitcher for the LA Dodgers.
The injury is caused by the repetitive
throwing motion of a baseball, and is
not a sudden injury, but happens over
time. According to Baseball-Reference,
most pitchers who have undergone
this surgery throw harder than they
did before. This result isn’t from the
actual surgery, but from the rigorous
rehabilitation the athlete goes through
post-surgery.
The past few years, there has been
an alarming rise in the number of pro-

fessional pitchers requiring the Tommy
John surgery. Reading an article by the
American Sports Medicine Institute,
it is believed that this rise in numbers
is not due to over-pitching in the pro
league, it’s happening to the younger
generation.
Players are throwing more and
harder every year, making pitching
one of the most competitive spots on
the team, and increasing the amount
of pitching practice youth/adolescent
pitchers are performing. This is wearing on their arms earlier and earlier
than before, and by the time a pitcher
hits the big league, he most likely has
already damaged the tendons in his
elbow. As he pitches on, he wears that
tendon down till it snaps, and he opts
to receive surgery.
One of the largest problems with
this operation is that it has worked so
well since the first operation, with little
change in the operation. Sporting News
lists the MLB pitchers who had Tommy
John surgery in 2014, including: Martin
Perez, Ivan Nova, Josh Johnson, Matt
Moore, and Luke Hochever. There are
39 players in all on that list.

According to the MLB Daily Dish,
the most recent player who is going to
receive the Tommy John surgery is Joe
Nathan, from the Detroit Tigers. Nathan
is 40, and has had problems with his
elbow before. Nathan suffered a major
setback during his last rehab game,
only being able to throw 10 pitches.
As Nathan walked off the field, he was
seen holding his injured elbow, saying
he heard a pop.
ESPN reports that there have already
been 14 Tommy John surgeries just this
year, and another two are scheduled
within the month. This is happening
in a sport that averaged less than 16
of those surgeries per year between
2000 and 2011.
This isn’t an epidemic like swine
flu or Ebola was, but there is definitely
something in the water. If we go off the
trend of previous years, where there
have been fewer surgeries this early in
the season, and an increase closer to
the end, than we are set for an all-time
high in Tommy John surgeries this
2015 season.
It is hard to say that this is an “epidemic,” especially where this isn’t a bug

that one catches. An epidemic lasts over
a period of time, and if this year hits
40+ Tommy John surgeries, that makes
it either the start of the trend, or perhaps
a simple fluke year. Time can only tell.

photo courtesy Terra Haute, Indiana, webpage

Tommy John

Most team sports have a leader that controls
the tempo of the game; the point guard in basketball, pitcher in baseball, utility in volleyball
and the list goes on. In Columbus, Ohio, Buckeye
Nation, Ohio State football program, currently
ranked #1 in the AP College football polls, has
three very capable and proven leaders on its
program at the quarterback position; Cardale
Jones (Junior), Braxton Miller (Senior), and J.T.
Barrett (Sophomore).
This controversial blessing is one many
teams wish they could say they have; however,
for Ohio State, it began in fall 2014, their National Championship year, defeating an Oregon
program 42-20.
Ohio State began the 2014 season with their
star quarterback declared out for the season due
to prior shoulder surgery; therefore, they had to
begin their season with second team QB Barrett.
For many programs this would be a disaster;
however, for this disciplined OSU program, it
is one they are prepared for led by legendary
coach Urban Meyer.
My true Utes fans may recognize that name
from his brief stint in Salt Lake City from 20032004, leading the team to a 10-2 record in 2003
and its first perfect season (12-0) since 1930 and
Fiesta Bowl win over Pittsburg in 2004. Meyer
also received honors as The Sporting News
National Coach of the year and Mountain West
Conference coach of the year in his two years
with the program.
With that said, this is the best coach to have
in a situation of this caliber. Buckeyes went 11-1
under Barrett, until he suffered from a seasonending injury against Michigan; therefore, it
was time for third team QB Jones to introduce
himself as starter and keep the Buckeye’s national
championship hopes alive.
Jones led the Buckeyes to two huge wins;
59-0 victory over No. 11 Wisconsin and 42-35
victory over national powerhouse No. 1 Alabama,
and can I say Buckeye Nation!
Jones continued Ohio State’s, “rough year”
with the victory and National Championship
win over the Ducks from Eugene, Ore. What
went from an assumed devastating season,
after having expected Heisman candidate QB
Braxton Miller from the previous season go
down with an injury, and having your second
unit QB lead you to an 11-1 season before also
going down to an injury. Then having your
third team quarterback winning possibly three
of the toughest games of the season, including
the national championship triumph.
The season had all the makings for havoc;
however, the adversity steered to a Cinderella
season which left the nation in awe and envy
and introduced a program led by three leaders
of different experience running the heart of their
program. As we advance to the 2015 campaign,
Ohio State already started the season victorious
with a 42-24 notch over Virginia Tech with Jones
named as the starter.
Coach Meyer has a system running with his
program where he has two quarterbacks, both
receiving sufficient time under-snap; however,
competing amongst one another for a starting
position, which both are worthy and certified
for the job.
For those of you wondering what happened
to the prior quarterback, Miller, he decided to
change positions, where he now lines up as a
H-back/wide out and from his production and
smoothness against Virginia Tech, makes you
question why he ever was a quarterback. Seven
catches for 137 yards and two touchdowns,
including one 54-yard touchdown reception,
53-yard touchdown run and took a few snaps
as well under QB, must I say more.
Ohio State has a sweet situation in Columbus
that any team wouldn’t mind having and add
another blessing, these two QBs haven’t hit their
senior years yet.
With thirteen games to go, Ohio State and
those amazing fans in Buckeye Nation are looking forward to a great, exciting and dialed in season. Sending a message to the world of football,
the season is young, but we are the team to beat
and if you want that title, you have to come get us.
One last thing to all my football and sport fanatics, if you
haven’t
seen that
Miller
S p i n
Move, it is
a must see.
Buckeye
Nation.

page 7

September 24, 2015

Alex Gunnell bringing fire
to USUE
soccer team
Kayla Newman

sports writer
kaylanewman1996@hotmail.com

photo courtesy Tyson Chappell

Kayla Hammond kicks the ball striving for a goal against a Colorado club team.

USUE WOMeN’s sOCCeR:

a bond that cannot be broken
Team continues to be ranked nationally
Kyndall Gardner
staff writer
kyndall_gardner@gmail.com

USU Eastern women’s soccer has been hard at
work this season and it shows in their record: winning
four games, tying one, going into overtime in one and
losing one. The team has been faced with challenging
teams and have overcome adversary by beating some
of the toughest teams in the nation.
The toughest team Eastern has played this season is
Monroe College from New York. Last season, Monroe
won the national championship and went into this
season ranked No 1.
USUE went into this game as the underdogs,
being expected to be completely blown out of the
water by this experienced and established team. The
Eagles did not back down, working hard in the game
to keep the score 0-0. The game continued to go into
overtime, without a single goal. The team went into
double overtime, an incredible feat for the the Eagles.

Sadly, a lucky goal was scored by Monroe in the last
couple minutes of double overtime. Though Monroe
won, the Eagles never hung their heads because they
had played up to the standard of the best team in the
nation, proving that they are a team to look out for
this season.
With 33 women on the team, it could be hard to
keep a good team bond, but the women’s soccer team
has a bond stronger than most. To be close on and off
the field, the team plays, “get to know you” games.
This last week, the women were required to sneak into
a teammate’s room, find something that they could
make up a story about, and take it.
At the end of it all, the team got together to share
the crazy stories they made up about their teammates
item. After listening to all the funny and crazy stories,
the women would go around and tell the real story
about the item that was taken from their room. The
team can agree that this strengthens their relationships
and helps the team’s dynamic when they know their
teammates personally.
The team is coached by Ammon Bennett, who is

also the men’s soccer head coach. The team agrees that
he loves and is knowledgable about the sport, as well
as his players. During practice, he’ll ask the players
to tell him an interesting thing about them or their
favorite color or movie, just so he is more personable
with his players. A player/coach bond is crucial to a
successful team, that’s why it’s important for Bennett
to know his players and care about them.
The team’s main goal is to make it to nationals
and win. To do this, the team says confidence is key.
If they believe they are just as good as any other team
and that they can beat any other team, then they can.
Power is in the mindset, and if the team keeps a positive
and focused attitude, the believe they can accomplish
any goal they set.
Beating Sheridan College and Northwest College
6-0, just to name the score of some of their wins,
the team is on fire. They only have a couple home
games left in the regular season, playing Mesa State
University at home Sept. 26 at 1 p.m., Northwest
College Oct. 2 at 2 p.m., and Sheridan Community
College Oct. 3 at 1 p.m.

Volleyball defeats 20th-ranked team
One more tourney, team begins region competition

Kyndall Gardner
staff writer
kyndall_gardner@gmail.com

USU Eastern’s women’s volleyball team
has been on the road the past month
working hard in preseason tournaments
to get ready for conference. With team
goals set high, the team tackled two
out of-state, back-to-back tournaments.
After a weekend is Scottsdale, Ari.,
the Lady Eagles returned with two wins
and four loses. They defeated Central
Arizona Community College and Scottsdale Arizona Community College.

“These were very successful wins.
The tournament was a great learning
experience for our team. It really
helped us to figure out the things we
need to work on before beginning
conference,” Lindy Blumel, a freshmen
on the Eagle’s volleyball team, said.
Being far from their home court,
the ladies battled through their tournaments and gained great knowledge
of what needed to be fixed, so that the
team could be more successful.
With only one more preseason
tournament left before conference play,
they hit the court and weight room get-

ting ready for their next tournament in
Nebraska.
The team headed to Scottsbulff,
Neb., where the Eagles played four
games; winning three and losing one.
After a loss against Western Nebraska
Community College, the Eagles came
back ready to win and win they did.
They beat Willston State College,
Sheridan College and Casper College,
the 20th-ranked team in the nation.
The Eagles came out on top. “Beating the 20th ranked team in the nation
gave our team a chance to see what
we are capable of. We knew that if

we played our best game and gave it
everything we had, we could win. We
have a very strong team this year and
we are all very excited for conference
to start. We have been working hard
on and off the court,” Shania Hurst, a
returning sophomore, said.
Now diving into conference the
Eagles are eager to hit the court. With
one of toughest conferences and nationally ranked teams, the women are
working hard to be ready to go. This
will be the year to watch as this is one
of the strongest volleyball teams to pass
through USU Eastern.

If you catch yourself at a women’s soccer game,
look onto the field and see a firey-red head playing center defense, chances are it’s Alex Gunnell.
Gunnell is from Eagle Mountain, Utah, and came
to Price to continue to play the sport she’s known
and loved since she was 4 years old.
After playing soccer for 15 years, she believes
that she brings a sense of urgency and hustle to the
team, always keeping the team intense and focused
on winning while still keeping it light-hearted.
“I like to think I can be funny. Well I try to be at
least,” jokes Gunnell on her witty and sarcastic
personality. She tries to keep her fun personality
on and off the field, always striving to keep the
mood light wherever she may be.
When Gunnell isn’t playing soccer, she loves to
be outdoors. Hiking is her favorite outdoor activity
and she loves to go whenever she can. Gunnell would
much rather be outside, enjoying the weather and
nature than being stuck inside all day.
If stuck inside, Gunnell admits her guilty pleasure
is, “The Office” and, “Parks and Rec.” “While all my
roommates are talking about ‘Gossip Girl’ or ‘Pretty
Little Liars,’ I’m
just sitting in
my room
watching Netf lix and
laughing
a b o u t
somet h i n g
stupid
Alex Gunnell
Dwight
said. I love
the dry humor.”
Gunnell doesn’t see herself as much of a girly
girl and says she loves to hang out with her guy
friends and be one of the, “bros.”
Though she might not see herself as that girly,
others sure do. Gunnell spent time being a model
for Niya Modeling Agency, doing all kinds of various shoots. Her red hair, bright eyes, and subtle
freckles add to her distinct look as a model. While
she enjoyed the modeling and attention, the soccer
field is where she belongs.
The worst date she’s ever been on, Gunnell said
she had multiple stories to share, claiming she’s been
of a plethora of horrendous dates. She describes her
most awkward date: “It was a blind date that family
friends had set up, claiming that I had to go on a date
with their nephew because they thought we would
totally hit it off. I agreed to go. When he picked me up,
we got in the minivan with his parents, and his uncle
and aunt that had set up the date in the first place; a
triple date nightmare. I love all kinds of food, except
one kind, Thai food. I absolutely hate it. And what
did we go out to go eat: Thai food. While trying to
keep dinner down, I sat there while my date poured
his heart out to me about his love for Justin Bieber.
At the end of the night, he walked me to my door
and gave me a side hug while his parents, and aunt
and uncle watched from the minivan, probably one
of the most awkward nights of my life.”
If you ever pass Gunnell in the hallway, she
will always have a smile on her face. Her lightheartedness makes her a great teammate and a
positive player, truly a great addition to the USU
Eastern women’s soccer team.

Basketball
continued from front page

from basketball activities by the athletic department pending the results of those investigations.

“We anticipate that we will see a police report
and a Title IX report in the upcoming weeks,”
said Dart. “The information in those reports will
help us determine what long-term sanctions might
be merited.”

Basketball activities at this time include team
workouts, weight training and study hall. Formal
practices begin Oct. 1 and games begin Oct. 30.

Coach Woodhouse: meet the women’s assistant coach
With 17 years of playing soccer, he knows the game
Mashaela Farris
staff writer
mashlf26@gmail.com

Jared Woodhouse

USU Eastern soccer team’s inaugural season in
2014 brought Jared Woodhouse to the college as an
assistant coach and he continues in his second year
coaching the popular sport.
Growing up in Orem and St. George, he has played
soccer for 17 years. “I’ve probably played since I was
about 5 and up until my college graduation,” Wood-

house said. When he isn’t at the college coaching, he
is a physical therapist at Pinnacle Nursing Home in
Price, Utah. He has offered treatment to many of the
school’s injured soccer players throughout the years.
Woodhouse was hired for the assistant coaching
position by the head soccer coach Ammon Bennett
shortly after he himself was hired in 2013. Woodhouse
has enjoyed his experience so far as an assistant coach.
His favorite memory of last season was when they took
the men’s second-string team to Western Wyoming and
defeated them 4-3.

Woodhouse wants to help his players understand and
become scholars of the game. He wants to help them
enjoy playing soccer as much as he enjoyed it. Soccer
player Morgan Bengsten says, “I think he is a really
good coach, I love how interactive he is with the team.”
Woodhouse’s expectations for the season are to,
“definitely make it to nationals, and hopefully win a
national championship.” He has four children that are
all active in different sports. His life goals are to finish
his doctorate degree, become a head college coach and
to win a national championship.

page 8

September 24, 2015

Layout by Rachel Prows
Photos by Rachel Prows and Emilee Merrill